Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services Annual Review 2012/2013

 

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Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services Annual Review 2012/2013

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2012/2013 Annual Review Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services

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Contents 01 02 President and CEO’s message Levels of disadvantage, client outcomes and service satisfaction How our work is funded Post Care Support Services Breaking the silence by sharing the stories African Youth Drive The importance of Find & Connect Parents yarning their way to wellbeing Supporting young Aboriginal and CALD people with mental health issues Additional problem gambling service Levels of disadvantage, client outcomes and service satisfaction among GHS clients Empowering African women IPSS in APY Lands Giving young people the ‘SCILs’ they need to succeed Together4Kids: “focusing on supporting children” Evaluation of PEACE’s Certificate IV in Community Services Cultural Fitness Training evaluation Board members Financial position President and CEO’s message counselling services relating to gambling which Relationships Australia (SA) will be providing in Adelaide, outer Adelaide and the Murraylands. During 2012/13, our services for people, who have been affected by out-of-home care as children, were established with new staff and a drop-in service located in the heart of the city. An advisory committee supports Find & Connect and Post Care Support Services and we greatly appreciate the work of the committee and the work of our staff. In 2013/14, our services will be extended further with Commonwealth funding to support survivors of childhood sexual abuse and their families taking part in the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Childhood Sexual Abuse. We were pleased that our expertise developed in providing Respond SA for people, affected by sexual abuse as children, will underpin the provision of Royal Commission services over the next three years. Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services also has a key role in providing HIV and viral hepatitis services in South Australia and we greatly value the partnerships with SA Health as our funding provider, and the many different community groups that contribute to these services. In 2013/14, we will extend these services to include Gay Men’s Health SA, with a focus on HIV and sexually transmitted infections. Again, in providing these services, the involvement of community groups is crucial and Relationships Australia (SA) will be undertaking extensive consultations as well as establishing an advisory committee to ensure active stakeholder involvement in developing effective strategies for the future. We are proud of the range of services we provide, many of which work together to assist the people coming to us. In this report, we provide some highlights from the year; however, this only touches the surface of the enormous range of work done by our staff. We thank our staff for their contribution, which is valued greatly, as is the involvement of community groups, our funding providers and our partnerships with other organisations. 03 03 04 04 05 06 06 T he past year has seen a substantial increase in our services, which the Board believes indicates the quality of Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services’ and the confidence of our funding partners in our ability to deliver positive outcomes that make a difference to people’s lives. We have been a specialist provider of Gambling Help Services since its inception and this year, in response to government tendering of existing services, we were very pleased to extend the geographical locations of the services we provide. With the addition of Gambling Help Services in western and northern Adelaide, we are now responsible for all metropolitan services, as well as the Riverland and Barossa regional services. We are very aware of the impact problem gambling can have on individuals and families and are committed to using the funds provided by The Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund to ensure that our services continue to be of high quality and relevant to the emerging trends in this area. In 2012, we developed a specific website to provide information to people affected by problem gambling and to assist them to access services. As we look towards the future, we are also concerned about the interface between gaming and gambling, and question the extent to which children are being trained via gaming websites to become future gamblers. We are pleased to have been successful in obtaining funding for the ‘Keep it Fun’ project. Relationships Australia (SA) worked with 10 Adelaide area gamers about online gaming. The result was to create an online or mobile widget/app/info source for gamers, aged 12 to 17 years of age, to help them work out whether they are keeping it fun or whether their gaming habits own them. The Premier has also taken up this issue as an area of concern. The recognition of the financial impact of problem gambling has been supported by the Federal Government’s provision of specific funding for financial 07 08 09 09 10 11 12 12 13 14 01 Franco Camatta Judith Cross President Chief Executive Officer

