LA State Standards Parent Resource Grades 3-5

 

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Parent resource booklet for Louisiana parents with students in grades 3-5.

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Louisiana Parent Resource Grades

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Where U.S. Students Rank Globally The United States Ranks: n 17th In Reading Literacy n 21st In Science n 26th In Math U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation 2014 IN READING LITERACY 17 TH IN SCIENCE 21 ST 26 TH IN MATH Based on 2013 International PISA results

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Louisiana Parent Resource Grades 3 – 5 www.cdl.org Special thanks to the following partners:

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|#| Center for Development and Learning

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Introduction This guide provides an overview of what your child will learn by the end of 3rd, 4th and 5th grade in English Language Arts (ELA). It focuses on key skills that will build a strong basis for success in college, the workplace, and everyday life. These K-12 standards were informed by Louisiana teachers, university professors, and other education experts. If your son or daughter is meeting the expectations outlined in these standards, he or she will be well prepared for the next grade. Why are high academic standards important? All parents want their children to be able to pursue their dreams – whatever they may be. A great education starts with high standards. A high level of academic rigor in our academic standards is necessary to ensure that students are learning up-to-date content that is important for their futures. Understanding what those standards are will help parents to ensure their children are receiving the best education possible. Of course, high standards are not the only things needed for children’s success, but they provide an important first step — a clear, consistent roadmap for learning. They also help your child This Guide Includes: develop real-world critical thinking skills needed for college and the workforce. n An overview of some How can I help my child? You should use this guide in two main ways: (1) as a tool to help students at home, and (2) as a resource to help build a relationship with teachers. Talk to teachers regularly about how your son or daughter is doing so that you can work together to address any issues. Parents are children’s first teachers. At home, you can play a big part in setting high expectations and supporting students in meeting them. *See page 48 for definition of the key things your child should be learning in ELA from 3rd through 5th grade n Ideas to help your child learn at home n Topics of discussion for talking to your child’s teacher about his or her academic progress ELA Parent Resource Guide 3–5 |3|

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About CDL Founded in 1992, the Center for Development and Learning (CDL) is a results-driven Louisianabased 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. CDL’s programs and services fall into three major areas: (1) evidence-based professional learning for educators; (2) direct services to students; and (3) public engagement of stakeholders at all levels. We aim to increase student learning. CDL specializes in providing educators with professional learning that is specific and relevant to the needs of teachers and their students. We have particular expertise in effective leadership practices, evidence-based teaching strategies and tactics, early childhood best practices, literacy, and learning differences. With an on-the-ground, in-the-trenches approach, we tackle real-time issues such as ways to remediate struggling readers and writers, differentiating instruction, structuring collaborative classroom environments, building leadership capacity, and developing and sustaining collective capacity. © 2015 The Center for Development and Learning Designed by: Claire Estopinal Edited by: Keisha Dubuclet |4| Center for Development and Learning

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Table of Contents Common Questions about Louisiana State Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Overview of ELA Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 What your Child Should be Learning Third Grade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Fourth Grade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Fifth Grade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Reading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Progressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Book Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Progressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Writing Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Speaking & Listening. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Progressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Special Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 How to Support your Child. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Glossary* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 * Definitions of words with an asterick beside them are contained in the glossary. ELA Parent Resource Guide 3–5 |5|

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Common Questions about Louisiana State Standards Q: A: What are the Louisiana State Standards? The Louisiana State Standards are learning goals that are designed to prepare our students for college and career success. Standards are not the same as a curriculum. Teachers can still decide how to get kids to the goal. Q: A: Why do we need rigorous standards? Louisiana is 3rd from the bottom in education compared to the rest of the country. More rigorous standards will help give all Louisiana students a higher quality education so they can be successful in today’s economy. Q: A: Who developed the standards? Louisiana has always had standards. State law requires a review of academic standards every seven years. In 2010, higher standards were adopted to ensure Louisiana students could compete with those from other states. The standards are informed by Louisiana teachers, university professors, and independent education experts. Parents, business leaders, and other stakeholders have the opportunity to provide feedback. |6| Center for Development and Learning

