Relationships Australia (SA) Annual Review 2012/2013

 

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Relationships Australia (SA) Annual Review 2012/2013

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2012/2013 Annual Review Relationships Australia (SA)

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Contents 01 President and CEO’s message 2013 Client Evaluation Survey Results 2012/2013 in numbers Implementation of Family Law DOORS Support for children and families where it’s needed most Domestic violence awareness collaboration Apology for forced adoptions Administration staff graduation Aboriginal cultural fitness New initiatives to help children and parents Working with Aboriginal families iKiDs northern puppet show education work Board members Financial position President and CEO’s message and know that this is in part due to the commitment of our Aboriginal staff and our focus on developing the cultural capability of all staff. The provision of Cultural Fitness Training to all staff at Relationships Australia (SA) is important and supported by the Board to ensure that we have a culturally diverse workplace, as well as culturally responsive services. 02 03 A 03 04 04 05 05 major focus for the Board this year was to re-examine our values, vision and purpose to ensure that we have a clear strategic direction, which is responsive to the needs of South Australians and to ensure a vibrant, energetic organisation into the future. In recent years, Relationships Australia (SA) has substantially re-oriented its services to focus on people with low incomes and those who have complex needs, especially due to violence and abuse, and we are pleased to see that our client data indicates that we are successfully reaching these groups. We are very conscious that there are many people who are underprivileged and do not benefit from economic successes in Australia. Our goal is to ensure that people do not experience financial barriers to accessing the support they require, and that those with complex needs, whether it be violence, abuse, mental health difficulties or other issues, have the opportunity to access services that support them to bring about positive changes in their lives. A key strategic approach to reach disadvantaged families has been locating our services in areas of high disadvantage in South Australia. We are pleased that in the coming year we are extending our service locations to include Port Adelaide, an area that has only previously received outreach services by Relationships Australia (SA). Our strategic focus is also supported by ensuring our services are offered at no cost to the client wherever possible, and where a fee is required, we ensure that fee reductions occur so that people with concession cards and low incomes are able to obtain the support they need. South Australia continues to face significant challenges to ensure equity for Aboriginal people and we are committed to working with our funding providers to achieve improved outcomes for Aboriginal people who are experiencing poverty, homelessness and higher levels of complex problems. We are very pleased to have an increasing number of Aboriginal clients receiving our services, This year, we saw 12,884 people. This includes an increasing focus on relieving the distress of children and youth. To support our services for vulnerable children and youth, this year we restructured our management team and developed the position of Director of Child and Youth Services, as well as specialist managers in the area. We know that to effectively break the cycle of disadvantage, we need to work with children and their families so that positive changes in their lives can occur. The Board has also reviewed the constitution and developed new objectives that reflect the current and future work of the Association. A key part of offering seamless service provision is our collaboration with Relationships Australia South Australia Health Promotion Services. At our AGM in November, Vaia Proios will be retiring from the Board after making an exceptional contribution to the development of Relationships Australia (SA). Vaia was an inaugural Board member at the 2001 merger of COPE and Relationships Australia (SA), and except for a two-year period, has been on the Board of Relationships Australia (SA) and before this, COPE, since 1997. During this time, she has provided leadership and strategic advice and has shared a passion and commitment to truly making a difference to the lives of the people we serve. On behalf of the Board and Relationships Australia (SA) staff, we thank her for her time, contribution, and vitality, which will be sorely missed. Our work is only possible through our partnerships. We value the support of our funding partners, the colloborative efforts with other organisations, the contribution of our Board members and importantly, the commitment of our staff. 06 07 07 08 09 10 Franco Camatta President Judith Cross Chief Executive Officer 01