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R 2013 Client Evaluation Survey Results Focus: Levels of disadvantage, client outcomes and service satisfaction Wellbeing and Safety. It broadens the scope of our curiosity with our clients, enabling outcomes to be monitored in many meaningful ways. The comprehensive information collected through PACES means it is suitable for use across all of our programs (e.g. gambling, relationship counselling, mental health services), and for any type of presenting concern (e.g. relationship and family concerns, physical or mental illness, financial difficulties, HIV/hepatitis C etc.). The inclusion of PACES within our HPS programs this year, including Gambling Help Services, MOSAIC, PEACE and the Family Youth Mental Health Support Service, has enabled us to identify significant issues of concern for our clients, which in turn, informs our practice and service delivery. elationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services (HPS) provide support to some of the most vulnerable individuals, families and communities in the state. Our ability to identify and address the range of complex issues with which clients present is underpinned by our commitment to rigorous screening and risk assessment. This year has seen the development and piloting of a new screening tool that provides practitioners with vital information to assist them in reducing clients’ health and safety risks, ensuring the best possible service outcomes. PACES integrates industry-leading tools, including DOORS and the Kessler 10, under five domains: Physical health, Agency or Self-Efficacy, Connectedness, Emotional 29% Clients with very high levels of psychological distress 54% Clients with relationship issues 53% Clients with financial difficulties 61% Clients experiencing little interaction with their friends, extended family, neighbours and broader community Clients reported significant safety concerns, including: being worried/frightened by someone else’s behaviour thoughts of suicide or self-harm concerns about the safety of their family because of someone else’s behaviour participation in life threatening or risky behaviour 36.7% 33.3% 26% 25.3% Despite these challenges, clients reported significant improvements as a result of receiving HPS services (Gambling Help Services, MOSAIC, Post Adoption Support Services and Indigenous Parenting Support Services): The Conclusion: The development and systematic implementation of screening tools such as PACES is just one of the many ways in which we ensure that our services are of the highest standard and responsive to the needs of clients and the community. Our continued success in achieving outcomes for our clients, including high client satisfaction, further reflects and reinforces the success of such initiatives. Satisfied with service received 99% improved access/ enagagement with services 93% improved knowledge and skills 88% improved family, community and economic engagement 89% 02

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How our work is funded W e greatly appreciate the financial support we receive from our funding providers, without which, we would not be able to provide the valuable services so needed by the individuals and communities we work with. We acknowledge the support of the following State and Commonwealth Government departments and agencies: This map illustrates the current Relationships Australia (SA) Child and Family Centre locations. Each region has been assigned a Disadvantage, Risk and Need (DNR) score, which is based on the following sentinel indicators: jobless families ratio, separations ratio, smoking during pregnancy ratio, Centrelink benefit ratio and substantiated child protection notifications rate ratio. A darker colour on the map indicates a higher DNR ranking and therefore a higher level of disadvantage. As the map demonstrates, our Child and Family Centres are provided in the regions of highest disadvantage and associated need, indicating that our services and programs are readily available y y and easily accessible by the most vulnerable members of the opulation. population. Australian Government • Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) • Attorney-General’s Department (AGD) • Department of Health South Australian Government • Department of Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI) • SA Health • Department for Education and Child Development (DECD) • Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund, a joint initiative of the Australian Hotels Association (SA Branch), Clubs SA, Adelaide Casino and the Government of South Australia. We are also grateful for our ongoing partnerships and collaborations with other community service providers, community groups and training partners. Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services 2013 funding breakdowns FEDERAL STATE OTHER Post Care Support Services P ost Care Support Services responds to the needs of those who have lived in out-of-home care in South Australia. This includes children’s homes, foster care, residential care, and other out-of-home care arrangements and/or under the Guardian of the Minister. Anyone over the age of 18 can access our service. The experiences for those who were in the care system are varied and many have experienced significant loss, disruption, multiple placements, and abuse whilst in care. The Create Report Card 2013 ‘Experiencing Out of Home Care’ states that reports from the South Australian population indicate that, on average, young people have experienced at least six different care placements. This can make it difficult for them to find a sense of stability, belonging and family, and make the transition into independence and adulthood challenging and complex. Relationships Australia (SA)’s Post Care Support Services understands the ongoing effect this can have on an individual’s life, and provides counselling, case management, access to support groups, advocacy and referral to other relevant support services. Historically, Families SA provided the Post Care Service; however, in 2012 it was outsourced to Relationships Australia (SA). Post Care Support Services is located at Elm Place and sits alongside our Find & Connect Support Services. There were many challenges to consider when implementing this service, including the complexity of clients’ needs, immediate responses to crises, gaining clients’ trust, managing their expectations, improving the outcomes for clients and building community awareness. The Post Care Support Services team is committed to the provision of high quality services to the client group and continues to exceed client outcomes. 03

