Beach Metro Community News - January 7, 2014

 

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Beach Metro Community News - January 7, 2014

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A NON-PROFIT COMMUNITY RESOURCE SINCE 1972, FUNDED BY OUR ADVERTISERS, DISTRIBUTED FREE BY YOUR NEIGHBOURS Volume 42 No. 20 January 7, 2014 East Lynn lights up for holiday party Kalen Davidson, also known as Pyromeo, of Zero Gravity Circus, plays with fire at East Lynn Park on Dec. 14. The second annual Danforth East Holiday Festival brought families out on a snowy night to enjoy the performance, along with carolling, the lighting of Christmas trees, hot chocolate and other treats, and, of course, a visit from Santa. PHOTO: JON MULDOON Holiday blackout for Beach By Andrew Hudson INSIDE Reunion for 1979 cover story ...See Pages 14-15 FOR 12 days this Christmas, all Elizabeth Hall got from Toronto Hydro was a tied-up call centre and two false reports that her house was back to full power. Hall said she knows many people had it worse. For all but two of the 12 days after the ice storm, Hall at least had partial power in her Edgewood Avenue home – enough to keep the furnace, fridge and freezer going. She and her husband even managed to cook their Christmas turkey by convection microwave. But by the time they finally got full power on January 2, they had the dubious honour of being the last house in Ward 32 to get restored. “I’ve come to the point where I can’t speak to them anymore,” said Hall, who, like many Beach residents, phoned Toronto Hydro dozens of times only to get a message about high call volumes and be kicked off the line. With partial power, Hall said she expected her house to be a low priority. But unlike the automated phone service used by Ontario Hydro, which supplies her cottage in the Kawarthas, Hall said she could get no estimated time of arrival. “We wouldn’t have stayed here every single day,” she said. “Even if we knew it was going to be more than a week, that would have been helpful.” Councillor McMahon said during the ice storm it felt as if she and her staff were running a call centre of their own. “It was intense,” she said. “We were one of the hardest hit areas.” On Glen Manor Drive, McMahon said a big iceladen tree fell on a feeder line, cutting power to several streets between Queen Street and Kingston Road. Some pockets, like the houses along Morton Road, Keystone Avenue, and the north half of Beck Avenue were out six days or longer. Cont’d. on Page 3 PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON PLUS Ann Black points to a tree that fell across her neighbour’s car during the ice storm that started on Dec. 22. After six days without power, by far the longest outage she has seen on Morton Avenue since moving there 22 years ago, Black was staying with her daughter in the west end but coming back daily to check on her house and her cat. Black’s neighbour, Aaron Gaouette, stayed two nights in his home without any power before booking a hotel downtown. “There were people just uncontrollably shaking out front of this hotel when we checked in,” Gaouette said. “The desperation on people’s faces was just incredible.” Police Beat.....................4 Community Calendar.....10 BMN’s Neighbourhood...11 Food and Drink..............12 School Daze..................13 Deja Views....................16 Real Estate...................16 Garden Views................17 Law.............................17 Pet of the Month...........18 Where Are They Now?....19 Beach Memories...........20 Nutrition.....................27 Signature Service Hallmark Realty Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated “Raising the bar” CALL TODAY FOR A CONFIDENTIAL CONSULTATION. OUR SERVICES INCLUDE COMPLIMENTARY DISCREET STAGING, DETAILED STRATEGY AND GREAT RESULTS! JILLINDA GREENE 416-230-3849 TAYLOR GREENE 647-281-5411

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2 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, January 7, 2014 FIRE ON THE BEACH Full • Screens • Tool sets • Cleaners • Wood • Gas • Electric speed ahead into the new year Mattias Lee, 4, and father Ian slide into 2014 by tobogganing down the hill beside the Balmy Beach Club on New Year’s Day. PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON 1828 Queen Street East (2 blocks west of Woodbine) PROUDLY CANADIAN The Beach Ki ng sto nR d 416-698-3473 www.classicfireplace.ca Queen St Woodbine Ave N ‘No name’ park has plans – but still no name By Jon Muldoon ABOUT 15 local residents gathered at Community Centre 55 last month to share their preferences for ‘no name’ park, located north of Gerrard Street East, halfway between Main Street and Victoria Park Avenue. Dan Connolly from Parks, Forestry and Recreation’s Capital department and landscape architect Jim Melvin from PMA Landscape Architects presented options to the group, including variations on potential picnic shelters and playground equipment. Suggestions from those at the meet- ing included the possibility of coin-operated barbecues, which are common in Australia and New Zealand. Melvin pointed out the gas lines required would add significant cost to the project. “It requires infrastructure that isn’t in this park,” he said. Ward 32 Councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon suggested the possibility of a fire pit, such as the one at Orchard Park. She also mentioned the brick ovens implemented at Dufferin Grove Park, which are used to bake bread and for community pizza nights. The lack of infrastructure would also preclude any wading pools or water fea- tures. Due to soil remediation, services can’t be installed more than a few feet below the topsoil, according to Connolly. “Water is really expensive, and we’re not sure if we can do it in this park,” added McMahon. The meeting concluded with residents marking down their preferences on the varied shelters, furniture and play equipment presented on a series of illustrations provided by Melvin. Though the park has yet to be properly named, the plan is for a two-year phased installation, with a picnic pavilion, paving and furnishing to be built this year, and a playground set for 2015. Carolling in the Park hits 25th year By Andrew Hudson “WHAT DOES a gingerbread man put on his bed? A cookie sheet!” Gerry Di Leo won a chorus of groans when he served that joke to everyone who gathered to sing carols in Glen Stewart ravine last month with the Salvation Army band. But jokes, even crummy ones, are just what carollers need on a cold night, says Nancy Palmer, who started the annual Carolling in the Park 25 years ago this past December. “We’ve been through rain, through falling snow, through mild, mild, mild,” Palmer said the day after this winter’s event. “I think last night was the coldest night we’ve ever seen.” Donna Dolan plays the cornet, a brass instrument slightly smaller than a trumpet, for the Salvation Army Scarborough Citadel Band. At the carolling, she stuck skier’s heat pads on it to try and keep the valves from freezing. They froze anyhow, she said, but luckily not until just after the band’s closing number. First with band master Fred Creighton, and now Steve Brown, the Scarborough band has played in Glen Stewart every year, Palmer said, and they have since expanded the tradition to a park in Leaside. That is where Jim McKnight, now a minister for Northlea United Church and Matt Moore keeps the beat for hundreds of chilly carollers at the 25th Carolling in the Park in Glen Stewart Ravine on Dec. 10. Led by bandmaster Steve Brown with help from emcee Gerry DiLeo, Moore and the Scarborough Citadel Salvation Army Band provided carollers with music for the night while local Scouts warmed their pipes with hot chocolate and apple cider. PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON the first emcee at the Beach Carolling in the Park, started a similar night three years ago. “They stole the idea, just as we stole the idea from Port Credit,” said Palmer, explaining how her sister invited her to a lake side carolling that has piped up every Christmas there since 1975. Palmer says it’s a simple recipe that keeps the crowds coming – hot chocolate from local Scouts, a fun mix of carols and songs, and a beautiful ravine park tucked away from city traffic and neon lights. “It’s magical,” she said. “And oh, the fun and games we had to get those lights in the trees.” Correction In our Dec. 17 issue, a story about fashion designer Sujeet Sennik’s presentation to a class at Duke of Connaught Public School misidentified Sennik’s former employer. He worked for Walmart before moving on to fight for garment factory workers’ rights.

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Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Beach blackout for holidays, cont’d. from Page 1 McMahon said Beachers showed great camaraderie throughout the storm, running extension cords to neighbours without power, storing food in their fridges, and cheering on Toronto Hydro workers. Now that the clean-up is underway, McMahon said she is gathering ideas for council’s special ice storm meeting on Friday. “There’s been a lot of talk from residents and councillors about whether we should bury our wires,” she said. “It’s immensely expensive, but I think that’s a conversation we need to have.” After hearing from many people like Elizabeth Hall, who could not get through to Toronto Hydro, McMahon said communication issues will also be key. On an average day, McMahon said the company’s call centre gets 3,000 calls – a far cry from the peak of 128,000 and average of about 40,000 calls received during the ice storm. “Unless you had a neighbour who had power, or you were going to a coffee shop and checking [online], you wouldn’t know everything that was going on,” she said, noting that she likes Councillor Paul Ainslie’s idea of having trucks go up and down streets with loudspeakers, as well as Toronto Hydro CEO Anthony Haines’ suggestion of linking to call centres outside the city in major outages. Also, given how many older trees are in the Beach, McMahon said she has been trying for a long time to start a network of Ward 32 tree captains who would help plant, water and mulch city trees on their street, and flag any that need pruning. “We all love our trees, and this is just devastating,” she said, noting that staff have said Toronto may have lost a fifth of its tree canopy in the storm. BEACH METRO NEWS 3 PHOTOS: JON MULDOON Above, trees and hydro lines fell throughout the Beach, one of the harder-hit areas during December’s ice storm. Some areas had power, though patterns were hard to discern, as one side of a street might be lit up while the other was left in the dark, such as on Norwood Terrace, left. OMB ruling discounts Queen guidelines By Andrew Hudson A different kind of “MAN-date” in Beach Hill By Andrew Hudson CITY COUNCILLOR Mary-Margaret McMahon says she still has faith in her “Beach Bible” after the Ontario Municipal Board poked a hole in it last month. On Dec. 11, the OMB ruled in favour of a six-storey condo proposed for the old Shell site at the northeast corner of Queen Street and Woodbine Avenue. The ruling dismissed a key part of the building design guidelines McMahon has championed for Queen Street East – that someone standing at Queen and Woodbine should be able to see the clock tower of the historic Kew Beach fire hall from any corner of the intersection. Writing for the OMB, board member Blair Taylor noted that neither the guidelines nor the Visioning Study they are based on contains any heritage reports to support preserving such a view of the tower, which would mean the sixstorey condo would have to be smaller than planned. “From the Board’s perspective, that is a fundamental omission of the Visioning Study,” he wrote. At the OMB hearing, where the City of Toronto and a Beach residents’ group argued against the developer, Queen EMPC Six Ltd., the lawyer for Queen EMPC also stressed another issue – his client had applied to build the condo before city council passed the new Queen Street guidelines in November 2012. Calling the OMB’s ruling on the for- mer Shell site “hugely disappointing,” McMahon said that hearing and an upcoming one for another six-storey condo proposed across the street are both oneoffs. “I still stand by our guidelines,” she said. Because they applied for their permits before council passed the guidelines, McMahon said, “We knew that the developers would plead wiggle room on these two. But no one else can.” McMahon said she will meet with city planning staff this week to talk about what happened at the OMB, and whether in the future they might seek changes to the city’s Official Plan. Another reason why the OMB ruled in favour of the Queen EMPC proposal is that the new Queen Street guidelines are non-statutory – unlike Official Plan policies, which are statutory, they can’t be appealed if a developer believes they are unfair. McMahon said one possible solution is to make Queen Street East a Heritage Conservation District, meaning its existing character would have Official Plan protection. Asked whether, in light of the OMB ruling, the $200,000 Visioning Study and resulting Queen Street guidelines were worth doing, McMahon said the guidelines are the strongest means to protect Queen Street’s character short of getting HCD status, which takes a long time. In the larger picture, McMahon said she feels the recent ruling shows why Toronto should be excluded from OMB jurisdiction. “A year ago, at council, we passed a motion asking the province to take us out,” she said. “And we’re still waiting.” Jan Hykamp, president of the Greater Beach Neighbourhood Association, said while he too is disappointed by the OMB ruling, the GBNA and the city did win some concessions. The OMB agreed with the GBNA’s architecture expert that the white stone facade and overhanging top floors on the building did not suit the character of the street and should be changed. The condo will also have to shed some of the balconies that were planned for it because of complaints from the apartment building to the north and a 1994 bylaw that called for a “notch” that protects a view to the Kew fire hall from the south side of Queen. Hykamp joined McMahon in calling for Toronto’s exit from the OMB, and said the GBNA is meeting with larger residents’ association groups and NDP MPP Michael Prue to talk about it. But Hykamp pointed out that such an exit is no simple move. “The right to appeal is so strongly embedded in law that even if the OMB goes away, you’ve got to answer the question, ‘What will take its place?’” Beach Metro News requested a comment from Kilmer Brownfield Equity Fund for this article, but did not receive a response by press time. GUYS STILL LOOKING for a New Year’s resolution can make a surefire pledge in Beach Hill. Called MAN-date, what started last winter as a regular guys’ night is still just that — a once-a-month mixer where local men get together for a pint. “All guys are welcome,” said Steve Crane, who came up with the idea. “The main thing is it’s a bunch of men that might run into each other in the neighbourhood and nod or say hello because they’ve had a chance to meet up.” Inspired by a friendly round of drinks at the Naval Club after a Beach Hill Neighbourhood Association meeting, Crane said MAN-date will rotate through other local spots, such as the Beach Hill Restaurant and The Corner House, a new pub opening soon at Gerrard Street and Bowmore Road. Some 20 to 30 people usually show up, he said, adding that it’s a different mix each time and people come and go over the course of a night. At 47, with a nine-year old son, Crane said he’s right in the middle, age-wise, of the MAN-date crowd. Younger and older guys stand to learn a lot from each other, he said, adding that it’s nice to draw a group with no particular focus other than living in and around Beach Hill. “Otherwise, you know what happens, you do kind of get in your silo,” Crane said. “If you’re lucky, you might stay in a softball group or whatever, but you’re mostly going to see your own kind of cohort or group of guys there. “That’s great, and I think that stuff should continue,” he said, noting MAN-date will likely evolve into doing some fundraisers, movie nights and other local activities. “But this is one chance, and it’s pretty low-impact in terms of commitment, to mix it up.” 1821 Danforth Ave. Toronto, ON M4C 1J2 Tel: 416-690-1032 Fax: 416-690-8420 Web: www.michaelprue.com E-mail: mprue-co@ndp.on.ca

