Ciao Magazine 241

 

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Ciao Magazine Issue 241

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FREE There’s life in the Inner West! Issue 241 | August 29 2014 Swinging spots! Where to tee off WIN! Boyhood Felony Vintage Classics Movie tix: le, Distributed in Leichhardt, Annanda , Petersham, Stanmore, Newtown Balmain, Drummoyne, Haberfield, Rozelle, Five Dock, Concord, & Summer Hill is taking over the Inner West! Inner West fatherhood Newtownians strut their sartorial stuff Street style New-age dads doing it differently The Village people Dulwich Hill’s boutique revival

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Inner West whispers Local gossip, rumour, hearsay and unsubstantiated fact... A coffee for Fast Eddie, bread and circuses, and what’s going on at the Marly? l Will Marly’s new rooftop bar last till summer? WE ARE C!AO Satire for the soul Following a coffee catch-up with Hunters Hill’s second-most famous resident, Latte Leftie has had a Damascene conversion. Dear LL – Are the reports you enjoyed double-halfcaf-half-decaf-soy cappuccino with Joe Hockey true? Could it really be the case that you are considering betraying everything you hold dear to write speeches for a Liberal Party treasurer? How can you even contemplate aiding and abetting the man you recently described as, “A cigar-chomping, hobby farm-owning, investment banker-marrying private schoolboy who deserves to be beheaded – ISIS style – the next time he opens his big mouth about the end of the age of entitlement, before having his headless corpse towed through the streets in a car driven by a poor person while baying mobs laugh at his penis, which is no doubt even smaller than Paul Keating remembers Bob Hawke’s being.” Disillusioned, Petersham LL replies: It is indeed true that I may have made the odd ill-considered remark about Joseph Benedict Hockey (née Hokeidonian) in these pages in the past. But I’m man enough to say I’ve misjudged the world’s greatest treasurer. Consider the following: Joe is a Palestinian. Not one of those exciting bomb-throwing, death-toIsrael ones but surely being the son of a swarthy Middle Eastern refugee counts for something? And, sure, Joe had an expensive private school education but did you know that his father never came to his rugby games on the weekend because he was busy cleaning the floor of his deli with nothing more than his tongue and a bit of scrunched-up newspaper? Granted, Hokeidonian Senior might have ended up a Whitlam-hating, reactionary property developer but do I need to remind everyone that, in his younger years, he named his son after Joseph Benedict Chifley? Given all that, I fail to see how I can be condemned for playing Toby Ziegler to a man who’s almost as left-wing as the sainted Malcolm Turnbull. n Email your dilemma to info@ciaomagazine.com.au. ADVERTISING Sonya Madden sonya@ciaomagazine.com.au Since the newest lockout laws, the Marlborough Hotel has been enjoying free rein in the Inner West. Every weekend the line outside often reaches as far as Istanbul (no, not the country, but rather the local kebab shop). Have the owners taken things too far? Rumour has it that the rooftop bar may be dealing with some council-related issues. The rooftop has been on an extended hiatus and whether it’s purely due to this heinous weather or something thornier, only time will tell. quality meats in Chippendale? Ex-Tetsuya’s chef Luke Powell is embarking on his first solo endeavour. Adding even more excitement to the developing Chippendale area. To be housed in a converted old mechanics warehouse. You may know him best for his pulled pork and fried chicken at Mary’s. However, his new joint is said to showcase his versatility with a shy away from the Americana theme. l Eddie Obeid seen at Leichhardt’s JOURNALIST Max Kobras max@ciaomagazine.com.au Bakehouse. True to corrupt politician form, Eddie Obeid was spotted hiding behind a large baseball cap and dark sunglasses, desperately trying to enjoy a Monday morning coffee in peace. Pity his sparkling MercedesBenz provided a far less stealthy getaway. Canteen is rumoured to be opening in Dulwich Hill. Bread and Circus have had huge success in Alexandria with their biodynamic, organic and sustainable produce satisfying the tastebuds of hip locals. But will it make the same impression in Dulwich Hill? Or will its biodynamic eggs fall flat in an area more down to earth. l A new Bread and Circus Wholefoods FOOD Melissa Leong info@ciaomagazine.com.au l Luke Powell’s anticipated opening of a LP’s WINE Winsor Dobbin www.winsordobbin.com.au history Pictured above is the War Memorial in Hinsby Park, Annandale, one of the many tributes to fallen soldiers who once hailed from the Inner West. From September 6th, Leichhardt Council will be running History Week 2014. This year’s focus will be on the First World War, with walking tours being organised to visit sites such as Hinsby Park. History Week will also feature a ‘Scan-a-thon’ in which residents are encouraged to digitise any historical memorabilia they have for public use. There are so many stories hidden in the Inner ART DIRECTOR Eleanor Wales eleanor@ciaomagazine.com.au West, you just have to go out and find them – September is shaping up to be the perfect time. Lest we forget. EDITORIAL Phoebe Moloney phoebe@ciaomagazine.com.au PUBLISHING Sonia Komaravalli sonia@ciaomagazine.com.au Contributors: Jared Ingersoll, Nigel Bowen and Millie Cotes Illustrations: Paden Hunter Ciao loves you, and our photographers only supply photos for publication with consent. We try and make you look your best. No responsibility is accepted by Ciao Magazine for the accuracy of advertisements or information. We welcome unsolicited editorial and pictorial contributions. The opinions expressed in Ciao Magazine are those of contributors, indemnifying the publisher from inaccuracy or consequences arising from its reproduction. © All rights reserved. No material is to be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Ciao Magazine is a free publication. Distribution, advertising & editorial enquiries 460A Parramatta Road, Petersham 2049 info@ciaomagazine.com.au (02) 9518 3696 0402 202 951 – Sonya 0405 509 805 – Sonia Ciao is locally owned and produced. Please recycle Printed by Spot Press, Marrickville Cover: Business owners Connie Dimas and Dominique Durand, sit back at The Larder Epicerie Fine, Dulwich Hill. Photo by Ben Cregan. Things we love: Petershambles. Found hanging from the immaculate white picket fence of a Petersham home. This still-life artwork has been graffitied over, bringing together a mixture of antique and modern styles which perfectly capture the “shambles” of the Inner West we all love so dearly. Also, we’re loving the idea of people turning our local streets into outdoor galleries! Could this be a new trend? C!ao’s voice In • Cronuts, the love child of a croissant and doughnut affair. Baked daily at Newtown’s hippest café, Brewtown. • Punny restaurant names, think Thai-tanic in Newtown or Pho-sure in Enmore. • The rebirth of some great local pubs. Thanks to the Henson in Marrickville, The Vic in Enmore and the Oxford Tavern in Petersham we don’t have to stray far for a good time. Out • Road rage - ease off those horns people. • Tagging. Graffiti art can be beautiful but signing your name everywhere is just plain annoying. • The excess of frozen yoghurt shops on King St. How much frozen yoghurt can we really eat? • Live music venues suffering from the new lock-out laws. • The state of the Cooks River. Despite politicians’ promises it remains heavily polluted. 42 Short Street, Leichhardt. Tel 9518 3281 • Open 7 Days 2 • Vietnamese pork rolls in Marrickville: crunchy, spicy and cheap. C!ao Magazine There’s life in the Inner West!