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Breaking the silence by sharing the stories R elationships Australia (SA) first began providing support services to adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in June 2004 and, in the following years, was the main support service for people who were sexually abused as children, and for those presenting evidence to the Mullighan Inquiry in South Australia. The service was named ‘Respond SA’ as a call to action! It is time for us as a society to respond effectively to prevent childhood sexual abuse and to provide the services that are needed for those who live with the impact of childhood sexual abuse on their personal and family life. The Respond SA website has several documentaries of people sharing their lived experiences. This year we released a short film called ‘Jo’s Story.’ Jo started her young life in an orphanage where she was abused by a priest. She was known to stand up for those who did not have a voice; this meant that she was often punished. The Royal Commission has been part of Jo’s road to justice, but it is just part of that road. Jo prefers to be known as a Remembered Australian and this story is part of her healing. You can view ‘Jo’s Story’ and other stories by survivors of childhood sexual abuse at www.respondsa.org.au We strongly support the need for a Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, and are proud to be involved by providing support services. We are aware of the courage required for adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse to disclose their experience, seek help and give testimony. This Royal Commission will have a wider role than other inquiries – looking at the many different environments in which children are abused; schools, sporting clubs, orphanages, foster care, religious institutions and government agencies. This Royal Commission will provide an opportunity to look at the gaps within organisations that care for children and promote best practice responses to ensure that childhood sexual abuse is heard and acted upon within a timely manner. Relationships Australia in each state and territory, together with wide range of other organisations, has been funded to provide support services to anyone who has been affected by childhood sexual abuse in institutions that work with children. This includes survivors, family members and employees of these institutions. The Respond SA website provides information for adult survivors, their families and service providers to better understand the related issues. So many people feel betrayed and isolated so the sharing of experiences is an important way of helping others and breaking the silence that has been imposed on those who were abused as children and whose reports of violence were not believed. African Youth Drive: “Youth Leading Change - Aspirations for Actions” Empowering young people to make informed health decisions and live healthy lives T he African Youth Drive was a project established by Relationships Australia (SA)’s PEACE Multicultural Services to respond to the emerging needs of young African people who are at risk of, or are already engaging in, risky sexual behaviours. The project creatively engages African youth who feel disconnected from sexual health providers and ‘mainstream’ provision models through the mediums of music, performance and dance. Youth are provided with life skills and sexual health information relevant to their own personal, community and cultural experiences, in a safe space where a sense of belonging has been created. Wider social health determinants such as racism, self-esteem, settlement challenges, intergenerational conflict, identity, belonging and health literacy are also discussed and included within performances. Our African Youth Drive consists of 30 young people from eight different African countries and has produced a range of original performances such as songs written about unsafe sex and the experiences of being a young African person living in Australia, an HIV role-play and expressive dance routines. These works will be recorded and distributed to community members as a way of creating awareness, building health literacy and contextual understanding and decreasing social isolation of those affected by HIV. The core foundation of the Project is based on the collaboration of diverse artists, parents, multicultural service providers and African youth leaders. To ensure the sustainability of the Project, participants formed an executive committee who are now the bearers of the newly created African Youth Drive Incorporated Association. The PEACE Multicultural Services team will continue to facilitate the Project and work in partnership with the community to develop new ways forward. 04

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The importance of Find & Connect: A seamless service across Australia F ind & Connect offers support to Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants in the form of counselling and support groups, access to records, and support with searching for and connecting with family. In the 20th centenary, at least 500,000 children grew up, and were known as Forgotten Australians. In 2004, the Senate Committee released a report into the experiences of those who grew up in orphanages, institutions and other ‘out-of-home’ care in Australia. The following is an extract from this report: “Upwards of and possibly more than 500,000 Australians experienced care in an orphanage, Home or other forms of outof-home care during the last century. Children were placed in care for a myriad of reasons including being orphaned; being born to a single mother; family dislocation from domestic violence, divorce or separation; family poverty and parents’ inability to cope with their children often as a result of some form of crisis or hardship. Many children were made Wards of the State after being charged with being uncontrollable, neglected or in moral danger, not because they had done anything wrong, but because circumstances in which they found themselves in resulted in them being status offenders. Others were placed in care through private arrangements usually involving payment to the Home. Irrespective of how children were placed in care, it was not their fault”. In the early to mid 1900’s over 7000 children migrated to Australia under assisted child migration schemes with the vast majority of children migrated from the UK and a small number from Malta. These migrations occurred under arrangements between governments and were seen as a way to move impoverished children to a “better life” in Australia and elsewhere, and to boost Australia’s post-war population. These now adults are known as Former Child Migrants, and talk of having experienced extensive physical, sexual and emotional abuse whilst growing up in institutions and other children’s homes. Many parents were not told that their children were being sent to another country and siblings were often separated. Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants experienced both abuse and a breach of trust by the very societal institutions that should have protected and cared for them. Many were lied to, removed from their families, and mistreated. The national Apology in 2009 by former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was an important step in acknowledging this past history experienced by so many. This Apology was followed by a commitment to support people by providing a range of services, including counselling and support with access to records and assistance in searching for family members. In August 2012, the National Find & Connect Support Service was formally launched by the Hon Jenny Macklin MP, Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. Find & Connect Services are available in six Relationships Australia offices across the country, including South Australia, New South Wales, Western Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory and Canberra. We all work together, along with the services in Victoria and Queensland to ensure that Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants can access support in the State/Territory they are currently living in, regardless of what State/Territory they were living in when being in out-of-home care. Collaborative working practices are paramount in working with Find & Connect services and Relationships Australia uses its existing connections and networks to provide a seamless service. Services support people in many different ways: counselling, records and family searches, support for family reunions for those who grew up in out-of-home care, support groups, drop-in centres and referral advice. Services are offered through Elm Place, and sit alongside our Post Care Support Services. Find & Connect Service’s free call number is based on the date of the Apology (1800 16 11 09). Every year, an event is hosted in each State and Territory to mark the anniversary of this historic event and to show a continued validation of history and commitment in supporting those affected by past practices. Relationships Australia (SA) values working with people who have knowledge and lived experience in out-of-home care. In South Australia, we have the benefit of advice from a Consumer Reference Group (CRG) consisting of seven active members. The CRG has a diverse group of members who bring experience from a range of former care arrangements provided in Australia, including church-based institutional care, various State based care, foster care, and other forms of out-of-home care. Speaking out about experiences in care has been an important part of the work of Forgotten Australians and this year we were pleased to be selected to provide national Ambassador training. Twelve Forgotten Australians undertook a 5-day training program with the Australian Institute of Social Relations (Relationships Australia (SA)’s training division) to become Ambassadors. Their role is to provide information, impart understanding of the impact of institutional care on individuals, and provide advice for the current and future needs of Forgotten Australians who are accessing a range of Government and non-Government services. FaHCSIA’s support to the success of the Find & Connect Services has been crucial in this first year and in maintaining a coordinating role nationally through regular Service Managers meeting, as well as Practice Roundtables for Support Workers and Counsellors. This provides opportunities to exchange information and ensure the delivery of best practice standards across all services. These meetings are also an important forum for information to go back to FaHCSIA in regards to future services and needs. 05