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4 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Scarboro Music BLOWOUT UP TO January Christmas morning fire claims one victim A man in his 60s is dead after a fire in a Queen Street East apartment just east of Glen Manor on Christmas morning. The fire, which was contained to the fourth floor apartment where the victim lived, was not weather-related. The fire marshal’s office is investigating. PHOTO: PHIL LAMEIRA 50% OFF! ONE WEEK ONLY 40 Years in the Beach! 1051 Kingston Road at Victoria Park 416-699-8333 studiomanager@scarboromusic.com BOXING WEEK SALE Shutter Cabinet Made from solid reclaimed wood teak , mango and rosewood 47”w x 13”d x 39”h Police Beat A 19-YEAR-OLD man was robbed in Crescent Town just after noon on Dec. 16. The victim was in his car when a man approached and entered his vehicle, pulled out a knife and demanded cash. The victim handed over his money and the suspect fled the scene in an unknown direction. The suspect is described as a 55-year-old white male, 5’11”, about 100 lbs with brown hair. A 25-YEAR-OLD man was on the subway near Victoria Park station at about 2 a.m. on Dec. 19 when five males approached. The suspects hit the victim, knocked him unconscious and took his cell phone before fleeing the scene. The victim was taken to hospital for treatment. A 35-YEAR-OLD male was near Victoria Park and Danforth Avenues at about 8:30 p.m. on Dec. 22 when six males approached. The group demanded his personal property, and two suspects restrained the victim. The suspects took two cell phones and fled the scene, leaving the victim unharmed. A 30-YEAR-OLD man was near Pharmacy and Denton Avenues at about 2:30 a.m. on Dec. 22 when three males in a vehicle pulled up. The group left the vehicle and attacked the victim, hitting him before taking his cell phone and fleeing the scene. The victim sustained minor injuries during the attack. A MAN has been arrested for armed robbery and faces a total of nine charges after an attempted drug theft at a Queen Street East pharmacy. Police allege that at about 1 p.m. on Dec. 22, a man entered the Shoppers Drug Mart at Queen and Lee and approached the pharmacy counter. With his hand inside his jacket, he claimed to be armed and demanded narcotics, threatening to shoot employees. When he was given drugs, he attempted to flee, but citizens stopped and held him. During the struggle, he dropped a knife. A second knife was found when officers arrived to arrest the suspect. Adam Price, 27, faces charges including two counts of Robbery, Disguise with Intent, three counts of Threaten Bodily Harm, Carry Concealed Weapon, Weapons Dangerous and Fail to Comply Probation. He made his first court appearance at College Park courts on Dec. 23. Anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact police at 416808-0703, or through the Crime Stoppers contacts listed below. POLICE IN 41 Division are looking for the public’s help in locating suspects in a kidnapping and assault investigation. On Dec. 21 at about 3 a.m., police were called to Bluffers Park for unknown trouble. There they found a 33-yearold woman, who reported that she had been held against her will for four days at an apartment near Lawrence Avenue East and Kingston Road. Three women and a man allegedly beat the victim repeatedly using a variety of weapons. She was then taken to another apartment near Danforth and Kingston Roads, where the assaults continued. The victim was put in a car and driven to Bluffers Park. On the way, one of the suspects choked the victim with a seatbelt. The victim managed to escape the vehicle and alert a passerby, who called police. On Dec. 30, June Wilson, 36, of Toronto, was arrested and charged with four counts of Assault with a Weapon, Aggravated Assault, two counts of Assault, Forcible Confinement, Kidnapping, Conspiracy to Commit Indictable Offence and Overcome Resistance to Commission of Offence. She made her first court appearance in Scarborough courts on Dec. 31. Still wanted by 41 Division police are John Brown, 44, of Pickering, Allison Bray, 35, of Toronto, and Elanna Marki, 40, also of Toronto. Anyone with any information is asked to contact Detective Graeme Naidoo at 416-808-4100. To leave anonymous tips on this or any other crime, contact Crime Stoppers at 416-222-TIPS (8477), online at 222tips.com, text TOR and your message to CRIMES (274637), or leave a tip on Facebook. Download the free Crime Stoppers Mobile App on iTunes, Google Play or Blackberry App World. SALE $479 Reg. $599 ...in the Beaches, 7 days a week www.seagullclassics.com 1974 Queen St. East 416-690-5224 COU RSE STAR TS TH JA N. 14 DINNER PROVIDED LOCATION: 129 Waverley Road TO REGISTER: 416-694-3054, wrbc@bell.net Toy collection covers four decades Reet Mae holds a Playmobil Santa Claus and Christmas tree, one of the roughly 300 Playmobil at her Birch Cliff home. Mae said she started buying the plastic theme figures when they first came out in 1973, the same year her daughter was born. “There’s some wonderful, wonderful stuff,” she said, touring a room packed wall-to-wall with the toys. Starting with spaceships and cowboys, she said Playmobil now includes everything from pirates to firefighters and packs of moose-chasing wolves. Now that her daughter has long outgrown them, Mae is finally selling most of the collection, though she said she will hang on to a few favourites like the garden scene full of moles with their own tiny molehills. PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON A 10-WEEK COURSE TO EXPLORE CHRISTIANITY YOU CAN ASK ANY QUESTION YOU WANT; OR JUST LISTEN! 2245 Queen sTreeT easT, 2nD floor • open 7 Days a Week Massage Therapy • reflexology acupuncTure • reiki hoT sTone Massage Therapy self care proDucTs gifT cerTificaTes aVailaBle www.therapylounge.ca 416.916.7122

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Tuesday, January 7, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 5 PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON East End showdown at Ted Reeve Arena Birchmount Collegiate’s Parker Hayward covers the net as Malvern’s Mason Aucoin takes a shot in a Dec. 19 senior boys hockey game at Ted Reeve Arena. Malvern won the game 3-1. Ice storm can’t stop Christmas deliveries By Jon Muldoon Community Centre 55 director Debbie Visconti credits volunteers and staff who went above and beyond all expectations for saving Christmas for almost 800 East End families. Each year, the centre organizes its Share A Christmas campaign, which sees non-perishable food, fresh produce and a turkey or ham provided to hundreds of less fortunate families, along with toys for children and teens, and treats for pets. December’s ice storm offered up no end of challenges on Dec. 22, the culminating day of the program, when hundreds of volunteers converge on the centre to pick up and distribute food and toys to homes throughout the East End. “The ‘miracle on Main Street’ almost didn’t happen that day because of the ice storm,” said Visconti. Freshco, at Victoria Park Avenue and Gerrard Street East, usually provides a tractor trailer for the produce distribution; however, the store’s power went out the previous evening, and they had no trailer available. After a last-minute scramble, staff at the store found a truck and loaded it in the dark, delivering it two hours late. That’s around the time the power at Centre 55 cut out. Thankfully, said Visconti, the centre has a generator, so the entrance, where volunteers sign up, fill out paperwork and pick up checklists for delivery, could be lighted. The rest of the centre was in the dark, but that didn’t put a damper on the spirits of the staff, who bundled up and got to work. Right as the trailer arrived, a small army of volunteers began to show up, despite many being without power themselves. “Really the community did come together for us,” said Visconti. Though the city sent a salt truck to help out – after a call from Ward 32 Councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon – it wasn’t enough to cover the sidewalks and keep the ice under control. Eventually the search for salt ended with a commercial facility in the far reaches of East York. Two police officers helped direct traffic, and even though the number of volunteer delivery drivers was lower than normal, most made extra trips, and Christmas was shared. “We managed to get through the day, and we were able to deliver to almost 800 families. I’m grateful to everyone who came out despite their own challenges,” said Visconti. “Nothing bad happened that we couldn’t work through.” Inside Out B L I N D S WINDOW COVERINGS Factory Direct • Factory Showroom • Factory Pricing • Repairs Free Measure • Commercial & Residential since 1985 32 Mobile Drive 416-694-0060 Michelle Alley ~ Coach, Mom, Kids advocate What we’ll discover: What’s behind our kids’ behaviour? Wed. Jan. 15 ~ 7-8:30pm Centre 55 ~ 97 Main St., Toronto M4E 2V6 How do we move beyond control, blame Guiding parents on the journey of awakening to their hearts calling...so they can lead by example. It’s so much more fun! and “getting it right”? What does it mean to “parent”, and what is our role in our children’s lives? What do our kids really need from us? Families in Flow - Free Event Register: 416.434.2020 or michelle@highvibelife.com or feel free to just show up! PHOTOS: JON MULDOON Despite a smaller number of volunteers, packages of canned goods, fresh produce, above, and gifts were delivered before nightfall at Community Centre 55’s Share A Christmas delivery day. Households with children were given toys, top, while those with pets were also covered, with treats and food for the furry family members as well. Just under 800 East End families received deliveries despite the ongoing ice storm and numerous related challenges.

