SkyLife Magazine Summer 2014

 

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SkyLife Magazine Summer 2014

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SUMMER 2014 REV THE THROTTLE ON FAMILY FUN Have a blast this summer with Adventure Buggies + TREETOP TREKKING The ultimate summer adventure IN ROOM COPY GET YOUR FREE DIGITAL COPY AT READTODAYMAG.COM VOL 1 | ISSUE 3 2012 SUMMER 2014 $19.95 ST. LAWRENCE MARKET A produce stop like no other todaymagazine.ca

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Today Magazine cover story Rev the Throttle on Family Fun l 30 Have a blast this summer with Adventure Buggies Summer 2014 Food & Drink Skyline Founder & President Gil Blutrich CEO Michael Sneyd President & COO Kevin Toth President, Skyline Vacation Club Jude Carrillo Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Skyline Resort Communities John Giffen Director of Communications/Managing Editor Kate Hillyar Contributors: Sean Cunningham, Bryan Dearsley, Kelly Holinshead, Michelle Robertson, Kevin Sebulski, Katie Thomas, Kim Kerr 30 My Magical Wine Cellar l 06 How to cultivate a wine collection Foraging, the latest trend at Deerhurst l 10 Take your tastebuds on a culinary adventure Restaurant Thievery l 14 What diners get away with The Summer of Wine l 16 Copacabana l 18 The hottest spot North of Brazil Cottage sipping with Angela Aiello recipes Grilled Stuffed Jalapeños l 23 Recipe by Anna & Michael Olson todaymagazine.ca 33 Distractions & Excursions The Ultimate Summer Adventure l 33 Treetop Trekking Publisher Rev Publishing Inc. President & CEO Daniel Pasco Sales Representatives Gail Cerrone, Dayton Davis, Madeline Dimperio, Dave Gibson, Michael Koval, David Mace, Alex Mills Editor Megan Pasche Senior Graphic Designers Tina Lanzillotta, Lacey McBane Graphic Designers Rachel Bertand, Tabitha MacDonald, Veronika Simmons IT/Web Developer Justin Soungie Contributing Writers Angela Aiello, Sandra Ozkur, Lynn Ogryzlo, Mariana Bockarova, Laura Charley, Gabrielle Tieman, Anna Olson To advertise please call 905.356.7283 or 1.877.888.2825 website todaymagazine.ca facebook.com/RevPublishingInc @revpublishing www.revpublishing.com Today Magazine Skylife is published by Rev Publishing Inc. All opinions expressed in Today Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of Today Magazine, it’s employees or owners. Reasonable care is taken to ensure that the information contained in this magazine is as up-to-date and accurate as possible, as of the time of publication, but no responsibility can be taken by Today Magazine for any errors, omissions or comments made by writers or interviewees that are contained herein. Furthermore, responsibility for any losses, damages or distress resulting from adherence to any information made available through this magazine is not the responsibility of Today Magazine. All unsolicited manuscripts and/or photographs submitted are assumed to be intended for publication or republication in whole or in part. The right to alter, edit or refuse photos and/or manuscripts intended for publication is assumed. All unsolicited material submitted to Today Magazine are submitted at the author’s risk. Manuscripts and or photographs intended to be returned must be accompanied by sufficient postage. Today Magazine does not assume any responsibility for any claims of our advertisers and reserves the right to refuse any advertising. Summer Reading l 36 A roundup of some of the hottest books on deck Summer Fun Outside the City l 38 Explore family activities at Deerhurst and Horseshoe Resorts 40 St. Lawrence Market l 40 A produce stop like no other Toronto Film Festival l 43 Celebrating Canadian art and culture Setting the Summertime Mood l 48 Movies and music to inspire the season Golfer’s Corner l 50 Getting a great fit Secret Spaces, Special Places l 52 Exciting “off-the-beaten-path” sights in Toronto Toronto Concert Listings l 54 Biggest headliners for August, September, October and November 60 Health & Beauty Swimsuit Dreams l 56 An interview with two of Toronto’s designers de rigueur How Italy Influenced an Icon l 58 The timeless style of Audrey Hepburn rehydrate this summer l 60 With Shizen Spa’s Moroccan oil treatment Skyline Corner Quintessential Canada l 62 Lakeside Lodge l 64 A look at Skyline Vacation Club’s collection A new condo opportunity on Peninsula Lake 4 64

