ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14

 

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ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14

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The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Contents 3 4 7 15 23 Chairmen’s Foreword Chief Executive’s Foreword Learn to Swim Health and Wellbeing Talent Development 39 Clubs 47 Workforce Development 53 Leadership 64 67 Key Performance Indicators Report and Financial Statements 82 Acknowledgements Cover photograph: istockphoto.com Main internal photography: SWpix.com 2 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Foreword from the chairmen ASA Group Board and ASA Sport Governing Board The ASA is responsible for providing the leadership to ensure that swimming remains the most popular sport in England. This requires management across a broad range of activities and partners and a twoBoard structure is in place to ensure this objective can be achieved. This is the first annual report reflecting this new governance structure. The Sport Governing Board (SGB) - responsible for swimming as a sport with the ASA’s members as their focus - works in partnership with the ASA Group Board which is responsible for swimming as an activity, resource allocation and commercial activities. The beating heart of our membership organisation is the clubs and their members, all tied together by the counties and regions. The SGB recognises this family and believes it is best positioned to lead and develop the process of excellence across all facets i.e. club development, volunteer support and training and talent development. Our membership numbers are increasing and there is a desire to develop grass root membership options so that every person is able to find and join a club that suits their needs. We need to encourage young members to stay in the sport and enjoy aquatics even if the desire to compete, with the associated training demands, has waned. This includes setting up different types of clubs or sessions that fall outside the traditional skill development and competitive structure. The conventional committee structure is being reviewed and instead of a ‘one size fits all’ approach, we are developing a different configuration to suit the varying requirements of each discipline. We are aiming to simplify the membership process, to allow members to manage their Foreword from the chairmen own information online whilst the expanding use of the Association website should help everyone feel more involved. The SGB also monitors the Talent programme, including the Beacon programme, and the swim21 quality programme that we aim for every club to achieve. The ASA Group Board leads on setting and ensuring the implementation of the strategy for participation, along with ensuring that sufficient resources are in place to meet the needs of the sport. The Board complies with best practice in governance terms as it comprises of a non-executive chairman and non-executive directors from business, commerce and other sports alongside members from the Sport Governing Board, plus the chief executive officer and chief financial officer. We are delighted that we have been given a further 12 months’ funding from our key funder, Sport England which shows the confidence they have in our increased participation figures. This is in addition to the four-year funding in place for the Talent programme. The coming year will bring some challenges and opportunities with a new chief executive for the ASA following David Sparkes’ transfer to solely chief executive of British Swimming. We would like to take this opportunity to thank David, on your behalf, for the huge development and transformation of the ASA under his leadership. We would also like to thank everyone involved in helping us to achieve our objectives. Without the huge volunteer workforce, committed partners from within and outside the aquatics industry, and staff, we would not be able to do so. An exciting year lies ahead and we look forward to working with you all to deliver success. The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 Edward Lord OBE JP Group Board Chris Bostock Sport Governing Board 3

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Foreword from the Chief Executive In 2013, the ASA agreed massive governance changes that brought in a two Board structure and as I write this, my last annual report foreword, the new administrative format is still settling into place. However, whatever governance structure the ASA has – either at present or in the future - it is always people who drive change and make such changes work. So as new and old friends work through their roles and focus on the needs of our sport, I certainly wish them well for the future. A keen focus in the year under review has again been to build stronger strategic partnerships with the pool operators and local authorities in order to drive more people to swim more often. And whilst still a massive challenge, the results on pool visits suggest that we are making slow but sure progress. However, we also have much more work to do in order to understand our customers, to rationalise why people do or don’t swim and then to work with our partners to ensure that their business decisions are firmly based on shared knowledge. The ASA Talent programmes have been showing significant success but the decision to remove elite funding from water polo and synchronised swimming has not been helpful, and some further changes in this area are inevitable as we readjust to this disappointing decision. I am pleased to see our work with the affiliated clubs starting to make progress and hope this focus will intensify in the future as the clubs themselves are sure to face some major local challenges. It has been a massive honour and privilege for me to lead the ASA for 20 years and I firmly believe that I leave the Association in a stronger position than when I first began my tenure as chief executive. My greatest enjoyment has been working with marvellous people both in the ASA, the voluntary sector and in our strategic partners. As I now begin to focus on my role in British Swimming, I am confident the ASA will continue to develop and show leadership in sport, and I wish you all well in driving the Association forward. David Sparkes OBE 4 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Ellie Simmonds OBE in action at the IPC World Swimming Championships in Montreal The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 5

