ET Journal Spring 2014 Issue

 

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ET Journal Spring 2014 Issue

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The EARCOS Triannual JOURNAL A Link to Educational Excellence in East Asia SPRING 2014 Featured in this Issue Curriculum - How Gaming Allows for Successful Differentiated Instruction - Our Move to Standards Based Assessments and Reporting – Slow and Steady EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 Theme: “The Science of Learning – Service of Learning”

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The EARCOS JOURNAL The ET Journal is a triannual publication of the East Asia Regional Council of Schools(EARCOS), a nonprofit 501(C)3, incorporated in the state of Delaware, USA, with a regional office in Manila, Philippines. Membership in EARCOS is open to elementary and secondary schools in East Asia which offer an educational program using English as the primary language of instruction, and to other organizations, institutions, and individuals. Objectives and Purposes * To promote intercultural understanding and international friendship through the activities of member schools. * To broaden the dimensions of education of all schools involved in the Council in the interest of a total program of education. * To advance the professional growth and welfare of individuals belonging to the educational staff of member schools. * To facilitate communication and cooperative action between and among all associated schools. * To cooperate with other organizations and individuals pursuing the same objectives as the Council. EARCOS BOARD OF TRUSTEES David Toze, President (International School Manila) Thomas Farrell, Vice President (Kaohsiung American School) Joe Beeson, Secretary (Yongsan International School of Seoul) Tarek Razik, Treasurer (The International School of Beijing) Margaret Alvarez (ISS International School) Diane Lewthwaite (Fukuoka International School) Anna Marsden (International School Suva) Tim Carr, Past President (Jakarta International School) David Condon (Canadian Academy) James McDonald (NIST International School) Office of Overseas Schools REO: EARCOS STAFF Executive Director: Assistant Director: Vitz Baltero Ver Castro Robert Sonny Viray Editor: Bill Oldread Associate Editor: Edzel Drilo Richard Krajczar Bill Oldread Elaine Repatacodo Edzel Drilo Rod Catubig Jr. Letter from the Executive Director Dear Colleagues: The end of the school year is near, and 2013-2014 has flown by. I hope everyone will have a smooth end of school. This is the time of year when so much is expected and workload is pushed to the highest peak. Breathe and stay relaxed. The Spring Heads’ Institute in Kaohsiung, Taiwan will have 35 school leaders in attendance, which is a good turnout for this retreat! We strive to increase attendance at this event each year and hope that next year will be even better. The 2014 EARCOS Teachers’ Conference (ETC) had 1300 registered delegates. The Shangri-La Bangkok proved to be a great venue for this year’s event. Fortunately the political situation calmed down in Bangkok and the conference went off well. Our keynoters Yong Zhao, Mark Polansky, and Catherine Steiner-Adair were well received. The conference offered 183 breakout sessions, and 10 preconferences proving to be an outstanding PD opportunity. Please see the conference write-up in this issue. Our EARCOS staff of Bill, Elaine,Vitz,Ver, Robert, and Edzel should be thanked for their tremendous efforts in organizing thousands of details. We hope you all have a great break this summer (northern hemisphere) and have time for family, friends, travel, and reflection. Our board and staff continue to work to make EARCOS a caring, supportive, and dynamic community of international schools. Please check out our website to see all our sponsored events and read about my travels throughout the EARCOS region. Please visit E-Connect, the EARCOS blog, initiated by our own Bill Oldread. Happy Holiday! Dick Krajczar Executive Director Check out our updated website at www.earcos.org and read our E-Connect blog at earcos-connect.tumblr.com Connie Buford (ex officio) East Asia Regional Council of Schools Brentville Subdivision, Barangay Mamplasan Biñan, Laguna, 4024, Philippines PHONE: 63-02-697-9170 FAX: 63-49-511-4694 WEBSITE: www.earcos.org (L-R) Robert Viray, Dick Krajczar, Edzel Drilo, Rod Catubig, Bill Oldread, Ver Castro, Vitz Baltero, and Elaine Repatacodo

