The Gift of Stitching №10 2006

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The Gift of Stitching №10 2006

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ONLINE MAGAZINE FOR CROSS STITCHERS Issue 10 November 2006 KOOLER DESIGN STUDIOS FRENCH CARTONNAGE AND CROSS STITCH WWW.THEGIFTOFSTITCHING.COM

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Contents - Issue 10 November 2006 Page 3 Designer Profile We introduce you to Janie Hubble from The Cat’s Whiskers Design Studio. She has designed us a lovely Fairy Wren box top. Page 7 Product Profile and Competition Beautiful hand crafted Jarrah boxes from Australia. These have been designed especially for a cross stitch to be inserted into the lid. Page 8 With My Grandmother’s Hands Kirsten Edwards discovers that the craft of rag rug making is still alive and well. Join us as we research this thrifty craft in Australasian history. This column also includes Part 2 of The Sime Scottish Sampler. Page 12 Schoolgirl Sampler Building Series This month we have a Victorian brown brick home, complete with a tree and blackbirds. Page 13 Mystery Series Part three of Li’l Christmas Angels by Pine Glen Designs. This one will brighten your tree. Page 15 All Things Counted We explore the craft of Cartonnage and how French stitchers combine it with cross stitch. Learn the craft with our cross stitch notions box. Full instructions provided. Page 20 Feature Pattern Night Before Christmas Scrapbook by Sandy Orton of Kooler Design Studios. Page 31 From Test-Tubes to Chart-Packs Jacinta Lodge discovers that starting a cross stitch business can be testing on your emotions. Page 32 Stitchalilcious Jacinta Lodge shares her first published design with us - Angel, Baby! A great project to teach cross stitch to someone younger. Page 33 Blackwork by Lynne Herzberg Lynne has graciously given us two designs this month. Joy Abounds and 123 Snowman. Page 35 Hugs from Six Strand Sweets and Dragonfly Stitches. A quick fun stitch with a lovely sentiment. Page 36 Stitch Diagrams www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 1

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Hello readers, One thing I hope this magazine will do, is encourage cross stitchers to try something new. I’ve been stitching for years, and it always pleasantly suprises me to find something new in the counted thread world. Today there is a great choice of fabrics to choose from. You can buy charts from all around the world and there is a rainbow of thread lines to cover all tastes. It doesn’t stop there. You can choose from thousands of buttons and charms to decorate your work and new finishing ideas are appearing all the time. I would like to learn all I can about counted thread work, I just wish I had more hours in the day. I think many of us feel the same way. But at the same time we also have our favourites - designers, threads, fabrics, shops. It’s so easy to keep doing your favourite things and leave trying something new to another day. I hope this month, I can entice you to try something new. We have an article about a French craft called Cartonnage. French stitchers enjoying combining this craft with their own cross stitch to create beautiful boxes. You may at first find the supplies and instructions a little daunting, but I really encourage you to give it a go. The end product is beautiful, not too hard to create and you’ll have a new set of skills to use in cross stitch. Did I mention it’s addictive? I already have more ideas for more boxes! On the topic of new things, our columnist Jacinta Lodge has created a pattern for us of a rather funky angel. You may want to use this pattern to teach a young person something new - cross stitch! Christmas is fast approaching. Our feature design is a Christmas Scrapbook designed by Sandy Orton from Kooler Design Studios. It’s a beautiful versatile design that could be stitched as a whole or you could take parts of it and adapt for smaller items. Also this month, I’m very proud to bring you Australian designer, Janie Hubble from The Cat’s Whiskers Design Studio. She has given us a design which showcases so many wonderful Australian products. Hand crafted Jarrah boxes, Stitches and Spice hand dyed fabrics and the well known Dinky Dye threads. As we prepare for a very warm Christmas in the south seas, we hope our fellow stitchers around the world enjoy all their preparations for the celebration season. Lots of love, Kirsten Edwards Editor www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 2

