2013 Annual Report

 

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HOPE Annual Report

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Hope  Academy  Charter  School   2013  Annual  Report  on  Curriculumn,  Instruction  and   Student  Achievement   MN  Charter  School  District  #4070     Maychy  Vu,  Director   720  Payne  Avenue   Saint  Pauk,  MN  55130   Phone:  (651)  796  –  4500     Fax:  (651)  796-­‐4599     Email:  maychyvu@hope-­‐school.org Prepared  by  Designs  for  Learning,  Inc.   2233  University  Avenue  West.,  Suite  450   Saint  Paul,  MN    55114   Phone:  (651)  645-­‐0200   Fax:  (651)  645-­‐0240   Email:  aadelmann@designlearn.net      

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  Table  of  Contents       Executive  Summary ..................................................................................................... 4   HOPE  Academic  Program............................................................................................. 6   Mission  and  Vision ................................................................................................................................................ 6   HOPE  Community  Academy  Addresses  the  Purposes  for  Charter  Schools ........................................................... 6   Accountability  Plan  Data ....................................................................................................................................... 7   After  School  Programming.................................................................................................................................. 16   Parent  Involvement............................................................................................................................................. 17   Innovative  Practices,  New  Initiatives,  and  Future  Plans ..................................................................................... 18   HOPE  Governance  and  Operations ............................................................................ 20   Teaching  Staff...................................................................................................................................................... 20   Management  and  Administration....................................................................................................................... 22   Director’s  Professional  Development  Plan ......................................................................................................... 23   Strengths,  Challenges  and  Plans  for  the  Future .................................................................................................. 24   School  Enrollment  and  Admissions ..................................................................................................................... 26   Community  Connections  and  Partnerships......................................................................................................... 28   Board  Orientation  and  Training .......................................................................................................................... 29   Board  Member  Information................................................................................................................................ 29   HOPE  Finances .......................................................................................................... 30   Overview  of  Finances .......................................................................................................................................... 31   Internal  Controls  and  Board  Oversight ............................................................................................................... 34   Finance  Award .................................................................................................................................................... 35   Audit.................................................................................................................................................................... 35   Attachments ............................................................................................................. 36       HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  2  

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  HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  3  

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  Executive  Summary     This  report  provides  the  University  of  Saint  Thomas,  families  of  HOPE  Community  Academy  (HOPE),  and  the  general   public  with  information  describing  the  progress  of  HOPE  and  its  students  during  the  school’s  twelfth  year  of  opera-­‐ tion.  The  key  findings  are  as  follows:      Academic  Goals:  HOPE’s  academic  goals  and  indicators  are  defined  in  its  contract  with  its  authorizer,  the  Univer-­‐ sity  of  St.  Thomas.  There  were  three  Academic  Goals,  focusing  on  Adequate  Yearly  Progress;  the  Minnesota   Comprehensive  Assessments;  and  the  Measures  of  Academic  Progress.   o Adequate  Yearly  Progress  Results  for  2013  show  HOPE  Community  Academy  meeting  targets  in  Participation,   Attendance,  and  Math  Proficiency  but  not  in  Reading  Proficiency.  In  Reading  Proficiency,  The  All  Students,   Asian,  and  Free/Reduced  Price  Lunch  groups  were  below  the  target  in  Reading.  The  Limited  English  Profi-­‐ cient  group  met  the  Reading  Proficiency  target,  as  did  the  Special  Education  group.   o On  the  Minnesota  Comprehensive  Assessments  (MCA’s),  23%  of  HOPE  students  scored  proficient  in  Reading,   as  did  34%  in  math.     o MCA  growth  data  shows  that  in  reading,  29%  of  the  HOPE  students  for  whom  there  was  Growth  data  made   high  growth  and  31%  made  low  growth;  in  mathematics,  41%  made  high  growth  and  only  15%  made  low   growth.   o On  the  Measures  of  Academic  Progress  (MAP)  assessments,  just  34%  of  HOPE  Academy  grades  2-­‐8  students   tested  at  or  above  the  national  median  for  reading  in  the  spring,  as  did  42%  in  math.  However,  a  comparison   of  fall  to  spring  results  shows  that  of  students  who  tested  both  times,  63%  met  or  exceeded  their  Growth  Pro-­‐ jections  in  Reading,  as  did  68%  in  Mathematics  (MAP  norms  are  constructed  such  that  nationwide,  50%  of   students  meet  Growth  Projections,  so  HOPE  significantly  outperformed  national  norms  on  this  measure).     o When  HOPE  Academy’s  Limited-­‐English  Proficient  (LEP)  and  non-­‐LEP  students  were  compared  in  terms  of   the  proportion  meeting  and  not  meeting  growth  projections  on  the  MAP,  slightly  more  LEP  students  met  the   projections  in  Reading  (62%  vs.  54%);  and  slightly  more  non-­‐LEP  students  met  the  projections  in  Mathemat-­‐ ics    (63%  vs.  59%).        Innovative  practices,  program  strengths  and  challenges,  new  initiatives,  and  future  plans:     o HOPE  continued  to  utilize  a  number  of  innovative  and  effective  practices  during  2012-­‐13,  including:      Integration  of  Hmong  language  and  culture  into  the  program,  via  classes  attended  by  all  students,   grades  K-­‐8.    Math  and  reading/literacy  instruction  scheduled  for  100  minutes  daily  in  all  grades.    Tutors  provided  by  community  partners  constitute  an  important  resource  to  support  student  learn-­‐ ing  at  HOPE,  during  the  day  and  in  the  after-­‐school  program.    Implementation  of  the  Response  to  Intervention  approach  allows  for  schoolwide  and  targeted  re-­‐ sponses  to  student  needs  in  core  academic  areas.      The  improvement  planning  process  continued,  supported  by  specialists  from  the  state  of  Minnesota’s   Regional  Centers  of  Excellence.    HOPE  uses  SmartBoards  in  every  classroom,  to  enhance  instruction  through  technology;  all  HOPE’s   teachers  are  trained  on  their  use,  and  common  lesson  plans  are  in  place  which  teachers  can  access   via  the  Boards.     o Challenges  faced  by  HOPE  during  2012-­‐13  included:   HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  4  

