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Contents. How to use this resource What is resilience and why is it important? Creating a supportive environment Practical strategies – seven essential resiliency skills Skill one Skill two Skill three Skill four Skill five Skill six Skill seven Further support and contacts 2 3 4 5 7 14 19 23 28 32 36 40

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How to use this resource. This resource is designed for you. Each section explains one of the seven essential resiliency skills as developed by Karen Reivich & Andrew Shatte (2002) and provides activities and templates to practice the skill. If using this resource in a classroom setting, worksheets can be copied or downloaded from https://teachers.reachoutpro.com.au and printed for each student. These activities can be applied in all classrooms, regardless of the subject content. Each Skills Section includes: • Definition • Classroom tips for exploring this skill • Lesson activities › › › › Key messages and outcomes Buzz Idea – fun activities that can be used to start the lesson or break up the lesson Practical activity to explore the skill Links to ReachOut.com content Icons. Background Information Student Worksheet Lesson Content Australian curriculum. If using this resource with students, the Australian Curriculum General Capabilities (assists students to become lifelong learners able to live and work successfully in the diverse world of the twenty–first century) provide meaningful connections to the importance of wellbeing (Personal and Social Capability). The practical strategies in this resource can be added to your current teaching materials to allow students to work towards achieving this capability. General Capabilities. Person and Social Cabability This capability assists students to learn to understand themselves and others, and manage their relationships, lives, work and learning more effectively. The Personal and Social Capability learning continuum is organised into four interrelated elements: › › › › Self–awareness Self–management Social awareness Social management Activities in this resource can assist in the development of this element. For more information: http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/general_capabilities.html 2

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What is resilience? › › › › › › › › Physical illness Change of school Resilience is the ability to bounce back from adversity. It is a necessary skill for coping with life’s inevitable obstacles and one of the key ingredients to success. When we apply resilience through the positive psychology lens, the learning is not only to bounce back, but to bounce forward. Examples of challenges some young people may face where resiliency skills are essential: Transitioning from primary school to high school Change in family make up (divorce, break up) Change of friendship group Conflict with peers Conflict with family Managing study workload Why is it important for young people? Having resiliency skills minimises the effect that negative, stressfull situations can have on a young person. These skills allow a young person to face challenges, learn from them and apply these skills towards living a healthy life. 3

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Creating a supportive environment. Below are some tips for creating this space. It is important to: › › › › › › the parameters for class discussions It is really important to provide students with a safe and supportive classroom environment that facilitates active participation and engagement. Collaborate with students to develop a group agreement that sets Allow all students to reflect on their own role in discussions – acting as a facilitator of the conversation to help to generate many viewpoints Value all student contributions and make this known Use a range of questioning techniques which open up discussion rather than trying to get to a quick right answer Recognise that some students may not feel comfortable sharing; explore ways of dealing with this such as using think, pair, share activities Explore ways to ensure that all students get an opportunity to speak, such as using talk tickets, talk sticks etc 4

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Exploring the seven essential resiliency skills. 1. Emotional awareness & self regulation 2. Impulse control 3. Optimism 4. Flexible & accurate thinking 5. Empathy 6. Self efficacy 7. Connecting & reaching out Practical strategies: 5

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Exploring: What is resiliency? Activities. Key message. Resilient people are comfortable in talking about and expressing a range of emotions. 1) Buzz idea › › 15 mins A picture tells a thousand words… A great way to introduce a topic! Spread picture cards over classroom floor. Ask students to choose a picture card they think best relates to the word resiliency (bouncing back, bouncing forward). Students then share what their card means in relation to resiliency Outcomes. Students will be able to understand that: › Being resilient is not about keeping things inside, but expressing how you feel and moving forward › The resilient person knows how to control their emotions so that they are able to push forward with a plan of action › There are many instances in life where resilience appears Resources Required. › › Post–It notes Pictures / magazine photos that can be interpreted differently or Picture This resource (St Lukes Innovative Resources) 2) What is resiliency? 25 mins Discuss with students what resiliency is (the ability to bounce back, bounce forward from tough times). Place ideas on board, and give students definition. › On a post it note, each student writes down their own definition and an example of when they, or someone they know has been resilient The class forms two large concentric circles. The students in the inner circle share their definition. The students in the outer circle share their example. The inner circle then rotates clockwise and the process is repeated until everyone has shared Looks like Sounds Feels like like 6 › › › Students then swap from inner circle to outer circle and share their other piece of information Draw a Y chart on the board. As a class, brainstorm what it looks like, feels like and sounds like to be resilient