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that was probably the first piece of embroidery I ever did. Who taught you? My mother was a home economics teacher before she got married, and she was, and still is, a brilliant seamstress and embroiderer. She encouraged and helped me to sew and embroider throughout the three years I did sewing at school. In years 11 and 12, art took over as my favourite pastime and embroidery was forgotten. When did you start cross stitching? done into the shop the next day. The shop owner laughed at my stitching - I hadn't realised that all the 'x's should have all been going the same way. She took pity on me with my crestfallen face and showed me how to cross stitch 'properly'. From that moment on I bought books and charts and taught myself. I then discovered stitching classes on the net and found out about hardanger, drawn thread work and other speciality stitches. This of course continued to feed my addiction! Mind you - I didn't ever finish the 'E' and it still sits in my cupboard as my original UFO ... maybe I'll finish it for Emma's 24th birthday! When and why did you start designing? In sunny Perth, Australia, Janie Hubble from The Cat’s Whiskers Studio, designs beautiful items for hand fnishing. They are inspired by traditional styles and modern shapes and colours. It’s a pleasure to introduce you to a fellow Australian in this month’s Designer Profile. View all of Janie’s design at her website: When my daughter was three (she's now 22). I wandered into a needlework shop during my lunch hour one day. I was immediately taken by all the wonderful threads, fabrics and patterns. I fell in love with all the colours and decided then and there that I would buy a chart and 'do a cross-stitch'. Of course, I didn't buy something simple - I found a book of large alphabets and was determined to do an 'E' for my daughter's fourth birthday. Luckily the shop owner talked me into using 14 count Aida - I certainly wouldn't have been able to tackle linen at that stage. I spent that evening stitching away, and proudly took what I had I started designing about three years ago. Like most stitchers I had always changed other designers' patterns to suit me and began to think of designs that I would like to stitch. Being a graphic designer I could picture the designs I wanted and it wasn't too long before I bought a cross stitch design program and started to play around with ideas. I showed my ideas to a few stitching friends who encouraged me to start designing seriously. www.thecatswhiskers.net.au Where are you from and what's it like? I live with my family and my two cats in the hills on the outskirts of Perth, Western Australia. It's a bit like living in an country town, where everyone knows everyone else, but we are only half an hour drive away from the city. We have several boutique wineries on our doorstep, and we can be in the Jarrah Forest in a matter of minutes. We have a mediterranean climate, with mild winters and hot summers. We live on half an acre, with a veggie patch, chooks (hens for those of you who aren't Australian), fruit trees, and a garden which will one day be tamed. At the moment it’s allowed to ramble and flower and lead it's own life! It's the best of both worlds really close enough to be able to pop into the city when one needs to feel 'cosmopolitan', but far enough away to escape the 'rat race'. We moved here fourteen years ago and still love it. When did you start embroidering? At high school I took sewing classes for three years and one of my very first projects was to make a pillow case and embellish it in some way. My Mum found an iron-on embroidery stencil of a lady in an English garden. She showed me how to do satin stitch and lazy daisy stitch and chain stitch and I had a great time embroidering over the stencil. I think www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 3