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Community Life R OA D T E ST n Phoebe Moloney Where to go swinging Between the feminist revolution and the rising middle class, golf has not faired well. I don’t know if it’s the four-hour games, exclusive memberships or the caddish outfits, but it seems for many people golf is just something they wouldn’t do. Public golf courses in the Inner West, however, are trying their darndest to engage a new breed of ‘social’ golfers. And with their pristine courses, reduced prices and cozy communities they have a lot more to offer than just a club sandwich. We donned our best argyle and checked out where the pros are putting their putters. RANT Massey Park Golf Course They are the bane of every driver’s existence throughout the Inner West – and I’m not talking about potholes. It’s the parking meters that make us sweat as we run back to our cars still chewing on our lunch with a keen eye on the clock! It's the omnipresent khaki-clad inspectors, that seem to loom around every corner waiting by your car for that free half an hour to tick over by a second. Relentless, they return to Norton Street day and night, weekday and weekend, driving away shoppers and diners too afraid to overstay their welcome and pay the hefty price. Where in other regions you’d be hard pressed to spot a parking officer doing a routine check once a week, in the Inner West they seem to out number locals as they trawl the streets in what many consider a predatory fashion. If I don’t bag an all-day parking spot nearby my Petersham office, I’m forced to move my car every two hours to avoid a fine and each time I walk back to my car I wonder: is this my punishment for choosing to drive to work rather than cycle or take public transport? But who could blame me for not wanting to risk my life riding a bike down Parramatta Road? Sounds like 'massive' and definitely looks it; Massey Park Golf Course in Concord is the kind of golf course you could mill around in for hours. With its resplendent green slopes and waterfront aspect, I wasn’t surprised to see members soaking up the clubhouse’s view (and beer) at 10 o’clock in the morning. For those who want a swing, Massey Park provides a 4.5km run that is fun to play no matter your level. Resident pro, Glen Kelly, says pars and birdies are not too difficult here and the wide grounds mean you won’t lose your balls unless you really try. For these reasons Massey Park is popular with the “weekend hackers”, however, it’s also easy to spot the aficionados – mostly because they tend to be the ones wearing the brightest clothes. Marrickville Golf Course Set upon a narrow strip of greenery along the Cooks River, Marrickville Golf Course is all about the “short game”. Its tight turns and sneaky angles are an attraction for golfers out to improve their accuracy. The challenges of this scenic 18-hole course don’t stop the punters, however, with nearly 40,000 people coming to visit every year. The 60-par run moves through a verdant progression of weeping willows, water views and a rain-garden installed by Marrickville Council. As one of the few golf courses to have a female pro, Marrickville Golf Course is particularly known for its Women’s Competition. According to Patsy Chu, Marrickville's Women’s Captain, the rogan josh at their Bistro is also a highlight. Fore! Barnwell Park Golf Course Slap bang on Canada Bay, Barnwell Park is probably the best advertisement for playing golf there is. Before you hit the grind of Lyons Road take a moment to observe the calm serenity of the bodies moving through this relatively flat course. Accessible, reasonably priced and compact, (the 18 holes can be finished in three hours) Barnwell park is perfect for beginners and seniors who don’t want to partake in an extended game. Barnwell’s $14 Twilight deal could see you teeing off into the sunset, and the public visibility is a great excuse to get out your plus-fours. The golfing pro, Greg Engall, also holds free beginners clinics once a month. For years business owners along the high streets have complained that the parking meters hurt their businesses. In response Leichhardt Council now offers 30 minutes free parking, which is a great start, but is it enough? “Leichhardt Council now offers 30 minutes free parking, which is a great start, but is it enough?” I mean what can you really do in half an hour? You can’t eat a full meal, considering the time it will take for you to order and food to arrive, you certainly can’t see a movie and any visit to Short Street Medical Centre is likely to take longer than 30 minutes, especially in the cold and flu season. Personally I don’t like to take the risk (and neither should you now that the starting price for parking longer than the allocated time period is $101), so I dutifully pay the $3.30 for a full hour – but that’s if I can find a working ticket machine. You see, not only am I expected to fork out for the pleasure of parking, I have to search left and right for the nearest meter machine after the first one I approached ate all my coins and failed to spit out a damn ticket. This is a real frustration experienced by countless people who are now simply making the decision to go elsewhere for their shopping and dining needs – namely to big centres with big car parks, where everything is just easier and the little guys are sadly left outside in the cold. I shudder to imagine what will remain when there is no one left willing to fill the meters with coins and businesses disappear along with the patrons. You only need to look out the window at the dozens of For Lease signs littering commercial strips to see what's to come. Balmain Sinfonia hits a high note In honour of Macquarie University’s 50th Jubilee, Balmain Sinfonia are presenting a brilliant program of classics, as well as a surprise selection of music from the times of Lachlan Macquarie. Highlights of the program include Beethoven’s piano concerto no.4 in G Major, featuring Clemens Leske as the soloist, and SaintSaens’ beautiful Organ Symphony no.3. The program will also include admired music from the times of NSW governor Lachlan Macquarie, who was in office from 1810-1821. The soloist, Clemens Leske, is one of Australia’s most illustrious pianists. After studying at the prestigious Juilliard School in New York, Leske went on to play with all of Australia’s major symphony orchestras and won the ABC Young Performer of the Year award in 1990. Join the Balmain Sinfonia, and one of Australia’s premier pianists, for this outstanding afternoon concert on Sunday 14th September, 2.30pm, at the Macquarie Theatre, Macquarie University. n Tickets are $25 (or $20 concession), available at the door or by visiting www.balmainsinfonia.com. What’s on n Compiled by Max Kobras. Email info@ciaomagazine.com.au Fri 29th to Sun 31st August FREE Community are events listings n Words: Felecia Smith. Weds 3rd to Sat 6th September InSide Out email info@ m.au ciaomagazine.co be oe Ph Attn: 10am-4pm over the weekend. n For more info and images, visit terravita.weebly.com Sunday 31st August Terravita Exhibition Terravita is the inaugural exhibition of a new group of eleven talented artists from Warringah Printmakers Studio. Aiming to demonstrate the wide range of skills and techniques involved in printmaking, such as intaglio, relief printing, lino cuts and photopolymeprints, this exhibition will be highlighting one of the most innovative and contemporary art forms on the scene. Terravita will be housed at the Balmain Watch House and will be open between 6pm-8pm on Friday and between 4 Unity Walk and Run A local lino cut Beginning in 2008, the Unity Walk and Run is a fundraising event held at Sydney Olympic Park that gives a voice to those living with, or affected by Parkinson’s disease. Now in its seventh year, Unity Walk and Run has already raised over $1.2 million for the more than 80,000 people across Australia living with this condition. Featuring a 4km run, a 8km run and a leisurely stroll around the area, this is a cause everyone can be a part of, regardless of their fitness level. If Work out for a good cause you’re free, make sure to come down and help in the fight against one of the most common and debilitating neurological disorders. n For more info or to register for the event, visit www.unitywalkandrun. com.au Marrickville Council has teamed up with Sunnyfield Disability Services to present a collaborative arts exhibition that is truly unique. Pairing the work of seven local artists with that of twelve people living with a disability who have been mentored through Sunnyfield’s ‘Hatch’ program, InSide Out is said to, “reflect on the internal expression of people without a voice breaking down the barriers that are often associated with disability”. This showcase, which will encompass a wide range of art forms, is deserving of support. Come check it out. n Chrissie Cotter Gallery, Camperdown, 11am-4pm See page 6 for more what's on...