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6 beach metro news Tuesday, January 7, 2014 In My OpInIOn Time line change would keep OMB appeals in check PeoPle across this province know the Beach as an iconic destination to visit fine restaurants, shop in eclectic stores and soak up the ambience of a vibrant, exciting neighbourhood. Those who have the good fortune to live there struggle to preserve the characteristics that brought them there in the first place. Recently developers have seized upon the possibility of building structures which will forever alter the landscape of our cherished streetscapes. The city has listened to residents and has developed a series of guidelines to ensure that development is controlled. The mitigation efforts are commendable but fall apart when developers choose to bypass city planners, lawyers, the committee of adjustment, council and local residents by taking their case straight to the Ontario Municipal Board. They can do this because the law is prescriptive. Developers can bypass the municipal process if the city fails to make a decision on a registered plan within 180 days, if it fails to amend a bylaw within 120 days or if a committee of adjustment fails to hold a hearing within 30 days after receiving an application. Because of the volume of construction starts in Toronto and throughout the GTA, many municipalities cannot meet these time frames. It simply takes too long to obtain staff reports, engineering surveys, hold public meetings and conduct negotiations with developers, all within the time frames set Michael Prue MPP Beaches/East York out in law. As a result developers are increasingly choosing the ‘straight to the OMB’ route. We have seen this procedure used on several proposed Queen Street developments. The effect of this approach is to sideline municipal input and potential ratepayers are forced to attend the OMB at great personal expense, and moreover to do so without a cogent, united argument (if the City is on board). This is why I have proposed a bill to extend the time frames. This idea came from discussions I had with local activist Brian Graff. Following our discussion I contacted legal counsel at the Legislature who helped me draft a bill. Bill 144 has now received first reading. Two more readings are necessary if it is to become law. Unfortunately the Legislature is now adjourned until mid-February. When we return all available time slots for private members bills are taken until March 20. After that date new slots are made available by lottery. But I am also hopeful that this idea may be adopted earlier. The Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing is consulting about changes to the Planning Act. If enough people indicate that time lines need to be altered it may just happen. For clarity my bill will give municipalities 365 days to finalize development applications. The committee of adjustment process (for minor building applications) will be lengthened from 30 days to 90 days. These changes will allow the City to gauge public opinion but more importantly allow for essential reports to be filed and considered. In the final analysis, municipal input must never be overlooked. Availability of schools, adequate water and wastewater, parking spaces, and the dream of community cohesion must all be part of the mix. These arguments need to be heard. More importantly they need to be considered. Let me finish by extending wishes for a happy New Year. Beach Metro community News, published by Ward 9 community News Inc., is a non-profit, non-partisan community newspaper founded in 1972 and published 23 times a year. It is distributed free by volunteers in east toronto and West scarborough and paid for by our advertisers. oFFIce: 2196 Gerrard st. e., toronto, M4e 2c7 PhoNe: 416-698-1164 Fax: 416-698-1253 WeB: www.beachmetro.com GeNeral MaNaGer Phil Lameira (ext. 24) phil@beachmetro.com advertIsING MaNaGer Paris Quinn (ext. 26) paris@beachmetro.com edItor Jon Muldoon (ext. 23) jon@beachmetro.com rePorter/PhotoGraPher Andrew Hudson (ext. 25) andrew@beachmetro.com ProductIoN Melinda Drake (ext. 27) melinda@beachmetro.com accouNts Hope Armstrong (ext. 21) hope@beachmetro.com Next Issue: January 21 advertIsING deadlINe: 5 p.m., January 13 voluNteer executIve: Julie DiGregorio, president; Rob Granatstein, vice president; Doug Black, secretary; Kelvin Francis, treasurer; Brian Mercer, past president; Paul M. Babich and David Windrim, special advisors this newspaper accepts advertising in good faith, but does not endorse advertisers or advertisements. all submitted editorial material is subject to editing. IssN #0838-2956 Letters tO the edItOr Praise to neighbours and unsung heroes after ice storm I take thIs opportunity to spread the good word about our wonderful neighbours during the recent power outage. As seniors, we were exceptionally cared for: two offers to join neighbours for warmth around a fireplace, walks shoveled for us and ice cleared, a thermos of hot water and a pot of tea and goodies brought to the door, and phone calls of concern. Our needs were truly met, needs of the body but more importantly, needs of the heart. audrey and Blenus Wright Malvern avenue their neighbours. After six days without power we returned home to a burst pipe even though all efforts were made to prevent it. We felt a call to a plumber would be fruitless due to the enormity of the problem – not so. A call to Balsam plumbing had Peter at my door within an hour. Even though his home was without power, his lot destroyed by trees, he helped his clients in the Beach. After fixing my problem he was off to Glen Manor to look after another one of his many friends. He could have charged any price he wanted but said he would not take advantage of his customers – regular prices apply. That’s what it is to be a Beacher. Many Thanks. Brian and sharon horst Letter of thanks the Gerrard Ashdale Library would like to thank our neighbourhood for generous contributions to our Christmas Open House, held Wednesday, Dec. 11. Over 100 people enjoyed visiting with Santa Claus, photos with Santa taken by Lenswork, entertainment by local musician Jason Kenemy and refreshments provided by The Gerrard India Bazaar BIA, BJ’s Supermarket, Coffee Time (Coxwell & Gerrard), Lazy Daisy’s Cafe and The Flying Pony Gallery. A special treat this year was carol-singing by the Toronto Beach Chorale. Thanks also to the library’s Craft Connection group for decorating the library so beautifully. We appreciate the time and efforts of everyone who helped make the open house such a success. Gail Ferguson Gerrard ashdale library mind where you choose to dump snow It Was heartwarming to see people gather together to shovel snow from front walkways, sidewalks and paths during a recent storm. People who have bad backs, heart conditions or who were away for the weekend had clear paths and sidewalks. Kudos to our neighbors. Unfortunately, I can’t say the same rules applied to the back of our property, as our laneway access was blocked with over four feet of snow. It took me over three hours to clear it and a sprained muscle three cheers for the firemen, the police, the EMS and the hydro workers. All greatly appreciated, however my accolades are going out to the guys and gals that just did what they had to do to help resulted. Someone even told me we should take down items off our back lawn which is, in his mind, communal space. His life and the lives of others would be easier if they could dump their snow on our property. It is private property and will be fenced off in the spring as we are tired of our lanterns and other ornaments being broken, moved or smashed by people attempting to co-opt our property because they can’t, or don’t, care to manage on their own property. We don’t want to have to quote the Trespass to Property Act or to have to be the crazy neighbours who put signs on their lawns to keep others from damaging, modifying or trespassing on our property. Please respect the property of others. Name withheld

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Tuesday, January 7, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 7 Glen Ames robotics team earns provincial spot By Andrew Hudson WHEN THEIR LEGO robot grabs a rescue truck, rams an ambulance and scoots both across a typhoon-swept model town, the Glen Ames robotics team hold their cheers. Not until the plane flies, all pets are rescued and the tricky evacuation sign flips just so do the Grade 7 and 8s break out smiling. It’s the sort of near-perfect run that set a school record and helped them win first among 32 Toronto schools vying for a spot at provincials last month. “It’s almost like you have no room for error,” says team captain Spencer Dunsmuir. The robot challenge at a FIRST LEGO League tournament is like throwing a Frisbee to someone far, far away, Dunsmuir said. Aim it even slightly wrong, and that Frisbee will sail way off target. But no matter how their robot performs at the Oshawa provincials on Jan. 18, the Glen Ames team has already hit a much bigger target, and one they set for themselves – raising $3,000 and 17 boxes of food, clothes and toiletries for a Philippines school hit by Typhoon Haiyan. “We’ve done that kind of a fundraiser at the school before,” said Dunsmuir, explaining how the team phoned up the Fox Theatre and set up a benefit movie day for staff and students. Some paid as much as $60 for a ticket to Ender’s Game or Back to the Future. While the Philippines campaign went above and beyond Glen Ames’ FIRST LEGO League challenge, the students were asked to research and talk about a natural disaster for this year’s “Nature’s Fury” theme. Haiyan made typhoons a natural fit, and gave the students a chance to help for real. The team’s research section emailed a US meteorologist who tracks typhoons and hurricanes, and the whole team dressed as superheroes and filmed a short musical to share the storm-tracker’s preparedness tips in a fun way. When Beach Metro News visited Glen Ames in late December, two of the team captains led a reporter upstairs to meet the whole ten-member team. They sat in a circle, and everyone spoke – about the robot’s optical and pressure sensors, or the time the robot’s arm malfunctioned, or the team-building event where they had 10 seconds to re-arrange themselves like a snake, then a lawn-mower. No one talked over anyone else because the team passed a plastic gold brick around for the right to speak. Until he got the brick, it was easy to forget the students have a coach to help them – librarian and computer teacher Luke Martin. “When they go in for the presentations, the judges don’t want to see the coaches,” Martin said. “So you set them up like that to begin with, and that sense of independence comes naturally to them because they’ve been doing it all along that way.” Martin is impressed by the logic skills students show in the FLL’s robot challenge. “Just on the programing side, they’re dealing with loops, sensors, switches and all this stuff,” he said. “I didn’t hear about a loop until Grade 12 computer science.” But technology isn’t everything when learning to program or design a robot, Martin added, noting how well the team works together in their after-school meetings, and online on the new Schoology site that is PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON Glen Ames graduate Gregor Browning, left, watches with some of the Grade 7 and 8s on the school’s current robotics team as their typhoon-fighting LEGO robot rescues a human figure in practice run before the provincial FIRST LEGO League tournament in Oshawa on Jan. 18. Glen Ames came first among the 32 Toronto schools competing at a qualifier for a spot at provincials this year, an achievement based on their near-perfect robot challenge and a typhoon education campaign during which they raised more than $3,000 and 17 boxes of supplies for a school hit by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. something like a Facebook for schools. “They’ll go home and say, ‘Oh, I have a great idea,’ put it up on Schoology and then bring it up at the meeting,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons why they are so successful this year.” Another reason is that after eight years, robotics is a serious sport at Glen Ames. Nearly a quarter of the school wanted to join FLL this year, Martin said. Twelve students tried out to replace the one original member has to miss provincials. Gregor Browning, a Grade 11 student now in the math and science program at Danforth Collegiate, is one of two alumni helping this year’s team. In 2011, he was on the Glen Ames FLL team that went all the way to the North American finals in Carlsbad, California. “We got to take it one step further than most teams normally do,” he said. “It was really fun.” Browing said the LEGO contest inspired him to enter the next-level FIRST Robotics Competition this year – 120-pound, six-foot robots that students design and weld together to do things like shoot a basketball or throw a Frisbee. EntErtainmEnt BEat By Jon Muldoon vides the singing voice for the character ‘Olive’ on the animated series Justin Time. The show takes place at Robinson Hall, St. Nicholas Anglican Church, 1512 Kingston Rd., just east of Warden, at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 18. Admission is $25 or $22 in advance through acousticharvest.ca. For more information visit the website or call 416-224-2235. For more on Bradstreet, visit davidbradstreet.com. • David Bradstreet ACOUSTIC HARVEST presents David Bradstreet on Saturday, Jan. 18, with special guest Mira Meikle. Bradstreet studied architecture in college, but quickly transitioned to full-time music, touring the US and Canada in the early 1970s. He is likely best known for his song Renaissance, which was a hit tune for Valdy. Bradstreet has worked as a singer/ songwriter, composer and producer for over three decades, with 21 albums to his name. He has won a Juno and been nominated for three more, along with a Gemini nomination. He’s also known for his production work, which has covered artists such as Jane Siberry, Colleen Peterson, Nancy Simmonds, Bill Hughes, Jason Fowler and Robert Priest. Opening act Meikle is a young performer who Bradstreet has been working with. The singer/songwriter from Oakville has won a number of competitions, and has performed for audiences large and small. She also pro- LONGTIME BEACHER Richard McMillan stars as Sandra in the Pleiades Theatre production of Michel Tremblay’s Manon, Sandra and the Virgin. McMillan has been acting professionally for just shy of four decades, and has worked throughout Canada, the US and Great Britain. He spent 11 seasons at Stratford, and has graced the stages at the Shaw Festival, The Old Vic in London, The Kennedy Centre in Washington, DC, and numerous New York City and Toronto theatres, amongst others. He has won a Gemini Award, four Dora Mavor Moore Awards, a Toronto Theatre Critics Award and the Pittsburgh Performer of the Year award. Tremblay is one of Canada’s most celebrated and prolific writers. The original title of the work was Damnée Manon, Sacrée Sandra. This rare production, a first for Buddies in Bad Times, is directed by John Van Burek, who originally translated the work and directed the first English performances in 1979. Manon, Sandra and the Virgin revolves around the story of Manon, mired in the past and steadfastly religious, and Sandra, a conniving drag queen. The pair represent the sacred and the profane in the provocative work, set in east end Montreal, in which both characters share a fascination with the vir- Richard McMillan gin Mary, speaking in parallel monologues. McMillan stars alongside Irene Poole as Manon during Manon, Sandra and the Virgin’s three-week run. The play opens Jan. 15, running until Feb. 2, at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander St., southeast of Yonge and Wellesley Streets. Performances are at 8 p.m. from Tuesday to Saturday, with Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m. Previews will take place at 8 p.m. on Jan. 11 and 14, and at 2 p.m. on Jan. 12. Tickets range from $20 to $32. For more detailed ticket information, visit the website at buddiesinbadtimes.com or call 416-975-8555. • RELISH BAR and Grill, 2152 Danforth Ave., just east of Woodbine, continues to offer a haven for live music in the East End. Regular performers include The BTBs on Wednesdays, Bentroots on Mondays and Danger Bees on Fridays. Kiki Karaoke happens on Thursdays, while the Stir It Up open mic night is on Sundays. Music of the Mediterranean Stars will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 7. Tracey Gallant takes to the stage before karaoke on Thursday, Jan. 9, with Melting Pot on Saturday, Jan. 11. Liane Fainsinger will perform a jazz brunch on Sunday, Jan. 12. Tuesday, Jan. 14 sees Fabio Dwyer performing, with Planet Bennett on Thursday, Jan. 16 before karaoke. The Songbird Sessions and Lilly Mason are scheduled for two seperate shows on Saturday, Jan. 18, with Steve Raiken lined up for Tuesday, Jan. 21. For more details and set times, visit them online at relishbarandgrill.com, call 416-4254664 or find them on Facebook.