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Designer Profile Continue.. What sort of pieces do you design? I love creating pieces that are useful, practical, and reasonably quick to stitch. I guess this is because I am basically a show-off. I love to show people what I've stitched - don't we all! Samplers are wonderful, but you can't cart a framed, two foot long sampler to your girlfriend’s stitching session and then nonchalantly lay it on the table for them to admire. Stitching accessories can be taken anywhere to be admired and drooled over. Three dimensional stitched boxes and containers have always fascinated me, and a stitcher can never, ever have enough accessories. So I'm doing my best to supply those who, like me, are into stitching smalls, with a never-ending choice. What types of fabrics and threads do you like to design for? I love stitching on linen, 28 count, 32 count and even higher - but 28 count and 32 count linens are my favourites to design with. And I love stitching with silks, especially Dinky Dyes and Gloriana. But if the design calls for a bit of sparkle, Kreinik always does the trick. And beads - I love beads! I have started to work a lot more with coloured linens, and am investigating how hand dyed linens work with overdyed threads. I recently met a textile artist here in Perth who is researching fabric dyes made from local Western Australian plants and fungi. Her knowledge is incredible and the results of her research are amazing. Perhaps one day I will work up a design using natural plant dyes. What influences and inspires your designs? Being a graphic designer by trade obviously has a bearing on how I design. I have always been inspired by the traditional European patterns and symbols, as well as repetitive and mandala type designs. I blend these influences together with a 'graphic design' representation of shapes, be it insect, plant or animal, and the result is 'my design style'. I often see something, or hear a quote, or there'll be a particular request from someone and I use these as launching pad for a new design. New thread colours are also a constant source of inspiration sometimes I see a new colour and immediately see a design for it. My daughter is planning her wedding at the moment, so I'm thinking that this might be the excuse I need to do a special design to mark the occasion. A lot of your designs are created for hand finishing. What influences this choice? Well, I suppose because I tend to design things that can be used rather than hung on a wall. It means that they have to be 'finished' rather than framed. And as I'm much, much better at hand finishing than I am at using the sewing machine, I tend to lean towards hand finishing. I try and make the finishing instructions quite detailed, with photos wherever possible. I know a lot of people feel hesitant when it comes to finishing their own pieces, so I hope that by showing them that it isn't as hard as it seems might encourage them to try it themselves. It feels good when you hand finish a piece successfully. What plans do you have for the future? I have so many new designs in my head, and so little time to stitch them. I am hoping that in the not too distant future, I can step away from the graphic design business my husband and I own and run full-time, and spend my days designing and stitching for The Cat's Whiskers. I am hoping that I'll be able to travel more, teach more, and encourage many more of the younger generation to stitch. What would you like stitchers to experience when they stitch your designs? I have a saying that is on all my design charts - 'needleart designs to make your heart sing'. That’s exactly what I want to happen when someone stitches one of my designs. I have always used stitching as a form of relaxation and meditation. Our days get more and more busy with just day-to-day living. I hope that I can encourage people to take some time to sit quietly and create a beautiful piece of stitching which makes their heart sing and gladens their soul. Images in this article include... From previous page: NEW design Grandma’s Cushion Accessories Left: Indian Dreams - Secret Message box top and sewing accessories. Insert shows the pocket open Above: Queen Anne’s Lace box top, pin cushion and scissor fob View more of Janie’s design at her website: www.thecatswhiskers.net.au Issue 10 November 2006 Page 4 www.thegiftofstitching.com

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Janie has designed this wonderful Fairy Wren box top. Stitched on hand dyed linen from Stitches and Spice using the popular Dinky Dye silk threads. Full instructions are below and you can see the Product Profile for more information about the hand crafted Jarrah boxes used to finish this design. Design Information Design size: 73 x 73 stitches Finished stitched area: 16/32 Count: 4 1/2” square (11.25 cm square) To complete this design as per model photo you will need the following: - 22 cm (8.7”) square piece of 32 count ‘Stitches and Spice’ hand-dyed Belfast Linen, ‘Jacaranda Haze’ - One piece of lightweight fusible interfacing. - A wooden treasure box with a centre insert size of approximately 5 1/4” (13 cm) square. - Quilters batting and glue to pad top of box insert. - Strong cotton thread (I used Perle cotton #8) to lace design onto box top. - Threads according to Symbol Key Stitches Used Cross Stitch 3/4 Stitch Scotch Stitch See page 36 for stitch diagrams Model stitched by Renee Isenhood Take one strand and starting from the 1R centre top of the pattern, stitch to the right hand top corner of the design, then continue down the right hand side of the design. Now take another strand and starting from the 1L centre top of GRAPH A, work scotch stitch to the left hand top corner of the design, then continue down the right hand side of the design. 3. Cut two pieces of quilters batting - one the same size as the box insert, and one slightly smaller. Lightly glue the larger piece of batting to the insert. Then centre and glue the smaller piece onto the larger piece to create a ‘mound’ shape. that the stitching remains centred, then glue the insert onto the box top with an appropriate glue, following manufacturer’s instructions. Thread and Fabric Kits Finding supplies made easy! Stitches and Spice are selling thread and fabric packs for this design. Kit contains 25 cm square of fabric of your choice (model stitched on Belfast 32ct) in Spice Blend Jacaranda Haze and 5 skeins of Dinky Dyes silk threads. Go to www.stitchesandspice.com.au and click on Gift of Stitching Fairy Wren Kits. On the same page there is the hand crafted Jarrah box used in this design. Stitches and Spice will ship worldwide. Instructions Notes before you start... All hand-dyed threads, even the ‘solid colours’ will have some variation in tone. It is suggested that you complete each cross stitch before moving onto the next one. It will be helpful to baste a centre line from top to bottom and from side to side of your fabric. The use of a hoop or frame is recommended to keep stitch tension even and to prevent over-handling of the fabric. 1. Using two strands of silk thread, follow the pattern to complete all the cross stitches in the design. You will find some three-quarter stitches have been used in the fairy wren part of the design. 2. In this design, the Dinky Dye over-dyed thread ‘Aussie Jewels’ is sequenced using scotch stitch in each of the inner corners of the design. Cut a length of ‘Aussie Jewels’ approximately 70 cm (or 28”) long with a nice mix of colour in it. Separate out four single strands. 4. Press your stitched piece. Cut out a piece of lightweight fusible interfacing to the same size as the outer edge of your stitching. Centre over the wrong side of your work and fuse, according to manufacturer’s instructions. This will ensure a nice, smooth finish to the stitching once laced. 5. Carefully centre it over the batting-covered box lid insert. You may need to trim your fabric at this stage to avoid too much overlap. Once you are happy with the position, lace your stitched piece onto the insert, ensuring www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 5