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In this Issue 2 contents 12th EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 The Science of Learning – Service of Learning ETC2014 Photo Gallery Middle School GIN Conference 2014 EARCOS Barge Trip SENIA Conference 2014 36 Approved Weekend Workshops SY 2014-2015 3 6 7 8 One of the services EARCOS provides to its member schools throughout the year is the sponsorship of two-day workshops and institutes for faculty and administration. The topics for these workshops are determined according to the needs of members. Workshops are hosted by EARCOS schools. 10 12 Faces of EARCOS EdThought - Navigating the Sustainability Mission Front cover photo 14 Curriculum - Our Move to Standards Based Assessments and Reporting – Slow and Steady - Life Long Learning in the Humanities Classroom: Discussing Governance with a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate - How Gaming Allows for Successful Differentiated Instruction - No Gold Stars Allowed! What Gifted Children Need from Their Teachers - Peace …. More than just an end to war - Reader’s Workshop: A Model for Reading Instruction - Rising Star Expedition Skype - Celebrating Cultural Awareness Day with Students of the Atayal Tribe Wat Arun Ratchawararam Ratchawaramahawihan or Wat Arun (“Temple of Dawn”) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Bangkok Yai district of Bangkok, Thailand, on the Thonburi west bank of the Chao Phraya River. The temple derives its name from the Hindu god Aruna,often personified as the radiations of the rising sun. Wat Arun is among the best known of Thailand’s landmarks and the first light of the morning reflects off the surface of the temple with pearly iridescence. Although the temple had existed since at least the seventeenth century, its distinctive prang (spires) were built in the early nineteenth century during the reign of King Rama II. The EARCOS Action Research Grant In an ongoing effort to implement the EARCOS Strategic Plan, specifically Strategy E, to conduct, communicate, and archive relevant data and research to identify and enhance exceptional educational practices, grants will be made available to encourage our teachers, administrators, and professional staff to conduct action research to improve educational practices for the purpose of enhancing student learning. Action research is a reflective process, conducted in the school setting, to solve a real problem, or to improve and enhance the instructional process.This research may be undertaken by an individual, or by several people collaboratively. It is our belief that the results of such research will impact not only the researchers’ practices but also those of others with whom they share their findings.To that end, grantees will be expected to publish their findings, which will be made available to all EARCOS mem-bers on the website. Some researchers may elect to present their work at a subsequent ETC, ELC, or publish it in the EARCOS Journal. Please visit the EARCOS website for more information. www.earcos.org 23 Green & Sustainable Press Release - Keeping it green at the International School of Beijing 24 - Salva Dut Challenges M’KIS Community to Change the World ‘Lost Boy’ Inspires Students with His Story of Perseverance - Shekou International School (SIS), is celebrating its 25th year anniversary - Dancing Master - Newly Appointed ACS WASC Commissioners 27 28 Student Poem Student Gallery Contribute to the ET Journal If you have something going on at your school in any of the following categories that you would like to see highlighted in the Summer issue please send it along to us: Faces of EARCOS - Promotions, retirements, honors, etc. Service Learning Campus Development - New building plans, under construction, just completed projects. Curriculum - New and exciting curriculum adoptions. Green and Sustainable - Related to campus development or to curriculum efforts. Student Art - We showcase outstanding student art in each edition. Press Releases Thank you for your help in allowing us to highlight the great things that are going on in EARCOS schools. Spring 2014 Issue 1 Featuring middle school art showcasing different types of medium. 32 Campus Development Featuring Jakarta International School–reflecting the school’s Indonesian heritage. 34 On the Road with Dr. K A glance of Dr. K’s travel representing EARCOS organization in various conferences and school visitation from different applying schools in the EARCOS region. Spring 2014