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8 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, January 7, 2014 PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON A little piece of magic in Kew Gardens Lisa Denvir and a friend were heading home from an early morning beach walk when they spied this curious door in Kew Gardens. At first, they found a pile of pebbles out front, each one painted with a tiny heart. A sign beside them read, “Share the Love. Take One.” Since then, Denvir said they often drop by the tiny tree house and peek inside. A few weeks ago, they stopped to clear away the snow only to find a ring-sized wreath on the door knob. Inside was a Christmas tree and a gift wrapped in shiny green paper. “We can’t wait to see what tomorrow brings,” she said. Beach arts scene By Jon Muldoon PAINTER AND PRINTMAKER Rebecca Ott’s work will be featured at Open Gallery, 454 Kingston Rd., opening on Jan. 16 and running to the end of February. Ott, a Toronto-based artist, studied both architecture and digital media before shifting her focus to visual art. Her work features oft-ignored elements of the modern urban landscape, including the undersides of bridges and expressways, power lines and utility infrastructure and buildings. She writes that her work explores “the quiet beauty of these often overlooked sculptural forms.” Open Gallery is operated in the office of Open Architects. The gallery focuses on work featuring or influenced by architecture, and offers a relatively rare chance to take in art in an East End gallery. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, Jan. 16, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more on Ott, visit rebeccaott.com, or check opengallery.ca for more on the venue. • Gardiner 02, etching/aquatint, by Rebecca Ott ARTISANS AT WORK is holding its monthly First Friday art party a week late this month. Stop by the shop at 2071 Danforth Ave., just west of Woodbine, from 7 to 10 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 10. The theme for this month’s featured group art show is titled Urban Culture. Live music will be provided by The Sidewalkers, and there will be a licensed bar and food. Upcoming monthly themes, for artists interested in submitting their work, include the Artistic Family Show in February, in honour of Family Day. Submissions must consist of up to three works each from at least three members of a family. March will feature the Close Up and Personal show, while April will see the Vintage show. Classes in encaustic, stained glass and a workshop on ‘silver PMC’ (precious metal clay) are upcoming. Weekly classes in oil painting by Julie Glick are available on Wednesdays for both youth and adults, and starting Sunday, Jan. 12, weekly live model sketching and painting sessions will be available, with both drop in and membership prices. For more information on classes, submitting to shows and the winter farmers’ market, visit artisans-at-work.com. • GERRARD ART SPACE, 1390 Gerrard St. E. between Coxwell and Greenwood, reopens on Jan. 8 after a holiday break. The show in January is titled Grandfathers: The Native Art Show, and will run until Jan. 26. Work from First Nations artists will offer interpretations of the ‘seven grandfather teachings’: love, honesty, respect, truth, courage, wisdom and humility. For more information on upcoming shows and hours, visit gerrardartspace.com and gerrardartspace.blogspot.ca. Barry Noble, D.P.M. — Podiatrist Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Heel Pain ♦ Heel Spurs ♦ Orthotics ♦ Custom Shoes Infected Nails ♦ Ingrown Nails ♦ Fungal Nail Infections Skin Infections ♦ Warts ♦ Callouses ♦ Corns Diabetic Foot Care Partial OHIP Coverage Main Medical Building 294 Main Street (at Danforth) 416-694-4166

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Tuesday, January 7, 2014 beach metro news 9 pro f e ss io na l d ir e ct o ry (self-governing health professions) HEALTH WELLNESS Holistic Therapies PSYCHOTHERAPY Judy Gould, Ph.D. Experienced Psychotherapist Relationship Difficulties • Anxiety Depression • Body Image Concerns Physical Illness • Free Consultation 816 Pape Ave. (near Pape/Danforth) LAWYERS/LEGAL TURNER CATHERINE ASSOCIATES Men’s Issues, Anger, Addictions Insurance coverage Nigel Turner 416-690-3684 Individuals and Couples Nishe Catherine 416-698-0370 CHIROPRACTORS DEGEN’S HEALTH GROUP Dr. Wade Whitten, D.C. Dr. Tanja Degen, D.C., CPT Dr. Christina Carreau N.D. 1092 Kingston Rd. (at Victoria Park beside Manchester Arms) MASSAGE THERAPY (Registered Massage Therapists) DR. KARIN RUMMELL & ASSOCIATES OPTOMETRISTS 1914 Queen St. E. (E. of Woodbine) Mon.- Sat. by appointment missfit.ca in-home personal trainer 416 888 6465 michelle@missfit.ca THERAPY LOUNGE Megan Evans, RMT, CRHP & Associates Massage Therapy • Reflexology 2245 Queen St. East • 2nd floor • Open 7 days per week • 416-691-5757 BEACHES OPTOMETRY CLINIC Dr. Linda Chan Optometrist 951 Kingston Rd. (West of Victoria Park) Evening & weekend appointments available 647-991-4225 www.judygould.com 416-699-5320 • Free Parking www.therapylounge.ca KEW BEACH HEALTH CLINIC Naturopathy • Homeopathy • Clinical Nutrition • • Matrix Energetics • • Bowen Therapy • Carol Henderson, MA Counselling Psych. Psychotherapy for indidviduals and couples. Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Anger Management Insurance clients welcome. Evening and weekend sessions avail. BARRISTER & SOLICITOR Estate Planning/Real Estate/Business House Calls GARRY M. CASS 416-916-7122 Dr. Johanna Carlo Chiropractor 2277 Queen Street East (at Glen Manor) Beaches Wellness Centre 416-691-1991 DR. DAVID JEONG DENTIST 2107 Danforth Ave. (at Woodbine Subway) New patients welcome. Open Saturdays. Acorn Personal Fitness Because Fitness is Personal Personal Training Specialist 416-690-6168 carolannehenderson@gmail.com 416.219.2671 416-767-CASS (2277) x 207 416-795-4899 (cell) 416-491-0273 (fax) garrycass@sympatico.ca URBAN CALM THERAPEUTICS Stephanie Gage, RMT Cami Rahman, RMT Caitlin McAulay, RMT 1789 Queen St. East, Unit 6 416-698-7070 Nancy Leach, M. Sc., BMCP Support for chronic or life-threatening illness through Counselling, Body Therapy, and Meditation Norm Spence 416 716 2367 The Body Means Well from the author of Glover & Associates Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries Real Estate, Family, Litigation Wills & Estates, Corporate Queen and Hammersmith ASHBRIDGE’S HEALTH CENTRE Dr. Emily Howell Jackie Leesun Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Orthotics Registered Massage Therapy 416-698-3157 Jen Goddard, R.M.T. Neville Park Health Group 2455A Queen St. East 416-696-1800 Dr. D. Caplan normspence@bell.net www.acornpersonalfitness.ca Studio at Victoria Park & Kingston Rd. www.mindfulwayconsulting.com 647-239-1903 416-691-3700 1522 Queen St. E. 416-465-5575 BALSAM DENTAL Family Dentistry * Open 6 days a week * New patients always welcome 2200 Queen St. East (at Balsam) VETERINARIANS John Littlejohn, D.V.M. and Associates ACCOUNTING CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT Bert van Delft Complete financial services for the business owner, manager, entrepreneur & self-employed Corporate and Personal Income Tax Services David Faed CRIMINAL LAWYER OMEGA HEALTH + FITNESS ART, Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Graston 1089 Kingston Rd. (at Victoria Park) www.omegahealthandfitness.com Dr. Tyrrell Ashcroft Dr. Thien Dang-Tan 416-690-6257 416-691-8555 www.balsamdental.com 690-0000 bestcriminallawyer.ca Barrister & Solicitor Lynn Wilsher, R.M.T. 23 years experience Queen and Hammersmith Woodbine Animal Clinic 1905 Danforth Ave. (Between Woodbine & Coxwell) 647-317-6017 DR. LINDA WINTER Psychologist Consultations • Therapy Individuals • Couples Over 20 years experience. Located at Queen & Wheeler 416-699-1175 CHRISTINE KATO, B.Sc., D.V.M. 98 Scarboro Beach Blvd. Bus: 416-270-9898 KATHRYN WRIGHT Family Law & Mediation 416-699-8848 Dr. Scott Dunham Chiropractor 416-462-1562 rmtheaven@hotmail.com KATO ANIMAL HOSPITAL 2830 Danforth Ave. (East of Dawes Rd.) 416-691-1071 Dr. Linda Iny Lempert Psychologist – Psychologue Individuals and Couples Services disponibles en français 47 Main Street (at Lyall) 416-690-2112 Dogs, cats, pocket pets. Housecalls available. Chartered Accountant • Corporate & Personal Tax • Specializing in small to medium business • Financial advice 21 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 502 William F. Deneault Kew Gardens Health Group 2181 Queen St. East, Suite 305 (at Lee) 2239 Queen Street East www.kathrynwrightlaw.com kathrynwrightlaw@gmail.com Personal Injury Lawyer Car accidents, Slips and Falls, Disability Claims 220 Bay Street, Suite 1400 416-643-3857 pcahill@willdavidson.ca www.kewgardenshealth.com 416-907-0103 ARCHITECTURE/DESIGN Stephen G. King, Architect B. Arch. OAA, MRAIC “Serving the Beach since 1987” Residential, Restorations, Home Inspections, Commercial, Interiors, Landscapes COMPLETE PROJECT SERVICES FROM DESIGN THROUGH CONSTRUCTION Member Ontario Association of Architects Paul J. Cahill Tel: (416) 962-2186 COUNSELLING individuals, couples finding your strengths insurance covered. M.a., M.div. registered Marriage & family therapist 416-694-4380 www.drlempert.ca HOUGHTON VETERINARY HOUSECALL SERVICES Vaccines, examinations, diagnostics, palliative care, and home euthanasia provided for your pets in the comfort of your own home. Chartered Professional Accountants • Accounting services for owner-managed businesses. • Personal and corporation income tax preparation. • Audit and consulting services for not-for-profit organizations Kriens LaRose, LLP (416) 694-8181 www.stephenkingarchitect.com DR. LYNN WELLS Psychologist Practice restricted to the identification of giftedness and to learning problems and disorders in all ages. Dr. Barbara Houghton 647-221-5516 www.krienslarose.com 416-690-6800 Linda Bronicheski, Lawyer Beaches Family Law Effective Resolution of Family Law Matters 47 Main Street, Toronto 416-763-6884 Linda@BeachesFamilyLaw.com Criminal Lawyer ShaunnaKelly.com (Phone) 647-340-6651 (Fax) 416-203-2332 shaunnakelly@gmail.com peg earle, W. MORRIS DESIGN ARCHITECTURAL AND INTERIOR DESIGN CONSULTANTS DESIGN CONCEPTS AND PERMIT DRAWINGS WESLEY MORRIS, ARIDO, IDC, AATO 416-698-9027 • peg@pegearle.com Child, Adolescent and Family Therapy; Trauma, Bullying, and Addictions; Youth in Conflict with the Law. Sports Performance Counselling for Youth VET ON WHEELS Gerrard Mobile Veterinary Services 416-690-1236 Dr. Jody Levenbach Children and Young Adolescents Assessment • CBT Social Skills • Parent Coaching Dr. Ahmad Badri, DVM 416-284-4610 www.vetonwheels.info info@vetonwheels.info Psychologist Certified Management Accountant B. Math, CMA Accounting Issues and Systems, Bookkeeping, Personal and Corporate Taxes Melani Norman Child and Adolescent Counselling 416-261-9679 The Law Office of Shaunna Kelly Siegi A. Schuler, Ph.D, RSW siegischuler@aol.com Call 416-471-0337 416-362-7472 www.leasidetherapycentre.com/siegi-schuler TAYLOR DESIGN SERVICES Architectural and Engineering Design Permit Drawings and Applications jdlevenbach@gmail.com 647-891-2603 Registered Dietitian Supportive nutrition counselling for women suffering with weight gain, hot flashes, insomnia, moodiness, etc. FINANCE/INSURANCE INSTANT TAX REFUND Personal & Corporation Tax • Bookkeeping GST/Payroll 2481 Kingston Rd. Suite 207 manoj@actfinance.ca 416-269-2744 MORTGAGE AGENT Certified General Accountant Emily C. Larimer Life Management & Corporate Coaching Kelly Greer, BASc RD • Bookkeeping • Personal and corporate tax services • Accounting services for small businesses and t he self-employed Call: 416-693-2274 emily@eclarimercga.com www.eclarimercga.com ADR-Mediation Michael Taylor, P. Eng. BCIN family law lawyer 2120 Queen Street East (@ Hammersmith) susan t. dixon MPSquared Coaching Merrill Pierce CCA ICF 416.824.2626 merrill@mpsquaredcoaching.com 416 316 3248 info@taylordesignservices.ca LAWYERS/LEGAL Dashwood & Dashwood Barristers & Solicitors Do you think differently? Gifted/ADHD Support & Coaching School/Workplace Performance Children/Adults Mary Lynn Trotter, MSW, RSW 416-875-9474 marylynntrotter@rogers.com www.adhdtreatmenttoronto.com Ask about insurance coverage PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SERVICES Renovations & Additions Structural Design • Building Permit 416-258-3596 • nutrigal.ca Andre Ouimet I help GOOD PEOPLE with BAD CREDIT 416-693-2733 www.dixonslaw.ca (Licensed Paralegal) Small Claims, Traffic Tickets, Landlord/Tenant, Criminal, Debt Letters, Mediation/Arbitration etc. Call for a Free 30 min. Consult Local • Affordable 416-200-6300 www.WINTACO.com PHYSIOTHERAPY EAST TORONTO ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS INJURY CLINIC David Evans, R.P.T., F.C.A.M.T. Danny Kuzmich, B. Sc., F.C.A.M.T. and associates 1577 Danforth, Unit 4 (at Coxwell) Shellyann Pereira Geoffrey J. Dashwood 961 Kingston Rd. Tel. 416-690-7222 Toronto, M4E 1S8 Fax. 416-690-8738 (647) 700-9014 EXPERT MORTGAGE LICENSE # 12079 MASSAGE THERAPY (Registered Massage Therapists) WAYPOINT permit consulting inc. Available for consultations permit plans, zoning info, etc. BCIN#41835 647-693-6221 PSYCHOTHERAPY Abina Murphy, R.I.H.R. Spiritual Psychotherapist Past Life Regression Reiki Master Snider & DiGregorio Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries. 978 Kingston Road, Toronto, Ont., M4E 1S9 579 Kingston Rd., #110, Toronto Advanced Therapeutics Kevin Oates, R.M.T. & Assoc. Voted “Best Massage Therapist” - NOW Magazine 1398 Queen St. E. (east of Greenwood Ave.) 416-691-3943 www.beachmetro.com CHIROPRACTORS Chiropractor Neville Park Health Group 2455A Queen St. East (Since 1989) Mike 416-659-2779 waypointconsulting@bell.net www.waypointconsulting.ca PHYSIOTHERAPY @ Beaches Health Group® Yvette Sedgewick 2212 Queen St. E. 416-690-2076 Tel: 416-699-0424 Fax: 416-699-0285 Email: info@sdlegal.ca 416-469-3879 (open 7 days) www.advancedtherapeutics.ca 416-693-5611 Nancy Christie, M.T.C. Mindfullness Psychotherapy • depression • trauma • anxiety • relationship • creativity • free initial consultation KEW GARDENS HEALTH GROUP Massage Therapy • Physiotherapy Osteopathy • Naturopathic Medicine Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries Public 300 Main Street 416-690-3324 O’Reilly, Moll & Forrest Dr. Janet D’Arcy 416-690-6257 Open Saturdays BEACHES MASSAGE CENTRE Zabiullah Khaliqi, RMT 416-690-5185 2212 Queen St. E. (at Spruce Hill) your beach architect Drafting + Design Architectural Design Permit Drawings Project Management Commercial, Residential 416-690-3040 Versatech 2181 Queen St. E., Suite 305 416-907-0103 www.kewgardenshealth.com (at Lee) www.mindfullnesstraumatherapy.ca 416-691-3768 DENISE M. F. BADLEYCOSTELLO Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Family, Real Estate, Wills Business, Immigration, Small Claims Court 2069 Danforth Ave (Woodbine) Dr. Kelly Robazza Dr. William Chan Chiropractic Acupuncture A.R.T. / Laser 2212 Queen St. E. Catherine Allon, BSc, MEd. Psychotherapist Personal Coach Career & Relationship Issues Dolores Wootton, R.M.T. Marlene Gascer, C.S.T. John Barnet, R.M.T., D.O.M.P. Book online at essencetherapy.com 2455A Queen St. E. (e. of Silver Birch) • Essence • 416-694-9531 • 416-816-1630 WELLNESS Holistic Therapies 416-690-6195 416-698-5861 John H. Personal Training Achieve your fitness goals today! Andrew Walmsley B.P.E. Leslieville Personal Fitness Private fully-equipped studio Qualified and experienced Call 416-694-0232 The Professional DirecTory may also be vieweD aT CARL A. BRAND BARRISTER & SOLICITOR NOTARY 961 Kingston Rd. Toronto, Canada M4E 1S8 Tel: 416-699-5100 Fax: 416-690-8738 brandlaw@live.ca Dragonfly Therapeutics REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPY Intuitive Reiki treatments & workshops Woodbine & Gerrard call 416-737-7717 416-694-4090 INTERIOR DESIGNER 416-694-3811 cell: 416-522-5903 toniavuolo@mac.com www.toniavuolodesigns.com Deadline for next issue is January 13th Tonia Vuolo BJARNASON, D.C. Chiropractor 416-709-6654 www.leslievillefitness.com 20 Leslie St. (free parking) 1906 Queen St. E. (1 block east of Woodbine) www.beachmetro.com 416-694-2868 SHARON MADSEN, HSC, RMT