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Symbol Key Symbol  ³ $ @ 2 X š — Dinky Dyes Silks # 20 - Gum Leaves # 35 - Madi’s Rose # 58 - Kayla’s Rose # 64 - Nutwood DMC # 318 DMC # 794 DMC # 820 DMC # 310 # 97 - Aussie Jewels DMC Alternaive Thread Suggestions DMC Caron Wildflowers 503 604 777 300 318 794 820 310 #080 Blue Lagoon www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 6

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Product Profile Treasure Boxes from The Cat's Whiskers Design Studio Made from the Western Australian hardwood Jarrah (Eugalyptus marginata), these beautiful boxes are heirlooms in the making! Each box has a warm satin glow, and is lined with good quality felt. A separate wooden plate provides the means to attach your stitched piece to the box lid. Made by an experienced craftsman, especially for The Cat's Whiskers Design Studio in the Perth Hills, Western Australia. They come in three sizes: Size A: 4" square insert Size B: 5.25" square insert Size C: 6.5" square insert Recommended retail $80.00 plus postage - Australian dollars. These boxes are available to order on-line from Stitches and Spice at www.stitchesandspice.com.au and Colours Down Under at www.coloursdownunder.com.au COMPETITION This month we are giving away one of these beautiful boxes. Size B which is the correct size for the Fairy Wren Box Top design on page 5. Enter now for a chance to win one of these beautiful heirlooms. Enter at www.thegiftofstitching.com/compnov.php www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 7