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     Board  development  (being  addressed  through  a  board  work  plan,  based  on  recommendations  from   the  Minnesota  Association  of  Charter  Schools)   Use  of  funds  (being  addressed  through  initiatives  to  strategically  reduce  the  school’s  large  positive   fund  balance  while  enhancing  programming)   Curricular  alignment  with  state  academic  standards  (being  addressed  through  alignment  of  the  liter-­‐ acy  and  math  curricula,  which  will  be  followed  by  the  other  core  areas)   Adequate  support  of  Hmong  language  and  culture  for  students  (being  addressed  through  enhance-­‐ ments  to  the  Hmong  Language  and  Culture  class  which  is  required  of  all  students)   Many  students  read  well  below  grade  level  and/or  have  difficulty  building  the  necessary  founda-­‐ tional  math  concepts  that  allow  them  to  progress  through  the  curriculum  (being  addressed  by  addi-­‐ tional  time  for  reading/literacy  and  mathematics;  and  other  interventions  described  throughout  this   report)   o   New  initiatives  begun  or  planned  during  2012-­‐13  included:    The  HOPE  science  program  was  reviewed,  and  a  new  program,  Pearson  Interactive  Science,  was  cho-­‐ sen  for  implementation  in  2013-­‐14.    Staffing  was  enhanced  with  the  addition  of  another  reading  specialist  and  a  Dean  of  Students,  as  a   new  position  beginning  in  2013-­‐14,  to  track  attendance,  academic  and  behavior  data  to  enable  the   staff  to  identify  specific  interventions.    Instructional  technology  was  enhanced  for  2013-­‐14  with  the  purchase  of  iPads  and  Netbooks  for   student  use.      HOPE  teachers  established  common  assessments  based  on  reading  level  by  grade.    HOPE  staff  identified  specific  instructional  strategies  for  implementation  during  2013-­‐14,  which  ad-­‐ dress  student  and  school  needs  in  the  core  areas  of  reading  and  math.  Two  sets  of  Plan-­‐Do-­‐Study-­‐Act   sequences  were  identified,  for  implementation  in  each  subject  area.    Finally,  HOPE  leadership  have  begun  an  initiative  to  build  a  more  cohesive  school-­‐wide  culture,   through  implementation  of  the  Innocent  Classroom  approach  during  2013-­‐14.       HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  5  