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Having fun at a British Gas Pools 4 Schools event 6 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Learn to Swim Target: 51% of children achieving KS2 (primary school) attainment level Learn to Swim 683 British Gas ASA Learn to Swim Pathway Following the launch of the British Gas Learn to Swim Pathway in November 2012, the ASA Delivery Team has continued to support operators to implement all four frameworks to ensure a seamless pathway from birth to adult swimming provision. The Learn to Swim Framework (stages 1-7) remains the most popular section of the Pathway but the launch of the Partnership Provider Programme (PPP) has seen a much more collaborative effort with operators to implement an Aquatic Improvement Plan that supports the whole Pathway. This is reflected in our implementation figures: • Foundation Framework – pre-school (474 sites) • Learn to Swim Framework – stages 1-7 (683 sites) • Aquatic Skills Framework – stages 8-10 (470 sites) • Adult Swimming Framework – Adult (137 sites) The Learn to Swim Pathway continues to be a significant step forward for our strategy and our centres, and we remain committed to continuing to support operators to deliver effective programmes. To support this delivery, we have focused our efforts on developing resources to help implementation and improve quality. We have also developed the ASA Learn to Swim Review and refreshed our ASA Learn to Swim Accreditation Offer. Learn to Swim Review The ASA Learn to Swim Review has been developed to help operators and swimming coordinators review the effectiveness of their Learn to Swim programmes. It is based on the sound principles of the ASA Learn to Swim Accreditation Programme (formerly swim21 Learn to Swim Accreditation) but also prompts a review of commercial aspects of the programme and customer satisfaction. The review has been piloted with four operators and will be available to PPP customers in 2014. sites using the Learn to Swim Framework – Stages 1-7 Learn to Swim Accreditation/Quest Partnership The swim21 Learn to Swim and School Swimming Accreditation Process has provided a valuable benchmarking tool for learn to swim and school swimming delivery. Over 500 swim21 CD-ROM resources have been distributed and several national operators have signed up to accredit their sites. However, whilst swim21 Learn to Swim has set a clear industry standard, many operators have not wanted to commit to two different assessments, as the cost of assessments has been prohibitive. With this in mind, the ASA has reviewed its accreditation offer and we have The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 7