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During the late 18th and 19th Centuries many left the shores of England, Scotland and Ireland to settle in the new colonies of Australia and New Zealand. Some were forced as convicts, others went looking for gold, many went looking for a new life and better opportunities. Life in these new lands was not easy. The settlers were constantly battling disease, unknown weather, lack of food and inadequate shelter. It took 12 months to travel by boat between England and New Zealand so supplies were scarce. Pioneering woman had to improvise and make do with what they had for their household items. One craft which was brought from England to the colonies was rag rug making. A simple past time that was both useful and decorative. All colonists needed was a blunt pointed instrument, a piece of sacking and strips of old fabric or wool. A hessian sack was cut open and a design was drawn with chalk on one side. The strips of fabric or wool were cut, and with a blunt pointed tool, the fabric was pushed through the hessian. The loops could be left or then trimmed to form a pile. New rugs were used by the hearth or near beds. Older ones were put by the door. To clean, they were beaten on the line. They were hard wearing and provided warmth. This craft was a way for pioneering women to express some creativity in their bleak circumstances. The economic depression of the 1930's was also known as the sugar bag years, due to the improvised use of sacking when other materials ran out. This generation made all sorts of things out of sugar bags including aprons, peg bags - it was also the perfect material for making rag rugs. Many surviving rugs are from this period. Crafts like rag rug making I thought, were no longer practised until I discovered Dulcie Evans from Invercargill, New Zealand. We met through an auction website. She sent me a photo of one of the rugs she had made. Curious, I had to know more. This led me to write this article in honour of all our grandmothers who for many generations were careful to live simply, with restraint and still be able to provide some warmth and decoration in the life of their households. I interviewed Dulcie and she kindly lent me some photos of the rugs she has made. At the end of the interview is the technique and tools that Dulcie uses to make her rugs. Interview with Dulcie Evans Rag Rug Artist Where do you live and what is it like? Invercargill, provincial Capital of Southland. This is right at the bottom of the South Island. Despite our reputation as a cold region, the weather is actually changeable. It can be cold at times and then we have fantastic hot sunny days. The people of Southland are called the friendly folk, always helping each other. The scenery around Invercargill is flat beautiful parks, and the area has the best land in N.Z. for farming. I have four children, all adults now. I have three grandchildren who are growing up fast and very good at their sports. How did you find out about rag rugs? My Mother-in-Law always made rugs, she learnt it from her own Mother. When she died I was lucky to inherit her 'tools'. I have five hooks, they are very hard to find now. How did you become interested in making rag rugs? I thought it would be a different craft to do. I decided to keep this wonderful old craft going. What is it about rag rug making do you enjoy so much? You get to make up your own designs. I like seeing the rugs come to life, especially getting the colours to match. I can do this craft while watching telly (television), even reading a book sometimes. The only thing to watch is 'not spearing your finger'. What materials do you use? Where do they come from? I use old jerseys, cardigans, coats, anything that doesn't fray too much. Everything is washed in very hot soapy water, just to make it mat. I then cut the material into fine strips, roughly half an inch wide. It all depends on the weight and texture of the material. If I haven't the correct colour I dye the jersey, it is surprising the different colours you can get. 1 2 3 www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 8

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What is the technique you use to make the rugs? I use a tool that is called a 'Proggy'. It is metal, with a point at the end and has a sprung thumb control. Since this tool is now so old, the only suitable spring is a cut down heavy weight safety pin. It has a wooden handle, moulded to fit the hand. I use a good quality hessian. After deciding the size, I hem and wash the hessian then draw a design, with a black felt pen. Then I’m all set to go. See the end of this interview for an illustrated explanation of the rug hooking technique. What sort of designs do you like? I usually do a floral design. I have also made a wall hanging with a picture of an English village. This I found very enjoyable. Anything that takes my fancy, just seeing something in a magazine, book or driving around the countryside. One rug was a design of Iris Folding, (I also make cards). This was so much fun. Getting the colours to match is great, finding the right one gives me a real buzz. What do you do with the rugs when they are completed? I sell them or give them away as gifts. I also do demonstrations, which I enjoy, as it brings back so many memories for people. They remember their own mothers and grandmothers making them. Mainly I use them myself. What uses do rag rugs have? The usual things, on the floor and sometimes for a wall hanging. What are the best materials to use when making rag rugs? Woollen materials are the most forgiving, nice to work with and if the rugs need to be clipped, it makes a nice matt finish. Bibliography Jennifer Isaacs, “The Gentle Arts - 200 years of Australian women’s domestic and decorative arts”, Ure Smith Press, 1992 Rosemary McLeod, “Thrift to Fantasy - Home Textile Crafts of the 1930s-1950s”, HarperCollinsPublishers, NZ, 2005 Technique and Photos Here is a photo of the tool Dulcie uses called a Proggy. Note the safety pin spring as mentioned in the interview. There are as many ways to make a rag rug as there are makers. Some knit the scraps together, others braid the scraps then sew the braids together. When a tool is used, some pull the threads through and knot, others create loops. Below is the technique Dulcie uses to creates loops which can be left or trimmed to make a pile. 1. The proggy is pushed down through the hessian, front to back. All the wonderful rugs on in this column are designed and made by Dulcie Evans. 1: Round mat 93 cm 2: Random Roses 1.7 m by 80 cm. She used an old woollen blanket to fill in the spaces. 3: A wall hanging with a New Zealand theme 4: A wall hanging - An English Village 5: New Zealand theme mat featuring scenery, Maroi motifs, and native flowers. 88 by 93 cm 6: Bowl of Flowers 94 by 62 cm 2. The proggy spring is opened and a piece of scrap is placed in the opening. The tool and scrap is then pulled back through to the front of the hessian. 3. A small hoop appears on the front of the hessian. The above steps are repeated until the desired area is filled. 6 5 4 www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 9