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EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 The Science of Learning – Service of Learning EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 - Theme: “The Science of Learning – Service of Learning“ The 12th annual EARCOS Teachers’ Conference found its way back to the familiar and luxurious setting of the ShagriLa Hotel in warm and inviting Bangkok,Thailand. Over 1200 participants from across the EARCOS region rekindled old friendships and took advantage of the many wonderful professional development opportunities on offer. The strands from this year’s conference included STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering (Robotics) and Mathematics), Social Studies and Humanities, Middle School Education, Counseling, Service Learning and General Education. Over 160 workshop presentations by a wide range of knowledgeable and inspirational speakers were featured at this year’s conference. Nine pre-conferences with two AP workshop offerings took place prior to the opening of the main conference. Kenny Peavy and Lynda Rolph kicked off the pre-conferences with an outdoor classroom session on the Chao Phraya River focusing on sustainability. Each of the pre-conferences focused on various aspects of the applications of the science of learning. The main conference opened on Thursday morning with a stirring vocal performance by St. Mary’s Varsity Ensemble from Tokyo, Japan, directed by Randy Stenson and accompanied by Rachel Stenson. This was followed by the first keynote address entitled Two Education Paradigms: What Defines a World Class Education by Dr. Yong Zhao. His humorous and poignantly insightful address focused on the changing needs of our students as they make their way through their education in order to wind up with enough skills to be independent, socially competent, and most importantly to NOT wind up living in their parents’ basements. The welcome reception at the poolside was held Thursday evening to celebrate EARCOS practitioner presenters. This was generously sponsored by TIECARE International. Scrumptious food and drink were accompanied by traditional Thai music and dance performances. Friday morning began with a melodic musical performance by a high school octet from the International School of Bangkok directed by Tom Myers. This was followed by the keynote address by former astronaut and test pilot Mark Polansky entitled Space, STEM and the Future. He shared the story of how he became inspired as child to explore space and shared some remarkable photos and video of his time working on board the International Space Station. He made it very clear how crucial it is that today’s students continue to be inspired to develop their STEM skills in order to carry on humanity’s quest to push the boundaries of exploration. The final day of the conference was rung in by the Secondary Marimba Ensemble from the New International School of Thailand under the direction of Krissi Olsen. The ultimate keynote address entitled Lost in Connection: How the Tech Effect Puts Children’s Development at Risk was presented by Catherine Steiner-Adair, an internationally recognized clinical psychologist, school consultant and speaker. The focus of her presentation was on how recent technological developments are challenging and changing the way that parents and teachers interact with their children. Pulling from a strong base of empirical evidence, Catherine emphasized how important it is for primary caretakers of children to remain focused on their social and emotional well-being in the face of the often disruptive and potentially harmful effects of using technology. The conference came to a close with a reception in the main ballroom where participants had one last chance to share their ideas from the workshops and say goodbye until next time to their many friends and international colleagues. The science and service of learning were highly visible throughout this year’s EARCOS conference. By Peter Kimball, Taipei American School / Jacques Sylvain, International School Beijing 2 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 - Theme: “The Science of Learning – Service of Learning“ Spring 2014 Issue 3

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EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 - Theme: “The Science of Learning – Service of Learning“ 4 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2014 - Theme: “The Science of Learning – Service of Learning“

