Beach Metro Community News - April 29, 2014

 

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Beach Metro Community News - April 29, 2014

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A NON-PROFIT COMMUNITY RESOURCE SINCE 1972, FUNDED BY OUR ADVERTISERS, DISTRIBUTED FREE BY YOUR NEIGHBOURS Volume 43 No. 5 April 29, 2014 Toronto East General launches expansion By Andrew Hudson PHOTOS: ANDREW HUDSON What a difference a week makes At top, skateboarder Harrison Robinson ollies in Kew Gardens on April 24. It was a sunny, 13°C day that seemed to jump a whole season ahead from the wintry scene just 10 days earlier, above, when the Beach was hit by what many hope was the last snowfall of the season. WHEN TORONTO East General opens a new tower in 2020, patients will find more private beds, better clinics and diagnostic facilities, a less congested entrance off Sammon Avenue, and two levels of underground parking. Rising eight stories on what is now a parking lot at Sammon and Coxwell, the tower is the core of a $300 million renovation. It will replace two outdated wings, built in 1944, that are scheduled for demolition next year. Engineers began test drilling the site a few weeks ago, but full construction won’t begin until late 2016. “It doesn’t happen overnight,” says hospital CEO Rob Devitt, who stood under the engineers’ giant auger aalongside Ontario health minister Deb Matthews on April 16. Devitt and Matthews spoke to a crowd of students from the neighbouring RH McGregor Elementary School, who yelled and waved flags every time either one said the word “hospital.” “For those of you in Grade 1, we’ll be cutting the ribbon when you’re in Grade 7,” Devitt said. “It takes that amount of time because it’s such a big building, and it has to be built carefully so it’s the highest quality building that we can have.” Devitt told reporters the hospital will have about the same number of beds after the renovation, but it will be able to take in more patients because nearly three-quarters of the 218 new beds will be in private rooms. Many beds go empty in the hospital’s current layout, Devitt explained, because shared rooms often have to be restricted to just one patient to control infection. Overnight patients will stay in the tower’s six upper floors, including those undergoing surgery and rehabilitation, cardiac or mental health care. Day patients will find many of the hospital’s busiest clinics grouped in the tower’s first and second floors. These include the arthritis and endocrine clinics, as well as clinics for gestational diabetes, hand and plastics, EEG testing, neurology, general surgery, and medical education. Devitt said the hospital will actually use less of its property when the tower goes up, allowing for better traffic flow and more green space on the grounds. The main entrance will move from busy Coxwell to Sammon Avenue, with a deeper, U-shaped roadway for drop-offs and a taxi stand. And by 2023, a planted courtyard will open along the hospital’s west side. Minister Matthews noted that the province has invested $28 million at TEGH since 2007, including a $10 million expansion of its ER and clinics for haematology and oncology. A hospital spokesperson said no construction contracts have been awarded yet, but many are expected this year. She noted that nearby residents may see workers going in and out of the old wings wearing protective gear, given that the 1944 buildings likely contain asbestos. After the speeches, AMEC engineer Michael Salter stayed by the drill rig to take questions from Grade 1 and 2 students from RH McGregor while their older schoolmates went inside to hear about unconventional careers in healthcare. Salter showed the students the “spoon” attachment used to draw up soil samples, and explained why engineers have to test the soil and groundwater below the site of a big building like the TEGH tower. “Are there any sharks, piranhas, or squids in the water?” asked one girl in Grade 2. No, Salter reported, so far the site seems free of aquatic creatures. INSIDE Studio Tour: 20 colourful years ...See Pages 14-15 PLUS Police Beat.....................5 Deja Views.....................8 Community Calendar.....10 BMN’s Neighbourhood...11 Food and Drink.............12 Pet of the Month............12 Where Are They Now?....17 Garden Views...............20 Write on Health............20 Beach Memories...........21 School Daze..................21 The NEW LISTINGS! Ambience Abounds in this unique home o ering two main oor replaces, formal living room, dining room , eat-in kitchen and family room with walk out to natural garden. Three bedrooms, two washrooms, nished basement, all with two car parking and just a hop, skip and a jump to Courcelette School. It's Home Sweet Home! *****Not all properties may be listed on mls at the time of publication***** Please visit jillindagreene.com for photos, or call Jillinda at 416-230-3849 for more details CAPE COD CUTIE! $869,000 Signature Service Team JILLINDA GREENE SALES REPRESENTATIVE TAYLOR G REENE 416.230.3849 SALES REPRESENTATIVE Five bedroom newer construction o ering attention to detail and proportionately equal bedrooms for the kids, big space for mom and dad with a full ensuite bath. Walk out from the family room basement to a maintenance free entertainers delight. LARGE FAMILIES SHOULD SEE THIS! $1,189,000 647.281.5411 A Surprisingly large main oor, great for entertaining or raising a brood of kids. 27 x 150 Lot. Private parking for two cars. Four Bedrooms and two front porches/decks overlooking the streetscape...all steps to the Boardwalk. VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN ALL WRAPPED UP IN COMFORT! SOUTH OF QUEEN! $1,099,000

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2 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 FIRE ON THE BEACH Tempting dinner is served • Screens • Tool sets • Cleaners • Wood • Gas • Electric Aleah Persaud, a Grade 10 student in the culinary program at Danforth Collegiate, serves fruit tarts, shortbreads and other desserts to seniors at the annual Temptations night held at Greenwood Towers, just across the street from the high school. With a live auction, raffle draw, and music by Scarborough’s GWood band, the April 3 fundraiser supported Toronto International Partnerships in Community. Founded in 1983, TIGP brings together children, youth, and seniors to make friends of all ages and to share skills such as reading, gardening, and using computers. PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON 1828 Queen Street East (2 blocks west of Woodbine) PROUDLY CANADIAN The Beach Ki ng sto nR d 416-698-3473 www.classicfireplace.ca Queen St Woodbine Ave N Construction season opens on Danforth By Yasmin Soul THE EAST end of the Danforth from Woodbine to Victoria Park will be under construction for most of the summer. The City of Toronto will be replacing sections of water main, the road and sidewalks, as well as sprucing up the streetscape with flowers and benches. The hope is to bring more traffic to the area and increase local business. Ward 31 councillor Janet Davis said residents want to see a more vibrant and walkable public space. “It will improve and beautify this part of the Danforth. It is very exciting to see that East Danforth is going to have as beautiful a streetscape as other parts of Bloor and Danforth,” she said. Davis said there is a mutual benefit for both businesses and local residents. “We all know that successful business districts are those that have neighbourhoods that support their local businesses. Making the public realm accessible and beautiful with trees and shade attracts and encourages residents to come down and shop locally.” Susan Samuel is a project engineer manager with transportation services. “Basically at the end of the day we will have a brand new road from Woodbine to Barrington. There will be a new line painted and the sidewalk will also be brand new except certain sections,” she said. She explained that even though construction might not always be visible, underground work can take time. Water mains must be disinfected and chlorinated when replaced. Pipes are pumped with water and then tested. This process has to be repeated until the water is deemed safe to drink. Samuel said the work should start in June and is planned to be completed PHOTO: YASMIN SOUL Ward 31 councillor Janet Davis, left, speaks with East End residents Meg De Bassecourt, centre, and Orla Kipling at a recent open house dealing with construction planned for Danforth Avenue between Woodbine and Victoria Park. by August. Some work will be done in stages as water mains, then sewers, and finally sidewalks are replaced. Funding for the project comes from the transportation and water departments’ capital budgets, as well as from the Danforth Mosaic and Danforth Village Business Improvement Areas. Work will take place between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Some Sunday work will be done as required. Although construction can be frustrating, some local residents are enthusiastic about the new look coming to their neighbourhood. Orla Kipling said she is excited to see the changes to the Danforth. “I think it will be really pedestrianfriendly and very pretty and shady,” she said. “It will no longer be a sauna when walking to stores. I think it will be really nice.” Meg De Bassecourt, who also attended an April 16 open house to discuss the project, was positive about what she saw. She believes the new look to the street will encourage new businesses to come in but it will also make it more family friendly. “You will want to go out with your family and shop locally. I walk that strip all the time and after Main it gets really scary as you go east. It is not an amazing stretch so, it will be nice to go for a walk and not feel like I need to keep my children both in the stroller,” she said. “It would be great to have a place you want to linger and spend your time as oppose to rushing to Target and not stopping anywhere else.” The road will at no point be completely closed off, and shops will remain open throughout construction. The next ad deadline is Monday, May 5 at 5 p.m. Call Paris at 416-698-1164 x 26 or email paris@beachmetro.com to book your ad now