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  HOPE  Academic  Program     Mission  and  Vision     The  Hmong  Open  Partnerships  in  Education  (HOPE)  Community  Academy  is  a  Saint  Paul  charter  school  which  serves   urban  students  in  grades  PreK-­‐8.  HOPE  emphasizes  a  rigorous  academic  foundation  with  mastery  of  fundamental  and   higher-­‐order  thinking  skills  to  prepare  students  for  life-­‐long  learning.  HOPE  also  instills  Hmong  and  American  values   in  their  students.         Mission  Statement   The  mission  of  HOPE  Community  Academy  is  to  provide  students  in  grades  PreK-­‐8  with  a  rigorous  academic   foundation,  focusing  on  the  mastery  of  fundamental  and  higher-­‐order  thinking  skills  that  prepare  them  for  life-­‐ long  learning,  while  instilling  in  them  the  finest  Hmong  and  American  values.     HOPE  Community  Academy  provides  quality  instruction  in  core  curriculum  areas,  to  provide  the  solid  academic  foun-­‐ dation  called  for  in  the  mission.  Our  teachers  strive  for  excellence  and  are  working  with  consultants  from  Minnesota’s   Regional  Centers  of  Excellence  to  create  a  School  Improvement  Plan  which  identifies  strategies  for  improving  the  ef-­‐ fectiveness  of  instruction  in  specific  core-­‐academic  areas.       During  2013,  HOPE  leadership  realized  the  need  to  enhance  the  aspect  of  the  mission  relating  to  Hmong  language  and   culture.  The  HOPE  board  initiated  a  plan  to  generate  an  assessment  tool  to  assess  students’  Hmong  language  skills   (described  below  in  the  section  on  Strengths,  Challenges  and  Plans  for  the  Future),  and  incorporate  Hmong  language,   culture  and  values  schoolwide.       Other  elements  of  our  efforts  to  live  up  to  the  school  mission  and  vision  include:     • In  addition  to  our  preK-­‐8  classroom  instruction  of  core  curriculum,  we  have  licensed  teachers  in  the  areas  of   Hmong  language,  Library,  Computer  Applications,  Music,  and  Physical  Education.    Our  Middle  School  teachers   are  licensed  to  teacher  their  specific  content  areas.    Media  and  Technology  instruction  is  integrated  into  each   content  area.   • HOPE  partners  with  other  organizations  to  supplement  our  students'  learning.    The  East  Side  Learning  Center   provides  on-­‐site  one-­‐on-­‐one  tutoring  for  our  primary  students.    We  also  sponsor  two  Boy  Scout  troops  in   which  boys  aged  11  to  17  may  join.    In  addition,  Middle  School  students  participate  in  the  school's  newsletter   and  yearbook  clubs,  the  Student  Council,  and  other  community  service  projects  throughout  the  school  year.   • HOPE  provides  a  free  after-­‐school  homework  program  for  parents  and  their  child(ren).    This  program  is  held   Monday  through  Thursday,  and  families  do  not  need  to  preregister.    The  Hmong  student  organization  at  the   University  of  St.  Thomas  provides  the  tutoring.    While  students  are  receiving  homework  help,  parents  also   have  an  opportunity  to  attend  classes  specially  designed  to  meet  their  needs  and  interests.   • Finally,  HOPE  offers  an  after  school  academic  support  program  as  well  as  a  summer  school  program.    These   programs  provide  additional  academic  support  to  students  who  are  selected  to  attend  one  or  both  of  them.     The  areas  of  focus  are  reading  and  math.     HOPE  Community  Academy  Addresses  the  Purposes  for  Charter  Schools     HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  6  

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The  primary  purpose  of  charter  schools  in  Minnesota  is  to  improve  pupil  learning  and  student  achievement.  HOPE   Community  Academy  strives  to  do  this  through  the  provision  of  a  rigorous  academic  program  with  high  expectations,   as  described  throughout  this  report.  See  in  particular  the  Accountability  Plan  Data  section  for  evidence  of  success  in   improving  pupil  learning;  and  the  Innovative  Practices,  New  Initiatives,  and  Future  Plans  section  for  discussion  of  im-­‐ provement  initiatives  currently  underway.     Of  the  five  additional  purposes  for  charter  schools  in  Minnesota,  HOPE  Community  Academy  is  currently  focusing   strongly  on  the  one  to  measure  learning  outcomes  and  create  different  and  innovative  forms  of  measuring  outcomes.   HOPE  has  established  common  assessments  at  each  grade  level,  depending  on  students’  reading  level;  and  teachers   analyze  data  from  these  assessments,  using  it  to  inform  instruction.  Also,  HOPE  Community  Academy’s  updated   School  Improvement  Plan  specifies  instructional  strategies  now  being  implemented  schoolwide,  which  include  inno-­‐ vative  processes  for  measurement  of  learning  outcomes.  There  are  two  instructional  strategies:  using  questioning  to   extend  student  thinking;  and  fully  aligning  reading/mathematics  curricula  to  the  state  standards.  Both  strategies  in-­‐ clude  a  Plan-­‐Do-­‐Study-­‐Act  sequence;  the  Study  element  specifies  innovative  strategies  to  measure  outcomes.  In  the   case  of  the  questioning  to  extent  student  thinking,  Professional  Learning  Community  (PLC)  teams  study  student  out-­‐ comes  weekly  based  on  sample  lessons,  then  indentify  and  schedule  student  intervention  groups  based  on  benchmark   percent  of  mastery  data.  In  the  alignment  of  curricula  to  the  state  standards,  the  PLC  teams  discuss  the  use  of  stan-­‐ dards  as  a  baseline;  utilize  a  Data  Day  to  examine  common  benchmark  assessment  results;    and  identify  and  schedule   student  intervention  groups  based  on  benchmark  percent  of  mastery  data.  See  the  Innovative  Practices,  New  Initia-­ tives,  and  Future  Plans  section  below  for  details.     Accountability  Plan  Data     HOPE  Community  Academy’s  Accountability  Plan  for  2012-­‐13  remained  the  same  as  for  the  previous  year;  the  2012-­‐ 13  school  year  was  the  second  year  of  the  school’s  two-­‐year  contract  with  the  authorizer,  the  University  of  St.  Thomas.   The  Accountability  Plan  includes  three  sets  of  Academic  Goals  with  multiple  measurements  and  indicators  of  success,   as  well  as  two  Non-­‐Academic  Goals,  summarized  in  Table  1.     HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  7  

