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T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E F O R PA S TA P R O D U C E R S Professional How to produce good & healthy oat pasta PASTA IGG-5-year wheat global supply projections A lifetime dedicated to pasta, always ahead in everything. Tariffe R.O.C. Poste Italiane - Spedizione in abbonamento postale - D.L. 353/2003 (cov.in L. 27/02/04 n°46) Art. 1 comma 1 DCB Bologna Perfect by nature www.fava.it N. 1 January / March 2014 Year XIX

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CONTENTS Chairman Claudio Vercellone Year XIX - N.1 January/March 2014 Professional Editor in Chief Claudio Vercellone avenuemedia@avenuemedia.eu Technical director Gianni Mondelli PASTA Editorial Scientific and technical committee Gianni Mondelli Technical production Maurizio Monti Wheat technician Miller’s Mastery Roberto Tuberosa Agricultural Genetics INTERNATIONAL PARTNER India AgriBusiness & Food Industry The leading magazine in India about food processing sector Media Today Group, New Delhi - India Romania Anamob - Romanian National Association of Flour Milling and Baking Industries Turkey Miller Magazine / Degirmenci Dergisi the magazine focused on the milling and world grain sector in Turkey, the “voice” of IDMA Fair Parantez Group, Istanbul - Turchia Editing Coordinator Delia Sebelin Tel. +39 051 6564337 ufficiostampa@avenuemedia.eu Advertising Massimo Carpanelli carpa@avenuemedia.eu Tel. +39 051 6564342 Edition, management, editorial, advertising and administration Avenue Media Srl Via Riva Reno, 61 40122 Bologna - Italy avenuemedia@avenuemedia.eu www.avenuemedia.eu Tel. +39 051 6564311 Fax +39 051 6564350 Subscriptions office abbonamenti@avenuemedia.eu Tel. +39 051 6564337 Fax +39 051 6564332 Subscription Ue countries € 45,00 - Outside Ue € 60,00 Print La Grafica Srl Via Matteotti, 16 - Mori (Trento) Registration N. 7875 of 9/9/2008 Court of Bologna All coprights belong to Avenue Media. May not be used without permission. Responsibility of the advertisements belongs to the firms. What is functional pasta? Clarification needed by Gianni Mondelli 5 Features PRODUCT ION T ECHNIQUES How to produce good & healthy oat pasta by Gianni Mondelli 12 TR ADE Grain and milling sector in India by the editing staff 28 R AW MAT ERIAL S IGC-5-year global supply projections by the International Grains Council 36 Departments FACTS & NEWS PA STA’S FRIENDS SUPPLIER NEWS COMING SOON C ALENDAR 8 10 40 42 43

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Future proof technology, for pasta. Thanks to 35 years of experience and constant technological evolution, Anselmo has become one of the most important companies worldwide. Today our pasta factory equipments, fully manufactured in the two Italian production sites, are present in 25 countries of 4 continents: we reached this goal thanks to the quality of our production, the use of advanced technologies, the commitment and expertise of our staff. Anselmo S.p.a. - Bene Vagienna (Cn) - ITAL Y - Tel. +39 0172654755 - F ax +39 0172654811 anselmo@anselmoitalia.com - www.anselmoitalia.com

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BOW-TIES, SHORT GOODS, PENNE - GAROFALO PASTA PLANT (ITALY) FARFALLE: PRODUCTION 2000 Kg/h SHORT GOODS: PRODUCTION 4000 Kg/h SFOGLIA 1300 TWO STAMPING MACHINES SFOGLIA 1300 TWO CUTTING GROUPS PRESSTRAPEN GT PRESSTRAPEN/GT Also for “Pastificio Garofalo” the best recipe for a FLEXIBLE PLANT NICCOLAI TRAFILE WWW.NICCOLAI.COM

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EDI TORIAL What is functional pasta? Clarification needed by Gianni Mondelli W hat is functional food and which are the characteristics it must have to be defined as such? This is such a simple and instinctive question that it may sound obvious; however, the answer will be not really complicated, but rather complex. Many have tried to answer this question, at different level of knowledge, especially in terms of scientific expertise. However, medical science as well as nutritional science have also given some indications, have reached compromises and agreed on definitions that can somehow be applied as real rules to make a rather convincing and certain distinction between functional food and food. «There are no rules about functional food definition» The neat line between these two concepts has been drawn. What is still lacking is the set of rules that factually and juridically regulate the ways in which this neat line can and must be crossed, i.e. the “international passport” that is valid for any “passenger” who carries food and its real and established “functionality” in his luggage. Let us take a concrete example: the European Union has not made laws on this subject yet. Maybe one day it will do so, but for now there is (quite a lot of) room for anarchy and smuggling. The market is bursting with food that is January/March 2014 Professional PASTA 5