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 3 Paralympian’s story inspires Balmy Beach students By Andrew Hudson WHEN PARALYMPIAN Jeff Tiessen arrived at Balmy Beach Public School to give a speech for Spirit Day, he found the gym full of kids wearing white and blue – it was also the Blue Jays’ home opener. Never mind that he grew up near Detroit and cheers for the Tigers, Tiessen is a big baseball fan. As a double-arm amputee, people have asked him what he would do if he could get his hands back, just for one day. “I would play baseball, maybe all day,” he said. “And I would feel the stitches on the ball.” Being able to pack a snowball would be nice too, he said, adding that he owes his kids some payback after the super snowy winter this year. Another question Tiessen gets is whether he would get transplants if he could. His answer is yes, so long as he can keep all the good things that have happened because he’s an amputee. After joining amateur and university track teams in his teens and twenties, Tiessen competed in three Paralympic Games: New York, Seoul and Barcelona. He won silver in high jump, plus a bronze and a gold in his best event – the 400 metre. His 54.89-second run at the 1988 Seoul Games remains the fastest ever for a double-arm amputee. Back when Tiessen was putting in six- and seven-hour training days for Seoul, he was also taking journalism classes at the University of Windsor – a move that led to the Disability Today Network, a magazine and book publishing company Tiessen founded at 26. Two decades later, Disability Today is going strong, as is Blaze, the kids’ horse-riding magazine that Tiessen started in 2003 after he and his wife began riding horses at their home near Smithville, Ontario. Speaking to students at Balmy Beach, where his niece goes to school, Tiessen said it’s the challenges he’s met that define him, and not his disability. “I’m not Jeff the guy who can’t bowl, or Jeff the guy who can’t paddle a canoe,” he said. “All the things that I can’t do – that’s not who I am.” Tiessen credits his parents for teaching him to strive even when the odds are long. They had already seen their son recover from a nearly fatal accident. Tiessen was 11 years old when he jumped a blown-down fence around a hydro building and got shocked by 27,000 volts of electricity. It took a long time before Tiessen learned to use his prosthetic arms and “hands” – a pair of split hooks he can open and close by rolling his shoulders. Once he had that down, his father pushed him a step further. He built him a special hockey stick, and signed him up for a regular minor-league team. “It was probably one of the best decisions he ever made for me, but I was really against it,” Tiessen said. He couldn’t tie his own skates or play like he used to, but even after he switched to track and soccer, playing hockey again taught him he could do just about anything if he kept at it. Tiessen brought that attitude to publishing, too. The first disability magazine he got involved with failed after financial problems with his business partner resulted in the loss of the founding money. Rather than fold, Tiessen struck out on his own, and he surprised some people by making Disability Today a for-profit business that, as he says, aims to do good, but also to do well. “That’s been a challenge in the disability community, because there is that underlying pretence that it’s all about charity,” he said. “I don’t believe that. Obviously, I have a disability and can run a business, and so can others.” As a journalist and Paralympian, Tiessen has watched the audience, sponsors, gear, and media coverage of the Paralympic Games grow exponentially from what it was when he ran in the late eighties and early nineties. “The representation has changed,” he said. “They’re not covering those legs up anymore with what looks like a calf and a cosmetic foot.” “There is a pride in their uniqueness, and their difference. It makes a tremendous statement about how comfortable they are with their situation, and I think that extends to the able-bodied community.” Bringing fruit trees to the Beach By Andrew Hudson Easter fun in the sun at parade A ban on politicians marching didn’t keep thousands of Torontonians from converging on Queen Street East for the annual Beaches Lions Easter Parade on April 20. Under sunny skies, children decked out in Easter bonnets or bunny ears held out bags and baskets to collect goodies, left, while a number of floats and marching bands, including the Malvern Collegiate band, above, provided a soundtrack for the annual Beach tradition. PHOTOS: JON MULDOON HE DIDN’T plant paw paws or goji berries, but Johnny Appleseed would certainly tip his hat to Treemobile, a volunteer group that delivers low-cost fruit trees across Toronto. Working last Saturday outside St. Saviour’s, an Anglican church in the Upper Beach, Treemobile volunteers sorted 16 types of fruit tree and a dozen types of fruit- or nut-bearing shrub that buyers had ordered online. Most of the trees and some rarer shrubs cost about $40, while asparagus crowns were five for a dollar. Delivery fees range from $1 to $10, depending whether buyers want their order dropped off or planted for them. “In Toronto, lots of people don’t own a shovel,” said Treemobile founder Virginie Gysel, laughing. Toronto is built on some of Ontario’s best farmland, said Gysel. Especially when climate change is such a concern, she said the idea is to grow your apples, pears, and plums right here, where they won’t clock any air miles. Homegrown fruit often tastes better, too, she added. “What orchardists want is stuff that’s hard as a rock, that all ripens at the same time, and they’re not really too concerned with taste,” she said. “What we want is delicious fruit with nice texture and scent, and it doesn’t have to ripen all at once.” A landscape architect who grew up on a tree farm, Gysel started Treemobile four years ago when she was a student at the University of Guelph. At the time, she was writing a thesis about all the farmland Canada is losing to its growing cities – an area the size of about three PEIs, according to a Statistics Canada report that looked at urban growth from 1971 to 2001. Gysel joined protests calling for a more sustainable approach, but she said she soon felt like taking more concrete action. “You just get tired of being against things,” she said, smiling. In its first two years, Treemobile sold 150 and then 250 plants. That number shot up to 1,000 in year three, when they launched an online store. Gysel said she wanted to start small when Treemobile branched into Toronto this spring. For one thing, she is still coordinating the Guelph chapter from her Beach-area home, and she has a big wedding coming up – her own. Still, Gysel found time and a supportive minister at St. Saviour’s church to plant something entirely new. Along with delivering this year’s orders, which are now sold out, the Treemobile volunteers started turning sod last weekend for what will one day be a kind of public orchard on either side of St. Saviour’s along Swanwick and Kimberley Avenues. Besides apple, pear, and other fruit trees planted two by two, Gysel planned a border bush of blue Haskap berries, even a row of persimmons. “This is a perfect spot,” she said, pointing out to the rising ground along the church’s south side. “It’s not at the bottom of a hill, you’re getting heat reflected from the church, and sun most of the days.” “In a few years, when they start to do things, people will sit here under the apple trees,” she said. “It will be quite novel.” Full line Benjamin Moore Paint COOK’S PAINT & WALLPAPER Mon-Wed 8:30-7 | Thurs & Fri 8:30-8 | Sat 9-6 | Sun Closed Free local delivery In-home colour consultation available Personal service Since 1949 • More Than Just a Paint Store 2672 Danforth Ave. (across from Canadian Tire) 416-699-2669

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4 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 Help us Put Abuse Out of Commission! Visit a garage sale near you on 13 Saturday, May 10 12 11 10 1 2 7 5 6 4 8 3 9 Shubhô Nôbôbôrshô! 1. 98 Woodington Ave. 8:00-1:00 Lainey Bonsell* Donate gently 2. 112 Stephenson Ave. 8:00-1:00 Jennifer Scaife* used items, call 3. 71 Pine Cres. 8:00-2:00 Amy Polson* 4. 18 Pine Ave. 8:00-1:00 Tory Brown* for drop-off or pick-up details 5. 23 Swanwick Ave. 8:00-2:00 Elisa Hajducek* 6. 1 Osbourne Ave. 8:00-1:00 Deborah Fletcher* 7. 419 Kingswood Rd. 9:00-1:00 Sean Starr* 8. 372 Victoria Pk. Ave. 8:00-1:00 Rakhee Gillespie* 9. 15 Haig Ave. 8:00-3:00 Caroline Ilaqua* & Ron Baldwin* 10. 56A Valhalla Blvd. 8:00-2:00 Connie Sheppard* 11. 96 Hollis Ave. 8:00-1:00 Vanessa Glen* 12. 463 Birchmount Rd. 8:00-1:00 Lindsay Reimers* 100% of proceeds support 13. 68 Willamere Drive. 8:00-3:00 Lindsay Storey* & Lauren Aiken* local women’s shelters and violence provention programs 14. 1399 Harmsworth Square, OAKVILLE 8:00-1:00 PHOTO: PHIL LAMEIRA 416-690-2181 Aronno Das, 9, performs during a competition as members of the Bengali community celebrate Pôhela Bôishakh, or New Year, on April 19 at the Bangladesh Centre and Community Services on Danforth Avenue near Main Street. The actual New Year date was April 14 and the year is now 1421 according to the Bangla calendar. Block Ness teaches team By Andrew Hudson Katerina Koumbridis* * Sales Representative KNEE PAIN? We can help! • Cold lasers eliminate pain, swelling and sti ness in knees • E ective relief for arthritis, ligament and meniscus injuries • Assessments and treatment by our professional sta PROFESSIONAL CARE FOR ARTHRITIS, JOINT PAIN AND INJURIES SPRING PROMOS THREE DAYS before a city-wide robotics contest, a freak radio problem had the Neil McNeil team re-thinking fast. The club robot, a.k.a. Block Ness Monster, was mostly behaving – it could carry a hockey puck, slide it on a giant crokinole board, and shoot it with an air-powered piston. (For the uninitiated, crokinole is a parlour game, invented in 1870s Ontario, where rivals flick small wood disks across a circular board, either to land them in a target or knock each other’s disks out, curling style. One robotics coach called it “the great Canadian game that apparently no one has ever played.”) But a radio hiccup from the robot’s remote control caused the piston to fire every time someone hit the ‘on’ button. And the team still had to re-design the robot’s aiming arm so it could scoop new pucks from a loader. “It’s been like this since Grade 9,” said Adam Cyprus, now in his senior year. Watching the team puzzle over ways to shield the robot from radio interference, Cyprus said the week before a competition is always haywire – the robot has so many ways to fail. Just then came a shout from Martin Zielinski, a physics teacher with an engineering background who has coached the afterschool club for a decade. “Plan B is now Plan A!” Zielinski said. “We have a plan, and it’s executable.” While they kept the drive and steering systems from last year’s robot (it played Connect Four), Zielinski said this year’s build was the first to use pneumatics. “Every year we get to explore novel designs, novel solutions,” he said. Started by teacher Bob Tone at Francis Libermann Catholic High School, Zielinski said the TCDSB’s club league is a grassroots effort that runs at a fraction of the cost of leagues that build much larger robots, such as First Robotics. Started in the early 2000s, the TCDSB league now involves five to seven schools, with the top team competing at Skills Ontario. Even on a relatively small scale, Block Ness weighs in at about 60 lbs and involves a lot of forward planning. “Once the robot is in the arena, you can’t touch it,” said fellow coach and science teacher Jason Milne. “There have been years where they say, ‘Ready, set, go,’ and someone goes in to drive it. That round is done – you’re not allowed to go in.” At the TCDSB contest on March 29, Block Ness fired pucks okay, but a new problem cropped up. Unlike the pucks they used in practice, the tournament pucks were unpainted and much harder to slide out of the loader. Richard Erikson-Lin, a Grade 9 student, said he’s learned a lot in his first year. From September to March, the twice-a-week club sketched out paddle, slider, and air jet systems before settling on the current build – a lot of time at the drawing board. “We learned cooperation,” said EriksonLin. “I learned to really respect these guys.” $10 OFF FREE Laser Consultation Massage Therapy Valid until May 31, 2014 (Registered Massage Therapist) Valid until May 31, 2014 COLD LASER - CHIROPRACTIC - MASSAGE THERAPY 1945 Queen Street East (two blocks east of Woodbine) 416.699.5273 info@theralaselasercentre.com