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n Local Gigs Saturday 30th August n Local screens Hobo Bordeaux For those who don’t know Hobo Bordeaux, they have been kicking around Sydney for a few years now with their unique mix of rock, blues and hip-hop influences. Enjoy with whiskey. FREE TICKETS Win double movie passes and DVDs n The Annandale Hotel, Free Friday 5th September Call the NRMA, Jarvis! Doc White and Si Compadres Sometimes I feel that countryblues was invented so that big hairy men with bourbon-soaked voices could be sexy. Well, if this man isn’t pulling it off, no one is. Doc has a good growl and a fantastic rolling beat. Would go well with whiskey. Pulp: A Film about Life, Death and Supermarkets Richard Linklater's blissful masterpiece: A boy grows up n Django Bar, $27.50 Boyhood It all goes well with whiskey Friday 5th September The Royal Artillery I have never heard of stoner-blues before. Maybe these guys invented it? Whatever it is, they sure as hell nailed it. Sounds a lot like later Kyuss or early QOTSA with these fantastic guitar licks. These guys should be headlining festivals. Screw whiskey, there is no drink strong enough to match this hectic band. At 165 minutes, Richard Linklater’s tender and profound new feature may make some nervous. It shouldn’t, the run time flashes by in a heartbeat – a bit like real life. Which is what it is, sort of… When he started it in 2002, his subject Mason (Ellar Coltrane) was just six. Then he assembled the same cast at regular intervals over the next 12 years catching various episodes in the boy’s life. It is all scripted, yet feels so natural, intimate and real, that by the time Mason is 18, a beautiful young man on the cusp of adulthood, we feel like we’ve been through the mill with him. His mum (Patricia Arquette) – already separated from his dad (Ethan Hawke), has quite a few bumpy patches, and we’ve watched and worried. But both parents are loving, if imperfect – particularly Mason Snr – so boho, cool, with an impractical sports car early on – middle aged, a bit daggy, with a respectable station wagon by the end. Yep, that's real life and this is Linklater’s stunning achievement. It is his masterpiece. M, Sept 4. Felony After celebrating a heroic drug bust rather too heroically, good cop Mal (Joel Edgerton) clips a cyclist with his car, putting the kid in a coma. Mal panics. Edgerton’s own taut and controlled script then dishes out the tension and moral conundrums so expertly that our brains start hurting… “Prison is for pricks who don’t take their pain – here!” growls his superior (Tom Wilkinson) pointing to his own head. And so it goes, just getting worse and worse for Mal. A very stylish, brooding Aussie psychological thriller: Very, very good...at everything! M on now. Eccentric NZer Florian Habicht (Love Story) is at it again with this portrait of Jarvis Cocker and his band Pulp, which begins with the bespectacled '90s Brit-pop superstar changing a tire in the back streets of Sheffield. Then it gets weird, as scenes of the band's fiercely dedicated fans (pensioners, a cross-dressing teen, newspaper sellers, fishmongers, an academic) intertwine with Cocker’s deadpan musings, concert footage and scenes of him dry humping a speaker box. It’s also a loving homage to the band’s home town and its people. Once a mighty industrial city making steel for the Empire, Sheffield now produces movies like The Full Monty and self-mocking, geeky musos like Jarvis. Fresh from its Sydney Film Festival outing, this warm, witty and wonderful musical doco is really quite unlike anything you’ve ever seen. M, available on Digital HD from Aug 27 and DVD from Sept 10. ★ Thanks to EntertainmentOne we have five DVDs to give away. Details below. n Reviews – Russell Edwards WIN TIX! n Lewisham Hotel, Free ★ Thanks to Universal Pictures we have we have 10 double in-season passes to give away. Details below. Bad call, Malcolm You must remember this... Take your family for a sail The 2014/2015 sailing season will be officially starting on September 6th at the Concord and Ryde Sailing Club as they celebrate 70 years of boating on Parramatta River. The Concord and Ryde Sailing Club, the most westerly sailing club on the Parramatta River, is renown for being family friendly. With its fleet of Optimist Dinghies and a family friendly attitude, this is a great club for people of all skill levels. Head Training Officer David McClean has even developed his own special training program that is suitable for anyone over the age of nine. But why not get the entire family involved? Their Family Learn to Sail course will be commencing with their first theory class on Tuesday 9th September, then every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8pm, and the practical classes will be running every Saturday morning from 9am. This is a great opportunity for all families who are interested in Saturday 6th September You can be the King of the World too! Vintage Classics at Palace Norton Street So who remembers those colourful Valhalla Cinema posters, a fixture of the walls and fridges of every Inner West share house of the 1970s? Featuring an eclectic and ever-changing mix of vintage, arthouse and cult hits, the best thing about that venue was its cheap admissions. Cinemas are way more comfortable than that draughty old Glebe barn now, but Palace Norton St still has those same great old films, and at much the same prices. Check out the Vintage Classics every Sunday at 3pm. Casablanca (Sept 7), Vertigo (Sept 28), Pulp Fiction (Oct 5), Apocalypse Now (Nov 23) and there’s much more, all at $10 admission ($8 Club). Tempted? Pick up the poster of the entire season. It's got a fridge magnet! www.palacecinemas.com.au/events/ ★ Thanks to Palace Cinemas we have 10 passes to Vintage Classic sessions to give away. Details below n More local movies: www.ciaomagazine.com.au getting out of the house, trying something new and having a great time whilst doing it. n For more information on their sailing courses, visit www.concordrydesailing.org. Zombie Prom 1986 n For more info, visit www.thevanguard.com.au Friday 12th September With some things, you only get one shot. You know, like your high school formal... or life. Unless, of course, there was some kind of, I don’t know, zombie prom, then you could have a Guts and glory second chance at both. Wait, there is a zombie prom? In fact, it is the Vanguard’s third annual Zombie Prom, complete with the entire graduating class of 1986 from Shermer High School returning from the grave. If the idea of shuffling around in leg warmers to Simple Minds on repeat gets your blood spurting, then this is a night not to be missed. 6 Three Blokes Telling Jokes is exactly what it says on the wrapper; a solid hour of three guys on a stage making you laugh till your sides ache. Coming from the hilarious brains of Andrew Barnett, Matty B and Scott Dettrick, this show explores the utterly ridiculous swathe of humanity that is middle class Australia. If you are into beer, barbies and big belly laughs, come down to the Factory Theatre as I reckon you’ll like this. n For more info or to buy tickets, visit www.fringecomedy.com.au Saturday 13th September Three Blokes Telling Jokes Taking care of your pelvic floor is all about feeling great and being able to do whatever you want without worrying about control or support, but unfortunately the important facts about this body part are rarely shared with women. Luckily for you, there is someone willing to share this information. Hosted at Balmain Sports Medicine from 1pm, this session will be led by women’s health educator Katalin Janssens and is highly recommended for ladies of all ages and fitness levels. n For more info or to make a booking, visit www.discreetlyfit.com Gonsal-Korale for her snap of local subcultures, titled 'Painting the Town', while runner-up went to Mark Gardiner for his moody black and white picture 'Across the Tracks'. All forty-two entrants will be on display at Balmain Library until the end of September. n For more info, check out #leichlibsnappers on Instagram or visit www.leichhardt.nsw.gov.au/Library Pelvic Floor Discovery To be in the running to win double in-season passes to Boyhood, a DVD of Pulp or pass to Vintage Classics Until the end of September at Palace Norton Street, email your Leichhardt Library Photo name and contact details to info@ ciaomagazine.com.au telling us where Competition you picked up your copy of Ciao. This inaugural photo competition has You can enter them all in one email, come to a close with the winners being but if you do, give us a preference. announced. First prize went to Indira Remember to include a postal address. WIN MOVIE PASSES & DVDs Only at the movies Sept 4 www.boyhoodmovie.com.au © 2014 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved