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worked with Sport England’s Quest programme to develop a comprehensive bolt-on module - ASA Learn to Swim Accreditation - that will be available through Quest by spring 2014. ASA Learn to Swim Accreditation will now be available in two formats: 1)  Stand-alone ASA Learn to Swim Accreditation 2)  ASA Learn to Swim Accreditation as part of Quest Facility Accreditation. Commercially, the ASA’s Learn to Swim Programme continues to be the most successful programme of its kind in British sport. However, our work has shifted towards supporting operators through the PPP programme to deliver effective learn to swim programmes. In what is a difficult financial period for many local authority pools, the ASA remains committed to providing the best resources to help operators get the most out of learn to swim - potentially a lucrative income generator. National Curriculum Swimming School swimming and water safety is a statutory element of the new Physical Education (PE) curriculum. All schools must provide swimming instruction in either Key Stage 1 or Key Stage 2. ‘Learning the Lesson - The Future of School Swimming’ is the ASA’s 2013 manifesto. It is about a belief that every child has the right to learn to swim in order to work towards a fitter, healthier and safer generation. However, the results of the largest ever school swimming census conducted by the ASA in England revealed that the statutory KS2 requirement for a child to swim 25m unaided is met by only 49% of state schools. With support from Kellogg’s and the Institute of Sport at Loughborough University, the census collected data from over 3,500 primary schools and gathered opinions from over 1,000 parents. The results show that: • 5  1% of children are unable to swim the minimum of 25m unaided • O  ne in 10 parents DO NOT take their children swimming because they are unable to swim themselves • 7  5% of parents do not know the national curriculum swimming targets • 3  9% of children are not taking any kind of swimming lesson The six point manifesto which was launched in 2012 is still a priority for the ASA, and with the announcement from the Prime Minister of an additional £15 million funding for PE and school sport, there has never been a better opportunity for schools to prioritise funding to ensure all children learn to swim at primary school. As part of the funding, the ASA is urging schools to look carefully at their swimming provision and to address the decline in the number of children learning to swim. This can be done in a variety of ways: • P  roviding additional lessons for children not achieving 25m • P  roviding additional lessons around water safety and self rescue • M  aking use of available resources that can support school swimming • S  upporting their number one resource - teachers - by upskilling them to deliver quality lessons The National Curriculum Training Programme gives school staff the knowledge to do this, and between April 2013 and March 2014, over 2,100 teachers attended such courses. Ongoing commitment by the ASA to school swimming has seen the development of a new school swimming website, new and updated resources and the redevelopment of the National Curriculum Training Programme that will provide opportunities for all school staff to attend from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 4. 8 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Learn to Swim Make a Splash has delivered 24 pool projects in some of London’s most deprived disadvantaged areas since 2009, teaching over Mobile Swimming Pools for Schools British Gas Pools 4 Schools is an innovative learn to swim programme that takes mobile swimming pools to schools across England. Delivered by the ASA and Total Swimming, the Pools 4 Schools pool is a portable teaching facility designed to accommodate a full class of children in a specially designed teaching tank. Since 2008, the British Gas Pools 4 Schools programme has taught over 40,000 people to swim in 28 locations across England, while ‘Make a Splash’ has delivered 24 pool projects in some of London’s most deprived and disadvantaged areas since 2009, teaching over 24,000 people to swim. The aim of the programme is to teach as many primary school children as possible to swim, as well as reaching out to the wider community by making the pool available for other sessions out of school hours so that the maximum number of people can benefit from having a temporary pool in the local area. British Gas Pools 4 Schools specifically targets communities with a lack of local facilities, high levels of socio-economic deprivation, high black and ethnic minority populations and barriers to swimming such as travel costs. 24,000 people to swim Case study ‘The second best day of my life – after being born’ at a school for 12 weeks. Daubeney Primary School in Hackney took advantage of the opportunity of having a temporary pool installed by Total Swimming to improve its swimming attainment rate of 23%. The majority of the children at the start of the programme were frightened of the water and unable to swim competently and confidently. As an added motivation, the 342 children at the school were set the challenge of swimming 25 metres unaided at the London Aquatics Centre just 11 weeks after their first lesson. All the children improved their skills and water confidence enough to attempt the 25 metres challenge, although not all managed to complete it unaided. Having said that, the progress made by some of the children was astounding with many non-swimmers going on to participate further. One child even stated, ‘It was the second best day of my life after being born.’ The project was so successful that the BBC’s ‘The One Show’ documented the school’s progress. Figures released by the ASA in 2013 revealed that, although swimming is a statutory element of the national curriculum, 51% of primary school children aged seven to 11 are unable to swim the length of a typical swimming pool (25 metres) unaided – the minimum national curriculum standard. School swimming is the safest and most effective way to ensure all children have the opportunity to learn this life-saving skill but many children miss the opportunity to swim due to a lack of facilities. The ASA is supporting schools to reverse this trend through the ‘Make a Splash’ programme where a temporary pool is installed The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 9