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The Sime Scottish Sampler - Part 1 Here is part two of The Sime Scottish Sampler. In many antique samplers, elements are sometimes stitched over one thread. In this sampler, I have included petite stitches for the rabbit, dog, bees and the verse. Materials Needed A piece of 28 count cream linen measuring 12.5” x 18” (32 x 46 cm). Olde Willow Stitchery Threads according to the key & ÿ " # $ ! % 207 211 220 223 226 227 229 Token of Love Teal Byberry Township Green Medallion Black Quaker Swan 18th Century Rose Society of Friends Gold Resignation Green Use three strands for satin stitch, two strands for cross stitch, and one strand for petite stitch and backstitch. Complete each stitch as you go, to show the best vareigation of the hand dyed threads. Backstitch the bees with Medallion Black (220). Backstitch the thistles around the verse with Resignation Green (229). Satin stitch the border around the verse and inside the thistles with Quaker Swan (223). Stitches Used Cross Stitch Petit Stitch Satin Stitch Backstitch See page 36 for stitch diagrams www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 10

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The Sime Scottish Sampler - Part 2 www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 9 October 2006 Page 11 Issue 10 November 2006 Page 15

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Schoolgirl Sampler Buildings Series This month’s building is from an 1840’s Victorian sampler. Blackbirds perch upon a large brown brick house and the neighbouring tree. Design size: 98 x 77 stitches Finished stitched area: 14/28 count: 7 x 5.5 inches (17.8 x 14 cm) Symbol Key ü ! é S k ¿ 205 216 219 230 232 235 Yorkshire Blue American Quaker Gold Quaker Meetinghouse Rust Providence Brown Virtue Teal Chestnut Complete cross stitches with two strands of Olde Willow Stitchery threads according to the key above. Backstitch the window panes with 1 strand of OWS 216 American Quaker Gold. www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 12

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Mystery Li’l Christmas Angels This is the third in a series of four Li’l Christmas Angels designed by Dodie Rauchwerk of Pine Glen Designs (www.pineglendesigns.com). This month it’s Li’l Bright with her Christmas lights. It is recommended that you use an evenweave or linen fabric to stitch this design as there are quarter stitches. Remember to add enough fabric for finishing. DMC 414 Apron and wings DMC 890 Holly leaves DMC 893 Mouth DMC 898 Eyelashes DMC 986 Lights cord DMC 3772 Face and hands DMC 3845 Dress and shoes DMC 5282 Halo Instructions Design size: 54 x 79 stitches Finished stitched area: 14/28 count: 3 3/4” x 4 3/8” (9.62 x 12.52 cm) 16/32 count: 3 3/8” x 4 3/8” (8.41 x 10.95 cm) 18/36 count: 3” x 3 3/8” (7.48 x 9.74 cm) Symbol Keys DMC Cross Stitch Symbol Key E5200 * Kreinik Pearl Blending Filament Other Stitches Instructions French Knots: DMC 321 Rhodes Hearts: Use these colours randomly for this specialty stitch. These lights can also be all stitched the same colour depending on the stitchers taste. DMC metallics: E703 E155 E321 E334 E316 Backstitch the following: www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue 10 November 2006 Page 13

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Mystery Li’l Christmas Angels - Bright Pattern www.thegiftofstitching.com Issue10 November 2006 Page 14

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