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  Table  1:  HOPE  Accountability  Plan   Academic  Goals   AYP  Goal:  HOPE  Community  Acad-­‐ emy  students  will  meet  the  require-­‐ ments  of  AYP  under  the  No  Child  Left   Behind  Act   MCA-­II  Goal  Series:     • Proficiency:  UST-­‐authorized   charter  schools  should  perform   as  well  as  or  better  than  the   state,  the  district  where  the   school,  resides,  and  schools  with   comparable  demographics   • Growth:  Student  growth  on  the   MCA-­‐II  over  time  is  at  least  com-­‐ parable  to  growth  of  students  in   the  state,  the  district,  and  schools   with  comparable  demographics   Measurements   State-­‐determined  annual  Ade-­‐ quate  Yearly  Progress  (AYP)   targets   Minnesota  Comprehensive   Assessments  Series  II   (MCA’s):Reading  and  Mathe-­‐ matics     (Grades  3-­8  for  Proficiency;   Grades  4-­8  for  Growth)   Indicators  of  Success   Meeting  AYP  in  all  areas  (Participation  and   Proficiency  for  Reading  and  Mathematics;   Attendance)   • Proficiency:  Percent  of  students  that   meet  or  exceed  expectations  compared   to  the  average:   o Statewide   o In  the  resident  district   o In  comparable  schools   Growth:     o Percent  of  students  that  made   low,  medium,  and  high  growth   o  Percent  of  students  who  are   proficient  with  medium  and   high  growth  and  not  proficient   with  high  growth  compared  to   the  percent  of  students  in  the   same  groups:    Statewide    In  the  resident  district    In  comparable  schools   National  Median:  Percent  at  or  above   national  medians  (at  least  50%  to  meet   target)   RIT  Growth:  Percent  meeting  RIT   growth  projection1  (at  least  50%  to   meet  target)   • NWEA  Goal  Series:   • National  Median:  UST-­‐ authorized  schools  should  per-­‐ form  better  than  the  national   median   • RIT  Growth:  UST-­‐authorized   schools  have  students  that  grow   at  the  same  rate  or  better  than  at   least  50  percent  of  the  schools   tested  nationally   Special  Needs  Populations  Aca-­ demic  Expectations:   For  special  education  or  English   Learner  student  populations,  if  either   exceeds  20%  of  the  school’s  total   student  population.   School  Specific  Academic  Goals   Non-­Academic  Goals   Attendance:  Each  school  will  meet   Northwest  Evaluation  Associa-­‐ tion’s  Measures  of  Academic   Progress  (MAP)  assessments   in  Reading  and  Mathematics     (Grades  2-­8)     • • Northwest  Evaluation  Associa-­‐ tion’s  Measures  of  Academic   Progress  (MAP)  assessments   in  Reading  and  Mathematics     (Grades  2-­8)   Specific  to  the  goal   Measurements   Attendance  rate  for  the  school   • • Participation:  Number  and  percent   who  completed  fall  and  spring  MAP   tests  in  each  category   RIT  Growth:  Percent  meeting  RIT   growth  projection,  compared  to  other   students   Specific  to  the  goal   Indicators  of  Success   Percent-­‐of-­‐attendance  more  than  90%  or                                                                                                                             1  Language  in  the  Accountability  Plan  references  “growth  goals;”  however,  with  the  change  to  2011  norms,  NWEA  now  uses   the  term  “projection”  for  the  typical  RIT  score  growth  amount.   HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  8  