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10 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Community Calendar JAN. 13: Osteoporosis Support & Information Group at Scarborough Village Recreation Centre, 3600 Kingston Rd. (at Markham Rd.), 10 a.m.-noon. Admission and parking free. Info: 416-396-4051 (20) JAN. 17: Visual Artists Show & Share at Art Cave, 155 Lamb Ave., 7-9 p.m., hosted by East End Arts. Receive and share friendly feedback on your visual artwork. Bring 1-3 pieces of your work. (20) JAN. 18: Robbie Burns Dinner and Ceilidh at Fallingbrook Presbyterian Church, 35 Wood Glen Rd. (at Kingston Rd.), 5:30 p.m. Roast beef, neeps, tatties and haggis. Piper, music, dancing and readings. Tickets $30. Reservations: 416699-3084, fboffice@rogers.com (20) JAN. 20: Nutritionist in the House at Community Centre 55, 97 Main St., 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free half/hour appt. with certified nutritionist Sheila Ream. Book at 416-691-1113. JAN. 21: Beach Garden Society at Adam Beck Community Centre, 79 Lawlor Ave., 7:15-9 p.m. Guest speaker Rodger Tschantz will talk about “What You Absolutely Need to Grow in 2014!” New members and guests welcome. Light refreshments. Info: beachgs. ca@gmail.com, www.beachgs.ca (20) JAN. 22-MARCH 26: Healthy Family, Healthy Life, a program for parents and children, at East End Community Health Centre, 1619 Queen St. E., Wednesdays 5-7:30 p.m. Learn how to plan and cook nutritious meals, grocery shop smarter and get fit. Program is free to families (with children aged 8-13) on limited income, living in East End CHC catchment. Program info: Olivia 416-778-5805 ext 208. Info: www.eastendchc.on.ca. (20) FEB. 23, MARCH 2: Scarborough Model Railroaders Train Show at 17 Jeavons Ave. (off Birchmount Rd.), 11 a.m.-4 p.m. See our two floors of model railroads in HO and N scale. Admission: $5 adults, $2 children, $3 seniors. Info: 416-262-9971, www. scarborough-model-railroaders.org (23) FEB. 25-MARCH 25: Craving Change at East End Community Health Centre, 1619 Queen Street East, Tuesdays 2:15-4:15 pm. Want to change your relationship with food? Come learn about what can trigger your food cravings, and strategies to change problematic eating behaviours. This program is free to people on limited income, living in the East End CHC catchment. See www.eastendchc.on.ca for Centre information. For program info or to register, call Miriam at 416-778-5805 ext. 210. Space is limited - call by January 24, 2014. (21) TUESDAYS (SEPT. to May): Support Group, East York Chapter Schizophrenia Society of Ontario at Toronto East General Hospital, 825 Coxwell Ave., 7 p.m., for families and friends of people with schizophrenia. Info: 416-6911740, www.schizophrenia.on.ca (r) TUESDAYS: SENIORS JAZZ at Canadian Legion, Baron Byng Beaches Branch 1/42, 243 Coxwell Ave., 1-3 p.m. Info: 416-465-0120 (fr) TUESDAYS: ABOVE THE BEACH free playtime drop-in at Forward Baptist Church, 1891 Gerrard St. E. (at Woodbine), 9:30-11:30 a.m., for children 0-5 years and their caregivers. Info: www.abovethebeach.ca (r) TUESDAYS: BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL (BNI) Meeting at The Mayfair Club, 801 Lakeshore Blvd. E., 7:30-9 a.m. RSVP: Andy Kovacs 416-342-7460, andy.kovacs@sunlife.com (19) SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH: Amnesty International, in the Beach, meets at St. John’s Norway Church (Woodbine Ave. at Kingston Rd.), 7 p.m., to support Amnesty’s Human Rights work, through letter-writing actions and through organized public events to generate awareness of Human Rights actions worldwide. New members are most welcome. Info: beachamnesty@gmail.com (e/o) SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH: East York Chapter Schizophrenia Society of Ontario General Meeting at Toronto East General Hospital, 825 Coxwell Ave., 7 p.m. Info: 416-691-1740 (fr) WEDNESDAYS: FRENCH CONVERSATION Group for adults, 7-9 p.m. This is a group of about 10 people at the intermediate level and above. If you are highly motivated and interested in joining, please call (leave your number if the answering machine responds) 416-699-4681 (r) THURSDAYS: WALKING GROUP at East End Community Health Centre, 1619 Queen St. E., 10-11 a.m. Want to get moving and improve your health? Come join the East End Walking Group for a stroll around the neighbourhood, followed by some light stretching. For more programs, check the Centre’s program calendar at www.eastendchc. on.ca. To participate in the walking group, call Zari 416-778-5805 ext. 222 (fr) THURSDAYS: COMMUNITY DINNER at 10 Gower St., 5 p.m. Volunteers welcome. Info: 416691-7407, www.neighbourhoodlink.org (20) FRIDAYS: FRIENDLY FRENCH Conversation Group at Calvary Baptist Church, 74 Main St. (rear entrance, lower level), 9:30-11:30 a.m. All levels welcome. Don’t use it you’ll lose it. Info: Diana 416-698-6537 (fr) BEACH INTERFAITH OUTREACH LUNCH and Fellowship for Adults is held Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. •Mondays at Waverley Road Baptist Church (129 Waverley Rd.), hosted by Corpus Christi Catholic Church •Wednesdays at Beach Hebrew Institute (109 Kenilworth Ave.) •Thursdays at Beach United Church (140 Wineva Ave.) •Fridays at Kingston Road United Church (975 Kingston Rd.) co-hosted by St. Aidan’s Anglican Church. Info: 416-691-6869 (r) BEACH PHOTO Club meetings are held every 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month, from September to June, at St. Aidan’s, 70 Silver Birch Ave., 7:30 p.m. Everyone from the novice to the experienced is welcome. The only requisite is an interest in learning about the photographic arts. (r/fr) GERRARD ASHDALE LIBRARY, 1432 Gerrard St. E. •Jan. 7: NFB Film Club, 6:30 p.m. Screening The Fruit Hunters, documentary about exotic fruit cultivators and preservationists. •Jan. 9: WoodGreen Resume Critiquing, Thursdays, 2-3 p.m. Call for appointment 461-645-6000 ext 2316 •Jan. 11: Ashdale Writers Group, alternate Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. •Jan. 11: Chess Club, 1-2 p.m. •Jan. 24: Youth Advisory Group (YAG), 4-5 p.m. Earn volunteer hours while helping us to create a better library for youth in the community. •Jan. 27: Family Literacy Day, 7-8 p.m. Stories, games and more. No registration required. Info: 416-393-7717, ashdaleevents@ gmail.ca, www.torontopubliclibrary.ca. Library is wheelchair accessible. (20) IF DRINKING has become a problem, we can help. Alcoholics Anonymous 416-487-5591, www.aa.org, www.aatoronto.org (e/o) HELP MAKE A DIFFERENCE in the life of a child. If you would like more information on becoming a Foster Parent, call the Homes For Kids hotline at 1-877-567KIDS. Help Foster a Future. (fr) EAST TORONTO CLIMATE ACTION GROUP are citizens who are concerned about smog, climate change and other environmental issues as they impact the city and particularly East Toronto. We meet monthly, and welcome your involvement and support. Info: www.etcag.org (fr) FAMILY SERVICE TORONTO offers educational workshops for those caring for aging relatives, parents or friends. Sessions include: Coping with Change and Loss, Healthy Caregiving, and Advocating for Your Relative. Info and registration: Lynne Gallagher 416-595-9618 (fr) FELDENKRAIS® FREE INTROS, Classes, Workshops, Sessions. Feeling at odds with the warring parts of your body? Even after exercise, massage or chiropractic adjustments, the relief gained is temporary while ease & comfort continue to elude us. Awareness Through Movement® offers a means to rebuild a unified sense of ourselves, a wholeness forgotten & abandoned as impossible. Feel freedom where we carry stiffness and pain, not through strengthening, stretching or correcting muscles but through utilizing the brain’s capacity to reorganize our stiffened parts into a coherent, fluid, moving whole. Also for the pain-free. Info: www.YourBodyTellsTheTruth.ca, Marlene Kennedy 416-406-0054 (e/o) ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH CHOIR welcomes new members. We practise Thursdays 7:30-9 p.m. and perform Sundays at 11 a.m. at 794 Kingston Rd. (3 blocks east of Main St.). You don’t have to have musical training to sing with us, but you do have to like singing and want to be with others to make the whole greater than the sum of the parts. We are friendly and welcoming and our leader is a wonderful music teacher. Info: Paul Williams 416-699-2518 (r) ROTARY CLUB OF TORONTO BEACH holds a breakfast meeting every Tuesday, 7 a.m., at the Balmy Beach Club. For information please visit www.torontobeachrotary.org or call Roger Cecchetto 416-415-5000 ext. 6078 (r) BUSINESS CONNECTION EXCHANGE (BCX Beaches Chapter) meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month at The Beacher Cafe, 2162 Queen St. E. (at MacLean), 8-9:30 a.m. Info: Alison 416839-9549, alison@singulardesign.ca ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION, Branch 617, 937 Warden Ave. Come join us for a drink, friendly conversation, and become a member. (fr) CONVERSATION CIRCLE, Tuesdays at Crescent Town Club, Thursdays at 20 Trent Ave., 12:30-2:30 p.m. Volunteers welcome. Info: 416691-7407, www.neighbourhoodlink.org (20) ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION, Br. 13, 1577 Kingston Rd., has hall available for rent. Many dates available including New Year’s Eve. Info: 416-455-0640 (19) FREE WORKSHOPS FOR PARENTS and Caregivers at Family Resource Connection, offered through East End Community Health, 10 a.m. Child care provided by Family Resource Connection staff. •Jan. 9: Sensitive/Shy Kids – What is your child’s temperament? •Feb. 13: Tips for Dealing with Transitions. Info and registration: 416-690-0102 (r) BABY TIME PROGRAM at Family Resource Connection, for parents and caregivers. Come join us for a time of singing and socialization. An opportunity to share resources and ideas with other parents and professionals. Mondays & Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. Info: 416-690-0102 (r) NEIGHBOURHOOD LINK SENIORS PROGRAMS at 2287 Gerrard St. E. •Fridays: Carpet Bowling, 10 a.m.; Lunch, 12 noon; Euchre 1 p.m. •Every second Wednesday: Lunch at Beach United Church, program 11 a.m., lunch at noon. Info: www. neighbourhoodlink.org (16) WOODSHED OPEN MIC at Lazy Daisy’s Cafe, 1515 Gerrard St. E., second Thursday of every month, 7:30-10 p.m. Bring your instrument and sign up after 7 p.m. to play a 10 minute set. Limited sign-up (3 slots) via email woodshedopenmic @ outlook .com. Music and local homemade food, fine coffee and teas, craft beer and VQA wines. Admission free (we pass the hat for the feature). Info: www.lazydaisyscafe.ca (fr) FREE SENIORS MOVIE at The Fox, 2236 Queen St. E. (at Beech Ave.), last Thursday of every month. Hosted by Rotary Club of Toronto Beach. Next movie Jan. 30: Philomena. Doors open 10 a.m., movie starts at 10:30 a.m. (21) LESLIEVILLE FLEA will be at The Distillery District’s Fermenting Cellar, 28 Distillery Lane, Jan. 19, Feb. 23, March 16, April 20 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Visit one of Toronto’s most beautiful and historic venues. Shop at over 70 vendors selling vintage, salvage, antiques, furniture, art, handcrafted items and more. Free admission. Public parking available. Info: leslievilleflea.com (19) ST. AIDAN’S Church, Queen St. E. at Silver Birch Ave. •Sunday services are at 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. (Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30) •Wednesday services, 10:30 a.m. All welcome. Info: 416-691-2222, staidansinthebeach.com (20) BEACH UNITED Church, “The Heart of the Beach”. Join us in our newly renovated location at 140 Wineva Ave. Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery care and children’s activity time available. •Interfaith Lunch Program, Thurs. Jan. 2, 11 a.m.-1 p.m •Seniors program and lunch, Jan. 8, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. •Choirs practise week of Jan. 6. Info: 416-691-8082, www.beachunitedchurch.com We are on facebook and twitter @NewBeachUnited (20) BEACHES PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 65 Glen Manor Dr. (S of Queen) in the heart of the Beach. Worship in a family-friendly, relaxed environment. Sunday School and Nursery. Coffee and new friendships are Free! LGTB friendly. Sundays 10:30 a.m. Minister: Rev. Matt McKay. Info: www. beacheschurch.org, 416-699-5871 (r) KINGSTON ROAD UNITED CHURCH, 975 Kingston Rd. (3 blocks W of Victoria Pk. Ave.). Join us each Sunday for Worship, Church School and Nursery, 10:30 a.m. Our services are filled with beautiful music and thoughtful sermons, and are shared amidst a caring community with true neighbourly spirit. Come in and get a faith lift. Info: www.kruc.ca. 416-699-6091 (r) ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 794 Kingston Rd. (3 blocks E of Main St.) •Masses: Saturday 4:30 p.m. (Contemporary Music), Sunday 9 a.m. (Children’s Liturgy), 11 a.m. (Choir) •Weekday Masses: Tuesday to Friday 8:15 a.m. •Reconciliation: Saturday 3:45-4 p.m. •Pray the Rosary each morning Tuesday to Friday, 20 min. before Mass. All welcome. Info: 416-698-1105, www.stjohnsrc. ca, stjohnschurch@bellnet.ca (r) FALLINGBROOK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 35 Wood Glen Road (corner of Kingston Road and Wood Glen). Join us Sundays 10:30 a.m. for a spiritually relevant service accompanied by an inspiring and joyous music program. Families always welcome and we offer a Sunday school program. Info: www. fallingbrookpresbyterian.com (r) CORPUS CHRISTI Church, 16 Lockwood Rd. •Masses: Tuesday-Friday 9 a.m., Saturday Vigil 5 p.m., Sunday 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. with children’s liturgy. Info: 416-694-0382, corpuschristi@bellnet.ca (r) TORONTO UNITED MENNONITE CHURCH, 1774 Queen St. E. We warmly welcome you to join us for our worship service each Sunday with Christian education and nursery, 10 a.m.-12:35 p.m. Info: 416-699-6631, www.tumc.ca (r) CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 72 Main St. (between Gerrard & Kingston). Know you are welcome at our neighbourhood church. Visit with us to worship & experience our caring, extended family. Sunday 10:30 a.m. Nursery, Sunday School & twice monthly Youth. Wheelchair accessible. Parking lot off Benlamond. Pastor: Alan Roberts. Info: Pastor 416-691-4721, calvaryonmain@bellnet. ca, www.calvary-baptist-church.ca (r) WAVERLEY ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH, 129 Waverley Rd. Sundays, 11 a.m. You are invited! Our services feature contemporary music and interesting messages to help you know God better. Current Sunday Series is “How to Grow Spiritually.” •Sept. 14: Community Block Party, 1-4 p.m., featuring singer/musician Evan Champagne. •Sept. 15: Back to Church Sunday, featuring Evan Champagne. Come as you are! Info: www.waverleyroadbaptist.ca (r) DENTONIA PARK UNITED CHURCH, 2550 Danforth Ave. •Children’s Ministry. Open to all children. Sunday School: Sundays 10 a.m., Friday program: Fridays 4-6 p.m. Free piano lessons for beginners, art, crafts class, ESL for adults. Info: 416-694-2095, www.dpuc.org (15) ST. SAVIOUR’S ANGLICAN CHURCH, 43 Kimberley Ave. (at Swanwick). Join us for Sunday service 10:30 a.m., with Church school. •Dec. 14: Christmas Caroling and refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Free, but any cash donations to our grocery-gift card program. •Dec. 24: Christmas Eve service, 10:30 p.m. Info: 416-699-6512, www.stsaviours.ca (r) ST. NICHOLAS’ ANGLICAN CHURCH, 1512 Kingston Rd. (one block east of Warden). Taking time to remember, celebrate and grow in the love of God at work in our world and in our lives, is a vital aspect of our spiritual faith journey. We gather together in worship, and for special events, which seek to develop and build our relationship with God and one another. Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Said Service of Holy Eucharist, 10:30 a.m. Sung Eucharist Service with contemporary and traditional music, and Sunday School. Mid-week Service Wednesday, 10 a.m. All welcome.