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Gil’s Desk The summer months are one of my favourite times of the year to get outside and enjoy everything that this great province has to offer. At Skyline, we are constantly looking to expand on the activities and attractions that we offer so there’s always something new for our guests to see and do. This year has been no exception. In the past few months we’ve added the free-wheeling thrills of Adventure Buggies at Horseshoe Resort. I first test drove these amazing utility vehicles with my son last year and the smile it put on his face confirmed for me that this was an experience I just had to share with our guests (read more on page 28). If like me, spending quality time with your kids is top priority, you’ll really get a kick out of our new additions to the Adventure Park, including an inflatable obstacle course, fishing pond, gem mining and paddle boats (page 36). At Deerhurst Resort, we’ve expanded our Splash Zone and doubled our fleet of canoes, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards so it’s easier and faster for you to get out and enjoy the waterfront. If a couples’ adventure is more your speed, check out our culinary (page 10), golf (page 46) and spa features (page 58), where you’ll be sure to find some inspiration. The biggest news from Skyline is the launch of our highly anticipated Lakeside Lodge project, coming soon to Deerhurst Resort. The first truly new development at Deerhurst in over 25 years, and a rare chance to own affordable Muskoka real estate, these whole ownership units will be just steps from the waterfront and feature an owner’s lounge, games room, storage and more (see page 62 for more details). Whatever adventure you choose this summer, I hope you’ll get out and enjoy living the SkyLife! The Skyline Collection Cosm op ol itan H ot el , Tor onto 8 Colborne Street (Yonge & King) Toronto, ON M5E 1E1 1-800-958-3488 416-350-2000 cosmotoronto.com Deerhurst Resort, Muskoka 1235 Deerhurst Drive Huntsville, ON P1H 2E8 1-800-461-4393 705-789-6411 deerhurstresort.com H orseshoe Resort, Barri e 1101 Horseshoe Valley Road Barrie, ON L4M 4Y8 1-800-461-5627 705-835-2790 horseshoeresort.com Pantages H ot el Toronto C e ntr e 200 Victoria Street (Yonge & Dundas) Toronto, ON M5E 1E1 1-866-852-1777 416-362-1777 Sh izen Spa Four locations shizen.ca Port McN icol l Discov ery C e ntr e (near Midland, ON) 81 Dock Lane Port McNicoll, ON L0K 1R0 1-877-678-7678 705-534-1088 Gil Blutrich Founder Skyline Hotels & Resorts Skyline Resort Communities Email: info@skylineinvestments.com twitter.com/GilBlutrich www.skylineinvestments.com For projects under development, visit skylinecommunities.com. Skylife 5

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6 my MAGICAL wine CELLAR

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Food & drink wildfire | foraging at deerhurst | restaurant thievery | summer of wine | copacaBana | recipes I used to have these incredible dreams: I’d walk down a set of concrete stairs, and at the bottom was a massive, polished, wooden door with a large iron lock on it. I and I alone had the key to the treasures that lay within. I’d open the door and behold an endless dark, cool room filled with dusty bottles of wine stacked tall on all four walls with dim candlelight flickering all around. I have no idea what is all in there, but whenever I need or want something, the perfect bottle of wine magically appears; wine for casual evening sipping, choice vintages for mealtime entertaining, sparkling to tickle my many moods and aperitifs for late evening nightcaps. But, as always, I’d wake up, shake my head and run downstairs to the empty bowels of my own basement – alas, there is no massive polished wooden door to be found, just a small corner of mismatched wine racks and half empty cardboard cases turned on their sides. No, I don’t know what’s down there either so it’s no wonder the perfect wine doesn’t magically appear to suit my many moods. So I pull back my shoulders, straighten myself up and decide its up to me to make the first move in managing my wine cellar. It’s a daunting task because, well, wine costs a lot of money! >> Skylife 7