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Academic  Goals   Measurements   Indicators  of  Success   or  exceed  its  attendance  rate  goal  for   year  ((ADA/ADM)*100)   improves  by  at  least  0.1%  over  the  previous   Adequate  Yearly  Progress   year   Parent  Satisfaction:  Each  school   Parent  survey  results   At  least  80%  of  parents  surveyed  are  satis-­‐ shall  survey  its  parents  annually  and   fied  with  the  school   report  on  the  level  of  parent  satisfac-­‐ tion  with  the  school.     The  Goals  and  Indicators  are  stated  below,  along  with  HOPE  academic  results  data  from  the  2012-­‐13  school  year.  The   indicators  for  each  goal  are  organized  into  a  four-­‐point  rubric,  scored  as:   4  –  Exceeds  standard   3  –  Meets  standard   2  –  Approaching  standard   1  –  Does  not  meet  standard.     AYP  Goal:  HOPE  Community  Academy  students  will  meet  the  requirements  of  AYP  under  the  No  Child  Left  Behind  Act  as   established  by  federal  and  state  law.  Failure  to  meet  AYP  for  three  consecutive  years  will  automatically  result  in  the   school  being  placed  on  intervention  with  the  University  of  St.  Thomas.       2013  AYP  Results  show  HOPE  Community  Academy  meeting  AYP  requirements  in  Participation,  Attendance,  and   Math  Proficiency  (via  Safe  Harbor)  but  not  in  Reading  Proficiency.  In  Reading  Proficiency,  The  All  Students,  Asian,   and  Free/Reduced  Price  Lunch  groups  were  below  the  target  in  Reading.  The  Limited  English  Proficient  group   met  the  Reading  Proficiency  target,  as  did  the  Special  Education  group,  the  latter  via  Safe  Harbor.     Note:  Under  the  state’s  waiver  of  federal  Title  I  requirements,  the  Adequate  Yearly  Progress  (AYP)  system  is  being   de-­‐emphasized,  and  its  place  taken  by  a  Multiple  Measurements  Rating  system  consisting  of  four  measurements:   Proficiency,  Student  Growth,  Achievement  Gap  Reduction,  and  Graduation  Rate  (for  high  schools).  Proficiency  is   measured  in  terms  of  the  proportion  of  students  testing  at  the  Meeting  or  Exceeding  Expectations  level  on  the   spring  MCA’s;  Student  Growth  and  Achievement  Gap  Reduction  consider  changes  in  MCA  scores  for  students  test-­‐ ing  two  consecutive  years  at  a  given  school.    However,  Adequate  Yearly  Progress  measures  are  still  calculated.       MCA-­II  Goal  Series     MCA-­II  Proficiency:  UST-­authorized  charter  schools  should  perform  as  well  as  or  better  than  the  state,  the  district   where  the  school,  resides,  and  schools  with  comparable  demographics  (schools  in  the  same  region  that  serve  similar   populations  of  students,  as  defined  by  socioeconomic  and  minority  status).  Schools  will  work  with  UST  annually  to  deter-­ mine  3-­5  comparable  school(s).  MCA-­II  proficiency  will  be  measured  on  a  school-­wide  level.       Indicator   4   3   2   1   MCA-­II:  Reading   Meets  or  ex-­‐ Within  5  per-­‐ 6-­‐10  percentage   More  than  10   Percent  of  students  that  meet  or   ceeds  the  com-­‐ centage  points   points  below  the   percentage   exceed  expectations  compared   parison  group   of  comparison   comparison   points  below  the   to  the  average:   by  more  than  5   group   group   comparison   • Statewide   percentage   group   • In  the  resident  district   points   • In  comparable  school(s)     HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  9  

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MCA-­II:  Math   Meets  or  ex-­‐ Within  5  per-­‐ 6-­‐10  percentage   More  than  10   Percent  of  students  that  meet  or   ceeds  the  com-­‐ centage  points   points  below  the   percentage   exceed  expectations  compared   parison  group   of  comparison   comparison   points  below  the   to  the  average:   by  more  than  5   group   group   comparison   • Statewide   percentage   group   • In  the  resident  district   points   • In  comparable  school(s)     The  tables  below  summarize  MCA  proficiency  data  from  spring  2013.     Table  2:  MCA-­II/III  Reading  Proficiency  at  HOPE,  Spring  2013     Percent  Meeting  or  Exceeding  on  MCA  III  Reading   2012-­2013  School  Year2   #  of  Students   Percent   Percent  Ex-­‐     Tested   Meeting   ceeding   Grade  3   49   31%   -­‐   Grade  4   42   19%   -­‐     Grade  5   52   14%   4%   Grade  6   66   21%   9%   Grade  7   35   23%   6%   Grade  8   36   3%   6%   Overall    280   18.9%   4.3%       Table  3:  MCA-­II/III  Math  Proficiency  at  HOPE,  Spring  2013     Percent  Meeting  or  Exceeding  on  MCA  II/III  Math   2012-­2013  School  Year   #  of  Students   Percent   Percent  Ex-­‐     Tested   Meeting   ceeding   Grade  3   50   38%   2%   Grade  4   42   33%   7%   Grade  5   52   27%    -­‐   Grade  6   65   25%   5%   Grade  7   35   31%   3%   Grade  8   36   31%   8%   Overall    280   30.4%   3.9%       MCA-­II  Growth:  Student  level  data  are  available  to  measure  a  student’s  growth  on  the  MCA-­II  over  time,  if  the  student  is   continuously  enrolled  in  a  school.  For  more  information  on  the  MCA-­II  growth  data  go  to  the  Minnesota  Department  of   Education’s  website.  MCA-­II  growth  data  will  be  analyzed  on  a  school-­wide  level.     Indicator   4   3   2   1   MCA-­II:  Reading   Low  growth  was   High  growth   Low  growth   High  growth  is   Percent  of  students  that  made   less  than  20%   percentage  ex-­‐ percentage  ex-­‐ less  than  20%   low,  medium,  and  high  growth   AND  high   ceeds  low   ceeds  high   AND  low  growth                                                                                                                             2  October  1-­‐enrolled  students  only.   Page  10   HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13    