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EDI TORIAL defined and promoted as “functional”, according to methods and claims that are so varied and mismatched to often appear weird. In other cases, they are dramatically fraudulent. However, the concept is absolute: functionality is for food what food is for health. By this four-letter word - few but essential letters - I mean anything one eats and drinks to live, every day, every year, all through his/her life. Let us have a look at some quotes. “A food can be regarded as functional if it is scientifically demonstrated to affect beneficially one or more target functions in the body, beyond adequate nutritional effects in a way which is relevant to either the state of well-being and health and/ or the reduction of the risk of a disease” (Consensus Meeting on Scientific Concept of Functional Foods - European Commission of Functional Food Science in Europe, Madrid, 1999). This quote has been taken from Professor Carlo Cannella’s distinguished study, Department of Medical Physiopathology, Nutritional Science, The Sapienza University of Rome. «On the market there are foods passed off as functional, but they are not» Again, here are foods that can be regarded as functional: • natural foods; • foods to which a component has been added; • foods from which a component has been removed; • foods in which the characteristics of one or more components have been modified; • foods in which the bioavailability of one or more components has been modified; • any combination of the above options. (Roberfroid N.B., B.J.N. (2002), 88, Suppl. 2, S133-S138) Based on the above quotes, the aswer to the initial question seems to be clear and convincing, as well as the indication of what can be and/or must be done to turn natural foods into functional. In a nutshell, what we should know and recognize is the simplicity of the “functional food” concept. When we explore the market, in a general and generic way, to see how this concept is factually interpreted and managed, we find out that the functionality of foods has acquired varied profiles, sometimes slightly blended, some other times so pronounced to appear even ridiculous. There are all sorts of products: serious, humorous, ranging from science to magic, from holy to profane, from spell to mask. Obviously pasta is no exception, even though it still remains at a certain distance from this farce. Yes, I admit, I may have gone too far, but - in any case - I think I can conclude by saying that there is some confusion that can be clearly and strongly perceived. So ? Well, I could think that it would be nice and useful if ideas and purposes were clarified as far as functional foods are concerned, especially the most familiar for us (pasta). How? There are so many experiences, skills and so many knowledgeable people who could start exchanging their views and co-operating to make things clear, to put into effect scientific principles and guidelines, adding their wisdom, tradition knowledge as well as the awareness of experience, which is what common people mostly appreciate and perceive, even unconsciously. Gianni Mondelli 6 Professional PASTA January/March 2014

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FACTS & NEWS Nestlé sells US frozen pasta business Campbell K-cups to make into coffee-soup machine In the US Campbell Soup Co. will start offering K-cup soup packs that can be made with Green Mountain’s popular single-serve coffee machines. The soups include a K-cup pack of broth that is brewed over a packet of dry pasta and vegetables. Green Mountain says its machines are designed so that the system is cleansed by the brewing process, meaning there wouldn’t be a danger of the soup and coffee flavors mixing. Nutrition information for the K-cup soups wasn’t available because the companies are still working through the product details, a Campbell representative said. But the companies are calling the soup packs a snack. Campbell and Green Mountain say they’ll launch three varieties next year, including chicken broth & noodle. US: Philadelphia Macaroni acquires Unilever plant Nestlé said it would sell its US-based frozen pasta business, Joseph’s Pasta, to private equity firm Brynwood Partners as part of a drive to clean up its portfolio. The global food company said in October it would dispose of underperforming businesses to slim down its sprawling portfolio which spans from bottled water to baby food. Nestlé acquired Joseph’s Pasta in 2006. It also bought Kraft Food’s frozen pizza business in 2010. Frozen foods are a multi-billion dollar business for Nestlé in the US with its Stouffer’s, Lean Cuisine and Hot Pockets brands. Nestlé’s total global sales of frozen and chilled foods amounted to 8.05 billion Swiss francs ($8.90 billion) in 2012 ($1 = 0.9042 Swiss francs). Philadelphia Macaroni Co. has agreed to acquire the Harrisburg, Pa., pasta plant owned by Unilever. The transaction is expected to close before the end of March. With a long-term supply agreement, Philadelphia Macaroni will continue to produce pasta products for the Unilever dry soups and side dish business in North America. Specifically, the Harrisburg plant makes pasta for the Knorr Pasta Sides and Lipton Soup Secrets products. The plant has about 50 employees, and Philadelphia Macaroni said they would be offered positions. Philadelphia Macaroni makes dry, frozen and specialty pasta for industrial, institutional, and contract retail customers. The company operates plants in Pennsylvania, North Dakota, and Washington. Barilla’s working for a 3D-printed pasta The Parma-based food giant Barilla is perfecting a very different kind of technique to shape pasta dough - using 3D printers. To do so, it is working with Tno, a Dutch organisation specialising in applied scientific research, on a project using the same cutting-edge technology that has already brought startling developments in manufacturing and may now be poised to make similar waves in the food sector. Kjeld van Bommel, project leader at Tno, said one of the potential applications of the technology could be to enable customers to present restaurants with their pasta shape desires stored on a Usb stick. «Suppose it’s your 25th wedding anniversary», Van Bommel was quoted as telling the Dutch newspaper Trouw. «You go out for dinner and surprise your wife with pasta in the shape of a rose». According to reports, Barilla aims to offer customers cartridges of dough that they can insert into a 3D printer to create their own pasta designs. Although the project has been going on for around two years, it was still «in a preliminary phase». 8 Professional PASTA January/March 2014