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MSGIN 2014 Middle School GIN Conference 2014 By Miriam Giddens (Grade 8 Student at Jakarta International School) As I strode toward the podium to make the opening speech for the first middle school GIN (Global Issues Network) conference, I looked out at all of the eager faces that filled the auditorium. We were fortunate to have over 30 schools from around the world in attendance. These 258 faces made up a group of youth who were excited about discussing the problems in the world, and were ready to help fix them. There were people who would one day be running NGOs, and there were kids that already are. These adolescents, who seemed so average, were the people that will and are saving the world. You could see the passion in their eyes. And it was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen. Then everyone went off on their various “Burst the Bubble” trips. These outings provided an opportunity for change as participants were about to “burst” their own bubbles within which they live. All of the Burst the Bubble trips provided students a unique opportunity interact with the local community where the “issues” are relevant on a daily basis. The trips ranged from going to the XS Project to visiting impoverished children, but each trip had one very important thing in common: they all educated students on global issues in Indonesia. At our conference we wanted to be globally aware. So we decided to reduce our carbon footprint by as much as possible. One of our solutions to the size of our carbon footprint was to have on-campus housing for the visiting students and teachers. Almost all of the visiting schools decided to stay on-campus and reduced their carbon footprint by 87%. Overall, the 2014 GIN conference was an utter success. It was life changing and perhaps it will be responsible for the world changing. By Sheila Yap, Brent International School. 6 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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EARCOS BARGE TRIP Barge Trip On March 24th eight educators, from kindergarten to high school, humanities to science, joined Kenny Peavy and Lynda Rolph on a barge tour of the Chao Phraya River for 3 days and 2 nights. The goal was to get outside and explore outdoor education and the environment. We began by building community, as we helped out with life on the boat and participated in ice breakers and team building games. We learned about life on the river through storytelling, hands on activities, and role plays. These were activities we could easily reproduce and adapt in our own classrooms to foster community and active learning. Kenny and Lynda introduced us to the sustainability compass, a way to look at the world around us with a different lens. We learned the history of the water hyacinth through an interactive role play, and got down and dirty as we observed the life that teems in its roots and stems. We listened as Kenny read us the book he has written, The Box People; he also shared how we too could share ideas through writing and also get our work and our kids work published. We got off the boat and observed the culture of the river by going to a market, interacting with people, and buying local foods to make a shared feast. We observed the lives of the Mon people in Ko Kret through the perspective of the sustainability compass, seeing how floods and tourism have changed their island life as potters. We looked for signs of well being and nature, and we also observed temples and traditions. We took a nature walk, observing the wildlife and listening to the sounds around us. We took time to relax. We had fun together, swimming and kayaking in the river, playing games, and hanging out in the evening. When we left the barge at the end of the third afternoon we were connected to a network of educators who share a similar passion, inspired to get students out into nature, and equipped with activities and ideas to implement as we return to our own parts of the world. A Complete Student Information System for International Schools Trusted by International Schools in more than 115 countries • AdminPlus: A fully integrated student information system. • Admissions Plus Pro: Track applicants through the entire admissions process. • Online Forms for admissions, re-enrollment, parent verification, staff employment applications, billing, and more. • Accounting with dual-currency and multi-language options. • Integrated with finalsite. New! TeacherPlus Web Gradebook Works great on PCs and Macs and is fully integrated with AdminPlus. See a free online demo at www.rediker.com www.rediker.com | 800-213-9860 | sales@rediker.com Spring 2014 Issue 7

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SENIA CONFERENCE SENIA 2014 Singapore Conference “Overall, I had a great time at the conference. I learned a lot and made some great connections with other people.” In addition to the workshops, a slot was allocated for a Community of Practice, a networking and sharing session, when participants met with colleagues with similar interests and whose experience they tapped into. “I enjoyed this opportunity. I gained good information that I was looking for and was able to help others with their questions. It was good to see where my school compares with others.” The highlight of the award ceremony was our student award winner, Celeste Palmer of Western Academy Beijing. Celeste had to overcome overwhelming obstacles with learning, yet she took it on with a no-nonsense attitude. When told she would never ride a bike, she laughed and learned how to ride one immediately. She was an inspiration to us all. SENIA also announced its first ever advocacy award winner: Dr. Shari Rosen of Shanghai, China. Congratulations to all of the nominees for both awards. This was just one of many positive comments provided by the participants about the recent SENIA 2014 Singapore Conference, held at United World College of South East Asia’s East Campus from Thursday, 27 February to Saturday, 1 March. With over 200 participants from more than 90 different schools and organisations attending from 17 countries, it was the biggest SENIA Conference to date. The common goal of everyone attending stems from SENIA’s mission: To support children with special learning needs by providing a network to combine our strengths to help raise awareness and advocate for the children in our lives. The conference ended with a panel session by the three keynote speakers and a prize draw, although it’s difficult to say which was the motivation for staying ‘til the end! One of the best parts of any conference is the chance to meet other people in the same field and gather new ideas. The conference BBQ and social on Friday evening served as a great forum to do this. What did you find most beneficial about the SENIA 2014 Singapore Conference? “Knowing what everyone else in our field is doing in this part of the world, connecting with fellow speech therapists, learning about new research and changes in the field that may affect how we work with our students.” “The chance to network with colleagues, hear some phenomenal experts, and learn new information that can be implemented at school.” Thank you to all the people who supported this year’s conference, especially the SENIA Board, Ailsa Hill, Head of Learning Support at UWCSEA East Campus, the The three strands of the conference were behaviour management, mathematics and executive functioning. Along with the three keynote speakers, Margaret Thorsborne, a leader in the field of restorative practices, Shad Moarif, an expert on dyscalculia and maths learning difficulties and Bonnie Singer, an expert on language and literacy, other leaders in their fields were brought in to offer ‘expert workshops’. Of course, no conference is worth its salt without workshops by practitioners and both expert and practitioner workshops were well received. “All the workshops were incredibly informative. I felt the everything about the conference was beneficial.” 8 8 EARCOS EARCOS Triannual Triannual Journal Journal