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n Your say n Sustainability n Local news What was your take on the demonstrations outside the Israeli Film Festival? Should we protest artistic events? ● “The Greens party are A Hole in our knowledge After Transpacific garbage trucks were grounded last week, and Ashfield was grounded in rubbish, we started wondering where our waste actually goes once it’s been swiped from our sight. With only three to six years worth of landfill space left in Sydney, the Inner West’s waste is being transported further away from familiar doorsteps to be buried. Inner West councils are now paying top dollar to banish waste, forking out approximately $100 per tonne of rubbish. We thought we ‘d take a look at some of the places being paid to make our rubbish their problem. What's My Colour King Street Theatre is planning a technicolour treat for the upcoming school holidays. Their program for young people will be casting, practicing and performing an entire work within the two week break as part of their 'Putting On a Show' workshop. Assistant Director, Maria De Marco has chosen a new work to be tackled by her students. What's My Colour? is a musical written by local Newtown resident Wendy Lewis and Israeli composer, Yuval Halpern, specifically for budding thespians. What xx x a load of rubbish the boycotter’s political advocates. I just don’t get it… how is censorship, the prohibition of artistic freedom and the silencing of dissenting opinion in any way 'progressive' and left wing?” Margaret, Annandale situated near the Penrith City suburb of St Clair and is set to close in 2016. Residents of this area have the double pleasure of there being another landfill site and chicken-farm close by, both of which have been investigated for the mismanagement of odour. Erskine Park is also particularly famous for its annual dog-show. The aim of the two-week workshop is to learn the backstage and onstage skills of putting together a live ensemble performance. The workshops are open to all young people between the ages of 10 – 25, and What's My Colour will be showing at the King Street Theatre on October 4th and 5th. n Contact King Street Theatre to register for the Putting On a Show Workshop. ● “Right of assembly should be universal. Peaceful protest is a pillar of our society” Patrick, Rozelle Lucas Heights ● “The protestors should be allowed to protest. I don't know why they want to though; the Israeli film festival is not the Israeli government” Max, Newtown About a half-an-hour drive away from Inner Sydney, Lucas Heights Resource Recovery Park in the Sutherland Shire is one of the oldest and largest landfill sights still operating in Australia. Lucas It's the final destination of Marrickville Council’s waste, of which around 20,000 tonnes enters landfill every year. The park spans 165 hectares, backing on to Heathcote National Park. Did you know? • Landfill is the most expensive option for managing waste • In Sydney 445kg of waste is generated per person per year • Australians are the second greatest producer of waste per person worldwide • If household waste was composted and sorted correctly, municipal landfill waste would be dramatically reduced • Only 30 per cent of TVs and computers in Australia are recycled •When paper is disposed in landfill it breaks down to produce the greenhouse gas, methane • 30 per cent of retail food waste goes straight into landfill without ever reaching the consumer • Not everything with a recycling triangle on it can be recycled, generally only those items numbered with a 1, 2, 3 or 5 • Gas from decomposing waste can be turned into household energy. Lucas Heights and Woodlawn both contribute electricity to their local power grid. Gill's xx x doing his bit for the seriously ill Woodlawn Every year 400,000 tonnes of waste is sent 250km by rail from Sydney to be processed in Woodlawn, Goulburn. Leichhardt, Burwood, Ashfield and Strathfield Councils all contribute. With the impending closure of other facilities closer to home, Sydney is becoming increasingly reliant on the Woodlawn site. A new rail line and transfer centre are being built in order for Sydneysiders to send a further 500,000 tonnes of garbage from our homes there each year. ● "I’m all for peaceful protests and I think they should be allowed, whatever the event. But these protests make me uneasy because there a people involved who can’t distinguish between the action of a government and the culture of a people who have contributed so much." Bibek, Dulwich Hill Riding against Cancer Local travel agent and father of three, Gill Gaspar, has been gearing up for a weekend away quite unlike those of his customers...one spent sitting on a bicycle seat. Inspired by his friends and family whose lives have been affected by cancer, Gill will be riding over 200km through rural NSW to raise funds for RPA's Chris O'Brien Lifehouse. With Sydney's Ride to Conquer Cancer coming up in October, Gill has been training every weekend with his team of eight friends. “We do a lot of the of the Bay Run together and then ride over to the tracks in Homebush. Wherever we go, we always end up having a coffee in Petersham,” he said. n To sponsor the team click 'Donate' at www.conquercancer.org.au and enter 'Gill Gaspar.' Erskine Park Erskine Park Landfill is run by Transpacific, the waste management service used by Canada Bay and Ashfield councils. The Erskine Park facility is Students make rubbish art Local artists, university students, teachers and children are collaborating to create Sculpture by the School, an annual event dedicated to the creation of sustainable art. Twelve local artists have teamed up with Marrickville West Primary School students to create an inspiring sculpture walk through their school grounds, with the hope of rivalling the better-known Eastern Suburb's exhibition, Sculpture by the Sea. Local artist Greg Shapley, whose recent 'Garbage Guts' exhibition featured images of Sydney waste, has been working with the children to construct a huge moving sculpture out of recycled materials. Shapley says the event will help Marrickville West students to think critically about the world, particularly their role in protecting the environment. “Creativity is a fundamental part of a child's exploration of the world, trying stuff out for yourself to see how it looks, sounds, works, feels. By encouraging re-use, we are creatively thinking of ways to give something old new life - before condemning it to landfill or the sensitive banks of a riverbed,” Shapley said. Sculpture by the School is still looking for submissions from local artists and tinkerers. The outdoor exhibition will be open to the public on Saturday 13th September between 3 and 8pm. n To submit art to Sculpture by the School send an email to sculpturemwps@gmail.com. Found objects, creative kids The Walking School Bus Canada Bay Council and the Canada Bay Club are working together to provide their local suburbs with an alternative transport option to the bumper-to-bumper traffic jams and sparse bus services that many Five Dockians and Haberfield dwellers suffer: their feet! The Walking Bus program will target local children who can use the bus to walk to school accompanied by a rostered parent who 'drives' the bus. Canada Bay Mayor Angelo Tsikeras hopes the Walking Bus will ease the morning competition for parking at school drop-off zones. “By reducing traffic and congestion around school sites, the Walking Bus also meets Council’s commitment to finding greener, more sustainable ways of living,” he said. n To get involved with the Walking Bus project call 9911 6555 