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“unleSS you’re a whiTe wine loVer, a GooD rule oF ThumB For SToCkinG a Cellar iS Three reDS For eVery one whiTe.” First, I’ll need some wines for aging. Many reds need anywhere from a few years to several decades to achieve their mellow, multifaceted maturity. By the time they’re ready to drink, they’re almost impossible to find and if you could, you wouldn’t be able to afford them. Besides that, when you age wines yourself they’ll probably be in better condition than most older bottles you’ll find withering away on LCBO shelves. Think about it, you’ll save money by getting good wines when they’re young, relatively inexpensive and readily available. But long term cellaring for red wines is not the only reason for a wine cellar. Most of the wine in your cellar should be for drinking, not aging, especially in your first year of enjoyment. You’ll need to stock wine for spontaneously sharing with friends, for drinking privately during quiet times, you’ll need wines to marry with foods and for those times when you’re just plain thirsty. April Kitpatrick is the Sommelier that manages the 2,500 bottle, glass wine cellar at Windows by Jamie Kennedy Restaurant at Sheraton On The Falls Hotel in Niagara Falls. April is a fickle wine drinker who admits to “dropping all the rules when a sip of a new wine has me turning cartwheels.” April is skilled at recommending wine with the restaurants different dishes but when it comes to facing her own glass of wine, “if you like a wine and you like a dish and it breaks all the rules together, I say go for it – chances are you’ll love them together. And if in the slight chance you don’t like them together, well, tomorrow is another day.” There is definitely a different wine for every occasion in April’s wine cellar. She talks of the way Sauvignon Blancs play on the palate for summertime drinking and how well it goes with lighter styled seasonal dishes. A thick, juicy, barbecued T-Bone steak has her excited about a medium Syrah or rich Cabernet. As the summer winds down April’s thoughts run to Pinot Noir and for hearty winter drinking when braised meats and heavier dishes find their way onto the menu, April begins to uncork bottles of full bodied Hermitage. Throughout spring and summer April delights in every kind of rosé, “A few bottles of both still and sparkling will go great with asparagus dishes, a thick pork chop or anything rhubarb and it’s fun, like the season.” When it comes to sparkling wine April has a long list, “you can never go wrong with sparkling. It’s light, refreshing and a great company greeter It starts things off right and if it happens to last into dinner, serve a salad first. The CO2 bubbles are bitter and take the edge off a vinaigrette salad. Rare to find a wine that stands up to a salad.” Late Harvest Riesling is April’s favourite dessert wine. “There are so many great examples from Niagara and around the world that you really can’t go wrong. It’s great value, elegant and not over the top sweet.” If you’re building your own wine cellar, consider stocking drinkable reds such as a few juicy black cherry, chocolatey flavoured Syrahs for barbecue season or perhaps a full, baked berry Italian Barbera for roasted savoury meats. You’ll need a few crisp Niagara Rosés for refreshing summertime sipping; full bodied, creamy French Chablis or searing New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc’s for dining excitement; Italian Prosecco wines for drinking whenever the mood strikes and Champagne for decadent moments. Never forget to stock a few dessert wines to make the end of a meal spectacular or fortified wines for hearty winter sipping and of course, don’t overlook half bottles and magnums. You’ll find magnums age more slowly and, many would say, more evenly. Also, serving a magnum at a dinner party makes the event much more special and festive. To keep your cellar growing you should set a monthly budget for wine purchases and stick to it. Plan your monthly purchases in two groups. About three-quarters of the wine budget should be for everyday drinking and the rest for those wines that need to be aged. Label the bottles you’re going to lie down with an approximate date for drinking. This will help with selecting a bottle of wine further down the road. It’s best to never stock more than two years supply of white wines, except perhaps for some Chardonnays and sweet dessert wines. Unless you’re a white wine lover, a good rule of thumb for stocking a cellar is three reds for every one white. When you’re selecting any wine, whether it’s for every day drinking or aging, be discriminating. If you’ve never tasted a wine, don’t be swayed by a wine that was rated high in a magazine or a medal winning wine, a wine that technically goes well with your favourite food and never buy a whole case of wine because it’s a bargain. The one and only hard and fast rule for stocking your cellar should be to taste, taste and taste before you buy. As you get into wine drinking and wine collecting, your tastes will change and evolve with experience and confidence. Make sure your cellar has room for new discoveries, new regions and new styles of wine and don’t stock your cellar too heavily in any particular region. Learn as much as you can about wines and your own personal preferences by attending tastings and take notes. Don’t forget to replace bottles, adding to your cellar as wines are consumed. Well, my incredible dream has become a reality since my wine cellar is now in order and I can look forward to many pleasurable surprises and mood satisfying sips. Recently I served a 20-year Borgogna Barolo and it was perfectly aged; luscious and velvet, we swooned over every sip. I served it with a savoury Piedmontese eggplant Timbalo. A marriage made in heaven! I checked my wine notes and found I bought it over a decade ago for only $45.00. I wonder how much it would retail for today, if I could even find it! And here it was sleeping in my very own magical wine cellar. 8