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MCA-­II:  Math   Percent  of  students  that  made   low,  medium,  and  high  growth   growth  was   more  than  35%   Low  growth  was   less  than  20%   AND  high   growth  was   more  than  35%   growth  percent-­‐ age   High  growth   percentage  ex-­‐ ceeds  low   growth  percent-­‐ age   growth  percent-­‐ age   Low  growth   percentage  ex-­‐ ceeds  high   growth  percent-­‐ age   is  more  than   30%   High  growth  is   less  than  20%   AND  low  growth   is  more  than   30%     The  tables  below  summarize  MCA  growth  data  from  spring  2013.     Table  4:  MCA-­II/III  Reading  Growth  at  HOPE,  Spring  2012  –  Spring  2013     Percent  Growth  on  MCA  II/III  Reading,  SY  2012-­13       #  of  Students     %  In  Each  Category   %Not  Prof,  High  Growth   39   20.5%   %Not  Prof,  Med.  Growth   43   22.6%   %Not  Prof,  Low  Growth   30   15.8%   %Prof,  High  Growth   17   8.9%   %Prof,  Med.  Growth   32   16.8%   %Prof,  Low  Growth   29   15.3%   TOTAL*   190     *May  not  add  to  100%  due  to  independent  rounding.     Overall,  29%  of  HOPE  students  with  MCA  Growth  data  in  Reading  showed  high  growth,  and  31%  showed  low  growth.   This  puts  the  school  at  level  two  Approaching  Standard,  for  this  measure.       Table  5:  MCA-­II/III  Math  Growth  at  HOPE,  Spring  2012  –  Spring  2013     Percent  Growth  on  MCA  II/III  Math,  SY2012-­2013       #  of  Students     %  In  Each  Category   %Not  Prof,  High  Growth   69   34.8%   %Not  Prof,  Med.  Growth   67   33.8%   %Not  Prof,  Low  Growth   19   9.6%   %Prof,  High  Growth   13   6.6%   %Prof,  Med.  Growth   20   10.1%   %Prof,  Low  Growth   10   5.1%   TOTAL*    198       *May  not  add  to  100%  due  to  independent  rounding.     Overall,  41%  of  HOPE  students  with  MCA  Growth  data  in  Math  showed  high  growth,  and  15%  showed  low  growth.   This  puts  the  school  at  level  four,  Exceeding  Standard,  for  this  measure.         NWEA  Goal  Series     HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  11  

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National  Median:  Percentages  established  for  the  national  median  goal  compares  the  school’s  progress  with  others   across  the  country  and  are  based  on  the  expectations  that  UST-­authorized  schools  perform  better  than  the  national  me-­ dian.  For  example,  at  least  50  percent  of  students  in  each  grade  should  perform  above  the  NWEA  national  median  score   for  that  grade  level.     Indicator   4   3   2   1   NWEA  MAP  in  Reading:  Per-­‐ More  than  65%   50-­‐65%   40-­‐49%   Less  than  40%   cent  at  or  above  national  medi-­‐ ans   NWEA  MAP  in  Math:  Percent  at   More  than  65%   50-­‐65%   40-­‐49%   Less  than  40%   or  above  national  medians     The  table  below  summarizes  the  proportion  of  HOPE  students  at  or  above  the  national  median  based  on  spring  2013   MAP  test  results.     HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  12  