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Learning Support and Counselling teams at UWCSEA and UWCSEA’s Centre for International Education. A massive thank you also to the practitioner workshop leaders and participants who made this year’s conference a huge success. “SENIA is doing a great job and there are hardly any good workshops around this subjects! So thank you for doing what you do!” It’s great to see the SENIA community growing in numbers and coming together to share and learn new ideas. Of course, the community can continue to communicate throughout the year via Facebook (www.facebook.com/SENIA.ASIA) and by following @SENIA_ASIA on Twitter. Board elections are currently underway to fill the three slots being vacated by Ericson Perez, Tanya Farrol, and Lori Boll. Tanya was one of the original members of SENIA and is now moving on to another international school outside of Asia. We would like to thank her for her service and true dedication to SENIA. Are you interested in attending the next SENIA conference? Next year’s conference will be held in conjunction with the annual EARCOS teacher’s conference in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia. Keep an eye on the senia.asia website for full details. Photos from Friday night BBQ and social Spring 2014 Issue 9

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Faces of EARCOS Faces of EARCOS Welcome New EARCOS Schools >> KIS International School (Thailand) Mrs. Sally Holloway, Head of School Ayeyarwaddy International School (Myanmar) (Provisional Member School) Dr. Gary Robson, Head of School Dostyk American International School (Republic of Kazakhstan) (Affiliate Member School) Dr. Raúl Hinojosa, Director EARCOS Support SCHOOLS FOR SCHOOLS Project >> Welcome New Associate >> ACHIEVE3000 (USA) Services: Online differentiated instruction in literacy and science Dr. K (EARCOS Executive Director) donating a P142, 000.00 pesos to Mr. Dick Robbins (Headmaster of Brent International School) to support SCHOOLS FOR SCHOOLS Project The SCHOOLS FOR SCHOOLS Project Help Rebuild Classrooms for Student affected by Typhoon Yolanda. The Margaret Sanders Scholarship Winner >> GAEA PATRICE R. MORALES, is last year’s recipient of the Margaret Sanders Scholarship award.. A Philippine Scholar at International School Manila (ISM), serves her school and her community with an intense desire to make a lasting impact. She has been an influential force in ISM’s Sustainability Initiative Plan (SIP), in which she has led focus groups representing all ISM stakeholders to address the school’s mission to “Involve our community in sustaining and safeguarding our environment”. She is Vice-President of ISM’s Service Learning Council, responsible for aiding with the organization of service trips and supporting the school’s service clubs as well as spearheading relief efforts for victims of natural disasters. Beyond the ISM community, she has been at the forefront in the development of the UNESCO Club Global City Charter that aims to supplement the education for students attending underfunded schools in the area. Gaea finds time to act as Secretary General of the Model United Nations at ISM and Editor-in-Chief of its literary magazine. She is also a gifted singer who is on stage at every opportunity. Congratulations! >> Congratulations to MS. ROWIE SILVESTRE for completing her On-The-Job training at the EARCOS office as part of her unit requirement in Computer Science course at Polytechnic University of the Philippines in Binan, Laguna, Philippines. We wish Rowie all the best for her future and thank her for all her hard work. SAT average scores in academic year 2012-2013 Students attending EARCOS member schools, on average, outperform other cohorts on the SAT. Source: SAT mean scores for students in 2012-2013. College Board internal analysis. 10 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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Take your musicians on an acoustical field trip. (without leaving the rehearsal room.) Wenger is the premier source for the BEST in Acoustics – from Standard Acoustical Treatment to the NEW flexible design of Tunable Acoustical Panels. You can now completely modify the acoustics of your classroom with the push of the button on our VAE Rehearsal keypad. Wenger has taken rehearsal room acoustics to an entirely new level – Level “Wow”. NEW! PRODUCT Practice where you perform! Now you can simulate nine different acoustic environments in your rehearsal room at the push of a button. Wenger can also program custom simulations of your auditorium or a competition venue. Your students benefit by being able to practice in an environment before they perform there. You control the entire system of microphones and speakers from a simple keypad. VAE® Rehearsal NEW! PRODUCT Tunable Acoustical Panels Smart mechanics and acoustic science allow the same wall-mounted panel to adapt from absorption to diffusion with the simple turn of a handle. It’s the multi-purpose solution to room acoustics. Wenger can now acoustically design your new or existing space into one that’s appropriate for both instrumental and choral rehearsal (yes, the same space) And it’s much more affordable than you can imagine. QR CODE Snap this QR code to view our VAE Rehearsal installation at Wayzata High School in Minnesota. The video includes comments from Mark Gitch, Wayzata’s Orchestra Director. 1-507-455-4100 www.wengercorp.com