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Parents yarning their way to wellbeing N gartuiya, Relationships Australia (SA)’s Indigenous Parenting Support Service (IPSS), supports Aboriginal families to access integrated services that aim to enhance child development, safety and family functioning in communities. IPSS provides support services and works with parents to increase their capacity to care for themselves and their children. Originally, the aim of IPSS was to facilitate playgroups for Aboriginal families; however, many parents were not ready for the socialising demands of playgroups, having been traumatised by past institutional and abusive practices. To overcome this, IPSS developed a way to provide parents with the specific parenting strategies they were seeking in a non-threatening environment. IPSS began by meeting parents and families in their homes or a neutral location to discuss how to create a positive parenting environment and outline what services are available. When parents were ready to engage further with services, they were encouraged to attend the Yarning Group: a group of parents that meet once a week to discuss issues such as nutrition, hygiene, respectful relationships and self-care strategies. Persistence was essential when encouraging parents to engage with services, as many had experienced the trauma of being forcibly removed as children and therefore were distrustful of workers. However, with support and understanding, many parents went on to engage in the Yarning Group to build confidence in addressing parenting goals and gain an increased understanding of attachment theory, the impact of trauma and positive parenting strategies. Many also developed friendships, which were sustained outside of the group environment. Supporting young Aboriginal and CALD people with mental health issues I t can be difficult for young people and their families to acknowledge the presence of, let alone access services for, mental health issues, particularly when such services are not responsive to the culture of the family. That is why Relationships Australia (SA) established a specialist Family Youth Mental Health Support Services (FYMHSS), which works specifically with Aboriginal and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) young people (0-24 years), and their families, who are experiencing mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, suicide, grief and loss. Working collaboratively with all family members, as well as community supports, our FYMHSS workers support young people and their families by developing family action plans that support the recovery of the young person. Family and home environments strongly influence Aboriginal and CALD young people, and play a critical role in early identification, intervention and recovery of mental health issues. We use a variety of approaches to engage and build family and community capacity to recognise mental health issues, seek help and connect with other relevant services. We know that there is a high level of stigma associated with mental health and especially so in Aboriginal and CALD communities. There are many barriers to work through; including language, racism and cultural misunderstandings of mental health. We provide a range of responses and activities for young people and families to help promote a better understanding of mental health issues and the risk and protective factors that affect young people in the community. The Emotionally Fitness Gym Program is one example of a Relationships Australia (SA) program designed specifically for young people. This program engages young people who are at risk of, or are currently living with, mental health issues to develop behaviours, knowledge and resources to support early intervention and recovery. 06