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  Table  6:  NWEA  MAP  Levels  of  Achievement  at  HOPE,  Spring  2013     NWEA  %  At  or  Above  National  Median  –  Reading     NWEA  %  At  or  Above  National  Median  –  Math     #  of  Stu-­‐ dents   Tested,   Spring   60   49   42   52   63   35   36   337   %  At  or   Above   National   Median   45%   39%   36%   29%   27%   31%   25%   34%     #    At  or  Above   National  Me-­‐ dian   27   19   15   15   17   11   9   113                           Grade  2   Grade  3   Grade  4   Grade  5   Grade  6   Grade  7   Grade  8   Overall   #  of  Stu-­‐ dents   Tested,   Spring   62   50   43   52   64   35   36   342   %  At  or   Above  Na-­‐ tional  Me-­‐ dian   39%   38%   37%   40%   48%   51%   42%   42%   #    At  or   Above  Na-­‐ tional  Me-­‐ dian   24   19   16   21   31   18   15   144     Grade  2   Grade  3   Grade  4   Grade  5   Grade  6   Grade  7   Grade  8   Overall     These  National  Median  results  from  the  spring  2013  MAP  tests  show  HOPE  Community  Academy  at  level  1,  Does  not   meet  standard,  in  Reading,  and  at  level  2,  Approaching  standard,  in  Mathematics.       RIT  Growth:  Percentages  established  for  the  RIT  growth  goal3  are  based  on  the  expectation  that  UST-­authorized  schools   have  students  that  grow  at  the  same  rate  or  better  than  at  least  50  percent  of  the  schools  tested  nationally.  For  example,   if  65  percent  of  the  school’s  students  meet  their  RIT  growth  goal,  then  the  school  is  performing  with  the  top  25  percent  of   schools,  nationally.  If  40  percent  of  the  school’s  students  meet  their  RIT  growth  goals,  then  the  school  is  performing  with   the  bottom  25  percent  of  schools,  nationally.     Indicator   4   3   2   1   NWEA  MAP  in  Reading:  Per-­‐ More  than  65%   50-­‐65%  (ranked   40-­‐49%  (ranked   Less  than  40%   cent  meeting  RIT  growth  goal   (ranked  in  first   in  second  quar-­‐ in  third  quar-­‐ (ranked  in   quartile)   tile)   tile)   fourth  quartile)   NWEA  MAP  in  Math:  Percent   More  than  65%   50-­‐65%  (ranked   40-­‐49%  (ranked   Less  than  40%   meeting  RIT  growth  goal   (ranked  in  first   in  second  quar-­‐ in  third  quar-­‐ (ranked  in   quartile)   tile)   tile)   fourth  quartile)                                                                                                                               3  The  Northwest  Evaluation  Association  now  uses  the  term  “Growth  Projection”  rather  than  “Growth  Goal,”  in  recognition   of  the  fact  that  the  projected  post-­‐test  score  may  or  may  not  be  an  appropriate  goal  for  any  given  student.  The  growth-­‐ projection  score  is  based  on  the  initial  score  and  is  simply  the  median  post-­‐test  score  for  students  with  that  initial  score.   MAP  norms  are  constructed  such  that  nationwide,  50%  of  students  are  meeting  Growth  Projections.   HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  13  

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The  table  below  shows  growth  in  MAP  score  results  for  students  who  tested  both  fall  and  spring.       Table  7:  NWEA  MAP  Growth,  Fall  2012  –  Spring  2013   NWEA  %  Meeting  RIT  Growth  Goals  –  Reading   #  of  Stu-­‐ dents   Tested,    Fall   &  Spring   47   40   50   61   34   35   267     NWEA  %  Meeting  RIT  Growth  Goals  –  Math   #  of  Stu-­‐ dents   Tested,    Fall   &  Spring   48   41   49   61   34   36    269     Grade  3   Grade  4   Grade  5   Grade  6   Grade  7   Grade  8   Overall   %  Meet-­‐ ing  Goal   60%      48%    70%    70%    65%    60%   62.9%         #  meeting  Goal     28     19   35   43   22   21   168                   Grade  3   Grade  4   Grade  5   Grade  6   Grade  7   Grade  8   Overall   %  Meeting   Goal   50%   51%   80%   77%   85%   64%   68.0%   #  meeting   Goal   24      21    39    47    29    23   183       These  MAP  Growth  results  from  2012-­‐2013  show  HOPE  Community  Academy  at  level  3,  Meets  standard,  in  Reading,   and  at  level  4,  Exceeds  standard,  in  Mathematics.     Special  Needs  Populations  Academic  Expectations     If  a  school’s  special  education  or  English  language  learner  population  exceeds  20  percent,  then  the  school  should  also   report  the  following  information.  This  information  is  used  to  better  analyze  the  school’s  progress  with  high  need  popula-­ tions.   • Number  and  percent  of  students  who  completed  the  fall  and  spring  MAP  tests  in  each  category   • Percent  of  students  with  special  needs  that  meet  their  RIT  growth  goals  compared  to  the  percent  of  students   without  special  needs  that  meet  their  RIT  growth  goals.       At  Hope  Community  Academy,  the  proportion  of  students  categorized  as  Limited  English  Proficient  (62%  of  the  total   student  population  as  of  10/1/12)  exceeds  20%.  The  proportion  of  special  education  students  (9%)  does  not.  All  LEP   students  who  were  in  attendance  during  MAP  testing  completed  the  tests.     The  tables  below  summarize  grade  3-­‐8  students’  MAP  test  data  from  2012-­‐13,  split  out  based  on  students’  LEP  status.       HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  14  

