Canadian Security Magazine - 2013 Salary Survey

 

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Canadian Security Magazine - 2013 Salary Survey

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RAISING AWARENESS ABOUT RETAIL THEFT PAGE 8 YOUR FRIEND, THE IT DEPARTMENT PAGE 14 CANADA’S ROLE IN CYBERCRIME PAGE 20 1 Canadian November/December 2013 THE PUBLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT 2013 Salary Survey What the survey results and experts say about security career paths and what you can do to change yours www.canadiansecuritymag.com PM# 40065710

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10 SALARY SURVEY 2013 Salary Survey: ONWARD and UPWARD How to get ahead of the game was common theme this year, with respondents concerned about career path, raises and whether security is sometimes just a “stepping stone” to something else. By Neil Sutton P $20-40K $80-100K 18.4% 22.4% $40-60K $60-80K 18% 16.4% Source: Canadian Security Salary Survey 2013 articipants in the 2013 Canadian Security Salary Survey, sponsored by Commissionaires, as well as industry experts interviewed after the fact, all appear to agree that front-line positions are best viewed as a stepping stone to a more lucrative career in security or possibly as a means to explore related elds. That said, opinions differ as to how to accomplish those long-term goals and vary depending on life stage, expectations coming into the eld and perceptions about variables such as security associations, accreditation and training opportunities. There were a total of 456 participants in the 2013 survey, which was conducted by Canadian Security in October. The most common job titles reported were: security guard (22.5 per cent), security manager (22.3 per cent) and security director (12.6 per cent). The remainder included consultant (6.4 per cent), site supervisor (9.7 per cent) and president (6.2 per cent), among many others. More than half of respondents (57.9 per cent) said they work in Ontario. A distant second was Alberta (11.8 per cent) closely followed by British Columbia (10.9 per cent). In terms of workplace satisfaction, 46.1 per cent said that their place of work is “average” or “needs improvement,” whereas 53.9 per cent described it as “very good” or “excellent.” Those numbers are on par with the 2012 survey results with 56.6 of respondents describing their workplace positively. The numbers are also remarkably similar this year in terms of response to the question: “Would you recommend security as a career to a friend?” In 2013, 76.3 per cent said yes compared to 76.5 per cent last year. As one might expect, the answer to that question changes depending on the income status of the person taking the survey — though not drastically. For respondents who reported income levels of $40,000 to $60,000, 77.4 per cent said they would recommend security. There is only a slight increase (78.5 per cent) for respondents who reported making $60,000 to $80,000. The numbers begin to change more noticeably at the high and low ends of the spectrum. However, at all levels, more respondents said they would recommend security as a career than not. For people making less than $30,000 annually, 54.5 per cent reported in the af rmative; for those making six gures, it’s 87.1 per cent. The picture changes slightly when broken down by title and there is noticeable variance based on job level. Posed the same question, “Would you recommend security as a career to a friend?”, 65.3 per cent of security guards said yes compared to 76.3 per cent of security managers and 89.5 per cent of security directors. When asked to elaborate on the question, survey respondents quali ed What is your income? $150+ $100-150K 5.1% 13.8% Less than $20K 5.9%

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SALARY SURVEY 11 their answers with a variety of comments. Some said they would recommend How long have you been with security “only as a stepping stone” or Less “only as a second career” whereas others noted that security “is a growing industry” and “can be a great career with More than 10 years advancement potential.” One respondent said, “it takes time but you can keep moving up.” Another said, “you need to make it a career [and] see it beyond just a job.” One of the most telling responses was, “like any career path, you get what you put into it.” For John Dewar, CEO of 6-10 years Commissionaires’ Victoria, B.C., and chairman of Commissionaires’ national business committee, there can be a degree of delayed satisfaction when it comes to security, at least monetarily. “I don’t think people are looking at mobility is continuous improvement and being a standard security guard as the job a dedication to education and training, they want to hold for a lifetime, but there says Tabesh. are a lot of advantages to it as a rst As such, Condor emphasizes job,” he says. education for its employees, off-setting For example, there may not be a lot some of the cost of training opportunities of glamour or nancial compensation and tying raises to passing some attached to patrolling parking lots, but programs successfully. It’s so important it is a necessary function and one that to Tabesh that he can impart important says Condor is “more life skills. “You’re of a training entity dealing with the public “One’s degree of than we are a security and you’re in a form a satisfaction with the job company.” bylaw enforcement,” Among the says Dewar. “We’ve they have depends on courses offered are had a number of people handcuff and baton who have started there what they’re looking to training, a tactical and moved on to other awareness course things.” receive from the job.” that was designed in One — John Dewar, Commissionaires conjunction with a Commissionaire started police of cer and a in a parking detail, “Verbal Judo” system and eventually left to that encourages become a police of cer, event de-escalation through words and he says. She then became a lawyer and conversation. ultimately a judge. More than half of survey respondents Benjamin Tabesh, president of (55.7 per cent) said that “lack of Toronto-based Condor Security, shares training” was their most immediate similar stories of guards and concierges occupational safety concern. When who made good, moving on to careers asked to rate their training opportunities, in border services, police work, the 63.4 per cent said they are “average” or legal profession and property managers. “need improvement.” However, the vast Condor employs anywhere from 150 majority (86.7 per cent) said “yes” when to 200 — the number uctuates as asked, “Are you adequately trained for people come and go. The key to career your current employer? than 6 months 6-12 months Source: Canadian Security Salary Survey 2013 3.5% 34.9% 6.6% 1-5 years 31.4% 23.7% your current responsibilities?” Only 38.5 per cent of respondents said they currently have a security designation, which is on par with the response to the same question in the 2012 survey (38.8 per cent). Of those that reported some form of accreditation, the most common response (27.1 per cent) was Certi ed Protection Professional (CPP), which is issued by ASIS International. CPP was also the most common response for people who said they don’t yet have accreditation but were working towards one. Accreditation is a focal point for Tabesh, who has earned ASIS’s PSP (Physical Security Professional) and CPP. He says Condor will pay for employees’ membership in ASIS and encourages them to take at least their PSP. “We believe in practicing what you preach,” he says. “I think it’s pivotal.” To a degree, Tom Robertson of TD Bank Group owes his security career to ASIS. He is currently associate vicepresident, governance and strategy, nancial crimes and fraud management group, at TD’s corporate security department. His skillset comes not from front line security but the front lines, so to speak. He served in the Canadian military for 13 years, with tours in Afghanistan and Bosnia, as well as a number of domestic