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Tuesday, January 7, 2014 NEIGHBOURHOOD EvEryonE has a story to tEll nEws in BriEf LOCAL NUTRITIONIST Sheila Ream will visit Community Centre 55, 97 Main St., on Monday, Jan. 20. The Centre’s popular Nutritionist in the House program gives you an opportunity to meet one-on-one with Ream and discuss anything pertaining to healthy eating. Ream is a certified nutritionist and mother of three who believes health is determined by what we eat, drink and think. The free private appointments are a half hour long, available between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. To book, call CC55 at 416-691-1113. CC55 IS TAKING bookings now for its Winter Festival of Lights coach trip on Thursday, Jan. 30. The bus will depart from Centre 55, 97 Main St., at 1:30 p.m., making its first stop at the Upper Canada Cheese Company in Niagara Region. The next stop is a cake and pastry boutique, followed by a fish and chips or roast chicken dinner at Betty’s Restaurant. The final stop is the festival of lights along the Niagara Parkway before returning to the centre at 9 p.m. Tickets are $55 per person, all included. To book, or to find out more, call Evonne at 416-691-1113 ext. 222. THE BAGPIPES are calling you to attend the annual Robbie Burns Dinner and Ceilidh at Fallingbrook Presbyterian Church on Saturday, Jan. 18, beginning at 5:30 p.m. The Scottish menu includes roast beef, neeps, tatties and, of course, haggis. Entertainment includes a piper, music, dancing and readings. Tickets to this popular event are $30 and are available by calling 416-699-3084 or emailing fboffice@rogers.com. The church is located at 35 Wood Glen Rd. at Kingston Road. EAST END ARTS will host another of its networking events on Friday, Jan. 17, at Art Cave, 155 Lamb Ave. The Visual Artists Show & Share encourages participants to bring a couple of their pieces of artwork to show for discussion and feedback. The event will start at 7 p.m. and end at 9 p.m. For more information visit eastendarts.ca. THE SCARBOROUGH Model Railroaders invite you to hop on board for their annual Train Show at 17 Jeavons Ave., Sunday, Feb. 23 and Sunday, March 2. The organization sets up two floors of model HO and N scale railroads featuring authentic steam and diesel sound and digital command control with passenger and freight train operation. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fares are $5 adults, $2 children, $3 seniors, and $12 for a family. For more information visit scarborough-model-railroaders.org. ABOUT 50 HOUSEHOLDS on Courcelette Road joined in a Red Ribbon toy drive this Christmas, collecting more than 100 toys for children at Emily’s House, a pediatric hospice. To learn more about Emily’s House, visit the website at philipazizcentre.ca. IT MAY be snowy and cold but Beach Garden Society members are already planning spring plantings and summer blooms. At their meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 21, guest speaker Rodger Tschantz will talk about What You Absolutely Need to Grow in 2014! The meeting starts at 7:15 p.m. at the Adam Beck Community Centre, 79 Lawlor Ave. New members and guests are welcome to come and chat with fellow gardeners or borrow a book from the library. For more information email beachgs.ca@gmail.com or visit beachgs.ca. rite popcorn, Shakley said he had a simple reason for becoming a regular. “The people are very nice, that’s why,” he said. “I think most of their business is because people actually like them.” For their part, Guang and Yen said they decided to stay in their home, noting what a friendly neighbourhood Beach Hill is, and how much the local neighbourhood association has done in the last two years to spruce up Gerrard and start more community events. Yen said she plans to rest, but also to help her sister take care of her 94-yearold father and her 89-year-old mother, who live in Pickering. Guang, meanwhile, is looking forward to what he can do after turning the shop’s 1,000 square feet of floor space into a studio. After winning a national prize for his watercolours while at Taipei’s National Taiwan University, Guang taught fine arts for five years at a teacher’s college in eastern Taiwan. Later, when he and Yen resettled in Toronto where they felt their children would have more opportunity, Guang continued teaching part-time for seven more years. He was also asked to make sculptures and a logo for the Toronto Taiwanese Community Association. And Guang started to build furniture – everything from his kids’ bunk beds to the kitchen table – even though his only work space was their crowded basement. Recently, a regular at Harry’s Variety told Guang he had better keep the shop’s coffee machine – he will need it to host small art shows in Beach Hill like the student exhibitions he used to run every year in Scarborough. “It’s a good idea,” Guang said, adding that he knows quite a few artists in Beach Hill, and would like to run shows as a community fundraiser. Yen agreed the studio is a great idea, especially if it means cleaning up the basement. “But don’t expect too much,” she said, laughing. After 30 years, it’s time they had a break. A ROU ND B E AC H M ETRO’S 11 Three decades on Gerrard East By Andrew Hudson BEFORE IT CLOSED on Christmas Eve, shoppers who stepped into Harry’s Variety were greeted by a handmade sign that said THANKS beside a big red number 30. Decorated with white flowers, and all of it hand-carved from Styrofoam, the sign was made by Guang Yuh Chern as a thank-you for the 30 years that he and his wife Yen Man ran the Gerrard Street corner store two blocks west of Woodbine Avenue. It was a fitting goodbye for a mom and pop where the coffee counter, cigarette cupboards and blue lotto ticket holders were also hand-made by Guang, and a sign of the store’s next life as a studio for his art. Speaking on one of her last days behind the counter, and two days before Guang turned 65, Yen said they were in their thirties and just getting set to raise a family when they bought Harry’s Variety and the house above. “Nobody else would want to stay in this business so long,” she said. “We’re crazy!” Between them, Yen and Guang kept the shop open 365 days a year, she said, including a few hours on Christmas Day. “People in the neighbourhood need things for parties,” Guang explained, looking serious. “Oh come on!” said Yen, laughing. Yen remembers a time when Guang, who studied fine arts in their native Taiwan, was away teaching a Chinese brush painting class and their two young children got sick with flu. Regular customers came to the rescue, Yen said, minding the counter while she ran to the back on diaper duty. It was only five years ago that her daughter Annie and son Azure, now a teacher and a web designer, started working Saturdays so the rest of the family could get time off together. “Luckily, they turned out okay,” Yen said, noting how fortunate they were to have Bowmore Road public school just blocks away. “But I think I put too much energy into it – this is 15, 16 hours of work.” Long hours aside, it’s getting more and more difficult to run a store like Harry’s Variety. Back in 1984, Yen said Gerrard Street had seven convenience stores from Coxwell to Woodbine. “Right now you see one or two,” she said. “It’s hard to survive.” Guang listed a few reasons why – larger stores got Sunday shopping, cigarette makers have cut back on their discounts, and Ontario’s switch to a harmonized sales tax raised the cost of wholesale goods. But the most significant change, they both agreed, is how many people now do all their shopping at supermarkets and big-box stores. James Shakley is not one of them. When he walked in, Yen stopped to introduce him as “Mr. Shakley, our biggest customer. “He’s so kind and generous,” she said. “He’s been coming in every day for 30 years – you never see a customer like him!” Besides wanting to support a store that is a short walk from his house in Beach Hill, not to mention the fact that the Cherns specially ordered his favou- PHOTO: SUBMITTED Debbie Visconti, centre, executive director of Community Centre 55, accepts a cheque for $7,500 from representatives of Top Drawer Creative Inc., including account director Chris Jones, vice president and creative director Brian Gahan and president Howard Chang. The Beach-based agency is behind the Beach Village BIA rebranding campaign, and charged a discounted fee which was donated to Centre 55’s Share A Christmas campaign.