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2013 Client Evaluation Survey Results Focus: Familial Relationships and Children T he Family Support Program Performance Framework employs a questionnaire to ascertain clients’ satisfaction with the service they received, as well as the extent to which programs met their objectives. In addition, this year’s evaluation included measures that ascertained how clients were currently managing their role as parents, in order to gauge the impact that clients’ presenting concerns, can have on familial relationships, particularly children. 95% satisfaction with service recieved 79% improved knowledge and skills 80% improved family, community and economic management 86% improved access and/or engagement with relevant services Parents had difficulty understanding children’s feelings Parents had difficulty dealing with children’s problematic behaviour Within the past 6 months, parents had been harsher than they had meant to be 64% 53% 52% 38% 47% 24% Parents attending non-children’s services Parents attending children’s services 41% 51% of parents of toddlers and babies reported their children had heard or witnessed very angry or violent behaviour at home of parents of school aged children reported their children had heard or witnessed very angry or violent behaviour at home The Conclusion: These results clearly demonstrate the need for all services to be vigilant about the wellbeing of children and families, even when parents are not accessing children’s services. There is a need to proactively and systematically employ tools and approaches across all Relationships Austalia (SA) services and programs to identify and address child and parenting related concerns. DOORS Handbook © Family Transitions, 2013. All rights reserved. 02

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2012/2013 in numbers How our work is funded We greatly appreciate the financial support we receive from our funding providers, without which, we would not be able to provide the valuable services so needed by the individuals and communities we work with. We acknowledge the support of the following State and Commonwealth Government departments and agencies: This map illustrates the current Relationships Australia (SA) Child and Family Centre locations. Each region has been assigned a Disadvantage, Risk and Need (DNR) score, which is based on the following sentinel indicators: jobless families ratio, separations ratio, smoking during pregnancy ratio, Centrelink benefit ratio and substantiated child protection notifications rate ratio. A darker colour on the map indicates a higher DNR ranking and therefore a higher level of disadvantage. As the map demonstrates, our Child and Family Centres are provided in the regions of highest disadvantage and associated need, indicating that our services and programs are readily available asily and easily accessible by the most vulnerable m members of the ation. population. Australian Government • • • Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) Attorney-General’s Department (AGD) Department of Health South Australian Government • • • • Department of Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI) SA Health Department for Education and Child Development (DECD) Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund, a joint initiative of the Australian Hotels Association (SA Branch), Clubs SA, Adelaide Casino and the Government of South Australia We are also grateful for our ongoing partnerships and collaborations with other community service providers, community groups and training partners. Relationships Australia (SA) Inc. 2013 funding breakdowns FEDERAL STATE OTHER Implementation of Family Law DOORS O ur Agency-wide implementation of DOORS – the Detection of Overall Risk Screen – is evidence of our continued commitment to addressing domestic and family violence. The DOORS is a three-part framework that assists separating parents and family law professionals to detect and respond to both wellbeing and safety risks, and was developed in collaboration with Dr. Jennifer McIntosh of Family Transitions. In contrast to specific domestic violence screens, the DOORS takes a broad definition of risk, covering adult, infant and child wellbeing, conflict and communication, parenting stress, and collateral stressors, encouraging the practitioner to evaluate the contribution of all these factors to imminent personal and interpersonal safety risks. DOORS provides: • Support for cross-disciplinary understanding of factors that combine to create a climate of elevated risk for families in the family law system A common screening framework that can be used across multiple services in the family law arena • A tool for systematically identifying multiple risks at the client’s point of entry into the service (e.g. physical or psychological harm and developmental harm) Associated response planning resources An annotated risk assessment resource list for specialist follow up A software program to streamline analysis. • • • Through DOORS, we are able to identify a client’s specific risks and associated service needs, ensuring they are provided the best assistance possible, including referral to, and collaboration with, appropriate services and practitioners within and outside of Relationships Australia (SA). Our Research team are currently in the process of reviewing over 1000 client responses to DOORS, and results will be made available in the coming year. • 03