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 5 PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON Fresh art for Woodbine Station A man cycles past a mural painted by East End youth that shows birders at Taylor-Massey Creek in two eras: 1910 and 2013. The creek scene was among three murals unveiled on April 23 at the site of a future second exit for the Woodbine subway station. The others show a street festival on Danforth Avenue and a poem, Seeing Beauty, at Woodbine, by Beach resident and poet laureate George Elliott Clarke. At a pre-unveiling party hosted by Artisans at Work, the youth and mentoring artist Jim Bravo laughed when they heard the poem’s closing line: “Now young artists tap dreams – Drafting Beauty – to which all say, ‘Bravo!’” Police Beat IN THE April 15 issue of Beach Metro News, it was mistakenly reported that two incidents of false luring attempts had been investigated by 55 Division police. In fact, one attempt made by a man to lure a teenage girl into a car near Gerrard Street East and Beaton Avenue did happen on April 7, and a suspect now in custody has been charged in relation to both that and an additional incident. On April 7, a man in a car approached a 16 year-old girl, and told her she was supposed to go with him. An adult known to the girl intervened and the suspect left the scene in his vehicle. On April 12, another girl, 13 years old, was approached by a man in a car near Coxwell and Danforth Avenues. The man attempted to convince the girl to get into the car, but she ran to a nearby house and told an adult, who called the police. On April 15, Fidai Nasir, 52, of Toronto, was arrested and faces two charges of criminal harassment. He made his first court appearance at College Park on April 15. Anyone with any information should contact 55 Division at 416-808-5500, or contact Crime Stoppers. On April 10, police issued a public safety alert about an incident near Duke of Connaught Public School. A 10 year-old boy had reported that a man grabbed his wrist, before an adult scared the potential abductor away. Police determined through further investigation that the story was false, no person was wanted and that the investigation was concluded. THE CRIME management team at 55 Division has announced Gary Wiszniowski, 33, as the newest candidate for Wanted Wednesday. On April 19, an argument took place be- Gary Wiszniowski tween two people near Kingston Road and Main Street. Police allege the suspect became enraged and began to kick, choke and punch the victim, but fled the scene when security arrived. Gary John Wiszniowski, 33, is wanted for assault causing bodily harm and choking. He is described as a white male, 5’9”, about 140 lbs, with short brown hair, green eyes and a thin moustache. Anyone with any information is asked to contact 55 Division police at 416-808-5500, or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222TIPS (8477), online at 222tips.com, text TOR and a message to CRIMES (274637), or leave a tip on Facebook. THREE TEENS were robbed of their cell phones on April 12. At around 11:30 p.m., the three 14 year-old males were near Williamson Road and Southwood Drive when two males approached. One pulled out a knife and demanded they empty their pockets. The suspect took the victims’ cell phones and ran south on Wineva Avenue. Photos appearing in Beach Metro News are available for purchase. Email andrew@beachmetro.com

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6 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 In My Opinion Ministry leaves board spinning wheels on crowding solutions THE GARDEN seems to be thinking that spring is going to happen. The snowdrops are up and the crocuses starting, so perhaps it really is SPRING – but I am not taking my winter coat to the cleaners yet! The TDSB is beset with crises, some of our own making and many because the Ministry of Education is trying to micro-manage all things educational. Let’s start with something simple – enough classrooms for the students of this ward. We are well over 1,000 pupil places short for the kids we need to accommodate. There are 22 elementary schools in our ward and over 70 portables – one school has 32, another 14, a few with four and some with none. The ministry has not allowed us to build except for a total of five classrooms in two schools – neither of these is George Webster, which needs 32 new classrooms. Don’t forget that next fall we will have 10 schools that will double the size of their junior and senior kindergarten enrollment as a result of full day kindergarten, and that we are beginning to feel the result of the baby boomers having grandchildren. More classrooms will be necessary as they work their way through the system. This month we were given permission to build at George Webster, but no money to build with. The ministry says we should sell more buildings. Sure, let’s do that. But when you empty a building to sell, there are students that need to be housed somewhere. Oops! There’s the problem. There is no permission to build an addition on the schools selected to put these children in. It is as if kids come in nice little bundles of 25 that can be shipped to a new location and put in “this extra space.” There is no “extra” space. There are bits and pieces of space in disparate locations that do not add up to a proper location. There seems to be no will to view the placement of children as an issue of housing people and not shipping widgets. My case in point is right here in Sheila Cary-Meaghar School Trustee Ward 16 our ward. We did the ministryprescribed process for the possible closing of two “small schools.” We took three months, held 10 meetings with all the people effected, drew up the results, sent it to the board for consideration and then sent it on to the ministry for consideration. We waited. We waited. We waited. The answer was that instead of closing and selling the two small schools and putting necessary additions on the neighbouring schools, we should just let everything stay the same! That was our position in the first place. It made the most sense. So why was it necessary to scare the pants off two neighbourhoods and leave them hanging for two years just to do what made the most sense in the first place? AND we are still working with 32 portables at George Webster! The approval to build is still not the final answer, nor even the final question. The next question is, will it be an addition or a tear-down and build new? Yes, you read correctly. Tear down a perfectly sound building with amenities we will never see again – wide halls, large windows, fabulous, perfect terrazzo floors (no cracks), charm and character. And replace it with the bargain-basement-priced building that will have NO charm and will be a last-for-50-years version. Maybe you can tell which choice I prefer. To tear down a sound and serviceable building and put up a lesser version is environmentally, economically and morally wrong. I have spent the best part of three years working on a solution to this dilemma. I want to do the right thing and not just what is a sentimental choice. I now believe I have followed every last thread of enquiry to determine that an addition is the best option. There have been walkthroughs looking at condition; boreholes to check what is underground that might be an obstacle; checking of costs for options – all the things one ought to do to get proper information for decision making. The present building is sound. The roof has been replaced recently. The mechanics are solid. The windows need to be replaced for the final upgrade which will make the building environmentally snug. It is my hope that we can design and build an environmentally responsible, attractive and flexible community asset with comfortable space that serves the needs of the teaching staff, the child care users, the community users and the children. Most of all I want a building that makes sense on every level and for every use. I actually believe that it is possible to build a comely building that looks like it belongs in its neighbourhood and is a joy to use … that’s good design and good sense. Beach Metro Community News, published by Ward 9 Community News Inc., is a non-profit, non-partisan community newspaper founded in 1972 and published 23 times a year. It is distributed free by volunteers in East Toronto and West Scarborough and paid for by our advertisers. OFFICE: 2196 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M4E 2C7 PHONE: 416-698-1164 FAX: 416-698-1253 WEB: www.beachmetro.com GENERAL MANAGER Phil Lameira (ext. 24) phil@beachmetro.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Paris Quinn (ext. 26) paris@beachmetro.com EDITOR Jon Muldoon (ext. 23) jon@beachmetro.com REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER Andrew Hudson (ext. 25) andrew@beachmetro.com PRODUCTION Melinda Drake (ext. 27) melinda@beachmetro.com ACCOUNTS Hope Armstrong (ext. 21) hope@beachmetro.com NEXT ISSUE: Tuesday, May 13 ADVERTISING DEADLINE: 5 p.m., Monday, May 5 VOLUNTEER EXECUTIVE: Julie DiGregorio, president; Rob Granatstein, vice president; Doug Black, secretary; Kelvin Francis, treasurer; Brian Mercer, past president; Paul M. Babich and David Windrim, special advisors This newspaper accepts advertising in good faith, but does not endorse advertisers or advertisements. All submitted editorial material is subject to editing. #0838-2956 Letters to the Editor High marks for creativity in business assistance plan TO HELP businesses along Queen Street and improve the overall experience of living in the area, I call on residents to seek out Toronto Parking Authority officers on their daily patrols. Engage these diligent and often maligned civil servants in friendly and polite conversation. Enquire how to interpret misleading signage to avoid a ticket, or learn about their guidelines if a vehicle falls foul of an invisible threshold. For my part in this community endeavour, I hope my chat with the enforcement officer ticketing vehicles at the drop-off area outside Kew Beach Public School provided sufficient distraction to spare some parents from an unnecessary expense while safely escorting their children to the school yard. Be assured that even a small interruption of the ticketing process negatively influences performance targets and lessens the attractiveness of the Beach for revenue generation. This spring, make a new friend and help keep monies in the local community. M. Noon Kippendavie Avenue Thanks for a good deed from a stranger SOME TIME in the last week a good person found our son’s health card on Queen Street. He or she did some research and forwarded the health card to a mailbox rented by the Toronto Beaches Lacrosse Club. Michele Kidd, the club administrator, then contacted our family. We greatly appreciate the efforts of the person who found the health card and of Michele. You paid it forward and we hope good karma comes your way. Mike and Karen Pitre Bylaw loophole for election donations IN JULY 2013, city council passed bylaw No. 1108-2013 which provides for rebates to be paid by the City of Toronto to donors to candidates in the 2014 municipal election. The bylaw contains no requirement that a donor be a resident of the City of Toronto in order to get a rebate from the city. This is nonsense. It is offensive that Toronto taxpayers are being asked to provide rebates to nonresidents. Clearly this is an oversight in the bylaw. I hope council will act as soon as possible to have the bylaw amended to add a requirement that the donor be a resident of the City of Toronto to qualify for the rebate. Please stop this gravy train. Alan Rowe Leuty Avenue