or email council@canadabay.nsw.gov.au. Written in the stars I wasn’t sure what to expect walking into Damian Rocks’ Stars Like You wellness centre for an astrology reading. What I walked out with was a new understanding of who I am… Having had a few psychic readings in the past, I wondered if astrology would be much the same experience; would Damian just be some nutty star-gazer assuring me I’d live happily ever after? Instead, I was pleased to find a knowledgable astrologer with a in-depth understanding of his art. As it turns out, Damian's reading of my natal chart was far more specific, insightful and surprisingly productive than any psychic reading. A natal chart is an interpretation of the exact moment in time and space when you were born, based on your position in relation to the Sun, Moon and planets of our solar system (to get the best reading possible you need to know your birth time). Essentially it offers a blueprint of your potential; where your life path might lead as influenced by the universe and what personality traits are common to your birth sign. 8 As Damian puts it, “Astrology describes the patterns that structure both the cosmos and the psyche. It’s not fortune-telling, but more a map of the soul, giving clear direction on where you have come from and the road ahead.” So if you’re ready to hold a mirror up to yourself and discover why you are the way you are, astrology can be the gateway to better self awareness. The experience of getting a reading is likely to change your perspective on your place in the world and empowers you to take control of your behaviour as it gifts you with insights into your strengths and weaknesses as a person (some you may not even be aware of). Damian's role in all this is also as a guide, advising you on how to use this knowledge to reach your full potential. Before opening his Leichhardt practice, Damian held Astrology Dinners at The Victoria Room, Darlinghurst, where he gained quite the reputation as a professional astrologer. A typical consultation lasts for 60 or 90 minutes and can be used to gain information on a specific issue or to get a better sense of self and your path in life. Perhaps the fault is in your stars, after all n For more information or to book a consultation visit www.starslikeyou.com.au

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n DULWICH HILL SPECIAL FEATURE Dully Delights With the Dulwich Hill Village Fair coming up on Sunday 14th September we thought we’d make like a local and sample one of Sydney’s most delectable destinations... Not many Sydneysiders would be willing to call their area of residence a village but for those dwelling in the leafy streets of Dulwich Hill there isn’t a more appropriate word to describe this suburb’s close-knit community feel. attitude. It has something to offer for everyone, with baked good, delicious cakes, even teacups made of marshmallows. The menu has a wide selection of whimsical options from breakfast through to lunch. The Larder Epicerie Fine A family owned food store, which stocks products from all around the world. Their focus is on fine cheeses but they also offer a range of international honeys, conserves, pastas, chutneys and much more. They also stock ‘Brasserie Bread’, a well-known sourdough cut that is baked fresh and delivered every day. They pride themselves on stocking fine produce that is hard to find anywhere else. Strawberry Fields Patisserie This is an-award wining French-inspired patisserie. It offers unique and delicious treats that are renowned throughout the Inner West. Their menu includes classics such as brownies, tiramisu, custard tarts and a range of cupcakes. Connie Dimas makes handmade jewellery and Dominique Durand serves exquisite cheese at The Larder Gourmet Meats The Hub House Diner Sideways Deli Café Tucked away in the back streets of Dulwich Hill this café is always busy. Famous amongst locals for its family friendly environment, uniquely catering to children, with brightly coloured pencils, toy boxes, books and a welcoming This is a new and trendy diner that looks like it belongs in the narrow streets of Surry Hills. They offer a delicious menu and are open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The menu is inspired by American diner food, featuring ribs, burgers and a range of delicious sliders. A gourmet butchery passionate about organic, free range and grass-fed meats. The butchers here like to experiment with gourmet foods, and produce a number of savoury treats. They are popular amongst Dulwich Hill locals for their fresh produce and great cuts of meat. OricCo Chicken Empire Café Coffee 1st Espresso Bar This spot is famous for having a great breakfast and good vegan and gluten free options on the menu. The coffee is first class and they serve up a unique ‘Dirty Chai’ for those who like cinnamon in their coffee. Empire Café boasts the best coffee in Sydney, let alone Dulwich Hill. The Empire is the only place in the suburbs where you can find Arabic bean coffee from Columbia. They offer an amazing breakfast menu and are situated in the heart of Dulwich Hill’s restaurant and commercial district. If you’re feeling like some Mediterranean style charcoal chicken, Oricco Chicken is the place for you. It’s known in the Dulwich Hill area for its authentic food, quick service and amazing garlic sauce. They also have a great selection of burgers, rolls and fries. Though what makes this a standout business is the welcoming environment you receive when entering. Abla Patisserie Gleebooks Little Portugal Try a cronut from the Hub House Diner Gleebooks is an independent bookstore, which has been running for more than 30 years. They have a great kids section and are known for being involved in the Dulwich Hill community, hosting a number of lectures throughout the year. It’s a cute little blue shop which offers the latest titles as well as an expansive secondhand section. A hidden gem in Dulwich Hill, which provides authentic Portuguese food rivalling the best in Petersham. The chicken is cooked on charcoal and is served with a mix of Peri Peri, lemon and herb sauces. It’s nothing fancy but the service is excellent, the food is cheap and the restaurant provides an authentic Portuguese experience. No wonder Dulwich Hill is keeping it a secret. Abla specialises in Lebanese pastry. It has the greatest variety, sweetest rose syrup and most delicate pastry you’ll find in the whole of the Inner West. Among many things on the menu are, baklava drizzled in syrup, ashtar filled Damascus rose and crunchy spring rolls filled with finely ground pistachios. Do or Dye This unique salon is run by Marylee Gallo who owes her success to the combination of experience within the industry, passion and own distinctive style. Gallo has developed a fiercely loyal client base and is most popular for her incredible bridal dos. The products she uses are top quality and her prices are affordable. Welcome to coffee fitness business cakes school work dining friends life 10