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Support for families and children where it’s needed most R elationships Australia (SA)’s Strategic Plan includes building on existing strengths in order to achieve positive and sustainable change for individuals, families and communities. We recognised the need for more family and children’s support services in Adelaide’s southern metropolitan suburbs, primarily Hackham West, which is one of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged communities in the Onkaparinga area. Anecdotal research shows that co-morbidity is present in many of the families’ struggles, including mental health, substance use, literacy and numeracy difficulties, surviving child sexual abuse and family violence. In 2007, Relationships Australia (SA), in conjunction with the Hackham West Community Centre, launched an initiative to help families navigate through relationship difficulties and assist parents to support children in managing developmental transitions. Since then, the initiative has continued to thrive. The free support services we provide include family relationships counselling, children’s counselling, education, advocacy, case work and referrals and are delivered at Hackham West Community Centre, and/or at any of the three local primary schools. Our practitioners also visit schools and community centres in the locality as required. Many of the families in this district do not have transport, and struggle daily with finances, relationship breakdowns and mental health issues. We maintain an open access strategy whereby clients can make contact and book appointments when required. We advocate for clients in school case conferences, Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) case conferences, Families SA, housing, income support and hospitals. Other issues we support our clients with include: • • • • Parenting Respectful relationships Emotional regulation and behavioural challenges with children Transitions (including changing schools, parental separation, income support, referral to CAMHS) Our holistic service model approach is continually reviewed with Hackham West Community Centre to ensure we sustain and enrich the existing outreach service. We have provided training to Hackham West community workers to increase their capacity to respond appropriately to disadvantaged families and children. We know that the families, volunteers and community workers at Hackham West Community Centre and the three local primary schools recognise and value this service. Looking ahead, we will continue our collaborative effort and in consultation with the community; we hope to increase our support to more families. Domestic violence awareness collaboration D omestic violence is a significant issue for many of our clients, with over 65% reporting a recent history of violence and abuse. Building effective cross-agency collaboration and community-wide prevention education is an increasingly important feature of our response to this complex issue. Effective referral and collaboration, both within and outside Relationships Australia (SA), ensures the best possible service for clients, and sets us apart as a leader within the community services sector in providing client-focused, holistic service responses to domestic and family violence. As evidence of our extensive cross-agency collaboration, this year, Relationships Australia (SA) and Salisbury/Elizabeth Family Relationship Centre collaborated with Lower North Health and Uniting Care Wesley Country SA to deliver services to people affected by domestic violence in the Balaklava, Clare Valley, Burra and Jamestown regions. Staff from Relationships Australia (SA) and Uniting Care Wesley Country SA presented regular awareness sessions at the Clare Valley Domestic Violence Women’s Support Group, run through Clare Hospital. These presentations provided women from the region with information about our Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) processes for identifying and responding to domestic violence. The sessions provided an opportunity for women to ask questions, evaluate and consider the range of service options available to them. Relationships Australia (SA) also participated in the Northern Domestic Violence Service’s (NDVS) Aboriginal reference group, consisting of Aboriginal representatives from a range of services operating in the northern suburbs of Adelaide. The group meets on a monthly basis to provide advice to NDVS to ensure services provided to the Aboriginal community, particularly women and children escaping domestic violence, are culturally appropriate and that resources are both accessible and equitable. A key aim of the work in these regions was to raise awareness of domestic violence in rural areas; an issue that is often ‘swept under the carpet’. By working in collaboration with other services, we were able to share knowledge and resources in order to deliver much needed services to isolated families and communities. This collaborative approach helps to ensure both individuals and their families have access to the services they need to address issues stemming from domestic violence and achieve better outcomes for individuals and families. 04

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Apology for forced adoptions O n Thursday 21 March 2013, former Prime Minister Julia Gillard delivered an apology on behalf of the Australian Government to people affected by forced adoption or removal policies and practices. The national Apology was witnessed by over 800 victims of forced or past adoptions in the Great Hall at Parliament House, including Meg Hale, who had her baby girl forcibly taken from her immediately after giving birth as an 18 year old in 1968. Meg said the Apology was a long time coming, “As a mother who lost my baby 43 years ago, I am glad to see the Federal Government acknowledge the truth about forced adoption so that my daughter may know the truth that she was not voluntarily given away. I am proud of the work we did to expose the myth about adoption and that after 30 years of hard work it has resulted in an Apology from not only each State and Territory but from the Federal Government of Australia.” Evelyn Robinson who had her baby son taken from her at the age of 19, also witnessed the historical moment of which she said, “The Federal Apology has the potential to contribute in a major way to healing and understanding. Australia is setting a commendable example to the rest of the world.” Relationships Australia (SA) Manager of Post Adoption Support Services, Nikki Hartmann, said that the Apology brought out many strong emotions in those who have been affected by forced adoptions, “The countless women who had their babies taken away have lived with feelings of terrible guilt, shame and sorrow for a long time. Today’s Apology is an important step in validating what these families have suffered and for the children who were adopted out, to know that it wasn’t by choice.” While it is difficult to know exactly how many people were affected by forced adoptions, the Australian Institute of Family Studies believes the number to be at least 200,000. It has only been since the 1980s that the policy was overturned, and until very recently the trauma it caused went unacknowledged. Administration staff graduation R elationships Australia (SA) places a high value on the professional development of our staff and the differences this makes to the services provided. The administration staff are the first point of contact for our clients and work tirelessly to meet their needs. With changing demands and new systems, there was an increasing importance to up-skill the administration staff. Through Skills for All funding, our training division, the Australian Institute of Social Relations, provided all administration staff the opportunity to complete the Certificate IV Community Services (Information, Advice and Referral). Commencing in November 2012, the staff attended monthly training at the Australian Institute of Social Relations. The program was developed and implemented to include the changing needs of clients, introduce new client assessment tools and develop a collaborative team approach. With the support of managers and service staff, the course offered a diversity of topics to develop and challenge each individual within their own learning journey. Twenty-two Relationships Australia (SA) staff completed the qualification and were presented with their parchments by Judith Cross in a graduation ceremony on 17 September. 05