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 7

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8 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 Deja Views Is this how people moved their homes around, or added a sub level – or both? The house on the right was moved south to accommodate a driveway. The year was 1924 and the view is looking northeast on Wheeler, just north of Norway Avenue. Do you have an old photo you’d like to share with our readers? Please call me at 416-691-4774. David Van Dyke’s COURSE STARTING @ WAVERLEY R0AD! ALPHA God’s Answers to Big Questions Tuesdays @ 7 pm You can ask any question or like…or just listen. Sunday Service & Kids Club @ 11 am Timothy Strickland Lead Pastor We are located at: 129 Waverley Road (Just N. of Queen St.) Join us for this 10-week course! Dinner Provided! Register Today! 416-694-3054, wrbc@bell.net waverleyroadbaptist.ca 129 Waverley Road Upbeat Music • Relevant Messages • Community Just North -Focused of Queen St. CITY OF TORONTO ARCHIVES, SERIES 372, SUBSERIES 3, ITEM 572 Discovery afoot with Jane’s Walks JUVADERM® ! 30% o rst syringe 40% o second syringe (up to a $220 saving) Limited time o er Appletree Clinic 1450 O’Connor Drive 647-722-2370 Dr. Cathy Andrew has moved to By Melinda Drake Free consultation THE JANE’S Walk festival is set to take to the streets, laneways and urban trails of Toronto on the weekend of May 2, 3 and 4. The walks are free, locally-led tours that organizers call “walking conversations.” The event pays homage to the late Jane Jacobs, an urban activist who encouraged residents to become involved in their communities. To honour her legacy, her friends founded Jane’s Walks as a way to immortalize her vision of walkable neighbourhoods. Here in the East End there will be a selection of community walks on offer. On Friday, May 2, beginning at 6 p.m., Sarah Dewar will answer the question Toronto has a Main Street?, by leading a tour through the neighbourhood around Main and Gerrard. Starting at Stanley G. Grizzle Park, the small park across the street from the Main Street subway station, the walk will meander down Main Street, stopping at historic points of interest along the way, such as the Main Street Library (built in 1921), Community Centre 55 (a former police station dating from 1910), Fire Station 226 (circa 1910), and St. Saviour’s Anglican Church (founded in 1891). The area was populated predominantly by railway workers at the turn of the century and the tour will visit the site of a long-gone railway roundhouse that sat at the intersection of Ted Reeve Drive and Crossovers Street. Stops along Danforth include the site of the former Empringham Hotel at Dawes Road. The hotel was a local watering hole for railway workers. The Ashbridge’s Neighbourhood – Since 1793, led by Robert Miller, will explore the Beach founding family’s original property on Sunday, May 4. Starting at the Beach skatepark at Lakeshore and Coxwell at 10:30 a.m., the route heads north, following the former Ashbridges Creek, making stops at Jonathan Ashbridge Park, the historic Ashbridge estate on Queen Street East, the 100-year-old Duke of Connaught School, and the Gerrard India Bazaar. The walk winds up at Monarch Park. Cont’d. on Page 22 Healthy Earth Legally children do not need to start school until they are 6 years old. If full day kindergarten is not for your child we have a solution. Please visit our website to see what parents have to say about our program. Visit us at www.healthyearthschool.com 416•690•5969 Email: healthyearthschool@rogers.com HALF DAY KINDERGARTEN 2-3-5 1/2 day session per week available for September Enriched Kindergarten Now accepting registrations. • One to six ratio • Individual Guided reading program • Writing skills • Math • Science • Global awareness • Theatre and music Bilingual Nursery School starting age 2.5 yrs old • Small teacher/child ratio • Highly skilled teachers • Arts and Crafts • Cognitive • Music • Drama • French • Global Awareness 2206 Queen Street East Proudly serving The Beach since 1992

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 9 Art festival questions value of art By Jon Muldoon ART OF the Danforth, the biennial celebration of art on East Danforth, is back for its third instalment. Founder and East End Arts managing director Cindy Rozeboom and AoD director Asad Raza may appear excited about this edition of the relatively new festival, but the whole reason this year’s AoD is happening is not excitement, but ambivalence. When Raza was asked to return as director, he insisted the only way he would do so was if he were permitted to take risks, and be allowed to actually fail. After many long conversations with Rozeboom, the two decided their own ambivalence about the value of an art festival should actually be the theme of the show. An AoD release states the festival consists of “site-specific public art interventions to test whether artists have anything to say to the community and whether the community has anything to say about art.” Raza said it was Rozeboom who first succinctly phrased the driving question behind this year’s AoD: “art, what have you done for me lately?” “We believe that it’s important, so prove it to us,” said Rozeboom of the instruction given to guest curators. “When you stop thinking ‘why is this important?,’ you shouldn’t be doing it.” The path to this year’s theme led through a number of more specific questions about art and art festivals, including their role in gentrification and change. Raza read a real estate article in a daily newspaper about a home in the East Danforth area, which specifi- cally mentioned AoD. That sparked a conversation about art’s role in neighbourhood change, along with questions about who the residents of a neighbourhood really are, and who decides whether changes are good and bad. “We don’t have a stake in development and change. What I can speak to is the role of an art festival in that change,” he said. Neither wanted AoD to be reduced to simply a check mark in the ‘plus’ column on a real estate sales pitch, and so that constant questioning will hopefully be a running theme of this year’s festival. “Every opportunity I have, I’m trying to insert a little uncertainty,” he said. Part of that uncertainty will come from a sort of forced coexistence. While past festivals have included installations in empty storefronts – a precursor to the Danforth East Community Association’s pop-up project – all of this year’s installations must share space with existing residents and businesses. In one case, this includes projections in the living room of a home across the street from the Woodbine subway station. Both organizers seemed pleased at the thought that many who see the projections might not even realize they’re art, and part of a community art festival, no less. In another instance, an artist will live as an alien in Value Village, interacting with customers and asking constant questions in an attempt to learn about the local inhabitants. Of course, while there are concepts and ideas behind all the projects at AoD, there will also be entertainment and spectacle for area residents not necessarily interested in asking the “bigger” questions. Artist collective VSVSVS built an obelisk for a previous art event. For their AoD performance, they will play with the notion of permanence and importance by lighting that monument on fire. Even if one isn’t inclined to ponder an artist’s questioning of the very notion of permanence, there’s still the communal spectacle of standing around while something is set ablaze. Raza described it as the magic of having entry points at every layer of a project – “the Black Forest cake theory of art,” he said with a laugh. Another aspect of the questioning nature of the festival, and the minds behind it, can be seen in the recentlyacquired office space that houses AoD and East End Arts. Both share a former bar on the second floor of the Linsmore hotel and tavern. “I’m fascinated by the forces of change that are ingrained in the building itself,” said Rozeboom. “It’s amazing how many people visiting our office say, ‘I’ve lived here all my life and I’ve never been here.’” It’s better to instigate conversation about change now, Raza said, before most of it has happened. Of course, Rozeboom said, those attending AoD shouldn’t necessarily expect answers to larger questions of a community art festival and its role in a neighbourhood. “There can’t be any one answer,” she said. “The best thing we can do is increase the number of people who might ask that question.” Art of the Danforth runs from May 2 to 11. For full event and installation listings visit artofthedanforth.com. Lawn Care Decks Interlock Natural Stone Retaininig Walls info@elitegroundskeeping.com www.elitegroundskeeping.com 416.645.1199