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  Table  8:  HOPE  Academy  Grades  3-­8  Students  Taking  the  MAP,  by  LEP  Status   Students  Tested   Reading   Mathematics   Fall  2012  –  All     339   338   Fall  2012  –  LEP     215   216   Fall  2012  –  Non-­‐LEP   124   122   Spring  2013  –  All   337   342   Spring  2013  –  LEP     219   221   Spring  2013  –  Non-­‐LEP   11   121       Table  9:  HOPE  Academy  Grades  3-­8  Students  with  Pre-­post  MAP  Scores4,  by  LEP  Status   Students  Tested,  Fall  and  Spring   Reading   Mathematics   Total  Number  of  Students  Tested  Fall  +  Spring     320   323   Percent  Meeting  Growth  Projection  (Total)   59%  (189  of  320  students)   60%  (194  of  323)   Percent  Meeting  Growth  Projection  (LEP)   61%  (127/208)   59%  (123/209)   Percent  Meeting  Growth  Projection  (non-­‐LEP)   55%  (62/112)   63%  (71/112)     These  results  show  that  most  grades  3-­‐8  students  enrolled  at  HOPE  during  2012-­‐13  took  the  MAP  in  both  fall  and   spring,  permitting  pre-­‐post  test  score  analysis  to  determine  whether  students  met  growth  projections.  These  data   show  that  when  HOPE’s  LEP  and  non-­‐LEP  students  are  compared  in  terms  of  proportions  meeting  or  exceeding   growth  projections  on  the  NWEA  MAP,  the  proportion  of  the  two  groups  meeting  the  projections  did  not  vary  greatly.   On  the  Reading  MAP,  slightly  more  non-­‐LEP  than  LEP  students  met  their  growth  projections;  on  the  Math  LEP,  a  few   more  LEP  than  non-­‐LEP  students  met  their  growth  projections.  The  2012-­‐13  results  on  this  measure  are  similar  to  the   results  found  last  year.       School  Specific  Academic  Goals     Based  on  the  Charter  school’s  mission,  each  school  should  propose  at  least  one  school-­specific  academic  goal  to  be  consid-­ ered  and  approved  by  UST.     For  the  2012-­‐13  school  year,  HOPE  identified  four  SMART  goals,  which  were  articulated  in  its  Priority,  Focus  and  Con-­‐ tinuous  Improvement  School  Plan  (submitted  to  MDE  Sept.  1,  2012).  These  goals  are  listed  below,  and  outcome  data   reported:     • By  2013,  39.7%  of  all  students  in  grades  3-­8  will  meet  or  exceed  standards  in  reading  on  the  MCA’s.   With  only  23.2%  of  students  meeting  or  exceeding  standards  in  reading,  as  reported  above  in  Table  ##,  HOPE   Community  Academy  did  not  meet  this  target.  However,  it  should  be  noted  that  with  the  shift  in  the  Reading   MCA  from  the  MCA-­‐II  to  the  MCA-­‐III,  scores  declined  statewide.  The  Reading  MCA  was  updated  for  2013  to   align  the  test  with  new  and  more  challenging  state  academic  standards  for  reading.  The  Minnesota  Depart-­‐ ment  of  Education  recommends  that  schools  basing  targets  on  the  Reading  MCA  consider  2013  a  new  base-­‐ line  year  for  this  purpose,  as  the  2013  test  is  not  comparable  to  the  previous  year’s.                                                                                                                                 4  The  numbers  of  students  with  pre-­‐post  MAP  scores  as  reported  here,  and  pre-­‐post  growth  results,  are  slightly  different   from  the  figures  reported  in  the  RIT  Growth  discussion  above.  This  is  because  a  different  method  was  used  to  derive  the   pre-­‐post  scores  reported  here:  students  were  identified  based  on  NWEA  data  on  all  students  tested;  and  projected-­‐growth   scores  here  were  calculated  using  NWEA’s  “Achievement  Status  and  Growth  Calculator”  spreadsheet  which  uses  slightly   different  parameters  from  the  reports  on  which  the  figures  in  the  RIT  Growth  discussion  are  based.   HOPE  Community  Academy  Annual  Report  for  2012-­‐13     Page  15  

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