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FernandEs Patisserie No ordinary patisserie, this sweets shop offers a range of authentic and traditional treats. A major drawcard to this particular patisserie is that it stays open until 8pm. So when you’re having that late night craving you can always enjoy brioche smothered in syrup, egg custard and cinnamon, almond-meal slice or sweet pumpkin delights. They are most famous for their delicious Portugese tarts but be warned, they run out quick! Gladstone Hotel This is your typical sturdy local pub, with good food, good beer and great entertainment. The new bistro offers a chargrill flavour with tantalising meats of all cuts and sizes. On Saturday nights you can enjoy live music in the garden bar and there are two-for-one frozen daiquiris from 7:30pm-8:30pm. Revive Beauty Luigis Bakery This Italian bakery is famous for its fresh daily baked bread. The bakery offers a selection of mouth-watering and unique breads, such as fresh ciabatta, polenta bread and bread rings coated in semolina. The best time to visit this bakery is in the early hours of the morning, when the smell of baking goodies fills the kitchen and spills out onto the street. This salon provides an intimate environment that offers a range of beauty services. They are known for their relaxing massages, so if you’ve had a stressful day why not head over and enjoy a hot stone massage or a Swedish massage? They specialise in skin treatment and offer spray tanning, peels and microdermabrasion. They are an award-wining salon and a popular choice for Dulwich Hill locals. Dulwich Hill back in the 1930s The Graff Caff Summerlane Kids A bright and cheerful gift shop that stocks all things kid related. The shelves are full to the brim with toys, gifts and clothing. Fashionable kids’ brands include Toshi, Seedling, Micro Scooters and more. The staff are friendly and create a welcoming environment. This café is popular among the locals for its homemade cakes, pastries, muffins and brownies, including plenty of delicious options for the gluten-free among us. The café is inspired by street art and they are always looking for local artists whom they can celebrate on their walls. Connie Dimas Jewellery Bettys Fitness and nutrition for women Every piece of Connie Dimas’ jewellery is uniquely crafted by hand. She draws influences from all across the world, collecting bits of inspiration in every country she visits. Her pieces are filled with colour and offer a range of different textures and cuts. She has a beautiful collection of necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings to choose from. Betty Concina, a professional athlete, founded this unique gym. She noticed the need for women to have their own environment in which they could feel safe and be informed within the Dulwich Hill area. This gym has a passion for helping women achieve their goals and to maintain healthy lifestyles through exercise and nutrition. Beyond being a desirable inner-Sydney suburb, Dulwich Hill has always been an area much marked by the passions of its entrepreneurial locals, especially those who were gastronomically minded. Dulwich Hill was formerly known as Wardell Hill after land-owner Dr Robert Wardell, whose flock of imported deer attracted hunting parties from across Sydney - not so different to the savvy brunchers who venture westward for Dully’s local fare today. Dulwich Hill’s foodie focus extends from a history of commercial cultivation in the area. Terrace Street is named after the farming technique introduced by the Chinese families in the 1870s when parts of Dulwich Hill were extensive market gardens. Later, Dulwich Hill’s suburban development was greatly influenced by three extremely successful businessmen who resided in the area: William Starkey, a ginger beer maker, Hugh Dixson, a tobacco manufacturer, and Henry Marcus Clark, owner of one of Sydney’s largest department stores, Marcus Clark & Co. Famously, former Prime Minister John Howard also sprung up from a local Dully business, with his father’s service station once situated on Wardell Road. Now the buzz of Dulwich Hill is testament to its rich cultural history. The lasting presence of Greek, Italian, Portuguese, Lebanese and Vietnamese communities in the area is evident in Dully’s impressive array of local restaurants. The photo above shows Dulwich Hill Village in 1936, a time when the parking was abundant but, alas, the coffee was not so glorious. Dulwich Hill has plenty of unmetered parking and is also accessible by train and bus. Catch the 423, 428, 426, 445, 412, 418 or walk from a neighbouring suburb. Now could also be the time to try the light rail! Through the Ages JEL’Z BARBER SHOP Jel’z looks like an old school barber shop with a modern interior and cool hair stylists inside. Catering to men of all ages and styles Jel’z barber shop is a cool new addition to Dulwich Hill. Having opened it’s doors in 2007, the salon gives the strip a bit “new school” style. Vinnies You know what they say; one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. This large charity store is filled with great vintage items. Once a small shop, Vinnies recently doubled in size. Row after row of shoes, stacks of belts and bags and – if you’re happy to rummage – lots of great dresses and skirts. Pick up some vintage sunglasses and know that you’re making a difference. n Words: Millie Cotes Artwork by Texas on the wall of the Graff Caff n www.facebook.com/dulwich.hill.village www.ciaomagazine.com.au 11

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in the kitchen Sweet potato gnocchi with brown butter, sage and pine nuts Method: Preheat an oven to 190C. Wrap the sweet potatoes in foil and roast until soft. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to the boil, add a pinch of salt and boil the potato cubes until very tender. Drain and set aside. Once the sweet potatoes have cooled, remove the soft flesh from the skins and combine in a bowl with the cooked potato. Using a stick blender, blitz the potatoes until smooth. Finely slice half of the sage leaves and add them to the mash along with the egg, flour and a generous pinch of salt and a grind of black pepper. Combine the ingredients to form a sticky dough. Turn the dough out onto a clean, floured surface. Dust your hands with flour and knead the dough until smooth. Divide the dough into 4 pieces and roll each into logs around an inch in diameter. Use a butter knife to cut the log into bite sized pieces. Repeat with the remaining balls of dough. Set aside the gnocchi on a We’re celebrating Fathers’ Day this issue, so it goes without saying that a little bit of amore is in order. Carbs may be out with the Paleo kids, but who really cares? After all, nothing says thank you like a bear hug and a bowl of spaghetti. Or in this case, gnocchi. Sweet potatoes, burnt butter and sage are one of life’s best combos, so this recipe is for deserving daddies only! Recipe serves 4. Something sweet for dad’s special day xx x Wine with Winsor n www.wdwineoftheweek.blogspot.com Cheap as chips Angove 2013 Long Row Merlot You can’t beat this budget range for value for money and this ‘drink now’ merlot is a very stylish wine for the price. It is soft and easy to drink with raspberry and dark cherry flavours to the fore and oak sitting unobtrusively in the background like a naughty schoolboy. This doesn’t need cellaring, or decanting: just twist the screw cap and enjoy. It’s a simple pleasure that would be great with anything from a steak sandwich to a plate of charcuterie. $10. Ingredients: 2 large sweet potatoes 2 Dutch cream potatoes, peeled and diced into 1 inch cubes 1 cup plain flour, plus extra for dusting 1 small bunch of sage leaves, leaves picked Sea salt flakes Black pepper 2 tablespoons pine nuts 50g unsalted butter Olive oil 1 lemon, cut into wedges to serve greaseproof paper-lined baking tray and place in the fridge, uncovered for at least an hour or two to dry out. In a frying pan on a medium to high heat, add a tablespoon of olive oil and pan fry the gnocchi for 2-3 minutes on each side until browned on both sides. Add the butter and allow it to foam up and start to smell nutty. Add a handful of whole sage leaves and the pine nuts and allow them to fry in the butter. Once the butter is bubbly and brown, remove the gnocchi onto serving plates. Drizzle the brown butter, pine nuts and sage leaves on top. Season with a little more salt and pepper, and serve with a lemon wedge. n Words: Melissa Leong, www.fooderati.blogspot.com Boutique benchmark 10 X Tractor 2013 Pinot Gris The quirkily named Mornington Peninsula winery Ten Minutes by Tractor produces some of the finest individual vineyard pinot noirs and chardonnays in the country, and is also home to one of best vineyard restaurants. 