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Case study Long term development of participants Swimathon Foundation Community Grants The Swimathon Foundation Community Grants Scheme offers funding to groups and individuals who provide and promote swimming in their local community. The Foundation is passionate about encouraging everyone to participate in swimming and hopes to encourage even more people into the pool with the Community Grants Scheme. The grants are administered by British Swimming and The Swimming Trust and are awarded annually. Over 600 people participated in the 22 Swimathon projects that took place in 2013. It is hoped that the 2014 projects will continue to increase participation. Braintree Mencap Swimmers, based in Essex, were awarded £2,500 in the 2013 Swimathon Foundation Community Grants Scheme. Organised and run by the Braintree District Mencap Society, the group ensures that people with learning disabilities have the opportunity to participate in local activities including swimming. Building on funds previously received from The Swimathon Foundation, the money was spent on developing weekly swimming sessions. This included catering for more swimmers, providing a specialist swimming teacher and subsidising transport costs to and from the pool. The sessions at Bramston Sports Centre are already so popular that there is a waiting list and a rota for attendees each week to ensure that everybody is given the opportunity to swim. Braintree Mencap Swimmers are committed to the long-term development of participants. A personal programme is tailor-made and developed for each member, with goals they can work to achieve on a weekly basis. For instance, one member began with the target of letting go of the side of the pool. She is now able to swim a width with the aid of a float, and her new target is to swim a metre without a floatation aid. Rachael Luckin, Leisure and Wellbeing Officer at Braintree Mencap Society said, ‘Three of our more mature non-swimmers have actually learned to swim thanks to this project. Their confidence and self esteem has grown due to this success. Without the Swimathon grant, this project would be impossible. Secondly, the staff and teachers at Witham Pool have been great. Our members have formed a bond with all staff there and everyone is friendly, welcoming and helpful. The fact that we have been able to swim every week is so important to our members, especially those on the Asperger’s or autistic spectrum. The dedication of Braintree Mencap staff and volunteers and the use of their minibus has also been invaluable.’ 10 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Learn to Swim Case study The children learned such a lot Children from three primary schools in South East London enjoyed a welcome break from the warm weather and learned about the dangers posed by open water, thanks to a vital life-saving scheme. Raising Awareness with Get Safe Get Safe is a national water safety education programme that aims to raise awareness of the dangers of swimming in open water such as lakes, rivers, canals and the sea, and, consequently, the importance of learning to swim and water confidence. The scheme is targeted at children of primary school age, particularly Key Stage 2 (aged seven-11). The programme operates via half-day events hosted by pool providers and swim schools that link in with local schools, with resources provided by the ASA. In 2013, the ASA funded 12 Tier 1 and 400 Tier 2 sites and taught over 70,000 children how to be safe in and around water. In 2014, we are targeting 400 Tier 2 sites and hope to spread the vital water safety message to even more children and their parents. The youngsters were taught water safety skills at Charlton Lido as part of Get Safe, the educational and water safety campaign run by the ASA and one of a series of events in 2013. The day aimed to teach children about the dangers of open water, as well as emphasising that swimming is the only sport that can save your life. There was an action-packed few hours in the water with a host of fun and educational events enjoyed in the art-deco style open-air pool. On dry land, there were also a number of activities including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills, a quiz and life-saving demonstrations. Specifically, the campaign teaches children all the important things they need to know when visiting coastal and inland waters, from how they can spot the dangers themselves to how to act in an emergency. Suzanne Philpott, Aquatics Manager of GL Leisure who ran the launch, admitted she was very keen to support the ASA’s Get Safe scheme again following a successful event 12 months ago. ‘We delivered this event last year and the same three schools were really keen to come back. They had so much fun last year and the children learned so much that they were very keen when they left last year that Smiling for the camera it would be run again. The children learned such a lot. Some of the parents came down as well and said it was a fantastic opportunity for their children to learn. It’s different to the teaching environment and the kids tend to take more notice so the parents were absolutely thrilled.’ Richard Wakeford, teacher at Charlton Manor Primary School, admitted that he jumped at the chance to bring his class to the event. ‘A lot of our kids go swimming and they were keen to get involved. They are always asking if they can go to the beach or show me their swimming skills so it’s nice to have the chance to come down to events like this.’ The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 11