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Aboriginal cultural fitness Aboriginal Publishing T he Aboriginal Review Committee for Laguna Bay Publishing was set up several years ago to invite Aboriginal writers to have their scripts reviewed for publication. The Aboriginal Committee recommends appropriate changes and engages with the writers to produce works for schools around Australia. Oxford University Press is involved in the publications, which can be accessed through the link below: www.lagunabaypublishing.com Relationships Australia (SA)’s Practice Manager, Aboriginal Programs and Policy, Joanne Willmot, has been on the Aboriginal Review Committee for Laguna Bay Publishing for over a year. Other well-known Aboriginal people who were/are involved in the ARTS recommended Joanne to the Board whose role it is to read, assess and review books that might be suitable for printing. According to Joanne: “Aboriginal children have not been able to access books written for and about them. This is a fantastic project that I feel very proud to be involved in and I hope that we can purchase some of the series for our early childhood programs and for young people looking for resources that inform them about themselves and others like them.” Joanne Willmot is also a member of the Indigenous Protected Areas Council that meets once a year to review and access programs across Australia. This Council meets to discuss and contribute support to the ongoing funding and future of specific programs. www.environment.gov.au/indigenous/ipa Joanne Willmot Cultural Fitness Training O ver the past 12 months, all Relationships Australia (SA) staff have participated in a two-day Cultural Fitness Training program facilitated by Joanne Willmot and Pamela Dawn. The training is designed to assist staff working in any Relationships Australia (SA) office location to engage with practices and understandings that will enhance Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal relationships and provide a model to ‘do the work differently’. Intended outcomes of the training include: • • • having the capacity to recognise cultural inequities and appreciate cultural diversity acknowledging and being open to talk about cultural issues taking responsibility to act (i.e. seeing cultural inequities and discrimination against Indigenous Australians as a shared problem) behaving in ways that ensure greater cultural safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff and clients. The Cultural Fitness Training Program has recently undergone rigorous evaluation by our Research and Evaluation team. The evaluation was designed to assess whether the program met its stated objectives by measuring the impact of the training in three key areas: 1. 2. 3. attitudes towards Indigenous individuals knowledge of Aboriginal history, including invasion behaviour towards people of Aboriginal origin, particularly in the workplace. A survey designed to assess changes in these three domains was administered to Relationships Australia (SA) staff on three separate occasions: 1. 2. 3. immediately before training immediately after training three months after training. • The first day of training involves education about Aboriginal history and culture, including invasion, followed by small interactive games focusing on how this history contributes to current discrimination towards Indigenous Australians. Participants are also provided time to discuss their experiences and feelings about Aboriginal people and their position within Australian society, allowing for selfreflection and a deeper understanding of one’s own cultural bias. On the second day, participants are encouraged to discuss their own culture and share the significance of culture for their personal identity and sense of belonging, whilst the facilitators explain and illustrate the importance of respecting cultural diversity and creating a favourable working environment for every staff member. The inclusion of three separate time points enabled us to determine any immediate pre- and post-changes that occurred because of the training, as well as identify the long-term impacts of the training. This evaluation is one of few studies that have systematically examined the impact and outcomes of Cultural Fitness Training, particularly within the community services sector. The results will enable us to further develop and refine our training, whilst also reinforcing the importance of Relationships Australia (SA)’s commitment to continued education and cultural issues. The results of the evaluation are currently being analysed by our Research team and will be prepared for publication within the coming year. 06