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EdThought EdThought >> Navigating the Sustainability Mission By Tom McLean, International School Manila ity. It does not actively support teachers, and others, who already carry out this work. Whilst there may be an awareness of sustainable schools initiatives, their significance is not really grasped by school leaders. Sustainability work in the school is characterised by the work of isolated teachers and young people, or of small groups which may tend to adopt a behaviour-change focus, and there may well be some latent frustration in this. There has been little or no financial contribution to making sustainability-focused change, or to staff professional development. (Scott 2012) Small groups of isolated teachers and students advocating behavior change are unlikely to equip learners with the knowledge and skills necessary to contribute to the types of systems change for which the Amsterdam Declaration calls. Individual behavior change, necessary as it is, is not enough. For example, a Filipino may reduce his energy consumption by choosing not to turn on his air conditioning; however that action will not change the fact that the energy he consumes is coal-powered. Individuals who are aware of the limitations of their actions may not respond positively to being encouraged to change their behavior. Such people are likely to remain unconvinced that personal change will solve the problem. The perception of empowerment is critical in motivating change. As Bandura has noted in his studies on self efficacy and health, ‘People’s beliefs that they can motivate themselves and regulate their own behavior plays a crucial role in whether they even consider changing detrimental health habits or pursuing rehabilitative activities’ (Bandura 1997). If schools are to live up to their mission statements and prepare students to affect change in systems we must treat systems thinking as a basic literacy. There is a need to clarify what exactly this basic literacy is, but a starting point is to ensure that education is grounded in the recognition that Earth is a closed system and that everything within the Earth system functions interdependently. One simple tool for facilitating systems thinking and fostering a sustainable mindset is the AtKisson Sustainability Compass (fig. 1). The Compass is based on the premise that individual human wellbeing is of equal value to, and interdependent with, natural, economic, and social systems. Considering issues from each Compass point ensures a holistic perspective and identifying relationships between Compass points stimulates systems thinking, as it encourages students to consider concepts such as feedback, delays, stocks, flows, sources, and sinks. The 2001 Amsterdam Declaration, signed by 1500 scientists from four of the world’s great global research programs, stated unequivocally that: An ethical framework for global stewardship and strategies for Earth System management are urgently needed. The accelerating human transformation of the Earth’s environment is not sustainable. Therefore, the business-as-usual way of dealing with the Earth System is not an option. It has to be replaced as soon as possible by deliberate strategies of good management that sustain the Earth’s environment while meeting social and economic development objectives. (IGBP) Awareness of the need for deliberate strategies of good Earth System management has not led to restorative action, as the Resilience Alliance noted in their 2009 Planetary Boundaries publication, ‘the predominant paradigm of social and economic development remains largely oblivious to the risk of human-induced environmental disasters at continental to planetary scales.’ (Stern 2007: Cited in Rockstrom 2009) If society is to address imbalances within the Earth System, schools must surely play a crucial role in equipping young people with the necessary knowledge and skills in integrated systems management. Schools frequently publish mission statements that declare a commitment to facilitating the transition to sustainability but rarely have a coherent strategy for realizing this commitment and assessing and reporting their progress in doing so. In order for schools to live their mission, a whole school approach to sustainability education that is fully supported by school leadership is a prerequisite. Without such a commitment, schools are effectively adopting the business as usual ‘non-option’ and thus are not living their mission. To illustrate this point further a proposed base-level descriptor for assessing the role of school leadership in sustainability education, developed by William Scott, is included below: The school leadership does not yet understand the significance of sustainability issues to young people’s education, and has not considered (or has rejected as irrelevant) that such issues might usefully inform young people’s current learning as well as their development of awareness, skills and capabil12 EARCOS Triannual Journal Fig. 1 AtKisson Sustainability Compass