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Q: A: How will high standards affect student grades and school performance scores (SPS)? Some are concerned that school test scores and letter grades will drop. A drop in scores is expected at first because previous standards were not accurate indicators of college and career-readiness. State changes to school and teacher evaluations have been made that will give students and schools time to adjust. From Failing to Fantastic: Winning the Education Game In football, the goal is to get a touchdown; it’s up to the coach to choose plays that will get the ball in the end zone. Standards set the goal; it’s up to the teacher to choose plays to help kids win. A: Q: How will higher standards affect me as a parent? As a parent, you may notice your child’s classwork and homework becoming harder. You may also see a slight drop in grades. While it may be uncomfortable and scary, this is normal because schoolwork and tests are more challenging. Keep in mind that now your kids are getting the high quality education they deserve but weren’t getting before. Q: A: How will higher standards affect students? Having high standards will require students to learn and apply more demanding concepts and procedures, resulting in deeper levels of understanding. Rather than simply memorizing, students will critically think through information and apply what they learn to solve real-world problems and situations. ELA Parent Resource Guide 3–5 |7|

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Q: A: What do the Standards mean for students with disabilities and English Language Learners? Because all children deserve a high quality education, there are no separate or different standards for children with special needs. However, the law requires that students with disabilities be provided a range of supports for classroom learning and testing. More information and resources are included in this book. Q: A: Will students still take the LEAP test? Students in grades 3-11 will take a more rigorous test for ELA and Math, with questions aligned to the higher standards. The LEAP will still be given for Social Studies and Science. Students in the 12th grade will take the ACT. Compared to other states in the country, Louisiana ranks 3rd from the bottom in Reading. Only Mississippi and Washington D.C. are lower than Louisiana. – The National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2013 |8| Center for Development and Learning

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Why Now? n Student mobility, military families n Too many different standards across states n Global competition n Today’s jobs require different skills Q: A: What do the Louisiana State Standards look like in the classroom? The standards are not curriculum. Schools and teachers will still make decisions about how to teach their students and meet their needs. Q: A: What are the benefits of high standards? High standards will help to ensure that all students, no matter where they live, are prepared for success in college and the workforce. High standards also make sure your child can compete with other students if you decide to move to another city or state. Our students will learn more real-world knowledge and think more critically, so that we in Louisiana will be able to compete successfully in the 21st century, allowing our economy to remain strong. ELA Parent Resource Guide 3–5 |9|

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Overview of ELA Standards The skills developed in English Language Arts (ELA) are used in every day life, making them very important. The language arts include reading, writing, spelling, listening, speaking, handwriting, grammar, storytelling and learning vocabulary. Your children will use their ELA skills in all subject areas, including social studies, science and math, to understand information and organize, develop and express their ideas clearly. A person who can speak well, relate well to others through language, and listen well to what others are saying will have higher chances of success in school and life. The Louisiana State Standards for ELA describe skills that students need to have in the following areas: ELA Standards Reading Writing Speaking & Listening | 10 # | | Center for Development and Learning

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Having strong oral and written language skills provides a foundation for further learning and future job success. Third grade is a turning point for children. Learning to read fluently will serve as a foundation for the reading demands in later grades. Building vocabulary in order to read challenging text* and increasing their ability to explain what a book says is fundamental in 4th grade. When writing and reading, 5th graders will be able to understand relationships between words (company and companion) and recognize that words have literal* and nonliteral* meanings (a piece of cake). They will also begin to build knowledge about subjects through research projects and analyzing materials. 11 #| ELA Parent Resource Guide 3–5 | |

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THIRD GRADE By the end of the school year your child should be: Writing short essays about related topics using facts and details. Comparing key points and details from two books on the same topic. Writing in complete sentences, including simple*, compound*, and complex*. Writing stories that present a situation, have clear sequences* of events, and describe the actions, thoughts, and feelings of characters. Making logical connections between sentences and paragraphs in stories (first, second, third; cause and effect). Reading closely to find main ideas and supporting details in a story. Using correct punctuation, capitalization and grammar, including subject-verb agreement and correct use of quotations and apostrophes. | 12 | Center for Development and Learning

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Spelling correctly and using dictionaries (print or electronic) to find meanings of words. Conducting short research projects using print and electronic resources. Reading stories and poems aloud easily, without pausing to figure out what each word means. Talk to the teacher about how your child is doing in school. Ask questions like: 1. “Is my child on track?” Distinguishing the literal* and non-literal* meanings of words, such as “something’s fishy,” “cold shoulder,” and “it’s raining cats and dogs.” 2. “In what area is my child doing well?” 3. “Are there areas where my child is struggling?” 4. “What are some resources and tools that I can use to help my child learn outside the classroom?” 5. “Can I see how the lesson is taught in class?” Asking and answering questions that build on what others have said during class discussions. ELA Parent Resource Guide 3–5 | 13 |

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