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10 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 Community Calendar APRIL 30: Beaches-East York Federal Liberal Association Executive Meeting at Community Centre 55, 97 Main St., 7 p.m. Open to all members. Following the meeting, regroup at The Grover Pub & Grub, 676 Kingston Rd., for beverages and chat. Info: beaches-eastyork.liberal.ca (5) APRIL 30: Courageous Voices at MCC Toronto, 115 Simpson Ave., 7 p.m. Grade 8 students from East Alternative School 2014 performance based on Joseph Campbell’s “Hero of a Thousand Faces.” Pay what you can. Proceeds to chosen Hero/Heroine causes. (5) MAY 2: East York Barbershoppers’ Annual Charity Auction at Harmony Hall, 2 Gower St. Pre-sale at 7 p.m., Live Auction at 8 p.m. Great bargains on tools, appliances, sporting events, housewares and much more. $5 admission at door. Proceeds to the Chorus’ community activities and those of the charities we support, including Harmonize for Speech and Harmony Hall Centre for Seniors. (5) MAY 2-4: Jane’s Walk, a weekend of neighbourhood walking tours honouring the legacy of community builder Jane Jacobs. Several walks in local venues. Visit janeswalk.org for info. MAY 2-11: Art of the Danforth Festival. Over 20 large-scale public art projects will be on display at various locations along Danforth Avenue. Free. Info: www.artofthedanforth.com (5) MAY 3: Open House at East Toronto Village Childcare Centre, 43 Kimberley Ave., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tour our great space and meet the teachers. Fun events for the kids, too. Now accepting applications. Info: 416-694-1733 (5) MAY 3: Spring Fling Rummage Sale at Main Street Terrace, 77 Main St., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Raffles, rummage, baked goods, books, BBQ – for breakfast and lunch. Seacret skin care products (Dead Sea). Sponsored by the Resident Council. Info: 416-690-3001 ext 227 (4) MAY 3: Rummage/Garage Sale at Scarborough Bluffs United Church, 3739 Kingston Rd. (at Scarborough Golf Club Rd.), 9-11:30 a.m. Bargains and treasures galore. Clothing, shoes, purses, linens, housewares, décor, small appliances, toys, collectibles and more. Wheelchair accessible. Info: 416-267-8265, scarboroughbluffs.org (5) MAY 3: Flea Market at Baron Byng Beaches Royal Canadian Legion, 243 Coxwell Ave., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Lots of good deals and a bake sale. (5) MAY 3: Jazz and Reflections at Beach United Church, 140 Wineva Ave., 4:305:15 p.m. Jim Clayton Trio (Piano, Bass, Drums). Theme: “Songs My Daughter Knows”. All welcome to come early for free coffee and tea. Free will offering. (5) MAY 4: Juno-nominated Sultans of String perform their diverse mix of world rhythms and grooves at Kingston Road United Church, 975 Kingston Rd., 1:30 p.m. $20, kids 12 and under free. Info: 416-699-6091, www.kruc.ca (5) MAY 4: Toronto Beaches Dog Association’s Annual Beachy-Clean Day at the Leuty Lifeguard Station, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sponsored by Tory Brown, Royal LePage Estate Realty. Donations to Community Centre 55 welcomed. (5) MAY 6: Beach and East Toronto Historical Society Annual General Meeting at the Beaches Library, 2161 Queen St. E., 6:30-8:15 p.m. (5) MAY 7: Ward 32 Annual Parks Social at The Naval Club, 1910 Gerrard St. E., 7 p.m., for Friends of Parks groups. Theme: How to Animate your Park. Info: 416-392-1376 (5) MAY 10: Spring Sale at Faith Presbyterian Church, 140 Dawes Rd., 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bake table, Filipino food, white elephant table, books, crafts, toys and more. BYOB- bring your owns bags! Venue is wheelchair accessible. MAY 10: Daffodil Tea at St. John’s Norway Anglican Church, 470 Woodbine Ave. (at Kingston Rd.), 2-4 p.m. Tea room, baked goods table, craft table, white elephant table, prizes. $5 per person. Info: 416-6914650, www.stjohnsnorway.com (5) MAY 10, 11: Spring Plant Sale at 14 Lyall Ave. (Main & Kingston Rd.), 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Michael Erdman and Cantemus Singers’ annual sale of garden perennials to raise funds for the Daily Bread Food Bank in Regent Park. Info: 416578-6602, www.cantemus.ca (6) MAY 12: Antiques Appraisal Roadshow at Community Centre 55, 97 Main St., noon-2 p.m. What are your valuables worth? Appraisals $5 per item. Info: 461-691-1113 (5) MAY 13: 100 Women Who Care Toronto East meeting at the Balmy Beach Club, foot of Beech Ave., 7:30 p.m. Support smaller local charities, and make an immediate, direct and positive impact. Info: www.100womenwhocaretorontoeast.com, torontoeast-100women@rogers.com (5) MAY 15: Open House at Balmy Beach Lawn Bowling Club House, foot of Beech Ave., 7-9 p.m. New members welcome. Bring your sneakers and enthusiasm. Try it. You’ll love it! (6) MAY 15: Movies Under the Stars at Norwood Park, Gerrard St. E. & Norwood Rd., 7 p.m. (movie starts at 8:45 p.m.). Screening “The Princess Bride”, presented by Community Centre 55. Free movie and food. (6) MAY 20: Beach Garden Society and Show at Adam Beck Community Centre, 79 Lawlor Ave., 7:15-9 p.m. “Gardening in a Changing Climate” with Charles Dobbin. New members and guests welcome. Enjoy informal discussions with members and check out our library. Light refreshments. Info: beachgs.ca@ gmail.com, www.beachgs.ca (6) MAY 22: Police Week Community Fair at New Woodbine Park, Kingston Rd. & Queen St. E., 4-8 p.m. rain or shine. Children’s activities, seniors’ bingo, barbecue, music, jumping castle, prizes. MAY 23-25: “Small Paintings for Small Spaces” at the historic Gardener’s Cottage, in Kew Gardens at the foot of Lee Ave., Friday 3-8 p.m., Saturday/Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Beach Guild of Fine Art’s spring show and sale features paintings by over 40 Guild artists. Original small paintings (none over $350), note cards. Free admission. Gift basket lucky draw. Info: www.BeachGuildOfFineArt.com (6) MAY 24: Beach Hill Neighbourhood Association’s Spring Fling at 1906 Gerrard St. E. (1 block west of Woodbine), 1-7 p.m. Tree and historical walking tours, help plant flowers along Gerrard, Blue Chip food truck and social, children’s activities. Meet your neighbours. All welcome. Info: www.beachhill.org (6) MAY 24: Ward 32 Enviro Day & Festival at Ted Reeve Arena parking lot, Gerrard St. E. & Main St., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Drop off items for recycling and donation and pick up info about environmental initiatives. BBQ, music, and more. Info: Councillor McMahon 416-392-1376 (6) MAY 27-JUNE 24: Craving Change at East End Community Health Centre, 1619 Queen St. E., Tuesdays 5:30-7:30 p.m. Learn about what can trigger food cravings, and how to change problem eating behaviours. Free to people on limited income, living in East End CHC catchment. To register: Miriam 416-778-5805 ext. 210 by May 12. Info: www.eastendchc.on.ca (6) MAY 29: Real Estate As A Career? The Real World of Real Estate at Royal LePage, 1052 Kingston Rd. (at Victoria Park Ave.), 7 p.m. Topics covered include: income expectations, getting started, commercial vs. residential sales, full time vs. part time, and more. Limited seating. Info and reservations: 416-464-7100, rwall@trebnet.com (7) MAY 29: Free Seniors’ Movie – “The Monuments Men” at The Fox Theatre, 2236 Queen St. E., doors open 10 a.m., movie starts at 10:30 a.m. Presented by Rotary Club of Toronto Beach. (7) MAY 29-JULY 27: Weight No More at East End Community Health Centre, 1619 Queen St. E., Thursdays 1:30-3:30 p.m. Learn how to plan meals, control food portions, make better grocery store choices and get fit. Free to people on limited income, living in East End CHC catchment. To register: Olivia 416-778-5805 ext. 208 by May 12. Info: www.eastendchc.on.ca (6) JUNE 3: Community Centre 55 Annual General Meeting at CC55, 97 Main St., 7 p.m. Agenda: to approve financial statements for fiscal year ended Dec. 31, 2013; to receive Program report; to fill one vacancy on the Board of Management. Info: Debbie Visconti, Executive Director, 416-691-1113 ext 225 (7) JUNE 7, 8: Muhtadi International Drumming Festival at Woodbine Park. This annual event celebrates the drum, its universality as an art form, and its cultural relevance today in communities around the world. 40+ Drum Groups, interactive area and more. Free. Info: www.muhtadidrumfest.com (7) Ongoing events SECOND AND FOURTH THURSDAY of every month: Chase the Blues Away at East End Community Health Centre, 1619 Queen St. E., 1-3 p.m. Drop-in to this free education and support group for people living with depression. Learn problem solving, stress management, self care and coping skills. Program info: Zari 416-778-5805 ext 222. Info: www.eastendchc.on.ca (9) GERRARD ASHDALE LIBRARY, 1432 Gerrard St. E. •May 10: Toronto Master Gardeners’ Ask an Expert – Growing Romantics, 10-11 a.m. Valuable tips on planting, pruning and growing these beautiful plants. •Mondays, 2-3 p.m. Adult Crafternoon. Drop-in for knitters, quilters, weavers, etc. •Tuesdays, 1:30-3 p.m. WoodGreen English Conversation Circle (ECC). Practise conversational English. •Thursdays, 2-3 p.m. WoodGreen Resume Critiquing. Answer all your job search questions. By appointment at 416-645-6000 ext 2316. •Saturdays, 1-2:30 p.m. Chess Club, drop-in, for ages 13+. Info: 416-393-7717, ashdaleevents@ gmail.ca, www.torontopubliclibrary.ca. Library is wheelchair accessible. (5) AL- ANON at Community Centre 55, 97 Main St., Wednesdays 7:15 p.m. Alateen members are welcome to attend. Info: 416-691-1113 (fr) EAST TORONTO CLIMATE ACTION GROUP are citizens who are concerned about smog, climate change and other environmental issues as they impact the city and particularly East Toronto. We meet monthly, and welcome your involvement and support. Info: www.etcag.org (fr) ROTARY CLUB OF TORONTO BEACH holds a breakfast meeting every Tuesday, 7 a.m., at the Balmy Beach Club. For information please visit www.torontobeachrotary.org or call Roger Cecchetto 416-415-5000 ext. 6078 (r) FREE WORKSHOPS FOR PARENTS and Caregivers at Family Resource Connection, offered through East End Community Health, 10 a.m. Child care provided by Family Resource Connection staff. •May 8: Mindfulness – maximize your well-being – for kids and parents. Info and registration: 416-690-0102 (r) BABY TIME PROGRAM at Family Resource Connection, for parents and caregivers. Come join us for a time of singing and socialization. An opportunity to share resources and ideas with other parents and professionals. Mondays & Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. Info: 416-690-0102 (r) HOW ARE THE BRITS RELATED to the Biblical Israelites? Come find out at 313 Sherbourne St., 2nd Sunday monthly, 2:30 p.m. (fr) THE SPIRIT OF WATERCOLOUR – support group for artists with some watercolour experience, to create, connect and meditate. Monthly meetings beginning Wednesday, May 7. Info: 416-694-0101 (5) FROM CHRIST TO AQUARIUS. If you are a spiritual person who no longer feels at home in any church, welcome to the Age of Aquarius! We will be meet- ing as a group for mutual support on a monthly basis, beginning Tuesday, April 29. Info: 416-694-0101 (5) HAVE FUN THIS SUMMER! Join the Kew Beach Lawn Bowling Club. Free lessons. Info: Fay 416-466-6598 (r) BEACH PHOTO CLUB meetings are held every 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month, from September to June, at St. Aidan’s, 70 Silver Birch Ave., 7:30 p.m. Everyone from the novice to the experienced is welcome. The only requisite is an interest in learning about the photographic arts. (r/fr) THE PSYCHIC IS IN! at Wunderland Gallery Café, 1905 Queen St. E., occasional sunny Sundays, May to September. Info: Toni Wolfheart, Psychic Astrologer 647449-5920, www.thepsychicinn.com (6) SPRING WRITING WORKSHOPS in The Beach with award-winning author and Beach resident, Rick Book •Creative Writing Workshop for Adults, Wednesday evenings, May 7-June 25 •Writing for Children Workshop for Adults, Thursday evenings, May 8-June 26. Workshop fee: $199. Enrolment limited to 10. Info and registration: WritingintheBeach@gmail.com (5) BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP at St. John’s Norway Cemetery, 256 Kingston Rd. Are you saddened by the recent death of a loved one? In this safe and confidential environment, freely discuss the process of grief and discover that others are walking the journey too. Facilitated by The Rev. Dr. Deborah Hart, United Church Minister and bereavement counselor. 5-week session, Wednesdays 7 p.m., beginning April 30. Light refreshments. Sponsored by Sherrin Funeral Home. To register: 416-691-2965 (5) ST. AIDAN’S CHURCH, Queen St. E. at Silver Birch Ave. •Sunday services are at 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. (Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30) •Mid-week service, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. All welcome. Info: 416-691-2222, staidansinthebeach.com (5) BEACH UNITED CHURCH, “The Heart of the Beach”. Join us in our newly renovated location at 140 Wineva Ave. Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery care and children’s activity time available. •Interfaith Lunch Program, Thursdays, 11 a.m. •Crafters, Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. •Choir practice Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. •April 30: Seniors program about Tea, followed by lunch, 11 a.m.1 p.m. •May 3: Jazz Reflections – The Jim Clayton Trio “Songs My Daughter Knows”, 4:30-5:15 p.m. Info: 416-691-8082, www.beachunitedchurch.com. We are on facebook and twitter @NewBeachUnited (5) NEIGHBOURHOOD UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION, 79 Hiawatha Rd. (S of Gerrard, W of Coxwell). Sundays, 10:30 a.m. Special children’s programs. Spirited choir. Are you searching for a community where people honour each other’s beliefs? Let us have the honour of supporting you on your spiritual path as you discover Unitarian Universalism. We are an open-minded inclusive congregation. May theme: Delight. Join us Sundays for inspiring services and vibrant children’s programs. Bring the whole family! Info: www.nuuc.ca, 416-686-6809 (r) WAVERLEY ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH, 129 Waverley Rd. (just north of Queen St.). Sundays, 11 a.m. You are invited! Our services feature contemporary music and interesting messages to help you to know God better. Our Kids Club is a great place for kids to play, grow and learn about Christian values and run concurrently with the service. Parents have the option of dropping off their children at 10:45 a.m. (pick-up at 12:15 p.m.). Info: www.waverleyroadbaptist.ca (5) iiPhone, iPod, iPad, Mac 1517 Danforth Ave • near Coxwell Stn Student SPECIAL!!!!!! 20% OFF ALL REPAIRS!!!!!!!!! danforth@irepair.ca • 1-855-299-iPad ( 4723 ) We’ve Got Your Fix. New Location iR epair.ca