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Additional problem gambling service R elationships Australia (SA) has been providing Gambling Help Services for over 17 years. Recently, we were successful in submissions in several new geographic areas to expand our Gambling Help Service delivery in the eastern, western, northern and southern metropolitan suburbs of Adelaide, as well as regional areas including the Adelaide Hills, Barossa, Murray & Mallee, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island. Premier Jay Weatherill visited Relationships Australia (SA)’s office several times over the past few months to show his interest and support for our problem gambling services team and clients. He held a press conference at our Hindmarsh office to voice his concerns and announce the ‘no live odds betting during sports’ legislation for South Australia, which became a national initiative. He also has a keen interest in addressing issues that surround simulated gambling games targeted at children, which normalize and promote gambling as a way of advancing in life. In addition to the expansion of our Gambling Help Services, Relationships Australia (SA) has also received a small grant to develop an ‘app’ for young people that will provide information and education on identifying problematic gambling behaviours and how to seek support. According to the latest census, the South Australian expenditure on gambling has increased in recent years as has online gambling. It is therefore necessary to act regularly to help the people who are the most affected and vulnerable. This includes partners, parents, family members, friends and colleagues who are concerned about someone they care for. Within our Australian culture, gambling is promoted in day-today activities, from putting a bet on who wins an election to a bet on who will win the AFL Grand Final. Making a bet is an accepted cultural norm, yet when this becomes problematic the problem becomes individualized. However, the impact of problem gambling goes beyond the individual and frequently affects immediate family and friends. Education about the reality of gambling and the changes of winning needs to be put in realistic contexts. People need to understand that the outcomes of gambling are random and learn skills to have conversations when their gambling has become problematic, to ensure that interventions occur early and that harm is minimized. Gambling carries with it an enormous amount of stigma that leaves people experiencing isolation and shame. Problem gambling is one of the most serious root causes of many socio-economic and family problems, including mental health problems and relationship issues. Recent research has also shown a demonstrable link between problem gambling, crime and drug use. Problem gambling not only results in significant distress, financial difficulties and relationship breakdown, but also often manifests because of underlying difficulties or traumatic events in life, creating a double-edged sword for at-risk or vulnerable members of the population. The Gambling Help Service uses a primary health care approach, building on people’s skills within a supportive environment. It provides counselling, groups, information, financial counselling and education sessions that support people to overcome problem gambling within their lives. We use a harm minimization approach and can provide support for as long as needed. Many people accessing the Gambling Help Service have found that seeking support has reduced the stigma and shame and assisted them in dealing with any underlying issues. For others, it has also assisted in rebuilding or strengthening their relationships with partners or other family members and to deal with adverse financial situations. In addition, Relationships Australia (SA) Consumer Voice Program provides an opportunity for people who have been affected by problem gambling to share their lived experience and encourage others to seek help or educate industry staff on the importance of effective intervention. Our Consumer Voice speakers provide a human face to the issues involved and place the problems of gambling into the day-to-day contexts of people’s lives. Through our Consumer Voice Program, we strengthen community action contribute to policy and legislative development. The diversity and scope of our current Gambling Help Services is a testament to our commitment to quality service delivery. 07

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2013 Client Evaluation Survey Results Focus: Levels of disadvantage, client outcomes and service satisfaction among Gambling Help Services clients The success of the Gambling Help Service is measured by the Family Support Program Performance Framework, which employs a questionnaire to ascertain clients’ satisfaction with the service, as well as the extent to which the program has met its stated objectives. This year, with the inclusion of PACES, we were also able to identify those areas that are most concerning to clients, meaning we can tailor service responses to their individual needs. Results from PACES showed that Gambling Help Services clients were experiencing a range of significant stressors: Gambling Help Service clients reported the 3rd 62% Gambling highest level of psychological distress compared to other services assessed. Methods that clients reported using to negate their feelings of distress Clients reported significant safety concerns, including: thoughts of suicide or self-harm 48.4% 62% Alcohol 63% Smoking participation in life threatening or risky behaviour 40.6% Outcomes of Gambling Help Service: Relationships Australia (SA)’s HPS services had a significant impact on addressing these presenting issues and improving outcomes for Gambling Help Services clients: The Conclusion: These results clearly demonstrate that the Gambling Help Service made a significant contribution to improving the lives of vulnerable and at-risk members of the population affected by gamblingrelated stressors. Satisfied with service received 99% improved access/ enagagement with services 89% improved knowledge and skills 94% improved family, community and economic engagement 90% 08