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Practical strategies skill one. Emotional awareness & self regulation. Ability to identify emotional experiences and control emotional response to external events. Resilient people are comfortable with their feelings and they express a broad array of emotions – happiness, joy, fear, sadness. Resilient people don’t get “stuck” in an emotion. Although they might feel sad or scared, these feelings don’t prevent them from coping with the situation and moving forward. Classroom Tips › › › Remind students of classroom group agreement / norms (creating a safe and supportive environment) Spend five mins at the start of your lesson allowing students to fill out their feelings journal Discuss one emotion at the start of each lesson. Ask students to reflect on a time that they felt this emotion – How did they feel? What was the situation? How did they move forward? 7 Wellbeing@School

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Essential resiliency skills. Key message. Resilient people do show their emotions and when going through a tough time, they do feel sad or scared or anxious as this is a normal part of life Emotional awareness & self regulation. Activities. I. 1. Buzz idea – Toss the ball (10 mins) Students stand in a circle What are they? sharing what their thought has been Outcomes. Students will be able to understand that: › Being resilient is not about keeping things inside, but expressing how you feel and moving forward › Expressing and understanding their own emotions is a key ingredient to resilience › Recording how you feel in different situations can assist in keeping a check on your emotions and assist in developing the skills on how to move forward II. Ask students to think about emotions, what do they know about them? III. One student starts with the ball and throws the ball to another student, IV. This is continued until all students have received the ball, and shared an idea V. For an added challenge, introduce more than one ball 2. What are emotions? I. (15mins) Remind students what resiliency is – as discussed in What is resiliency? activity Each student writes down an example of an emotion on post–it notes under the headings positive / negative II. Students present their examples and place the post–it note on the board, III. Discuss why the emotions are under each heading Resources Required. › – – – › › › Worksheets Emotions list Feeling Connected Feelings Journal Post–it notes Coloured pens / textas Soft small ball (X3) IV. Add an extra column. How does this make someone feel? As a whole group, students suggestions are written up (By teacher or individual students) 3. I. Connecting Feelings with Emotions (20mins) Explain to students that keeping a check on their emotions assists in knowing how we respond in certain situations and how best to move forward and learn about how situations make us feel II. Share with students the List of Emotions (A–Z) III. Students work through the worksheet Feeling Connected, using the List of Emotions as a reference IV. Share their Feeling Connected diagrams with a partner V. Share with the class 4. Feelings Journal (5 mins) Can start a lesson, end a lesson or used as a break in the middle of a lesson This is a journal that can be used throughout a students school day, your lesson or in their personal life. Recording our feelings allows us to understand how we feel and helps to develop our resilience ReachOut.com links. Fact sheet: Why do people get angry? Find out all about anger, including what it is, signs of anger, types of anger, and what people can do to reduce their anger. http://au.reachout.com/all–about– anger I. Use the Feelings Journal template II. Record your feelings over a day, then a week III. Share them with a trusted friend 8

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Worksheets / skill one. Emotional awareness & self regulation. 9 Wellbeing@School

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List of Emotions (A–Z). We have a complex thinking system. Being aware, listening to and responding to our emotions is one of the keys to facing and responding to tough times. (Adapted from salutegenics.com.au) List of Emotions A Abandoned / Annoyed Absent / Affectionate Anxious / Abused Affirmed / Apathetic Accepted / Afraid Appreciated / Acclaimed Agonised / Astounded Accused / Alarmed Attractive / Alienated Adamant / Averse Adequate / Ambivalent Awed / Adoring Angry / Awkward B Bad / Bewildered Bored / Bitter / Brave Blasé / Burdened Beaten / Blissful Burned out Beautiful / Bold Betrayed C Clever / Cranky Cagey / Comfortable Creative / Callous Compliant / Cruel E Eage / Enchanted Exhausted / Easy going Energetic / Exhilarated Ecstatic / Enthusiastic Explosive / Envious Elated / Euphoric Electrified / Evasive D Daring / Dismayed Daunted / Destructive Dissatisfied / Deceitful Determined / Distracted Defeated / Different Distraught / Disturbed Delighted / Diminished Divided / Dependent Dirty / Depressed Disappointed / Dubious Disconnected / Dull Desperate / Discontented Dumb H Happy / Hollow / Hostile Hassled / Homesick / Humble Hateful / Honoured / Hurt Helpful / Hopeful / Hyper Helpless / Hopeless Hysterical High / Horrible G Generous / Gorgeous / Gullible Gentle / Grateful / Gutless Glad / Greedy / Gutted Glowing / Grieving Good / Guilty Calm / Concerned Curious / Confident Cut off / Carefree Conned / Cynical Cornered / Cowardly F Foolish / Frightened False / Frantic / Frigid Fantastic / Free Fatigued / Fresh Frustrated / Fawning Fretful / Full Fearful / Friendliness / Funny Flustered / Friendly Embarrassed / Exasperated Empty / Excited 10