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h nd beac 4 ssons a 1 ming le ildren aged 7im sw e Fre e for ch ic v d a L safety POO A SE st BUDE 3 0th Augu until ept Saturdays) (exc 2,300 children involved opportunity to attend the free 40 minute session which included beach safety advice provided by RNLI lifeguards and up to 30 minutes in-water tuition with ASA teachers. Eighty eight per cent of parents watching the lessons reported learning more about how to stay safe in and around water themselves. Fifty nine per cent of parents surveyed told the ASA that they planned to change their behaviour around water as a result of the Swim Safe initiative. Specifically, parents referred to ‘only using lifeguarded beaches from now on’, ‘looking out for rip currents, rocks and waves’, ‘paying attention to tide times and safety information’ and ‘reinforcing the meanings of the flags with their children’. The 2013 programme in Bude was a great success with over www.swimmin g.org/swimsaf e Swim Safe In 2013, the ASA and the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) worked together on a beach safety initiative pilot called Swim Safe. The 2013 programme in Bude was a great success with over 2,300 children involved. In 2014, the programme will be expanding to three locations across the country. The programme offers free improver swimming lessons and beach safety advice for children aged 7-14. Most young people learn to swim in a safe and familiar indoor pool. Swim Safe gives young people the opportunity to test and improve their swimming ability in a different aquatic environment. Children were offered the 12 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Learn to Swim Case study Great success for Suffolk Norse Swimming A reorganisation of county services in 2011 saw the school swimming service transfer out of Suffolk County Council control to Suffolk Norse, a private, joint venture company, operating within Norse Commercial Services. Suffolk Norse Swimming is part of Suffolk Norse which operates a fleet of coaches and buses contracted with Suffolk County Council to provide, amongst other things, home to school transport. Currently, Suffolk Norse Swimming organises and provides swimming lessons for 222 schools. Approximately 3,500 children swim weekly with the service. Suffolk Norse Swimming provides a comprehensive, centrally organised and administered service which assists schools to meet their individual swimming targets and fulfil, at the very minimum, national curriculum requirements. It expects 80% of Year 6 children to achieve a swim of 25 metres and at least 60% to achieve its Personal Safety Award. This award requires children to: • Be confident, competent and safe in deep water • Swim 50 metres in clothes • H  ave an awareness of how to be safe when playing in and around water. To help schools meet these expectations, Suffolk Norse Swimming organises instructors, pool hire and transport, using its own coaches and buses as much as possible. It provides a progressive programme of activities involving water confidence, stroke improvement, self rescue skills, water safety, basic life-saving and other swimming related activities. It also provides a comprehensive programme of awards to challenge and motivate young children. Certificates are free to schools. • W  e challenge children to swim as far as they can by engaging them in activities related to the Swimathon. Over 2,000 children took part this year. During the spring term, children were challenged to develop their stroke technique and confidence to rest on, and swim through, the water. Putting their learning into practice at the end of the term, the average increase in distance swam, across all schools, was 103 metres. • W  e participate in Drowning Prevention Week putting the spotlight on water safety and self-rescue skills. During this week, swimming lessons focus on helping children to understand the SAFE code, learn self-rescue skills and have a go at saving others using simple reaching and throwing rescues. • W  e give children opportunities to extend their ability to swim by setting swimming challenges in open water. Under the watchful eye of trained coastguards and lifeguards, children answer questions about water safety as it relates to the conditions on the day, attempt a rescue, swim 50 metres and tread water. This provides a great opportunity for children to experience swimming in open water and compare it to swimming in pools. • A  nnually, children participate in Great East Outreach Swims. These recreate open water events with children challenged to swim circuits of the pool as many times as possible in four minutes. In 2013, over 3,200 children swam a staggering 349,492 metres, equivalent to swimming the Channel 10 times! These events take place during usual school swimming lessons and culminate in a county event for selected schools. Suffolk Norse Swimming views the national curriculum requirements as the minimum expectation for all children. To ensure that all children make progress and achieve high quality outcomes, the service offers a wide range of additional opportunities for children beyond those usually associated with school swimming: • A  pproximately 100 schools take part in annual Aquasplash festivals, providing an enjoyable introduction to competing against others. These fun competitions take place during usual school swimming lessons. In addition, all schools take part in Level 2 Sainsbury’s School Games Galas with winning schools competing annually at the County Sainsbury’s School Games Event. The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 13

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Andrew Allum (left) and Peter Gleed, 35-39yrs silver and gold medallists at the British Gas ASA Open Water Championships at Rother Valley 14 The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014

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Health and Wellbeing Target: 536,400 more people aged 14-25 swimming once a week Health and Wellbeing The ASA is committed to increasing participation within swimming, and will continue to work hard with the industry and our partners with the aim of achieving this. Eighty one per cent of leisure operators in England have a relationship with the ASA. The ASA continues to work with partners such as the Department of Health, Department for Work and Pensions, Public Health England, and the Government’s Responsibility Deal. Swimming represents the largest participation sport in England with 2.93 million people swimming at least 30 minutes a week. Therefore, the ASA is in a strong position to tackle physical inactivity. Moderate swimming of half an hour a week can lead to a reduction in treatment costs of £1.1billion to the NHS. The ASA Health Strategy ‘Taking the Plunge for a Fitter Lifestyle’ is committed to using swimming to improve the quality of life for those with health problems, and sustain good health in already active people. We know that two hours of swimming a month equates to the gain of 70 quality adjusted life years per 100,000 people. British Gas Swimfit® British Gas Swimfit® is a world leading pool workout programme. Delivered by qualified instructors and available on poolside and online, Swimfit® provides an interactive and social experience for today’s swimmer. Based on the concept of a gym programme, Swimfit® provides structure and purpose to a pool session, supported by an interactive online, social and pool customer experience. Swimmers become more motivated to do more in the pool, more motivated to return and more motivated to reach a specific goal. The result is a product that allows pool operators to attract, motivate and retain swimmers. Facilities purchase a Swimfit® package from the ASA, inclusive of Swimfit® poolside products, Swimfit® marketing collateral, training of the Swimfit® activators and ASA Aquatic Officer support. The number of participants taking part in structured Swimfit® session per week is 5,225. Over 1,000 Swimfit® activators are trained to deliver structured sessions. External marketing and promotion has enhanced the public profile and supported the structured sessions running in 227 sites across the country. The ASA Annual Report and Accounts 2013-2014 15

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