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Empowering African women I n 2012, Relationships Australia (SA)’s PEACE Multicultural Services, in collaboration with Women’s Health Statewide SA, successfully piloted the Empowering African Women Program. Now in its second year, the group of nine young women, aged between 17-30 years, shared how they often feel disconnected from sexual health services and stigmatized when they seek help. These experiences are familiar to the PEACE team who has heard many stories from young women about challenges in relating and communicating to older community members, making it challenging to have their voices and experiences heard. The Program was delivered via six interactive sessions, over six weeks. The aim of the program was to: • empower young women to negotiate their safety • better understand the operation of gender roles within society • make independent decisions about their health • create awareness and knowledge around the female condom, promoting it as an effective HIV and STI prevention tool. The young women quickly built trust as they were provided with a safe and respectful environment in which to share their own personal experiences. Different issues were discussed allowing the women to talk openly about their own cultures and the barriers that such topics raise in their communities. Throughout the Program participants generated useful ideas about encouraging the use of the female condom among their communities. Upon completion of the Program, many participants expressed that they had learnt new information that they would take back to the other young people within their communities. They also felt empowered to share positive messages about safe sex, and understood the importance of educating men, not just women, on these vital issues. IPSS in APY Lands R elationships Australia (SA)’s Indigenous Parenting Support Service (IPSS) provides a visiting parenting support service to communities at Amata and Mimili in the APY Lands, to build the capacity of parents, families and communities to raise happy and healthy children. IPSS facilitates regular information sessions at family and children’s centres in the region, which focus on helping parents and families to develop their parenting skills. Recognising that parenting in Aboriginal communities is not the sole responsibility of the birth mother and father, the team ensures that they are available to all members of the community, fostering a community approach to raising children. While the team predominately works with the most vulnerable families in the region, the service is available to all members of the community. By gaining the trust and respect of the community, IPSS has also been able to work with people outside of formal sessions and programs, with community members often approaching workers privately to discuss concerns and issues. The team also collaborates with the range of other services visiting the APY Lands to deliver programs and services in communities, bush camps and home settings. IPSS works with social workers from Families SA, schools, financial counselling services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, and the NPY Women’s Council’s babies and children’s programs to support parents in the community. Despite the challenges of travelling to remote areas and facing difficult and often unacceptable conditions, the team has worked hard to deliver services and build relationships that are culturally respectful, beneficial and valued by the community. 09

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Giving young people the ‘SCILs’ they need to succeed T he School Community Innovations and Learning (SCIL) team aims to improve the social and emotional wellbeing of children, youth, their families and schools. The service is comprised of two programs: the Living with Autism program and the Child and Youth Case Management team, which collectively provide services to up to 100 clients per week. The ‘Value Me’ girls program was developed to address the growing pressure on young teens, harnessed through social networking and the internet, to engage in pornography, risk taking behaviour and/ or violent material. These influencers have resulted in a significant increase in self-harming behaviour requiring medical attention. The ‘Value Me’ girls program aims to address this behaviour by encouraging young girls to ‘value their physical body’, ‘value their mental health’, and ‘value their public and private reputation’. The program is in a trial phase with 10 participants working with a group of professionals, including a self-defence instructor, personal trainer, nutritionist, GP and counsellors. Living with Au sm The Living with Autism program provides support to individuals who are experiencing life with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), either personally or through a family member. For children under seven years, our children’s therapeutic workers assist clients in schools and at home. The three most common support requests for assistance relate to peer and sibling relationships; self-regulation for anxiety or challenging behaviour; and support with concentration, routines, rules and learning. Clients over the age of seven can access centre-based support, including parenting support, help with developing social skills and support for couples navigating a relationship with ASD. Child and Youth Case Management The SCILs Child and Youth Case Management team offers a case management and therapeutic conversations program for young people aged 12 years and over. Each worker has a caseload of students identified as disengaged or at risk of disengagement from the learning environment. There are many reasons school is difficult for some students and our most common referrals are for individuals who have experienced trauma, are living in complex family environments or have learning or developmental disabilities. Our children’s therapeutic workers work with these young people to support them in reengaging with school or building an alternative learning pathway to future employment. New programs In 2013, the Child and Youth Case Management team developed two new group programs, the four R’s (4Rs) and the ‘Value Me’ girls program. The four R’s refer to building Relationships, taking Risks, selfRegulation and Reputation. 18 students have taken part in this 12-month program, which offers students an opportunity to attend outdoor adventure activities twice a term, as well as meeting individually with a counsellor to explore the four R’s. The students began the year with a day of high ropes, followed by a mountain bike riding day and a fishing expedition. Through these activities, students were encouraged to harness their fear to overcome obstacles and develop resilience and the confidence that they can achieve anything through team work, humour and persistence. 10