10X is its entry level label and this is an outstanding take on pinot gris; with waxy pear notes, hints of honey and lots of textural interest on the palate. Intense, rich, fleshy and spicy. $28. n Veg: Broccoli is the best buy of the week from $2/kg at Trim Fresh. Potatoes and spinach are also great buys but tomatoes are expensive with the change of season. Cherry and grape tomatoes should still be fine. n Fruit: Imperial mandarins will soon be gone with the end of winter but there will be Murcott mandarins to replace them at $3-6/ kg. Oranges are plentiful and delicious at $1-4/kg and there are nine varieties of apples available ranging from $3-8/kg. n www.trims.freshfoodclub.com.au At the markets Italian style La Prova 2013 Sangiovese Sam Scott is making some very impressive wines using Italian grape varieties from the Adelaide Hills and the Barossa Valley for his La Prova label. This is a blend of fruit from the two regions with a fragrant nose leading on to a palate that is at once silky soft and savoury. A very pretty wine that is extremely easy to drink and would be a terrific match with dishes like duck ragu with fettuccine. There is a Nero d’Avola in the same range that is also worth seeking out. $23. Bite-sized tomatoes won’t break the budget At home with... Enrique de nicola Enrique De Nicola and his sister moved to Sydney with a dream of sharing their family’s love of food. Now Estilo Buenos Aires is renowned for being one of the few non-Italian restaurants in the streets of Haberfield. But as Enrique reveals, Argentinian menus take the best of cooking styles from all over the world. What sets Argentinian food apart? Argentinian cuisine has a lot of Spanish and Italian influence mixed with traditional [local] food. These cultures embraced the ability to use good quality produce that the country is known for, making some basic dishes even more appealing. A great part of this is the abundance and quality of our meat, which is cooked in a special way. What are the essential ingredients of the Argentinian Parrillada? Can you make it at home? A typical parrillada (mixed grill) consists of different parts of the cow like short ribs, skirt, chinchulines (chitterlings), sweetbread, chorizos, morcillas (black sausage); you can also add chicken or other types of meats. We don’t marinate any of the meats but we have chimichurri, a combination of spices with oil that you put on the meat just before you eat it. The best way to cook a parrillada at home is either using a Webber type grill or, if possible, setting a grill up on the floor and using wood charcoal. 12 Jared Ingersoll Provides some food for thought Jared learns about food from the 1800’s... Recently, I served up a really special dinner at the Hyde Park Barracks which was a collaborative affair between a few talented historians and chefs to produce a meal that was a retrospective look at the food being served up in Sydney during the 1850’s. Fare from the 1850’s has been a very interesting thing to research as there is really quite a lot documented from around that time! What is also interesting is looking at the approach of the new settlers when it came to feeding themselves. I had always wondered why local food sources were not used widely and why today, 160 odd years later, non-Indigenous Australians know next to nothing about Indigenous foods, let alone eating them. What meal have you eaten in Australia that has left an impression? You can’t beat prawns on the barbie. Australia has some of the best seafood in the world. But I get a bad impression from the meat pies, I always wonder what’s in them! What meal will you never be able to make as well as your mum? Being from Southern Italian parents, it has to be potato croquettes and arancini. The way she made them were unique and delicious. What do you think is the most important thing to teach the next generation of Australians about food? Simple fresh food is the best, having a nice thick juicy steak with a salad and a glass of red in front of you can be most enjoyable. Also that food is not just about flavour, but sociability. Sitting at the table with family or friends for a long time chatting and joking is a really important part of life for Argentinian communities. We call it ‘sobremesa’. n Estilo Buenos Aires: 78 Ramsay Salsa Criolla This is spread over cooked meat, the same way as chimichurri is. Some people, like me, find it even better! Ingredients: 1 Red capsicum, seeded, chopped into small squares 1/2 Green capsicum, seeded, chopped into small squares ½ Yellow capsicum, seeded, chopped into  small squares 1 Brown onion, finely chopped 1 Clove garlic, finely minced 1 Tablespoon parsley, finely chopped 1 Tomato, seeded and chopped into small squares 1/2 Tablespoon oregano 1/4 Cup white vinegar 1/2 Cup vegetable or sunflower oil  Salt and pepper to taste Method: Mix all of the ingredients together and serve with barbecued meat. You can enjoy this sauce fresh but it’s better if you let the ingredients sit for a couple of hours so the flavours combine. “I had always wondered why... non-Indigenous Australians know next to nothing about Indigenous foods, let alone eating them.” Well, one really surprising thing I learnt was that Aboriginal Australian foodstuffs were in fact eaten in the 1800’s by settlers, some were regular staples on their tables. The second thing that surprised me was just how well the early settlers ate; their favourite food being pork and Aboriginal Australian meats to bulk up their meals. One colonialist described a sumptuous meal in the 1820’s in which he was served a haunch of kangaroo that, “would equal the quality of any sophisticated table!” While we might scoff at his white-man surprise today, I find it interesting that we still have a long way to go when it comes to the acceptance of eating Aboriginal Australian game meats, and Indigenous foods in general. I hope one day the use of Indigenous ingredients will become more commonplace and that Indigenous spices, fruits and meats are showcased in a broader range of restaurants. Eat well, folks! St, Haberfield

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Weekly specials, delicious produce, excellent value MarketPlace Leichhardt, Cnr Marion and Flood St Leichhardt. Located next to Aldi Tel: 9572 6886 Dried black olives $9.99kg English spinach 99cents a bunch Washed potatoes Val Verde diced tomatoes (capsicum & chilli variety) $1.99 2.5kg Lavazza coffee twin pack 2 x 250g $6.99 a tray Vittoria anchovies 80g $8.99 3 for $6 $1.99kg Sweet mandarins $9.99kg Soccer ball ham Vittoria Espressotoria Coffee Machine Father’s Day Special $29.99 $1.49 Strawberries punnet (ends September 7th) *Specials until Wednesday 3rd of September

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Praising the Patriarchs Don Readett Russell Lea n feature If Fathers’ Day cards are anything to go by, being a great Dad is all about the socks, suitcases and suppressed emotions. Thank God that ship has sailed. Meet four Inner West Dads who are part of the changing face of fatherhood, and who are certainly not afraid to talk about it. Stay-at-Home Dad Don had been working in education for forty years when he retired from teaching to fulfil his self-proclaimed title of Housewife Superstar. The former principal still takes a morning-tea break but it’s now enjoyed in the company of one of his four daughters. What were your greatest concerns about becoming a stay at home Dad? It took me about 12 months to get used to the fact I wasn’t going to work anymore. None of my daughters could drive so I was dropping them off, taking them to afternoon activities, shopping and at first I thought that, mentally, it wasn’t enough for me. I spoke to a few other dads and they made me realise how lucky I was to retire and spend all this time with my kids. What experiences do you think you wouldn’t have had if you had remained at work? Lots of really pleasant mornings with my children and a lot of time to talk. I feel like I’ve got to know my children better. While Georgia (19) was doing the HSC I felt lucky to talk about her dreams for the future and honoured that she was seeking my opinion about what she wanted to do. What have you learnt about yourself ? I am adaptable. I can turn boring things like drabby bits of driving and grocery shopping Don with his grandson, Leo Joe Zappia Stepfather Five Dock Joe was a 38-year-old bachelor when he met his long-term partner Helen and her four-year-old daughter Christine. Over the past 17 years Joe’s relationship with his stepdaughter has evolved into something between father and friend, and inspired him to have a child of his own. What is your favourite memory with Christine? It was definitely the first time I met her. Me, my partner and Christine were all going to the shops and Christine took my hand. Prior to that I had never thought about being a father, it was