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New initiatives to help children and parents T here have been a number of new initiatives and developments within Relationships Australia (SA)’s children’s programs, which aim to help both parents and children. One example includes the development of a puppet show suitable for Aboriginal children living in the northern region of South Australia. We have recently developed an education session, ‘Clear as Mud’, that focuses on coping strategies for primary and secondary school children. These have been trialled successfully in primary schools, and will be rolled out in secondary schools this year. Relationships Australia (SA) has also developed several children’s animated books, which focus on children’s experiences in separated families. The books are intended for parents to read with their child, to help them talk openly about their child’s experience of living in two households. At the back of the book, we have developed a ‘Coping Cube’, which is a fun and interactive communications tool for parents and children to create together. Initially, this book was developed specifically for children’s post separation services. However, since its inception, other child-focused services have shown an interest in the books, which can also assist children and their parents in homeless accommodation and Indigenous Parenting Support Service clients. Working with Aboriginal families W orking with Aboriginal families to improve social and emotional wellbeing has once again been a priority for Relationships Australia (SA) and the Salisbury/Elizabeth Family Relationship Centre this year. Our work with Aboriginal families spans across three main areas: adults and families, youth and students, and collaboration with other service providers. Our Aboriginal Liaison Officers provided case management, ongoing assessments and support services to adults and families experiencing social or emotional discomfort. We also provided counselling to individuals and families in relation to a range of issues including homelessness, domestic violence, grief and loss, suicide, child protection, substance abuse, mental health, financial crisis and issues of trauma, such as the stolen generation. At the Para West Adult Campus, we provided case management, counselling and advocacy services to students who were experiencing issues relating to sexual assault, homelessness, mental health, post care, violence and bullying. We also worked with Families SA and our post separation service iKiDs and Indigenous Parenting Support Services (IPSS) to assist children and their families to address social and emotional issues. Collaborating with other service providers is an integral part of ensuring Aboriginal families receive holistic and culturally appropriate services. This year, Relationships Australia (SA) assisted in the coordination of the Northern Aboriginal Family Alliance (NAFA), organising service delivery for the most disadvantaged individuals and families. Moving forward, Relationships Australia (SA) hopes to expand the range of services we provide to Aboriginal communities and offer greater access to Aboriginal counsellors and programs. 07

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iKiDs northern puppet show education work R elationships Australia (SA)’s iKiDs (Supporting Children and Young People After Separation) program supports children and young people (aged 4 to 18 years), schools and parents in responding effectively to the impacts of parental separation. iKiDs consists of child and family counselling, therapeutic group work and education and skills programs. The iKiDs puppet project (which commenced in 2009) forms part of the education and skills program and utilises puppets, performance and narrative storytelling to bring awareness of parental separation to the school community. The puppet show project aims to assist children in understanding that they are not alone in their experiences of family separation. In January 2013, Aboriginal Liaison Officers at the Salisbury Family Relationship Centre, in conjunction with our iKiDs practitioner, developed a region-specific script for a puppet show, which would be relevant for school communities in the northern region of Adelaide. The show, titled “You’ve Got a Friend in Me”, has now been performed in two schools, with three more performances scheduled this term and further bookings secured for the remainder of the school year. The puppet characters include two children, one of whom is Aboriginal, in a school setting and two household animals – a cat and a dog. The show includes dancing, music and other sound effects. Script and character development has very much been influenced by experiences with individual and group work clients in the iKiDs program. Themes of the show include the importance of friendship, help-seeking behaviours, distinguishing between good and bad secrets, emotional literacy, coping with emotions, respectful vs. violent behaviours, adult vs. children’s responsibilities, the healing power of pets, and coping with grief/loss. The show also encourages children to appreciate that all families are different, in the same way that children come in many different shapes, sizes and skin colours. The performance also involves an interactive debriefing. During this debriefing, the two puppeteers who play the cat and the dog ask the children questions about the show and invite them to talk about their own lives. Examples of questions asked include, “What did the characters do to help themselves feel better at times?”, “What do you do that helps you feel good?” and “Who do you talk to when life is hard? Because sometimes things are really good and sometimes things are not so good”. Some children will share their own experiences during this debriefing, while other children prefer to do such sharing after the show when they are provided the opportunity to cuddle the animals and talk to the performers. Themes presented in the shows are relevant for all children regardless of whether their parents are separated or not. Part of the script deliberately reminds children that all parents argue sometimes, and this does not necessarily mean they will separate. The script also highlights the fact that although parental separation can be tough, there are many things that can help kids. The cat and the dog remind the audience that there can be good things about separation once you get through the hard stuff, for example, new family members and parents who are not fighting so much. Teachers are offered follow-up activities to take back to the classroom, and all teachers are present at the show. If the school has a counsellor, they are also strongly encouraged to attend. The northern iKiDs puppet show fits well with the counselling and group work components of the program and some children have been fortunate to experience all three components. In their group work and individual counselling, many children report remembering the characters in the puppet show and how the characters solved their problems. Children have also reported that they can relate to the characters and their experiences, demonstrating that the show achieves its objective of normalising many of the situations that children might find themselves in. Based on our experience, “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” appears to work best with children between the ages of 5 and 9 years and with an audience of roughly 100 children or less. “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” has been booked by primary schools until the end of 2013, and is proving to be a time/cost efficient way to educate large numbers of children about separation and coping with family change. 08