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Wildfire Steakhouse Cosmopolitan Hotel Toronto welcomes trendy new restaurant | By: Bryan Dearsley G uests at Toronto’s Cosmopolitan Hotel – and food fans across this great city, for that matter – have a lot to thank restaurateur Jody Ness for. Not only has Ness opened up his second Wildfire Steakhouse & Wine Bar in the very heart of the city, at the Cosmopolitan on Colborne Street just seconds away from Yonge Street and Toronto’s financial and tourist districts, but he’s brought with him the same superb recipes and flavours the North York original has become famous for. “It’s very much urban chic,” says Ness of the new location superb décor. “It adds to the whole experience for our guests, and truly does compliment the food we serve. We ’re thrilled to share everything we’ve created in North York in this excellent new Cosmo location.” To ensure a smooth transition, Chef Josh Lauder heads the Cosmopolitan team after 12 years at the North York restaurant, bringing with him a flare that definitely sets Wildfire apart from traditional steakhouses. “We’re very careful to ensure nothing but the best quality produce is served,” says Chef Lauder. “All our meat is prepared in house, as are all our seasonings. It adds a very unique flavour to the steak and fish dishes we specialize in.” And after sampling Wildfire’s menu, it’s easy to see that Lauder truly does possess a passion for the meals he and his team produce. Favourite starters included a superb roasted zucchini soup, escargot Provencal, and the table’s top-pick, the calamari, served in a warm tomato salsa with capers, black olives, red onions and a salsa verde. “You won’t find calamari like this anywhere else in Toron- to,” boasts Lauder, and rightfully so. “Most restaurants tend to overcook it so it’s chewy. It should be soft and succulent, almost melting in the mouth.” It’s this attention to detail that truly sets Lauder’s dishes apart. Take the entrées. While the guys went for the New York Striploin and the superb Filet Mignon, both served with garlic mashed potatoes and seasonal (and well seasoned) vegetables, the ladies in our party were a little bolder. Their preferences extended to the tenderloin fettuccine, served with wild mushrooms, asparagus, creamy chipotle sauce and grana padano (one of Italy’s most popular cheeses); and the piri piri half chicken churrasco, served with rosemary roasted new potatoes and seasonal vegetables (and, it so happens, Chef Lauder’s personal favourite). And if that wasn’t enough to fill you (we had enough to take home!), there’s the superb desserts, all prepared in house by Chef Lauder and his team. Topping the list for chocolate fans was the decadent chocolate torte, while the crème brulee made with Madagascar vanilla beans went down a treat, too (both dishes are gluten free). Other highlights of this superb new location include a huge inventory of wines, a superb private dining room, and a variety of unique events designed to provide new guests with a taste for Wildfire, all the while appealing to existing fans. These include special cocktail hours from Monday-Friday (4pm-7pm) where wines, martinis and tapas are offered at just $7 a pop; and participation in the excellent Summerlicious program, a Toronto-wide culinary celebration offering lunches for just $25 and dinners for $45. *Some conditions apply. Based on availability