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PA STA’S FRIENDS China: meat giant Shuanghui changes name Cribis Dun & Brandstreet awards Pavan Group Cribis Dun & Brandstreet, a world leader in the credit information systems and business information sector, assigns a rating of 1 to Pavan for reliability in trade relations.This prize, awarded to less than 6% of the companies analyzed, is the synthetic indicator of the size and the riskiness of a company. It is awarded on the basis of analysis of payment transactions, cash flows, payment trends and in general the financial soundness of the company. Even in market comparison Pavan is an exception: the average rating for this sector, based on the analysis of about 1.600 companies, is valued at level 3, while in the recent observation period (24 months), the value for Pavan has remained stable at level 1. This recognition further represents the reliability of the Pavan Group, increasing the confidence of suppliers, customers and stakeholders in establishing or strengthening mutually profitable and lasting relationships. In Australia Simplot launches new tuna and rice range Shuanghui International has changed its name to WH Group in a move the Chinese meat processor said reflected its «aspirations as a world-leading brand». The Hong Kong-listed meat group was transformed into the world’s largest pork processor when it acquired the operations of US giant Smithfield Foods last year. «The renaming of our corporate brand to WH Group reflects the increasingly global reach of our operations, which combine the largest pork production companies in China and the United States and cater to consumers globally», Ceo Wan Long said. The WH Group name is derived from “Wanzhou Holdings”. The Chinese character Wan stands for eternity and Zhou represents continents. Food processor Simplot will soon launch a new John West tuna and rice range. The new product will give consumers a healthy on-the-go meal solution, including tuna and rice that can be heated and ready to serve in just 45 seconds. The meal components are packed separately in microwavable tubs, which Simplot said offered consumers «complete control» of how hot each part of the meal is. The range includes flavours such as chilli and tomato, thai green curry and savoury tomato and onion. «Our research showed that consumers loved the and health benefits of tuna, but struggled with ways to consume it outside of the typical tuna sandwich for lunch», Mr Sterling said, Group Marketing Manager Shelf Stable Simplot Australia. «Tuna and rice is the perfect meal solution: it’s nutritious but incredibly easy to prepare», said Sterling. Sofrito could reduce the risk of cancer The combination of tomato, olive oil, garlic and onion in a sofrito increases the amount of polyphenols and carotenoids, which are bioactive compounds that may help to prevent cardiovascular diseases and cancer, according to new research from the University of Barcelona. The results were published in the Food Chemistry magazine. The researchers said their work identified for the first time polyphenols and carotenoids, which are antioxidant substances, in sofrito. «These compounds produced by plants and which we eat are related to reduced cardiovascular diseases», said Rosa Maria Lamuela, leader of the project. Other bioactive compounds found in the sofrito included carotenoids and vitamin C. Researchers said that the intake of carotenoids such as lycopene prevents prostate cancer, and the consumption of foods rich in beta-carotene can help to reduce the incidence of lung cancer. The researchers recommended using virgin olive oil instead of sunflower oil and said they were now looking for the ideal proportion of the four ingredients. 10 Professional PASTA January/March 2014

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product ion t echniques How to produce good Dried rigatoni obtained with DV14 formulation that is described in the article. The label for this pasta may be “Oat rigatoni”, plus the characterizing element of this sale designation or the list of the ingredients, as follows: “Common oat (characterizing) flour, durum wheat semolina, vegetable proteins”. The label shall indicate the presence of gluten (allergen). Ingredients shall not contain water for dough preparation. 12 Professional Pasta January/March 2014

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PRODUCT ION T ECHNIQUES & healthy oat pasta “Functionality” cannot undermine product characteristics by Gianni Mondelli W hen can a food be regarded as functional? The answer to this question is contained in the editorial published in this issue of Professional Pasta. In detail, when we deal with functional pasta, I hasten to underline that “functionality” should not constrict, distort or even ignore, in any way, the overall quality of the product. My own personal axiom is the following: “Functional pasta is fine, but it must always be pasta and nothing else”. In other words: “what is good and tasty in the traditional pasta must always be part of functional pasta, even in case of unavoidable variations, mostly in the colour and taste of boiled and plain pasta. Zero tolerance and zero concession to any deficiency that would inevitably downgrade the product, thus making the approach hateful and unpleasant, to say the least. Functional pasta must be “good”, hold up to cooking, easy to eat on fork and firm to the bite; sauces and seasonings must also stick to it nicely. In a nutshell, functional pasta must have the same “genetic code” as the traditional Italian pasta, i.e. to be “good” in every respect, to brings honour to the “main course” of the Italian tradition. January/March 2014 Professional PASTA 13

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