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Board members Franco Cama a President Franco is a lawyer by profession. He is a director of an Adelaide legal practice that he established over 30 years ago. He practises in the corporate and commercial group and has a particular interest in corporate governance. He advises a number of not for profit organisations. Franco has also been extensively involved in legal education having for many years taught in the Practical Legal Training programs in South Australia. He also holds the status of Adjunct Associate Professor of Law at Flinders University where he teaches in corporate and commercial law subjects at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Franco has been a legal member of the Nurses Board of South Australia. He has been involved with Relationships Australia (SA) since 2000 and is currently a member of the Investment Committee. Judith Cross Chief Execu ve Officer Judith has 20 years experience as a Chief Executive Officer in the not for profit sector and has been working in community services and health for over 30 years. Originally working in child and family therapy, Judith has contributed to state and national policy and has also developed education services in the community service and health field, establishing one of the first Skills Centres in this sector. She has had a significant involvement in domestic violence and sexual abuse policy and service development and was appointed by the South Australian Government as the social work advisor to the South Australian Children in State Care Commission of Inquiry into the sexual abuse of children whilst in state care. Judith was a member of the Premier’s Council for Women for six years and is currently on the Board of Family Relationships Services Australia. She has been a Telstra Women’s Business Award finalist and was awarded a Centenary Medal by the Commonwealth in recognition of her contribution to community services. Vaia Proios Vice President Vaia has over 28 years experience in a range of agencies and roles within the South Australian public sector, with a strong background in strategic policy advice, intergovernmental relations and leadership roles. She has worked closely with a range of Ministers and portfolios. She has also worked in the not for profit sector, through roles at Lidcombe Workers Health Centre and Redfern Legal Centre. Vaia was a member of the COPE Board from 1989 until it amalgamated with Relationships Australia (SA) in 2001, and served on the new merged Board from 2001 to 2004 and then from 2006 to the present. She currently serves as Vice President and Chairs the Service Governance Committee. Geoff Kay Treasurer Geoff is a chartered accountant and is the Principal of GK Business and Taxation Consulting, an accounting firm specialising in taxation and small business consulting. He has over 25 years experience in professional practice and was a partner of a mid-tier firm until going into business for himself in 2009. He has many years of experience in advising small businesses in many different areas including manufacturing, retail and primary production and importing. He has been a Board member of Relationships Australia (SA) since 1998. Geoff is also on the board of an Aged Care Facility and South Australia’s leading Golf Club, Kooyonga. Harold Bates-Brownsword Member Before beginning work in community services, Harold worked with a number of multi-national organisations in sales, marketing and human resources. Since being offered his first position in a community services organisation, Harold has worked in child protection, disability, aged care and not for profit housing organisations until taking up a role in the Business School at Flinders University. He teaches accountancy and works with young people and international students to help them make the transition from secondary school to the University. Harold’s qualifications include a Bachelor of Arts from Melbourne University, Honours Degree in Psychology from Adelaide University, a Master of Policy and Administration from Flinders Univeristy, Certificate IV in Workplace Training and Assessment and a Bachelor of Accounting from Flinders University. 09 Vicki Toovey Member Vicki has over 20 years experience in both the State and Commonwealth public sector as well as involvement with community organisations and intergovernmental committees. Her role as a senior executive in both Commonwealth and State Governments with a particular focus on social policy included Director of Women’s Health Statewide, Director of the Government of South Australia, Office for Women and Director in Premier and Cabinet. Vicki has also worked in Indigenous Affairs, Family and Community Services at the Federal level. She has been an advocate for people with disabilities including as President of Women with Disabilities Australia and membership and chair of Commonwealth disability advisory bodies. She is a librarian by training and a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Vicki chairs the Board’s Governance Committee and is a member of the Service Governance Committee.