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Take your TaSTe BuDS on a Culinary aDVenTure... In your own backyard BY: KATIe THOMAS T hink back to your childhood, to finding blueberries roadside or picking raspberries or fresh tomatoes in your backyard. There’s nothing better than the taste of something you’ve picked. We all know the benefits of organic and local produce but what about items you find or grow yourself? Foraging is the next biggest culinary trend and while it’s hard to grow enough to meet the demand of a busy restaurant, many chefs choose to keep a few items on tap in their personal gardens. Foraging isn’t a new way of thinking in the culinary world; restaurants have been working with 100-mile menus, locally sourced and organic ingredients for a few years now. Increasingly chefs put aside space for a place to grow herbs and certain vegetables. In fact, there are a handful of restaurants in Toronto that focus on foraged ingredients: Yours Truly, an Asian-inflected prix fixe restaurant; Ursa, a modern Canadian Queen West spot; and edulis, a quaint mom-and-pop shop. But what about further afield? Deerhurst Resort has had a long tradition of locally sourcing ingredients as a founding Savour Muskoka member. executive Chef David Bakker and his culinary team make every effort to source out ingredients locally. For several years, Deerhurst has had a proud tradition of growing fresh herbs and producing its own maple syrup and honey. Not only does the kitchen use these items on a daily basis but they’re made avail- able for sale in the General Store. “Seasonally we see a lot of different vegetables from our local partners,” says Rory Golden, Director of Food and Beverage. “We try to incorporate fresh, local ingredients wherever possible, it’s really important for us to establish relationships with local suppliers so that we can work to bring their products to the table.” For over 20 years the sugar shack at Deerhurst Resort has been tapping the surrounding forests to produce maple syrup. With more than 2,000 taps, the sugar shack produces around 2,000 liters of the golden stuff a season. Besides selling it in the retail store, Deerhurst’s maple syrup is used in a variety of dishes in the four on-site restaurants plus some specialty items such as the Deerhurst Maple Collection of jams available in the General Store. Besides the seasonal Savour Muskoka menus, Chef David Bakker tries to incorporate items from the property as much as possible. Having grown up on a small pig farm, it’s a vision Chef can get behind. “It’s a unique challenge we face at Deerhurst, trying to keep up with volume but still using local products,” says Chef David. “We have to have a large quantity of items available to meet the demand and volume we see in our outlets, but before we place orders we always source locally first. We have a duty to support our local farmers and suppliers.” Some of the dishes that best exemplify Deerhurst’s commitment to locally sourced ingredients include: Deerhurst house smoked salmon which, aside from the salmon, is an entirely local dish featuring pickled beets and Deerhurst maple mustard; the Milford Bay smoked trout salad (a Savour Muskoka dish) is 100 per cent locally sourced featuring candied pecans, smoked trout from nearby Milford Bay and a buttermilk maple dressing. In fact, 40 per cent of the eclipse Restaurant menu items are dishes that are locally sourced. “Besides sourcing local ingredients we also forage on property for several seasonal items such as wild leeks and shitake mushrooms,” says Golden. “We’re well known for our dedication to keeping our dishes local and because of this we see a lot of support in the community. It’s really great to see it come full circle.” Skyline Hotels & Resorts makes it a priority to locally source ingredients and grow items on site wherever possible. “Sustainability is a concern for many of our guests,” says Kevin Toth, President & C.O.O of Skyline Hotels & Resorts. “We encourage our properties to find ways across the board to promote initiatives that help us to reduce our footprint, this includes chefs gardens and locally sourced products.” For more information on menus and Deerhurst Resort outlets or to make a reservation please visit deerhurstresort.com. For more information on the Savour Muskoka program visit savourmuskoka.ca. 10

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W gr hy n loc ab ot al som de e als www.grabjab.com

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BUFFALO NIAGARA e Nearest Faraway Place A T R AV E L E R R E V I E W “Just GO – it was brilliant!!!” Reviewed by acrossthepond1, a TripAdvisor traveler » Toronto » August 23, 2013 ALBRIGHT KNOX ART GALLERY “If you did not know you were in Bu alo you would only expect this level of quality in New York, London or Paris. Just blew us away with the variety.”