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 NEI GHBOURHOOD Everyone has a Story to Tell News in Brief BARON BYNG Beaches Branch 1/42 of the Royal Canadian Legion, 243 Coxwell Ave., will host the Silver Spring Show on Sunday, May 4, from noon to 5 p.m., to raise funds for the installation of a chairlift in the building. MC for the event is Naomi Tyrrell, an interdisciplinary artist and performer. The Spirit Choir and the Spirit Band, members of the Neighbourhood Unitarian Universalist Congregation, will provide music. Representatives from companies and organizations catering to older adults, such as CARP and the Toronto Council on Aging, will be on hand to provide information, advice and products. Tickets are $20 and include a door prize and a luncheon. WALK SO Kids Can Talk, an annual fundraiser for Kids Help Phone, will take place in Woodbine Park on Sunday, May 4. Canada’s largest walk for child and youth mental health will kick off Mental Health Week, May 5 to 9. The theme of this year’s event is “Heroes.” Kids Help Phone has been providing 24-hour anonymous and confidential counselling for children, teens and young adults since 1989. For more information visit walksokidscantalk.ca. FIND OUT what your valuables are worth at Community Centre 55’s version of Antiques Roadshow. Professional appraisers from Treasure Antiques in Thornhill will be on hand Monday, May 12, between noon and 2 p.m., to value your collectibles. Appraisals are $5 per item. CC55 is located at 97 Main St. For more information call 416-691-1113. ST. JOHN’S Norway Cemetery is offering a bereavement support group beginning Wednesday, April 30. The five-week session will provide those saddened by the loss of a loved one an opportunity to discuss the process of grief in a safe and confidential environment. Sessions will be facilitated by Rev. Dr. Deborah Hart, a United Church minister and experienced bereavement counselor, on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. at the cemetery’s main office, 256 Kingston Rd. Light refreshments will be served. To register call 416-691-2965. THE TORONTO Beaches Dog Association is hosting its annual Beachy Clean Day on Sunday, May 4 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dogs and their people are invited to help clean up a winter’s worth of trash from the beach. Meet at the Leuty Lifeguard Station. There will be treats for those on two or four legs, and a colouring contest for children. DRIVERS WILL find the Queen Street East and Leslie Street intersection closed from May 11 to June 21 for TTC track work related to the Leslie Barns. Streetcars on the 501 route will run along Gerrard Street East between Broadview and Coxwell, while buses will replace the 502 and 503 streetcars, and travel via Dundas Street. Anyone on foot or walking a bicycle can still cross Queen and Leslie during the five-week closure. THE EAST York Barbershoppers will hold their annual charity auction on Friday, May 2, at Harmony Hall, 2 Gower St. Presale starts at 7 p.m. and the bidding begins at 8 p.m. Admission is $5. Proceeds support community activities including Harmonize for Speech and Harmony Hall. A RO U ND B E AC H M ETRO’S 11 Driven to unconventional theatre By Andrew Hudson “YOUR JOB is life and death.” Given six words, that’s how Rosamund Small gets at the heart of her new play, Vitals. Given two more words, Small might have added “and traffic.” Set in Toronto, Vitals dispatches the audience into a real house where a fictional paramedic, Anna, is on a 911 call. The one-woman play is based on interviews with Kaleigh O’Brien, a long-time paramedic who told Small what it’s like to work emergencies in this city. “She’s driving an ambulance with the siren on, and people are jaywalking,” said Small with a wry laugh. “It was kind of like she was just complaining about traffic, but she is trying to get to someone who’s having a heart attack.” Even before it opened yesterday, Vitals extended its run by a week. And that was before the Globe and Mail ran a preview calling the 23 year-old Upper Beaches resident the next big thing in Toronto theatre. That morning, she woke to a proud voicemail from Marguerite Campbell, her Grade 2 teacher at Beaches Alternative School. But Small credits a lot of the buzz to the play’s director, Mitchell Cushman. “He’s really good at turning everyday objects into magical things,” she said, noting how he timed musical kids’ toys to run on stage in a recent show. Cushman also co-founded Outside the March, the site-specific company that is staging the play with support from Theatre Passe Muraille. “They do theatre in unexpected ways and unexpected places,” said Small, recalling a recent play, Terminus, where the audience sat on stage, and the actors performed on the stage edge with empty seats behind them. Small set her first hit play, a 2009 Fringe Festival comedy called Genesis and Other Stories, in a church. It was partly inspired by the zany Noel Coward comedies her mom took her to as a girl. PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON Rosamund Small wrote the play Vitals, which brings its audience to a private home, where the action follows a paramedic on-site for an emergency call. “We gave the whole audience juice boxes halfway through the play — it was just a fun time, and really suited to the Fringe.” Small’s next production was a verbatim work, Performing Occupy Toronto, where actual dialogue she recorded at the Occupy Toronto protest was performed right where it happened, in St. James Park. While she grew up going to traditional theatre and loves it, Small enjoys the extra “live” feeling of a play performed off-stage. “The authenticity of it is really exciting,” she said. “We see so many amazing movies and TV shows, but they’re always at a distance.” Small also gets a kick from interviews. Unlike Performing Occupy, in which she transcribed interviews with some 125 protestors, Small said she took no notes while talking with Kaleigh O’Brien about being a paramedic – she was looking for insights, not accuracy. She heard from O’Brien how paramedics need to improvise, but also follow EMS protocols, and always with the stress of a potential legal action in mind. And she learned how busy a shift feels for the 900-odd paramedics serving a city of millions. “It’s not even that I didn’t know about medics, I didn’t think about them,” Small said. “I didn’t think about them the way you do about doctors – they have this whole specific world of intense, focused pressure.” After two years of work on Vitals, Small is in the playwright’s sweet spot – she gets to watch a director make it come alive, and is stepping in only when the crew needs coffee or batteries. She continues to work for the Paprika Festival, a mentoring program for playwrights ages 14 to 21 that was a huge help to her. In a bit of a departure, Small is also writing prose, but she does have another play in the works too – one that ventures into a children’s imaginary world. Small said there’s a lot of similarity between plays and children’s playing. “The line between playing house, and then bossing everyone around and making them make a play about a house is very close.” Sweet find on Easter egg hunt “Found one!,” says Cameron Hynes, 2. The Easter egg hunt at Wildwood Crescent Playground on April 19 was a huge success with dozens of little ones scouring the area for holiday treats. PHOTO: PHIL LAMEIRA