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12 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, January 7, 2014 The Main Menu Sandwich Special Monday to Friday 11am - 3pm (except holidays) LUNCH *new winter hours Soup is on, so let it snow with Soup or Salad A 10% Discount for Seniors and their Family offered Wednesdays 3pm - 9pm* DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS WEEKEND BRUNCH & ALL DAY BREAKFAST s we found out over the holidays, regardless of technological advances, we really have no control over the weather. However, what we can do is make winter-resistant food – that is, food that warms and cheers us. There is no better cure for the winter blahs and freezing weather than soup. Here are my favourite stand-bys full of nutrition, flavour and comfort. Happy New Year! Bouillabaisse Straight from the south of France, this fish/soup/stew will enliven your taste buds and satisfy your inner hunger, while making you dream of southern shores. It is one of my favourite meals for everyday and entertaining. The soup, without the fish, can be made ahead of time in minutes. The fish and/or shellfish is added at the end and cooks briefly, making it an easy entertaining meal. Add a good crusty baguette and an interesting salad, and you have a quick trip to Provence. 2 tbsp (25 mL) olive oil 2 leeks, white parts only 2 celery stalks or fennel, diced 2 onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 can (28 oz/796 mL) diced tomatoes 1 cup (250 mL) chicken or fish stock 1 cup (250 mL) dry white wine 1 bay leaf 1 3-inch (8 cm) piece orange rind ½ tsp each, ground fennel and thyme leaves pinch cayenne pepper Jan Main is an author, cooking instructor and caterer stir together mayonnaise, olive oil, lemon juice and garlic. Serve soup garnished with a spoonful of aioli. Serves four to six. Three Recipes in One – Tomato Vegetable Soup, Stew or Sauce Whenever I don’t know what to make, this all-purpose soup-sauce is the answer. It always tastes full of goodness, flavour and versatility. Serve it as soup, pasta or pizza sauce or with added beans as a stew. 2 tbsp (25 ml) vegetable oil 2 onions, chopped 2 leeks, white parts only, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 celery stalks, diced 1 green pepper, chopped 1 box (8 oz/250 g) mushrooms, cleaned and sliced 1 tbsp (15 mL) all-purpose flour 1 can (28 oz/796 mL) diced tomatoes 1 cup (250 mL) chicken stock 1 bay leaf 1 tbsp (15 mL) tarragon 1 tbsp (15 mL) granulated sugar 1 tsp (5 mL) leaf thyme ½ tsp (2 mL) salt ¼ tsp (1 mL) fresh black pepper ½ cup (125 mL) chopped fresh parsley Optional Ingredients: 1 can (19 oz/396 mL) chick peas, rinsed and drained ½ cup (125 mL) sour cream or yogurt as a topping Cont’d. on next page janmainskitchen@yahoo.ca 2560 Gerrard St. E. (east of Victoria Park) Mon 8am-3pm | Tues-Sat 8am-9pm | Sun 8am-5pm Dine In | Take Out | Catering | 416-690-2098 GRAND OPENING 10% off Pick-up (over $20 before tax) Restaurant • Catering 1732 Kingston Rd. (at Birchmount) www.umefashionsushi.com Cruise Vacations & so much more... Fish: 1 lb (500 g) firm-fleshed fish such as haddock, halibut 1 ½ lbs (750 g) shellfish such as scallops, shrimp or mussels ½ cup (125 mL) fresh chopped parsely sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Aioli (this garlic mayonnaise is yummy but not necessary) ½ cup (125 mL) mayonnaise 2 tsp (10 mL) each, olive oil and fresh lemon juice 1 clove garlic, minced In a large saucepan or Dutch oven heat oil over medium-high heat. Add leeks, celery or fennel, garlic and onions; cook, covered, five minutes or until softened. Stir in tomatoes, stock, wine, bay leaf, orange rind, fennel, thyme and cayenne. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Soup may be made a day or hours ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Just before serving, cut fish into twoinch (10 cm) chunks. Add to soup with shellfish; bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer about five minutes or until fish flakes. Discard bay leaves, orange rind and any unopened mussels. Meanwhile, prepare aioli if using: Vacation Packages Coach & Rail Tours Travel Insurance Flights Hotels Car Rentals BoTToMs up Fine wine and dining in Scarborough 2255A Queen Street East, Toronto www.cruiseshipcenters.com/TheBeach ® (647) 352 6111 Aeroplan is a registered trademark of Aeroplan Canada Inc. TICO #: 50017269 A ARE YOU NOT GETTING THE BEACH METRO AT YOUR HOUSE? The Beach | Upper Beaches Danforth | Birchcli High school students can get their We are looking for carriers in COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS by delivering our newspaper! To setup your route, please call 416-698-1164 x.24 phil@beachmetro.com t last there is a fine we had: a beef cheek with shaved, black dining establishment in Italian truffle and horseradish crème Edward FinstEin a.k.a. The Wine Doctor — wine Scarborough – West Hill fraiche, accompanied by a 2012 Ben writer, educator, judge, consultant Wine Bar at 4637 KingsMarco Malbec, was delightful. A seared winedoctor.ca ton Rd. Serving inspired, downtown thewinedoctor.blogspot.com diver scallop on a lump crab and potato @DrWineKnow gourmet fare in the east end of the gallette with a miso and bonito broth, city, it’s a little gem. washed down with a 2010 Beringer From the time head chef and proprietor Christopher Reserve Chardonnay, sang. A charred coconut husk sorbet Kanka was a lad, he wanted to cook. Now 38, with almost did an admirable job as a palate cleanser and a Quebec duck 20 years experience as a professional chef, he owns his breast on a double smoked bacon fricassee and Saskatoon own restaurant. Taking over what used to be a pizzeria, he berry merlot reduction, married with a 2011 Rodney Strong opened in September 2012. As with many young chefs, the Pinot Noir, was sublime. A delicious deconstructed lemon journey wasn’t easy. He honed his craft at landmarks such parfait adorned with peanut brittle shards, alongside a 2007 as Monsoon, Taboo Resort, The Historic Distillery restauRoyal Tokay Tokaji Aszu, finished us off. Presentation was rant group, Bangkok Garden and Elmwood Spa. spectacular. All ingredients of his cuisine at West Hill are premium Most admirable about Chris’ cuisine is that he lets the and locally obtained and he’s incredibly meticulous about main ingredient in each dish speak without overpowering or his food. “Good food isn’t cheap and cheap food isn’t good,” masking it with excessive seasonings or sauces. The menu he says. changes monthly and he offers gluten-free options. Vegan As a master smoker, butcher and fishmonger, he takes a dishes can be created upon request. hands-on approach including in-house smoking, butchering His wine list is small, but nicely structured with approximately 40 labels representing both New and Old World. Beand fish preparation and even has a saltwater aquarium cause it’s a wine bar, he’s very conscious about wine service where he keeps his shellfish alive until needed. Although he and uses good quality, appropriately designed stemware for was eliminated, a stint on Food Network’s Top Chef Canada each varietal and style. further illuminated his talent. General service is great and congenial and Chris always When asked how he would classify his cuisine he’s hesitant to answer. Although he confesses his specialty is Asian, finds time to come out on the dining room floor to chat with there are several influences. Not really wanting to pigeonpatrons. Amiable and professional, he loves to talk about his hole himself, he says, “My food is classical sexy, a combinafood. The decor is warm and welcoming with soft music and tion of Katharine Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe.” there’s an outside patio for summer enjoyment. Live music Sound a little mature for a man his age? There’s no quesis an added bonus on weekends. tion, he’s wiser than his years and understands the food No need to go downtown! Do yourself a favour and check service industry extremely well. out West Hill Wine Bar and enjoy this haven of gastronomic, His food and wine savvy speak for themselves. On Tuesvinous pleasure in the heart of Scarborough. You’ll be absodays, he offers a four-course tasting menu, including matchlutely delighted. See westhillwinebar.com for details. ing wines with three of the dishes. It’s a good example of NOTE: My award-winning, comic wine mystery novel what his regular menu is like and is a veritable steal at $45. Pinot Envy is now available online, at selected bookstores or Although he embellished a bit for our dinner, here’s what through my office.

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Tuesday, January 7, 2014 beach metro news 13 Pegasus Project craft sale Dressed for the season, Pegasus directors Lindsay Reimers, centre, and Marie Perrotta, right, show tea towels, tote bags, table runners, tea cozies and other crafts for sale at a December Pegasus Holiday Bazaar at the Beaches Recreation Centre. All the crafts were hand-made by Pegasus participants, staff, or volunteers, with proceeds raised going to the Pegasus Community Project for adults with special needs. PHoTo: AnDRew HuDson School Daze W Escaping the junk food jungle M H hen I learned my high advertising on school buses. I even read school daughter was of one effort by McDonald’s to place ads argaret oogeveen heading out to the loon report card envelopes – perform well is a local writer, editor and cal fast food joints for in school and you get a Happy Meal! It mother of two daughters. lunch, I panicked. A few years back, I’d mhoogeveen@sympatico.ca didn’t happen, though, thanks to the 416-699-2608 stopped packing her lunch for school efforts of an activist group called Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood. because half the time it came home You might wish that at least the schools would stop selling uneaten and, besides, I liked the idea of my daughter becoming more responsible. junk food. A few years ago the Ontario government thought Well, that didn’t exactly happen. She didn’t pack her it would do just that, so it pushed through a well-intentioned lunch. She just gave in to the temptations that had been Healthy Schools Strategy that was meant to reduce the dangled before her eyes since she began watching Dora the amount of fast food in schools. It did. Although my daughter Explorer. can still get French fries and pizza at the school cafeteria, On average, our children watch 4,600 television advertisethere’s healthier fare too, and no more pop or candy bars in ments for junk food every year. Food companies spend $2 the vending machines. billion annually trying to convince youngsters to eat more So far so good. Except that, as Ontario Auditor-General fat, more sugar, and more salt. Just what our children need. Bonnie Lysyk has told us (see her recent report), kids are Now, more than ever before, children are suffering from fleeing the schools at lunch time to find their fix elsewhere. high rates of obesity and diet-related diseases such as Type It’s the time of year for resolutions, so here’s one. If they’re 2 Diabetes. in your house, toss out The Oreo Cookie Counting Book and But wait – what’s even more insidious is that the advertisThe M&M’s Brand Counting Book (yes, these books do exist). ing isn’t limited to television, like it was in the old days. Fast Spend a little time talking food companies are all over the internet. We’re not just talkabout advertising with your ing pop-up ads, banner ads, or “featured” sites on searches. children – its purposes and Food companies actually create sites with games just to goals. Arm them with media attract children so that they can build brand loyalty and get literacy so that they become their name, email address, birthday, Facebook information, not blind media consumers phone number and so on. Let’s just say that you might want but media observers, analysts to be sitting down with little Johnny for a talk about what and critics. information to give out on the net. And don’t knock yourself I suppose I should count myself lucky that my daughters when your children eat junk • Full Day Casa (33 months to 6 years) are not exposed to the level of product indoctrination that food once in a while. Control • Elementary (grades 1-6) some kids get in the US. There, some schools allow Coca what you can – what goes • Extended Care & Extracurricular Programs Cola fundraising (win a plastic toy if you sell a certain numinto the fridge and onto the ber of Coca Cola products). Others permit company logos in dinner table. And get that school gyms and in school hallways in return for funds, and conversation going! Preparing Children for a Lifetime of Learning Fully Accredited by: The Main Menu, cont’d. from previous page In a large saucepan or Dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Cook onions, leeks, garlic, celery, green pepper and mushrooms, covered, until softened, about five to 10 minutes. Sprinkle with flour. Stir in flour until smooth and cook a few minutes. Stir in tomatoes, chicken stock, bay leaf, tarragon, sugar, thyme, salt and pepper. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer about 20 minutes. Discard bay leaf. Stir in parsley. Taste. Correct seasonings and add optional ingredients if desired. Serves four to six. Lazy Lasagna Variation Lasagne is always popular but this version is much easier and cheaper to make than the traditional recipe. 1 previous recipe tomato vegetable sauce 12 oz (375 g) penne or fusilli, cooked according to package directions 2 cups (500 mL) each, shredded old cheddar and mozzarella cheese Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Spray a 13- by 9-inch (3 L) baking dish with baking spray. Spoon an even layer of tomato sauce on bottom. Spoon a thin layer of pasta, then a sprinkle of cheese. Repeat with another layer of pasta, tomato sauce and cheese. Bake casserole in preheated oven 35 to 40 minutes or until heated through. Serves six. (416) 694-6273 www.kewparkmontessori.com Respect Resourcefulness Responsibility Healthy Earth Legally children do not need to start school until they are 6 years old. If full day kindergarten is not for your child we have a solution. Please visit our website to see what parents have to say about our program. Visit us at www.healthyearthschool.com 416•690•5969 Email: healthyearthschool@rogers.com Services: •Nursery School •Junior Kindergarten •Senior Kindergarten Enriched Kindergarten Now accepting registrations. • One to six ratio • Individual Guided reading program • Writing skills • Math • Science • Global awareness • Theatre and music Bilingual Nursery School • Small teacher/child ratio • Highly skilled teachers • Arts and Crafts • Cognitive • Music • Drama • French • Global Awareness 2206 Queen Street East Proudly serving The Beach since 1992