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Financial position Rela onships Australia (SA) 2013 $ Current Assets Cash Assets Receivables Other TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS Non-Current Assets Investments Intangible Assets “Property, Plant and Equipment” TOTAL NON CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL NON-CURRENTASSETS TOTAL ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS 6,846,765 139,747 266,283 7,252,795 1,057,611 233,803 5,273,765 6,565,179 13,817,974 Current Liabili es Payables Provisions TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES Non-Current Liabili es Provisions TOTAL NON CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS 1,996,447 701,660 2,698,107 496,195 496,195 3,194,302 10,623,672 Equity Retained Surplus Reserves TOTAL EQUITY 8,537,961 2,085,711 10,623,672 This is a summary of our financial posi on as of 30 June 2013 taken from our statutory accounts. 10

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Relationships Australia (SA) locations Adelaide City 161 Frome Street Adelaide SA 5000 Phone: (08) 8223 4566 Elm Place Ground Floor, 191 Flinders Street Adelaide SA 5000 Phone: (08) 8419 2042 Outer West (Port Adelaide) 8 Butler Street Port Adelaide SA 5015 Phone: (08) 8340 2022 South (Marion) Office Suite 500a Wes ield Shopping Centre 297 Diagonal Road Oaklands Park SA Phone: (08) 8377 5400 North (Salisbury) Shop 8a, Salisbury Cinema Complex Cnr James and Gawler Streets Salisbury SA 5108 Phone: (08) 8250 6600 North East (Ridgehaven) Unit 2, 1273 North East Road Ridgehaven SA 5097 Phone: (08) 8396 4237 Riverland (Berri) 9 Kay Avenue Berri SA 5343 Phone: (08) 8582 4122 Corporate Office First Floor, 191 Flinders Street Adelaide SA 5000 Phone: (08) 8216 5200 Australian Ins tute of Social Rela ons 49a Orsmond Street Hindmarsh SA 5007 Phone: (08) 8245 8100 Adelaide Family Rela onship Centre 161 Frome Street Adelaide SA 5000 Phone: (08) 8419 2000 Salisbury/Elizabeth Family Rela onship Centre Shop 8a, Salisbury Cinema Complex Cnr James and Gawler Streets Salisbury SA 5108 Phone: (08) 8285 4499 13 Elizabeth Way Elizabeth SA 5112 Phone: (08) 8255 3323 Visit our websites • Rela onships Australia (SA) www.rasa.org.au • Australian Ins tute of Social Rela ons www.socialrela ons.edu.au • AVERT Family Violence www.aver amilyviolence.com.au • Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse www.respondsa.org.au • square www.square.org.au • Gay Men’s Health SA www.gmhsa.org.au • The Family Law DOORS www.familylawdoors.com.au • Gambling Help Services www.gamblinghelp.org.au • Statewide CALD Domes c Violence Service www.cald-dv.org.au Outreach services are provided at: • Aldinga • Kingscote • Mount Barker • Murraylands • Noarlunga • Victor Harbor • Port Adelaide • Hackham • Clare • Gawler • Nuriootpa • Barmera • Renmark • Loxton • Waikerie • APY Lands

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