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12 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 The Main Menu Sandwich Special Monday to Friday 11am - 3pm (except holidays) LUNCH Ontario asparagus a Mother’s Day treat Here are some Mother’s Day suggestions to put a smile on everyone’s face – cooks and guests included. Featuring homegrown asparagus, these recipes fresh from Foodland Ontario are tasty and visually appealing without being too fussy or time-consuming to prepare. They are definitely special enough to say “Happy Mother’s Day!” Tips about asparagus tips: for maximum freshness, choose asparagus with tightly closed purple tips. It is the tips, not the thickness of the stalks, that indicate freshness. Wash and break off stalks where they easily snap. Finally, asparagus requires only about two minutes cooking in boiling water. Do not over-cook! Grilled Asparagus and Goat Cheese Appetizers Feature “jewel of the season” asparagus on crisp toasts with goat cheese and a drizzle of balsamic glaze. The glaze is available at Vincenzo’s, Westlake and Danforth, and other fine food stores. If the glaze is unavailable, substitute good quality balsamic vinegar. 1 baguette cut into half-inch (2 cm) slices 2 tbsp (25 mL) olive oil 1 clove garlic, halved 12 oz (375 mL) asparagus Pinch each, salt and pepper 1/2 cup (125 mL) goat cheese, softened 2 tbsp (25 mL) balsamic glaze Brush 12 slices of baguette with 4 tsp (20 mL) of the olive oil. Place on greased grill over medium heat. Grill for two to four minutes turning once, until light golden colour. Transfer to serving platter. Rub each slice with cut Jan Main with Soup or Salad is an author, cooking instructor and caterer janmainskitchen@yahoo.ca 10% Discount for Seniors and their Family offered Wednesdays 3pm - 9pm DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS WEEKEND BRUNCH & ALL DAY BREAKFAST 2560 Gerrard St. E. (east of Victoria Park) Mon 8am-3pm | Tues-Sat 8am-9pm | Sun 8am-5pm Dine In | Take Out | Catering | 416-690-2098 side of garlic; set aside. Wash asparagus and snap spears where they break naturally. If asparagus spears are thick, slice in half lengthwise. Place asparagus on rectangular grill topper or in grill basket. Brush with remaining oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill over medium heat, turning once, until tender-crisp, about three to five minutes. Cut spears into thirds. Alternative cooking technique: Baguette may be toasted in the oven rather than on the barbecue grill, and asparagus may be blanched in boiling water for two minutes rather than grilling. Spread goat cheese evenly over each baguette slice. Top with asparagus spears. Drizzle with balsamic glaze. May be served warm or at room temperature. Serves six at two appetizers per person. Asparagus, Chicken and Spinach Salad Perfect for lunch or dinner, this visually attractive salad tastes as good as it looks. Serve with plenty of warm, fresh whole-grain baguette. 1 lb (500 g) boneless, skinless chicken breasts, preferably air-chilled 1 lb (500 g) asparagus, trimmed 2 tsp (10 mL) olive oil Pinch salt and fresh black pepper 1 bunch fresh spinach, washed and dried, torn into bite-sized pieces (about 8 cups/2 L) 1 cup (250 mL) halved greenhouse cherry tomatoes 1/2 cup (125 mL) thinly sliced red onion Smoked Paprika Lime Dressing: 1/3 cup (75 mL) olive oil 3 tbsp (45 mL) fresh lime juice 1 tsp (5 mL) smoked paprika 1/4 tsp (1 mL) each, salt and fresh black pepper 2 tbsp (25 mL) plain 2% yogurt 2 tsp (10 mL) liquid honey In measuring cup whisk together oil, lime juice smoked paprika, salt and pepper. Pour half into large bowl; add chicken and turn to coat in marinade. Whisk yogurt and honey into remaining dressing and set aside. Let chicken stand at room temperature for 10 minutes or cover and refrigerate for up to six hours. Place chicken on greased grill over medium heat. Brush with any remaining marinade in bowl. Close lid and grill for 12 to 15 minutes, turning once, or until no longer pink inside. Transfer to plate; cover and let stand for five minutes. Thinly slice chicken breasts crosswise. Meanwhile, in large saucepan of boiling water, add asparagus and cook uncovered two to three minutes or until asparagus is tender crisp. Immediately drain in colander and while still hot cut on the diagonal into two inch (5 cm) pieces. In large bowl, gently toss spinach, asparagus pieces, sliced chicken, cherry tomatoes and red onion. Cont’d. on Page 17 Bottoms Up Highlights from the Finger Lakes competition T BEACH METRO NEWS looking for carriers! High school students can get their COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS by delivering our newspaper! To setup your route, please call 416-698-1164 x.24 phil@beachmetro.com he annual Finger Lakes Internacharitable individuals would be tional Wine Competition took impossible to come by. E dward Finstein wine writer, award-winning author, TV and place March 29 and 30. This 139 Double Gold, 283 Gold, 1,465 radio host, educator, judge winedoctor.ca competition, held in Rochester Silver and 1,293 Bronze were given thewinedoctor.blogspot.com every spring, is the only wine competiout. Ontario came away with two @DrWineKnow facebook.com/EdwardDocFinstein tion in the world where all the proceeds Double Gold, 10 Gold, 42 Silver and go directly to one charity. That charity is 62 Bronze medals. Camp Good Days and Special Times, a non-profit organizaThe Best of Show is judged after the competition is over. tion started more than 30 years ago, to provide camp for Specific judges, highly skilled with a particular style or children and families from around the world touched by can- grape, pick the best from the Double Gold winners. In other cer and other life-threatening challenges. Everyone involved words, the very “best of the best” are singled out. The best with the competition donates their time. Chardonnay went to Lafond Winery and Vineyards from Celebrating its 14th anniversary, the event outdid itself on California for their 2011. St. James Winery from Missouri many levels. A record-breaking 3,756 wines from 20 countook the trophy for best Riesling. Paul Hobbs Winery of tries were entered. Products California scooped best Cabernet Sauvignon for their 2011 from all 50 states and six and Debonne Vineyards from Ohio won for their 2013 Vidal provinces were included. icewine. Seventy-seven of the On Saturday, May 3, awards will be given out during the world’s top judges in panels gala wine auction and dinner. Once again, judges are asked of four or five swirled, sniffed to bring two special bottles from their own cellars to be and tasted the entries. auctioned off as the “judges’ special collection.” It’s sure to Gold (90 to 100), Silver (80 bring in a good amount of money for the charity. Donations to 89) and Bronze (70 to 79) to the auction are always welcome and extremely appreciated. medals were awarded, as Fourteen years on, this competition has reached a pinwell as Best of Show. Any nacle beyond what anyone could have imagined. It keeps getwine that scored Gold from ting bigger and better. Of course any large event like this is each member of a panel on only as good as the people working it, and the folks involved the first evaluation received here are the best. a Double Gold. This event provides so much for those in need! Cheers to Perhaps even more important than the judges was all for an incredible job well done. This competition stands the army of volunteers that as a model for others like it and I hope it’s only a matter of categorized wines, opened time until we see more. For more details on the Finger Lakes bottles, served and washed International Wine Competition go to fliwc.com. Donations stemware. A more spectacuto Camp Good Days are always welcome. See the website at lar group of friendly, giving, campgooddays.org for more information.

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 13 Pet of the Month Walk to honour Duke at Woofstock By Marna Gale L ong before beagles invaded my heart, I was servant to a seriously spoiled Cockapoo named Wednesday. She was a backyard breeder special. I wasn’t so rescue savvy in those days. According to her paperwork, Wednesday had been born on Dec. 3, just a day before my stepdaughter Claudia. After her dad and I got together, Claudia had little choice but to share her special day with my fur daughter. From singing the birthday song to blowing out candles on her liver-flavoured cake (with Claudia’s help), Wednesday enjoyed an equal blast of birthday bliss every year. But when homeless beagles hit the scene, I realized celebrating birthdays was completely unnecessary. For them, every day following their rescue is cause for celebration. While Wednesday had been a happy dog from start to finish, this business of rescuing dogs triggered something more. It’s funny how much we gain from giving. For me, it’s about seeing a dog’s tail wind up and swing like a pendulum for the first time. More than 120 beagles later, I’m still hooked. Actually, I’m more hooked than ever and I owe it to the dog pictured above. There was still plenty of snow on the ground at the end of March. That’s when I first met Duke. He was making the best of things at a small rural shelter where his owner had parted with him due to a job transfer. It seemed Duke had come full circle in just over a decade – his owner had adopted him from that same shelter as a puppy. Duke was about to turn 12. That’s over-the-hill by shelter adoption standards but a perfect candidate for a Big On Beagles (BOB) Rescue. I fully expected to meet a sad old dog when I visited the shelter, but I was wrong. Never had I met a happier couple than Duke and his tail. I got acquainted with both in the outdoor dog run. He spared a brief moment to melt my heart with one look and then was back at the door with what appeared to be eager anticipation. The shelter manager solved the mystery for me. Dogs are creatures of habit. The World According to Duke clearly states: getting sprung from his cage means walks along the country road with a friendly volunteer, despite any silly detour to the dog run first. With every tick-tock of his tail, I became more driven to find him a foster home as soon as humanly possible. I wanted Duke to really have something to wag his tail about. They say everything happens for a reason, but it’s hard to find consolation in that adage when the unthinkable happens. While Duke waited for me to get my ducks in a row, tragedy found him first. He was on one of his beloved walks along the country road when two escaped huskies viciously attacked him. Duke was seriously injured and may well have died on that road were it not for a woman who risked life and limb to save him. I still don’t know who she is or how she did it, but I am forever grateful. Duke was rushed to a local veterinary hospital with little hope of survival. There was concern his rectum had been perforated by the deep bites to his back end. That’s when I shared a tearful telephone conversation with the shelter manager: “If Duke can be saved and still live a happy life,” I sobbed, “I want him saved no matter the cost.” Of course, no amount of money can buy a miracle. We could only hope surgery would be enough to make that tail wag again. I should have known it would be enough. We were talking about Duke’s tail after all. A few days later, I was picking up our miracle beagle from the hospital. Once again, I prepared for a sad old dog, considering all he’d been through. Once again, I was delightfully wrong. Despite looking like a patchwork quilt of shaved fur and giant staple stitches, Duke and his tail were raring to go on the next leg of their adventure! We began with a two-hour car ride to Toronto. Have you ever driven that far with an impatient patient? He literally burst out of the car when we arrived at Beaches Animal Hospital for his follow-up care. That brings us to the part of this adventure I wanted for him all along – a fabulous foster family to really give him something to wag about. That family comes complete with an equally adventurous beagle sister and brother. They all share his tick-tock philosophy: Every day is worth wagging your tail over. It probably goes without saying but from this day forward, let me be the first to wish you a “Happy Birthday, Duke”. Duke is the happiest 12 year-old beagle to ever wag his way to Big On Beagles (BOB) Rescue, bigonbeagles.ca! Endless tail-wags of thanks go out to our friends and supporters, including Quinte Lost Dog Network. Join us in the Rescue Me Village (k9rescueme. com) at WOOFSTOCK (woofstock.ca) on May 24 and 25 when we will be hosting our own Beagle Wiggle Walkathon in Duke’s honour! Halton High School Summer Sessions Registration opens April 1, 2014 INTENSIVE 4 WEEK CREDIT COURSES JUNE 25-JULY 24 JULY 28-AUGUST 25 Mathematics 10 Geography of Canada Science 10 Mandarin Functions and Applications Advanced Functions Data Management Chemistry 11/12 Mathematics 9 Canadian History Science 9 English (all grades) Functions Biology 11/12 Calculus Physics 11/12 Individual and Group Instruction Available • small classes • individual attention • quali ed instructors • relaxed environment • choice of session The only middle school alternative in the heart of the Beach. Now accepting applications for grades 6, 7 and 8 September 2014 Learning should fit your child at every stage. See for yourself at our OPEN HOUSE, May 1, 4-6 pm Contact Sherry VanDerKooi to talk about your child and Avalon. 2181 Queen Street East, 416-686-6621 avalonmontessori.ca 1580 Kingston Rd., Toronto, ON, M1N 1S2 647-352-5182 | success@haltonhighschool.com www.haltonhighschool.com