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12 SALARY SURVEY posts before retiring with the rank of Captain in 2007 to begin a private sector career. His military training in counterintelligence seemed “a natural alignment” with the security industry, he says, and he reached out to the Toronto chapter of ASIS when he left the military to make connections. That eventually led to a job interview with Sun Life Financial and a position as a senior investigator. After a three-year stint at Sun Life in a variety of roles — ultimately as a director of corporate compliance — Robertson accepted a position at TD. “I credit ASIS as being the bridge for me between my military life and my civilian life,” he says. Robertson is now is a position to hire other security personnel in his department. He says one of the rst items he looks for on a resume is a CPP “because it’s a baseline; it gives you some sort of benchmark to go from.” Robertson holds CPP, CISSP (certi ed information systems security professional) and CFE (certi ed fraud examiner) certi cations and has demonstrated careful planning in his pursuit of a security career. He says he is aware that a person’s stage in life can play a large role in how they view or appreciate a career in security. He initially took a pay cut when he left the military and joined Sun Life knowing it was a short-term lost for a long-term payoff. It was also an opportunity to pursue a new lifestyle and afford him the chance to start a family. Some survey respondents also noted that a person’s age and living arrangements can have a profound effect on how they view a job in security. Respondents complained that shift-work and work-life balance issues are taking a toll on their personal lives. One noted that “this job is a single person’s job who is staying at home with parents.” Another said that security provides “good advancement for those that are young.” Others suggested security works best as a “second career.” Dewar of Commissionaires says that these are common observations. He notes that his company specializes When was your last raise? last 3 months More than 2 years ago 13.6% 18.1% last 6 months 18.4% 1 or 2 years 16.4% last 12 months 33.4% in providing employment to veterans — people who are at a transitional point in their life. Robertson, a military of cer, was able to translate his expertise into security management. For other veterans, guarding may represent a good use of their accumulated skills, at least in the short term. “We assist veterans in transitioning from service careers into civilian employment,” explains Dewar. “These are folks that tend to be in midcareer range.” It’s important for people coming into security to do so with their eyes open, adds Dewar. “I think one’s degree of satisfaction with the job they have Do you currently have a professional security designation? Yes No 38.5% 61.5% depends on what they’re looking to receive from the job,” he says. “Any time that people go into an occupation or any other type of situation in which they’re not completely aware of what’s going to happen, you’re setting it up to be a not very happy experience for them.” As such, when Commissionaires introduces a new employee to its organization, “we make it very clear what the job will entail.” He reiterates that skills learned on the job can be applied to other elds. “As an entry-level security guard, you would have the opportunity to become familiar with the other types of occupations that are available.” For someone who worked so hard to get into security, Robertson has found ways to expand beyond it. “As my career progresses, I’m moving away from traditional security,” he says,“ and more into areas that are more closely aligned with the pro t centres of the bank.” But, he adds, he greatly appreciates the “intrinsic value” that life safety brings to an organization. “Ideally, you add to the bottom line, but what you really do is help people that need help. To my mind, there’s nothing more rewarding than that.” For more results from the Canadian Security Salary Survey 2013, please visit www.canadiansecuritymag.com. Source: Canadian Security Salary Survey 2013

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