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Together4Kids: “focusing on supporting children” S ince 2010, Relationships Australia (SA)’s Together 4 Kids (T4K) program has provided training and support to over 700 community service and homelessness sector workers across South Australia. The T4K program aims to give a voice to children who are at risk of or experiencing homelessness in South Australia. We recognise the need for children to be able to access specialist homeless services in their own right and have been working to provide those working in the sector with the skills they need to address the unique needs of children experiencing homelessness. Through supporting workers to develop child-focussed skills and knowledge in the homeless sector context, T4K’s ultimate aim is to improve service delivery to children accessing support from specialist homelessness services. With this mission in mind, T4K has developed a series of facilitators’ manuals for a series of therapeutic group programs, which are aimed at providing children with opportunities to engage in services and play-based activities, as well as therapeutic intervention where required. The ‘Pirates’, ‘Caterpillars to Butterflies’ and ‘The Garden’ facilitators’ manuals provide workers with a framework to successfully run these therapeutic programs with children, independent of the T4K program. The manuals are underpinned with knowledge in attachment theory, trauma-informed practice and play-based theory, and can be used to facilitate a weekly program as designed, as well as one-off sessions that can be adapted to meet specific client needs. By collaborating with specialist homelessness and domestic violence services, T4K has also fostered opportunities for sector workers to collaborate and co-facilitate the programs, both in community and in-house settings. T4K has worked with organisations across the state to deliver these programs, including the Eastern Domestic Violence Service, the Southern Youth Homelessness Service, the Western Domestic Violence Service, and Seaton Central, a ‘Communities for Children’ initiative. In the future, T4K hopes to continue developing therapeutic, evidence-based and trauma-informed programs that address the needs of the most vulnerable children and families in our community. “ 11 On Census night in 2011, the Australian Bureau of Sta s cs counted 105,237 people experiencing homelessness or severe overcrowding with 5985 being South Australians. This is both concerning and disheartening, as this represented a 17.3% increase Australia-wide, from the 2006 Census. In its first year, T4K was able to demonstrate excellent outcomes for homeless children: • Reducing levels of stress • Reducing emo onal symptoms • Reducing conduct problems and problems with peers • Reducing hyperac vity • Increasing pro-social behaviour, and • Improving school a endance.

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Evaluation of PEACE’s Certificate IV in Community Services R elationships Australia (SA)’s Research and Evaluation team conducted a qualitative evaluation of the Certificate IV in Community Services – a VET course and community capacitybuilding program offered by PEACE Multicultural services. The program supports people from multicultural backgrounds to increase awareness around such issues as problem gambling, HIV and hepatitis C. Capacity building programs, such as the Certificate IV, focus on enhancing a community’s ability and skill to address health-related issues, and work from an assumption that each community has existing assets and strengths that can be mobilised to bring about change. It is the aim of capacity building programs to identify, harness and ultimately enhance these strengths as a means to increase knowledge, improve problem-solving skills and promote collective action. The focus of capacity-building programs on community involvement is particularly useful for addressing culturally sensitive issues that are typically associated with stigma or shame. In many migrant and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities, topics such as sexual health and same-sex attraction are considered taboo and rarely discussed openly, and STIs such as HIV and AIDS are seen as resulting from ‘immoral’ behaviours. Such perceptions and stigma ultimately impact health by preventing people from testing for STIs or being informed about their incidence and risk factors. The Australian Federation of AIDS Organisation argues that the best way to combat the prevalence of stigma in CALD and migrant communities is through community, peer education that provides accurate and current information about HIV/AIDS transmission. Despite their applicability in addressing significant issues for CALD communities, to date, few empirical studies have systematically investigated the impact of capacity-building programs. Our evaluation team worked to fill this gap in knowledge by exploring, in detail, the outcomes of Relationships Australia (SA)’s Certificate IV training at both an individual and community level. To fill this gap, three focus groups were conducted with 26 participants who had undertaken the training since its inception 10 years prior. A variety of community groups were represented, including students from South Sudan, Burundi, Somalia, Philippines, Kenya, Ghana, Kurdistan, Iran, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Persia, and Liberia. Overwhelmingly, participants provided positive responses regarding the Certificate IV training, indicating that it had a substantial impact personally, professionally, and at the community level. Amongst the most significant changes identified by participants, was the acquisition of vital information regarding STIs, which worked to normalise taboo issues such as HIV, and empowered participants to become community advocates. Participants also reported the development of a new perspective that enabled them to become more tolerant, inclusive and forgiving in their interactions and work with others. Together, these changes provided participants with the necessary skills and confidence to explore new education and employment opportunities and, most importantly, to engage their communities around matters of sexual health. Such communityled initiatives achieved significant advances in health promotion and the reduction of stigma within participants’ communities, demonstrating the substantial impact of Relationships Australia (SA)’s Certificate IV in Community Services at the individual and broader community level . “ This gave me an opportunity to work, you know, through the units of competency. So then doing the Diploma and Cer ficate IV in Training and Assessment it gave me an opportunity to work as a project officer and to start to train other community educators and be able from there to go into counselling and study counselling and doing counselling and case management. It just opened so many doors and I just always think about ‘what would happen if I actually didn’t do this course?’, you know, ‘what would have happened to me? Cultural Fitness Training evaluation R elationships Australia (SA)’s Cultural Fitness Training program underwent a rigorous evaluation this year to determine the impact of the training on Relationships Australia (SA) staff in three key areas: (1) attitudes towards Indigenous individuals; (2) knowledge of Aboriginal history, including invasion; and (3) behaviour towards people of Aboriginal origin, particularly in the workplace. This evaluation is one of few studies that have systematically examined the impact and outcomes of Cultural Fitness Training, particularly within the community services sector. The results will enable us to further develop and refine our training, whilst also reinforcing the importance of Relationships Australia (SA)’s commitment to continued education and commitment to cultural issues. The results of the evaluation are currently being analysed by our Research team and will be prepared for publication within the coming year. ” 12