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14 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, April 29, 2014 Swing Into Spring By Jon Muldoon Centre S Beach a decade ago. “It was really the first call I made when we got an apartment in the Beach,” said Vachon. “It’s the best decision I’ve ever made. It’s a great community of artists.” Crighton organizes a pre-tour for the artists themselves. Usually artists are unable to leave their locations to check out the work of others on the tour, so the entire group of 24 artists travels together with 10-minute stops at each location on the Friday afternoon before the official tour begins. The tour was founded in 1994 by Carolyn Barnett and Susan Macdonald. Both have since moved away, though both take part in tours in their current hometowns. Barnett is returning as a visiting artist for the spring tour, sharing Roderick Mayne’s Kingswood Avenue location. Crighton, who had already been organizing showings at her home with other artists, was happy to join in right from the start. “When Carolyn started the tour it was great, because everything wasn’t just on my shoulders,” she said. While she speaks to visitors about her work on the main floor during the tour, she enlists friends to give tours of her looms and work rooms upstairs. “If I’m not selling, I’m educating people,” said Crighton, who said she sometimes misses teaching, which she’s done throughout the US and here in Ontario. “I loved seeing the light bulbs go off when people got it,” she said. However, “I found I couldn’t divide my time between teaching and weaving.” Vachon has also embraced the organizational side – she joined the executive committee six years ago. She said organizers are constantly looking to improve SCARBORO MUSIC 1051 Kingston Road • (416) 699-8333 www.scarboromusic.com 2245 Queen sTreeT easT, 2nD floor • open 7 Days a Week Expert Repairs Reasonable Rates ReStore ReString ReVamp Beach Studio Tour marks 20 yea THIS SPRING marks 20 years of Beach artists opening their home studios to the public, with the 21st Spring Beach Studio Tour set to take place this weekend, from May 2 to 4. Weaver and clothing designer Lucille Crighton has been there for all 40 tours (including the annual fall tours). It’s been such a success for her that the Beach Studio Tour and the One Of A Kind Show are the only two events she takes part in every year. Crighton said she is looking forward to yet another weekend of catching up with long-term clients and friends. “The spring tour is like the rite of spring,” she said. “A lot of people come back again and again. I’ve built strong relationships with my customers because I’m interested in them, and they’re interested in how an artist works.” Those, in a nutshell, are the main reasons for the success of the tour, which is the longest-running studio tour in the city – the access to a creator’s workspace (most shared with visiting artists), combined with the relationships artists build with those who are touched by art. “It’s such a beautiful way to connect with people, through the arts,” said current tour chair Nathalie Vachon. She has taken part in the tour for 10 years. There are many who have been on the juried tour since the early years, a testament to its success – fine artist Dianne Shelton and photographer John Dowding have both been taking part since the second year. Vachon, a painter and entertainer, immediately embraced the tour and local art scene when she returned to the Massage Therapy • reflexology acupuncTure • reiki hoT sTone Massage Therapy self care proDucTs gifT cerTificaTes aVailaBle www.therapylounge.ca 416.916.7122 Weaver and clothing designer Lucille Crighton from May 2 to 4. For the duration of the tour, the tour for both artists and art lovers. This year the website (beachstudiotour. ca) received a full overhaul, along with the design of the map and promotional materials. “Every year we try to do something new,” she said. To help celebrate the 20th birthday, a p spe cha the sum for “ you Beach Art By Jon Muldoon ARTISANS AT Work will be hosting a messy and exciting art competition on Saturday, May 10. The fun gets underway at 7 p.m. The local edition of Art Battle Canada will feature 16 artists, who will each have 20 minutes to create a painting of their choice in acrylic. The crowd determines the winner, and winners of each round move on to battle in the grand finale. The winner of the event walks away with $200 and a spot in the national competition. For more on the art battle concept, visit artbattle.ca or facebook.com/artbattlecanada. For the month of May, the gallery will also be hosting two shows. The Garden Show, not unexpectedly, features work inspired by or related to gardens. Also appearing is the annual juried Rosedale Valley School of the Arts student exhibition. Both shows will share a monthly First Friday opening night party on Friday, May 2, from 7 to 10 p.m. The evening features artists and art lovers mingling to the sounds of live music, with a licensed bar and snacks. For more on the gallery and community studio space, including information on live model sessions, summer art camp for kids, and various art classes, visit artisans-at-work.com. Artisans At Work is at 2071 Danforth Ave., just west of Woodbine. FELICITY SOMERSET’S photographs will be featured at Cobalt Gallery, 870a Kingston Rd., during the month of May. Somerset has long focused on macro and abstract images, but recent trips to Newfoundland and Labrador found her widening her viewpoint to encompass more traditional landscapes. The weather, which changes quickly and without warning on the east coast, played a large role in dictating her subjects, which range from the ocean itself, to the unique homes, boats and fishing equipment to be found throughout the region. Somerset will be at the opening reception, to be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, May 1. For more on the gallery see cobaltgallery.ca. For more on Somerset, see felicitysomersetphotography.com. BUF Bit eva Linda Bronicheski Barrister and Solicitor 47 Main Street (at Lyall) 416-763-6884 www.BeachesFamilyLaw.com

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 15 re Stage Solid Pine! years of celebrating local artists Made by independent carpenter north of the city working in solid pine hutches, TV stands, night stands, etc. All to custom sizes ...in the Beaches, 7 days a week www.seagullclassics.com 1974 Queen St. East 416-690-5224 Happy Mother’s Day from MOM'S SPECIAL DAY $155 PHOTO: JON MULDOON Full Facial, Manicure, Pedicure with Parafin, & Aromatherapy Back Massage Hair Cut & Manicure Mini Facial & Blow Dry with deep condition treatment Shellac Manicure & Pedicure e Crighton stands in the midst of her colourful studio. Her Balsam Avenue home will be open to the public for the Beach Studio Tour the tour, she is sharing space in her house with photographer John Dowding and metal artist Tod Waring. $65 $75 ers. our. with nal ing day, a party was held in April. During the speeches, Beaches-East York MPP Michael Prue mentioned that artists are the soul of a community, which really summed up the importance of the tour for Vachon. “It’s such an honour when something you create speaks to somebody on a powerful and deep level,” she said. The sharing of studios with artists from outside the Beach area also adds some great variety, said Vachon. “The art we create is influenced by our surroundings and our stories, so it’s great to have others come bring their stories,” she said. And for art lovers or those simply curious about home art studios, the tour is not only a great way to access local artists, but a great neighbourhood to traverse while moving from one studio to the next. “We have such an incredible backdrop for that,” said Vachon. $75 direct payment | visa | mastercard | american express 2090 Queen St. East (West of Wineva Ave.) info@hairdynamix.ca | 416-699-3575 www.hairdy namix .ca Arts Scene May in his Silo City exhibition at Open Gallery. Bittner has spent about two years photographing the mostly disused grain silos along a mile-long section of the Buffalo River, capturing the towering concrete structures in all kinds of light and weather. After thousands of photographs, he began to feel more at home, and discovered the mix of constancy and change that, to him, reveals the essence of a place. Open Gallery is operated by Open Architects Inc. in their office at 454 Kingston Rd. The gallery features work inspired by or celebrating architectural qualities. For more information on the gallery, visit opengallery.ca. For more on Bittner’s work, see thomasbittner.net. phs 70a ay. cro s to her ass athithyed cts, the uipon. epurssee set, m. Felicity Somerset BUFFALO PHOTOGRAPHER Thomas Bittner’s work, featuring that city’s elevator alley, will be featured throughout Thomas Bittner Barry Noble, D.P.M. — Podiatrist Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Heel Pain ♦ Heel Spurs ♦ Orthotics ♦ Custom Shoes Infected Nails ♦ Ingrown Nails ♦ Fungal Nail Infections Skin Infections ♦ Warts ♦ Callouses ♦ Corns Diabetic Foot Care Partial OHIP Coverage Main Medical Building 294 Main Street (at Danforth) 416-694-4166

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