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14 BEACH METRO NEWS Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Tuesday, January 7, 2014 BEACH METRO NEWS 15 Centre Stage 34-year reunion for former refugees By Andrew Hudson GYMNASTICS FOR KIDS 49 Railside Rd. 115 Simpson Ave. 416-461-8998 torontopremiergymnastics.com Winter Registration only people like Anne and Maxine came out, but also their children. Crook said it was great to see Anh, Minh, and Thu Dao again (Quan now works in Hong Kong), but equally nice to meet up with the Beachers. “We all lived in the Beach, but none of us knew each other,” she said. “This was our connection.” At home in Scarborough, Anh and Manh are busy renovating the basement. Hanging on one wall in their dining room is a series of panoramic photos, showing a bright white ship against an ocean-blue sky – portraits from a recent cruise. It’s hard to imagine a ship more different than the first one they ever put to water. Asked why they fled, Manh said it was not the war, which had been raging almost since he was born. “Even in the war, in the fighting, somebody who lived in a big city still had a life,” he said. It all changed April 30, 1975, the day that his city, Saigon, now Ho Chi Minh City, fell to the North Vietnamese forces. After that, Anh said if a family wanted to eat chicken, a sign of wealth, they had to shut their blinds and find some secret place to throw out the bones. Former members of the South Vietnamese government were targeted for labour camps in the jungle, where they were forced to find their own food, Manh said. Some returned to Saigon and lived on the beach, homeless. At the time, Anh said there was a widespread rumour that single South Vietnamese girls would be forced to marry disabled veterans of the North Vietnamese army, to look after them. “We were very scared,” she said. The government was unpredictable. From 1975 until they left, Manh said everyone he knew had their bank account emptied, then given a flat sum. “Everybody was even – no rich peoThe Giangs were featured on the front page of Ward ple, no poor people,” he said. Some 9 Community News (now Beach Metro News) in 1979, people burned the money, he said. when they first arrived in Toronto from Vietnam. ANH GIANG laughs when she remembers the first time she saw a Canadian. He was smoking on a beach in Malaysia, wearing a T-shirt and a pair of cut-off jeans. Growing up in Vietnam, Anh said no one wore ripped clothes if they could help it. And this man was an immigration official, from Canada, a country about which she knew only two things – it was the one country that would take her whole family, and she was flying there later that day. “He looked like a very poor person,” Anh said, laughing. “We said, ‘Oh my God, we chose the wrong country!’” Thirty-four years ago, Anh Giang and her husband Manh were among the millions of so-called boat people fleeing the newly Communist government of Vietnam. They were also parents of nine month-old boy, Quan, and guardians for Manh’s younger brother, Minh, and Anh’s niece, Thu Dao Tren. Thanks to a group of Beachers who answered calls from city hall and others to sponsor such families, the Giangs settled quickly in Toronto. Maxine Crook, one of the sponsors, remembers the day she met the Giangs at the airport. “Of course, they were very nervous,” she said. Crook drove back through Chinatown, where she hoped they would at least read some of the signs and feel at home. “They brightened right up,” she said. For her part, Anh said she and Manh thought all their support was coming from the Canadian government – they had no idea about the sponsoring families. So they were surprised to be staying for the first month in the home of Anne Keown and her then husband Seamus. They arrived on a Friday. Seamus and Anne made them bowls of congee, and for the first evening they had a translator to help. On Saturday morning, the whole family woke up at 6 a.m. Anh said they sat quietly on the sofa. In Vietnam, where they ran a bakery, the family worked seven-day weeks. She remembers how surprised Seamus was to find them all waiting there, hours later. He tried to explain that in Canada, people had the weekend off and liked to sleep in. This fall, the Giangs and their sponsors met for a Thanksgiving dinner in the Beach. It was the first time they had seen each other in 34 years. Anh said she was touched to see that not PHOTO: ANDREW HUDSON Enjoying a reunion dinner with some of the Beach families who sponsored their settlement in Toronto are Anh Giang, third from left, Minh Giang, kneeling by his wife and daughter, Manh Giang, wearing a solid blue shirt at centre, and Thu Dao Tren, wearing the leopard print shirt at right. “They worked so hard for so many years.” Luckily, Manh worked with Anh at her family’s bakery. They made nothing but baguettes, on a quota, in just two lengths. “You have to eat, so the bakery was fine,” said Anh. “They let my family go on.” In 1975, Anh remembers counting everyone in her family and, even for someone as good with numbers as she is, it took some work. “I remember it was 68 people,” she said, smiling. “I didn’t even count my cousins. The family put some money from the bakery in the bank, but like many in Vietnam at the time, they kept much more in hidden gold. Eventually, they had enough to go in with a couple of partners and buy a fishing boat they hoped would be enough to get them out of the country. Manh said government officials knew what they were doing – they actually taxed people as they left. The tax they had expected, but Manh said they hadn’t left Saigon harbour when a government boat came alongside and with no warning forced them to take twice the number of passengers they had planned on. “We couldn’t say no,” he said. “You couldn’t lie down in the boat – just sit.” Overburdened, and without enough food, it wasn’t long before their boat was met by pirates. “They lined up,” said Anh, who counted 11 pirate boats lined up to rob them, raiding the rice on board for hidden gold bars. Anh kept hers in the breastpocket of her second shirt, which she had taken off because of the heat. In amongst the children, and without washrooms on board, it soon got dirty and luckily was ignored. One group made them evacuate the boat while they turned it inside out and stole its water pump. From then on, Manh and others had to bail water out of the ship by hand, passing buckets fire-brigade style. They sent out an S.O.S. signal, and were picked up by a large ship, likely from Singapore. Ten days after leaving Saigon, they arrived in a refugee camp in Malaysia. “Oh my God – we were so happy. Our boat was almost like this,” Anh said, holding her hand on a steep angle as if pointed into water. In that first camp, Anh worried, not without cause, about her many young nieces, as the men and women were separated while crews cleaned the boat. Manh said boats would come in and take people, men and women, to other islands and kill them. “They were not pirates,” he said, his voice rising. “They were fisherman. Just for fun. It was very easy to kill them, and put them in the sea.” Finally, the Giangs moved to a more permanent camp, on a Malaysian island, that was supported by the US, Canada, and several European countries. They were there for two months, and Anh got very sick. It was at that time Anh saw the Canadian with the cut-offs. Luckily there were others who were more sharply dressed. Anh and Manh had interviews with immigration officials to whom, on advice from people in camp, they said Minh was several years younger than he was because they knew it would boost their chances. Their first flight was to Edmonton, where the sight of nothing but trees on either side of the plane had them worried they were moving to a completely rural country. By the time they flew again to Toronto, Anh was healthy, and the bright lights as they touched down were a relief. So many years later, the Giangs have had a whole other life in Canada. Anh’s math skills landed her a job early, before her English improved, at a home and auto insurer where she still works today. She took a 10-year break to work with Manh when they opened Nha Trang, a Vietnamese restaurant they have since sold at Ossington and Queen. Eventually they were able to bring some of Manh’s extended family to Canada as well. “They sponsored us, and we sponsored his family,” said Anh of the Beach families who gave them their start. After the reunion dinner with them in the fall, Anh and Manh said they are looking forward to the next one, this time at their house.

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16 beach metro news Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Deja views The archival photograph was taken at the southeast corner of Woodbine and Danforth Avenues, looking east at Christmas time in 1954. Do you have an old photograph you’d like to share? Please call me at 416-691-4774. DaviD van Dyke’s CiTy of ToronTo ArChives, series 65, fonDs 9, iTem 2 Money, Life anD Law Beat the competition with an early sale W elcome to 2014. I hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season. Old Man Winter has arrived in fine fashion. The long-term forecast for this winter is predicted to be somewhat colder and snowier than last year, but it was still going to be a mild winter. Well, I guess we’ll have to see what Mother Nature has in store for us, since weather prediction, like real estate prognostication, is a variable art form at best. If we do receive a good, old-fashioned Canadian winter, and you’re planning on getting the jump on the competition (a good idea!) by putting your Beach house on the market in the first couple of months of this year, there are a few things you’ll want to consider, especially if there’s an accumulation of the fluffy white stuff along with cold temperatures. There are obvious reasons why spring is traditionally a strong season to sell. Starting near the end of March, the snow and ice – if there was any – is usually gone, and the sunshine and warmer temperatures put a jump in everyone’s step. With that, a renewed optimism permeates the Beach market. April and May often see the biggest jump in unit sales due to an increasing inventory of listings, sought out by warm weather spring buyers. This combination over the last five years, and arguably the last decade, has helped propel average sale prices to Thomas Neal tneal@trebnet.com 416-690-5100 real estate…Beach Wise new highs in the spring. And it’s this very focus on the spring market that can create the right formula for a successful sale in the early winter market. Getting your property on the market early can make good sense. There’s an audience of buyers left over from the past year who didn’t see what they liked, or lost out on a favoured property. And if they started shopping last spring, they may be a little anxious about waiting until the next spring market. If your property won’t rival listings that the spring brings forward, less competition now means more competition from buyers. The early Beach market gets underway around mid-January, when the last vestiges of the holidays are packed away, and the normal routine for many has returned. Hopefully you used the holidays to get ready for an impending sale by decluttering and tidying your premises and thinning out those closets. If you knew that you were going to try to sell in the new year, you probably had a chance in the fall to get those bigger projects completed. But if you didn’t, and you need to, your contractor or handyman might just relish the opportunity to work indoors. Outdoor projects will be weatherdependent, of course, so you may need to go with what you have. If what you have is going to reduce the sale price and your timing isn’t essential, you may want to re-evaluate your timing. On the other hand, if there’s cold weather and snow cover, that roughlooking backyard or older roof may be a little less obvious. If you have a roof problem, that’s one of those items that could be caught on a home inspec- tion. It’s a good idea to give your agent any roofing receipts you might have if it’s up to snuff. Buyers should note too that most home inspectors won’t venture onto the roof if there’s snow or a chance of ice. If you’re selling and we do have snow, obviously you’ll need to keep your paths clear and ice-free. This is also a great chance to showcase your parking facilities, especially if you have a private drive for multiple vehicles. Take the extra time and energy to move all the snow so there’s as much parking as possible. If your property relies on street parking, it may be a good idea to remove the mounds of snow blocking on-street spots in your immediate vicinity. Other quick tips for selling in the early new year include keeping your home’s interior and exterior effectively lighted to offset early nightfalls. But don’t leave your Christmas lights up, even if you think they make the house look beautiful. Keep a rotation of dry mats for shoes and boots, keeping the floors surrounding them dry. You’ll want your potential buyers to be able to remove their shoes without stepping in a puddle. Also, keep your own shoes, boots and winter gear away from the front entrance. Lastly, don’t leave candles burning for ambience, as they could get accidently knocked over. Be careful too with burning artificial logs in your fireplace. It can be a great feature, but some artificial logs throw off a chemical smell that may bother people. A real wood fire is a nice touch, but only if you’re sure the chimney draws well. You don’t need a roaring multiple log fire – you’ll get the same effect with a safer, smaller fire. Gas fireplaces are great too, but if a child touches the glass and burns their hand, a potential good showing could be threatened. I wish everyone a happy and prosperous new year. Take care!

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