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I Idiotic / Inattentive Insecure / Ignored Incompetent / Insincere Immobilised / Independent Inspired / Impatient Intimidated / Imposed upon Infatuated / Impressed / Inferior Involved / Impulsive Infuriated / Inadequate Inhibited / Isolated J Jaded / Joyous / Jumpy Jealous / Jubilant Jinxed / Judgemental K Keen / Kind L Likeable / Lovable Logical / Loving Lazy / Lonely / Low Left out / Loser, like a / Loyal Lethargic / Lousy / Lustful M Mad / Mixed up Manic / Merry Motivated / Manipulated Miserable / Mystified Maternal / Misunderstood N Nasty / Nervous / Nostalgic Needy / Numb Negative / Nice Q Quarrelsome / Quiet Queasy P Pain / Persecuted / Panicked / Petrified Preoccupied / Paranoid Pissed off / Pressured Passionate / Playful / Pushy Pathetic / Pleasant / Put out Peaceful / Possessive Puzzled / Peeved Powerless / Powerful R Rational / Relaxed Restrained / Ravenous Relived / Revengeful Reborn / Remorseful / Revolted Reckless / Repulsive / Romantic Refreshed / Reserved / Rueful Rejected / Restless S Sad / Settled Squashed / SafeShallow Sapped / Shame Stunned / Satisfied Shocked / Strained Stupid / Scared / Shy Sulky / Screwed up Silly / Self–confident Sluggish / Stumped Sure / Selfish / Sorry Surprised / Sensitive Spiritual / Suspicious T U Unctuous / Unsafe Upset / Undervalued Unsociable / Uptight Uneasy / Unwanted Used / Unprotected Uprooted / Useless V Vain / Vicious Vivacious / Valued Violent / Vulnerable W Wanted / Wilful Worthless / Warped Wishy–washy / Worthy Weak / Wonderful Wronged Wicked / Worried Z Zany / Zealous O Oblivious / Opposed Overwhelmed Obsessed / Optimistic Owed / Odd / Outraged Offended / Overlooked Taunted / Thrilled Touchy / Teased Trapped / Turned off Tempted / Tired Tense / Torn Threatened / Touched 11

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Feeling connected. Example › › What roles do you play in your life? How do these make you feel? (Use List of Emotions A–Z) Use the template provided below to record the emotions (negative / positive) you feel in different roles you have in your life (an example is provided). Recording how we feel helps us to keep a check on our emotions › Share with a partner, then the class Excited Wanted Role... Sulky Annoyed Sister Happy Role... Role... 12

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Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday What was happening? What were you feeling? Was it negative or positive? How did Feelings journal. you react? Was there a physical reaction? What will you do next time? 13

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Practical strategies skill two. Impulse control. We all have impulses to do things and say things – these are not always in our best interest, nor helpful to others. To be resilient doesn’t mean to stop these impulses, but it does require you to stop acting on every impulse that does not serve you well. These skills of impulse control can be learned. Classroom Tips › › › › Remind students of classroom group agreement / norms (creating a safe and supportive environment) Use the “stop, think” message when facilitating class discussions Model impulse control in your classroom and your staffroom Share examples of your own impulse control strategies / examples with your class 14 Wellbeing@School

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Essential resiliency skills. Activities. 1. Buzz idea: Order order! Key message. Being resilient doesn’t mean not acting on our impulses, but rather, controlling our impulses Impulse control. (5 mins) › › › Ask students to silently line up in order of month and date of birth (they will need to rely on non–verbal communication) Once in a line, ask everyone to share their birthdays in order Use the line to group students into groups of three (10 mins) Outcomes. Students will be able to understand that: › › Being resilient involves controlling impulses There are many kinds of impulses 2. Class discussion › › › What are impulses? In groups of three, write down as many things as you know to do with impulses Whole class discussion. Provide definition of impulse (ability to control our behaviour) Resources Required. › › Impulse Control Strategy Cards Impulse Scenario Cards 3. Controlling our impulses › › – – – (20 mins) Split class into new groups of three. Use the same Buzz Idea but vary the theme This time get students to line up in shoe size Hand out the scenario cards to each group Each group chooses two scenarios to fill out the questions on the worksheet. Have students allocate a scribe, reporter and time keeper (10mins) in their group You may like to allocate specific scenarios to each group to avoid doubling up › Students report back to whole class group their responses ReachOut.com links. Fact Sheet: It’s not uncommon to fight with your siblings – in fact it’s a fairly normal part of growing up. However, it can be good to know why you’re fighting and different things you can do that might ease the tension http://au.reachout.com/Fighting–with–a–brother–or–sister Fact Sheet: There could be a number of causes of family conflict, ranging from lack of communication to differences in values. There are things you can do to stop the situation getting worse as well as good ways to talk about it http://au.reachout.com/Family–conflict–with–parents 15

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