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Dear Canadians, You’ve tailgated at the Ralph. Caught a flight, found a bargain, been to a game and returned home the same day. You’ve been here, done that. But do you really know Buffalo? Have you seen a Broadway show at Shea’s? Tried the beef-on-weck sushi at Seabar? Quaffed a craft brew at Cole’s? Toured a Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece? Walked and gawked and windowshopped in the Elmwood Village? Caught an alt-country show at an opening at the Burchfield Penney? Segwayed through Delaware Park? Stopped to smell BIFF HENRICH Sportsmen’s Tavern? Been to the flowers at Garden Walk? Taken the kids to the Buffalo Zoo? Had an artisanal cocktail at Vera? Been to a classical concert at Kleinhans? KC KRATT Kayaked through Elevator Alley? Gone to a food truck rodeo at Larkin Square? Tried your luck at the Seneca Buffalo Creek Casino? No? en what are you waiting for? at’s 15 things e nearest faraway you didn’t know about Buffalo Niagara. Pop over the Peace Bridge and see for yourself. place is just a short drive away. Sincerely, Bu alo Niagara RHEA ANNA VISITBUFFALONIAGARA.COM

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iS ThaT an espresso Cup in your PanTS? The World of Restaurant Thievery When I started writing this story I asked almost everyone I met if cocktails. Less brazen was when Dunbar was forced to switch from they’d ever taken anything from a restaurant. You know, a napkin, a “cutting my own steaks to pre-cut so inventory could be more exact,” glass or packets of soy sauce. Almost unanimously the answer was, and he started buying $30 knock-o Peugeot pepper mills because “the real-McCoy” kept disappearing, “At $150 a pepper mill it got “yes, I took…” Restaurant thievery as it turns out, comes with a lifetime of pretty expensive.” But Dunbar says, “Employees who steal, bad tippers and people boasting and bragging rights that are not at all di cult to pry out of thieves. Take David Dunbar for example. His life of crime began that walk out on a bill are the most deplorable people.” His justifia few decades ago when he started taking spoons from restaurants. cation for his thievery is simple: “I always over tip, so I think it all kind of works out.” All over the world, wherever he dined, he pocketed a small Spoons, menus, cutting boards, salt and pepper spoon. Today, David has a large jar in his kitchen shakers – it doesn’t matter. Diners will take full of memories and stories all in the form of just about anything from bars and restaudi erent spoons. He looks at his collection of rants that isn’t nailed down. The problem hundreds of spoons and he talks with great is so rampant that The Waldorf Astoria satisfaction about a country, the food he in New York City launched an amnesty ate, the people around the table and the program – no questions asked. In the experience. past year they’ve received hundreds of David, a chef himself covets an ornatepilfered items each one with a di erent ly tattooed, black handled spoon. “When story of a special moment in time. So I’m working I like to use this spoon, but taken aback with the returns, the WalI have to watch it closely. I know somedorf is planning to erect glass cases in one will pinch it.” Ok readers I know what their lobby dedicated to those who loved you’re thinking, a spoon thief worried his o l z their time at the Waldorf so much, they all stolen spoon will get pinched - that’s rich. B y Lyn n O g r y wanted a piece of it. David’s name has been changed to proRestaurant thieves I spoke to say they assume tect his identity, as with others mentioned in the items they took didn’t cost a lot, or that the busithis story, but restaurant thievery it seems, is quite nesses have plenty of replacements. Some justify their actions by common. David denies any guilt for his actions, instead he ranks spoon theft low on the scale of bad etiquette and culin- saying they’ve spent plenty of money at the place over the years. ary crimes. “There are bigger fish to fry,” claims Dunbar who And for things like glassware, many think bars get all that stu free from distributors anyway, though that is rarely the case. once hired undercover watchers to masquerade as customers I ran into Dorothy Davis who wouldn’t commit to stealing from in his restaurant. “At $600 to $1,000 a weekend, it was really a restaurant but has experienced it first hand. Dorothy and a group expensive.” What he caught was an employee bringing cheap bottles of vod- of colleagues spent an evening at a company banquet celebrating ka into his restaurant and pocketing the money he made from $12 an annual event. One of the girls, Betty Birthwaite had too much 14