just not something I felt I had to do. That moment awakened my desire to become a parent. I feel like Christine and I have been emotionally attached from the start. What do you like to do together? A large part of our relationship has been sharing music, whether it is listening to CDs, playing music together or just talking about songs. It was great to show Christine (who is now 21) bands I like and sharing with her the history of older music I listen to. What advice would you give to other men who find themselves being stepfathers? You can’t be their dad and you will be different to a friend, so don’t try to fulfil a particular role or persona – just be natural. Relationships can’t be forced, the child has to be able to trust you. It’s like any other parental relationship, really, you have to be honest and consistent and win their trust. What is one thing you hope your children have learnt from you? Honesty and openness. I hope they know they can be open and honest in anything they say to me, that it won’t shock me, and that I am prepared to discuss anything. there to offer guidance. What do you hope you have taught your son? I hope I have taught him to be honest and to deal with things at face value, not to prejudge anything. And to work hard and treat everyone equally. What has helped you the most with being a single parent? Keeping up my own friendships. Hanging out with my mates has given me space for myself. It also means that now that John is older, I am not just sitting around alone. I have someone to talk to if I need it. Do you have any advice to other single fathers? Don’t be afraid and just get on with it. I wouldn’t recommend it but it’s not the end of the world. It’s a new frontier. In the end, you have to be there to provide a home base. both have interactions with people our own age. We also love cooking together and playing in the garden. Do you feel like you have made any mistakes? No, not really. Someone told me when Stella was born that you can’t break them and that they have no idea that you don’t know what you are doing. From then on my motto has been fake it till you make it. It has worked so far. Do you have a message to any couples considering becoming a two-dad family? If it is something that you really want to do, don’t let the process stop you from becoming a father. It’s hard to create a child in a same-sex relationship but the rewards are worth it. n Words: Phoebe Moloney Brett into something I enjoy. I guess I have been able to make the decision that these things are important. What is the one thing you hope you have taught your daughters? To be independent, to look at problems and solve them. I want them to know we don’t give up. If there is an obstacle to do something, you work out another way round and just do it. Single Dad Chiswick Brett and his partner divorced when his son, Texas, was 11 years of age. Now 18, Texas spends most of his time at his dad’s house. Brett sees one-on-one time with his son as the most valuable part of being a single parent. What is your favourite activity to do with your son? Well, when he was younger we used to walk around the bay and the local parks together. Later, he enjoyed the skate park. Now Texas is older he has got his own friends and is studying to finish high school, so I guess we spend more time doing our own thing. I still feel I am Ashley Scott Marrickville Two-Dad Family Man Ashley has two children: Stella (2), who lives at home with him and his partner, and Maggie (6 months), who lives with her two mums in regional Victoria. Ashley works part-time so he can spend the rest of his week with his little star. Did you have any major fears about becoming a father? That I might break the baby. That I couldn’t raise a child. That I would get bored. What is your favourite thing to do with Stella? Stella and I love going to playgroup so we can 14

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White Leaf Dentistry D-Inked Tattoo removal Wayne Black from D-Inked in Newtown has a pretty interesting job: removing regretted tattoos from the bodies of Sydney-siders. With a resurgance in the popularity of body art among InnerWesties we thought we’d chat to Wayne about the ins and outs of tattoo removal, and some of the stories behind the tats he’s successfully de-inked. What made you want to become a tattoo removalist? I saw the demographic changes occurring in the Inner West...and a lot of average tattoos around. So I thought it would be a good business opportunity going forward. What are the most common reasons people want a tattoo removed? The most common reason is that they want an ex’s name removed. Otherwise, it’s usually because they have an unfashionable tattoo, like a tramp stamp or the Southern Cross, the tattoo’s quality is below standard, or they feel they are not that person anymore. What is the best thing about your job? Meeting a lot of great people and interesting characters from the Inner West and beyond. Time to get rid of that tramp stamp? Before becoming a dentist, Dr Scott Williams was a music teacher. Now, his work at White Leaf Dentistry requires him to be both a scientist and an artist. We talk to Dr Williams about running his own practice in Haberfield, and some of the amazing mouths he has met on the job. What do you love most about your job? I am in the very fortunate position where I get to work as a dentist, business owner, a researcher, and a teacher. The great thing about having a range of things to do is that I can vary the amount of each. The other nice thing about working as a dentist is that you get to meet lots of people. I am always learning from our patients, we get to meet some very special people. Our patients never cease to amaze us. What services do you offer at the Haberfield clinic? We offer a full range of general and family dentistry, but we have a few special interests, such as Cosmetic Dentistry, Tooth Whitening, Clear Braces, Implants, Dentures, Headache and Migraine Treatment, and of course Emergencies. We like working with anxious and phobic patients and offer sleep dentistry services with a medical doctor so these patients can have their dental treatment completed while sedated. What is an important thing you have learnt looking into other people’s mouths? That you can’t separate the mouth from the body. We are forever finding evidence of sleep apnoea, reflux, and other problems in the mouth. Occasionally we find nastier things and so it is really important that everyone comes for regular check-ups. We work closely with our medical colleagues to ensure our patients are getting holistic care. How can people look after their oral health in the coming Summer months? Well, sport is one of the biggest culprits for dental trauma and Summer Sport is not far off. Our clinic makes a range of custom mouth guards to help prevent damage to the teeth and jaws whilst playing sports. These are custom designed and cost-effective, and are much more powerful at preventing trauma than over-theshelf products. What do you enjoy most about working in the Inner West? The great food, great shops, great people, and that its close to everything. Who wouldn’t like working in the Inner West!? I really enjoy hearing the stories of their tattoos and why they’re removing them. It makes every day fun. Making people’s tattoos disappear right before their eyes is also pretty satisfying. How does the removal process work? The laser energy blasts the tattoo ink into very fine fragments that are absorbed by the body’s immune system and carried away internally. An analogy I like to use is that it’s kind of works in a similar way to a bruise fading. It’s the same process, it just takes a bit longer. Removing a tattoo for good requires a few sessions every six to eight weeks. Does it hurt? Nooooo...ok...a bit. But we manage the pain professionally. Does D-inked offer any other services? No, we solely specialise in laser tattoo removal. And sometimes, attempts at humour. n Call 9550 1111 or go to www.d-inked.com. au to book a free consultation with Wayne or receive free advice about getting your tattoo removed. An example of before and after name-removal www.ciaomagazine.com.au 15

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