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One example of use of the Compass is as follows. Extracting and burning stored fossilized carbon can be linked to increases in human wellbeing on account of fossil fuel’s capacity to stimulate economic development, but the failure of society to accurately price and regulate the use of fossil fuels is resulting in large carbon flows into the atmosphere, resulting in atmospheric feedback, which is negatively impacting economic systems and human wellbeing through climate change. The Compass can be used to analyze any issue at any level of complexity because it is not exclusive to conventional environmental issues and is highly flexible. The largest systems students can realistically hope to understand and influence are likely to be the schools in which they learn. Consequently, it is logical for students to be taught systems thinking in the context of their schools. Schools are distinct communities; microcosms of society, in which the wellbeing of individuals is of paramount importance, economic decisions vital, and the relationship with the environment observable and measurable. In order for schools to provide this type of learning they must collect and make accessible data from each of the Compass points. Without accurate information students cannot hope to gain an accurate understanding of how they and their schools are contributing to the transition to sustainability. The task of identifying indicators and descriptors from each of the Compass points is not easy, and this is why leadership in sustainability education is so critical. Without a concerted effort to gather such data and coordinate the use of it in ways that enhance the learning of all students, schools are not living their mission to prepare students for the systems change that they will inevitably live through. Alma Harris notes: ‘Essentially schools have two options in terms of the sustainability agenda. They can approach sustainable development as: • A ‘bolt on’, peripheral activity that is a small part of the curriculum • An integral, holistic, whole school development that shapes curriculum delivery, interpretation, and implementation It is only the latter of these two options that is likely to produce awareness raising, changes in behaviour, and rich teaching and learning. The other option will inevitably result in piecemeal and fragmented delivery; partial attention to key issues and most probably, dissatisfied learners.’ (Harris 2008) Questions for Self Reflection • Do we understand and prioritize on-going inquiry into sustainability that includes, and goes beyond environmental activism? • Do school leaders prioritize aspects of school programmes that focus on the interdependence of subject knowledge and skills? • Do teachers understand their role in assisting students to recognize interdependence between subjects and are they skilled in doing so? • Is a coordinated whole school approach to sustainability education in existence that utilizes authentic school data in curricular and co-curricular activities? • To what extent are all members of the community, and especially students, involved in decision-making processes? • To what extent do students learn and understand the value of systems thinking? • Does the school foster a mutually beneficial relationship with the broader community? • Does the school facilitate discussion of emerging and possible futures? • Does the school assess its progress towards sustainability? • Does the school foster debate about the ethical framework required for global stewardship? • Does the school consider “ecological or sustainability literacy” as a requirement for student graduation? References Amsterdam Declaration on Earth System Science. 26 August 2013. http:// www.igbp.net/about/history/2001amsterdamdeclarationonearthsystemscie nce.4.1b8ae20512db692f2a680001312.html Harris, A. 2008. Leading Sustainable Schools. London, UK. Specialist Schools and Academies Trust. Rockström, J., W. Steffen, K. Noone, Å. Persson, F. S. Chapin, III, E. Lambin, T. M. Lenton, M. Scheffer, C. Folke, H. Schellnhuber, B. Nykvist, C. A. De Wit, T. Hughes, S. van der Leeuw, H. Rodhe, S. Sörlin, P. K. Snyder, R. Costanza, U. Svedin, M. Falkenmark, L. Karlberg, R. W. Corell, V. J. Fabry, J. Hansen, B. Walker, D. Liverman, K. Richardson, P. Crutzen, and J. Foley. 2009. Planetary boundaries: exploring the safe operating space for humanity. Ecology and Society 14(2): 32. [online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol14/iss2/art32/ Scott, B. 2012. Developing the Sustainable School: Thinking the Issues Through. Bath, UK. University of Bath. EdThought We partner with our customers by three things: service@teamstyle.cn 0086-21-31261560 Shanghai.China Spring 2014 Issue 13

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