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to drink so at the end of the evening Dorothy decided to help Betty shows me two of her pilfered little baskets. So how has this a ected home. When she opened her purse to retrieve the coat check ticket, the restaurant? You can now purchase the little fryer baskets if you to her horror Dorothy discovered an entire table setting complete want one and just in case, they’ve installed 17 new security cameras with silverware taken from the banquet hall. Dorothy looked the throughout the restaurant. Fueled by some combination of thrill, sentimentalism and alcohol, other way that evening, but the following year when the same event people who wouldn’t dream of taking a pack of gum from the cortook place, Dorothy made sure Betty’s place setting was made up of ner store have no qualms about sticking an espresso cup in their a paper plate, plastic glass and plastic cutlery. pants. In fact, I met another chef who collected little espresso All joking aside, for as long as restaurants have been open cups while eating his way through Rome last year. He’s proud for business, customers have walked o with things. Take of his collection. For some reason, many otherwise-law-abidnapkins for example – many do. Celebrity chef, Jamie Oliing citizens don’t consider stealing from bars and restaurants ver claims that 30,000 of his monogrammed, cloth napkins to be stealing at all. And unlike in retail stores, where there go missing every month. Another celebrity chef Terence are price tags on items, diners don’t always think about how Conran supposedly lost 1,000 ashtrays in the same time the costs of their impulse grabs add up for restaurants. period at his restaurant. So who pays? “Restaurant theft definitely has an impact on Jennifer Johnston and a group of colleagues travelled to (menu) prices,” explains Jamie Rilett, Vice President of the Ontario Boston for a conference. The group was dining at an Italian resdivision of Restaurants Canada. Jamie, whose name has not been taurant one evening when, “it involved a lot of drinks and daring,” changed says branded or unique restaurant items are commonly says Jennifer. They were leaving when they noticed the entire stolen. Depending on the restaurant and level of theft, in an induslobby was decorated with Italian foods, giant tins of peppers, totry where profit margins are so thin and anti theft measures and mato sauce and olive oil among hanging prosciutto, garlic and security procedures are high, “it means everyone is paying for it in cheese. One of Jennifer’s colleagues picked up a tin and to their their restaurant bill.” surprise it wasn’t a display tin at all but a full tin of roasted pepPeople who pinch from restaurants must know that a pers. “I had the biggest purse so that’s where it went. I brought higher cost of doing business is great incentive for restaurait home, right through customs,” says an astonished Jennifer. teurs to take matters into their own hands. Like the A & W Once back in Canada, Jennifer made an asparagus and roasted that installed 17 additional security cameras, all restaurants pepper salad and brought it into work so all responsible could have their own security policies that range from looking the share in the profits of their crime spree. other way to calling the police. But at the end of the day Jamie Most of these restaurant crimes are technically shoplifting says, “restaurants are in the business of making people feel weland punishable by law. “I would never be able to legitimately shoplift. I think my conscience just wouldn’t let me do it. I would come and chaining silverware to the table is not a welcoming feel.” So restaurant thieves, you’re not only paying for the item you stole feel terrible,” says 23-year-old Sally Snow, who stole a few mini deep fryer baskets from the A & W restaurant on Montrose Road through higher prices, but for everyone else’s impulse of crime as well. in Niagara Falls. “They served their fries in them. “I thought they’d “In the end, it would be cheaper for customers to just buy what they really come in handy for paper clips and hair clips.” She proudly want,” laments David Dunbar. “But where’s the thrill in that!” Skylife 15

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