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Board members Franco Cama a President Franco is a lawyer by profession. He is a director of an Adelaide legal practice that he established over 30 years ago. He practises in the corporate and commercial group and has a particular interest in corporate governance. He advises a number of not for profit organisations. Franco has also been extensively involved in legal education having for many years taught in the Practical Legal Training programs in South Australia. He also holds the status of Adjunct Associate Professor of Law at Flinders University where he teaches in corporate and commercial law subjects at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Franco has been a legal member of the Nurses Board of South Australia. He has been involved with Relationships Australia (SA) since 2000 and is currently a member of the Investment Committee. Judith Cross Chief Execu ve Officer Judith has 20 years experience as a Chief Executive Officer in the not for profit sector and has been working in community services and health for over 30 years. Originally working in child and family therapy, Judith has contributed to state and national policy and has also developed education services in the community service and health field, establishing one of the first Skills Centres in this sector. She has had a significant involvement in domestic violence and sexual abuse policy and service development and was appointed by the South Australian Government as the social work advisor to the South Australian Children in State Care Commission of Inquiry into the sexual abuse of children whilst in state care. Judith was a member of the Premier’s Council for Women for six years and is currently on the Board of Family Relationships Services Australia. She has been a Telstra Women’s Business Award finalist and was awarded a Centenary Medal by the Commonwealth in recognition of her contribution to community services. Vaia Proios Vice President Vaia has over 28 years experience in a range of agencies and roles within the South Australian public sector, with a strong background in strategic policy advice, intergovernmental relations and leadership roles. She has worked closely with a range of Ministers and portfolios. She has also worked in the not for profit sector, through roles at Lidcombe Workers Health Centre and Redfern Legal Centre. Vaia was a member of the COPE Board from 1989 until it amalgamated with Relationships Australia (SA) in 2001, and served on the new merged Board from 2001 to 2004 and then from 2006 to the present. She currently serves as Vice President and Chairs the Service Governance Committee. Geoff Kay Treasurer Geoff is a chartered accountant and is the Principal of GK Business and Taxation Consulting, an accounting firm specialising in taxation and small business consulting. He has over 25 years experience in professional practice and was a partner of a mid-tier firm until going into business for himself in 2009. He has many years of experience in advising small businesses in many different areas including manufacturing, retail and primary production and importing. He has been a Board member of Relationships Australia (SA) since 1998. Geoff is also on the board of an Aged Care Facility and South Australia’s leading Golf Club, Kooyonga. Harold Bates-Brownsword Member Before beginning work in community services, Harold worked with a number of multi-national organisations in sales, marketing and human resources. Since being offered his first position in a community services organisation, Harold has worked in child protection, disability, aged care and not for profit housing organisations until taking up a role in the Business School at Flinders University. He teaches accountancy and works with young people and international students to help them make the transition from secondary school to the University. Harold’s qualifications include a Bachelor of Arts from Melbourne University, Honours Degree in Psychology from Adelaide University, a Master of Policy and Administration from Flinders Univeristy, Certificate IV in Workplace Training and Assessment and a Bachelor of Accounting from Flinders University. 13 Vicki Toovey Member Vicki has over 20 years experience in both the State and Commonwealth public sector as well as involvement with community organisations and intergovernmental committees. Her role as a senior executive in both Commonwealth and State Governments with a particular focus on social policy included Director of Women’s Health Statewide, Director of the Government of South Australia, Office for Women and Director in Premier and Cabinet. Vicki has also worked in Indigenous Affairs, Family and Community Services at the Federal level. She has been an advocate for people with disabilities including as President of Women with Disabilities Australia and membership and chair of Commonwealth disability advisory bodies. She is a librarian by training and a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Vicki chairs the Board’s Governance Committee and is a member of the Service Governance Committee.

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Financial position Rela onships Australia South Australia Heath Promo on Services 2013 $ Current Assets Cash Assets Receivables Other TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS Non-Current Assets Investments Intangible Assets “Property, Plant and Equipment” TOTAL NON CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL NON-CURRENTASSETS TOTAL ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS 1,678,595 14,705 916 1,694,216 101,811 101,811 1,796,027 Current Liabili es Payables Provisions TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES Non-Current Liabili es Provisions TOTAL NON CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS 962,486 202,721 1,165,207 161,299 161,299 1,326,506 469,521 Equity Retained Surplus Reserves TOTAL EQUITY 469,521 469,521 This is a summary of our financial posi on as of 30 June 2013 taken from our statutory accounts. 14

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