November 2013 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

 

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November 2013 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

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auto CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS C-STORES • INSTALLERS • RECYCLERS CARWASHES • SERVICE STATIONS DEALERS • GARAGES • BODY SHOPS & trucking NOVEMBER 2013 $4.95 WORLDS LARGEST TRUCK CONVORY GAINS POPULARITY IN NOVA SCOTIA (Story on page 48) SAFETY IN AUTO RACING (SEE PAGE 20) VOCHO THE LOVE BUG IN MEXICO (SEE PAGE 31) I FALL TO PIECES HEALTH & SAFETY IN THE AUTOMOTIVE WORKPLACE NAPA CFL GAME IN MONCTON (SEE PAGE 54) WIN PRIZES!!! A BRAND NEW TOMTOM START 45 GPS NAVIGATOR OR A NAPA 126 PIECE TOOL SET! CROSSWORD GUESS & WIN DETAILS ON PAGES 69 AND 70! OWNED AND PUBLISHED BY ALFERS ADVERTISING & PUBLISHING INC. Publications Mail Sales Agreement Number: 40062985

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auto scan & visit our online hub! Call us toll-free: 1-866-423-3939 Fax us: 1-902-423-3354 E-mail us: rob@autoatlantic.com Mail us: 51 Bethany Way Halifax, NS B3S 1H6 atlantic V O L U M E & trucking 6 • N O V E M B E R • 2 0 1 3 I FALL TO PIECES In which your humble editor attempts to make sense of workplace safety standards across the Atlantic region COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN – Too often, “customer service” isn’t. Gavin Brown talks about the importance of “under-promise and over-deliver” to be a hero to your customer. ALI LIFT INSPECTOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM EXPANDS INTO CANADA – and offers more choice than ever before for gettin’ your lift on! A MESSAGE FOR ALL JOBBERS IN ATLANTIC CANADA – Bob Greenwood poses a delicate question: How do shop owners balance skilled technician salaries with rising business costs? STRAP IN! SAFETY IN AUTO RACING – Think auto racing is all about air bags and seat belts? Think again! Tim Terry gives us the 411. ONE LITTLE HABIT OFFERS BIG BENEFITS, CUTS PUFFER RISK – Did you know that the collective cost of idling vehicles sucks $3 billion out of Canadian pockets every year? VOCHO THE LOVE BUG – You would think that two countries as distinct as Germany and Mexico would have little in common, but they do share a long and storied history over one item: The VW. AIRBAGS ARE LIKE BIG MARSHMALLOWS…and People Like Marshmallow! Gavin Brown returns to talk about the importance of keeping customers informed…and safe. INSTILLING A CULTURE OF SAFETY IN YOUTH – The Retail Gasoline Dealers Association works closely with service stations to enhance the safety skills of tomorrow’s workers. BUSINESS LESSONS I’VE LEARNED AS A SMALL BUSINESS CEO: Did you know that 25% of all business start- ups tank within their first year of business? AIA REORGANIZES TO BETTER SERVE ITS MEMBERS – For the Automotive Industries Association of Canada, it’s about moving forward, not moving on. TRUCK CONVOY RAISES OVER $24K FOR NS SPECIAL OLYMPICS – When over 100 truckers show up for this kind of event, people listen and dig deep into pockets. VEHICLE DISMANTLING SAFETY: A SERIOUS REALITY CHECK – Andrew MacDonald asks if you’ve checked both processes and products to optimize safety. WIN BIG! A TomTom GPS from National Energy Equipment, or a NAPA 126 piece tool set in our 2 BIG contests!! n o v e m b e r 2013 n autoandtruckingatlantic.com T W E L V E • I S S U E Page 6 ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 68 PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers @autoatlantic.com EDITOR Carter Hammett Carter@autoatlantic.com REGIONAL SALES MANAGER Susan Rose susan@autoatlantic.com PRINTING & MAILING Advocate Printing Ltd. advocateprinting.com Auto Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3S 1H6. Tel 902.423.6788 Fax 902.423.3354. Opinions expressed in Auto Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada. Page 12 Page 14 Page 16 Page 20 Page 26 Page 31 Page 34 Page 40 Page 44 Page 46 Page 48 Page 67 Member AIA Canada, AAIA, ATA and the AMA Publications Mail Agreement No. 40062985 Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6 Page 69 Page 70 3

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Letter from the Editor RAISING THE BAR ON SAFETY T’S TRUE: CANADIAN CAR SALES ARE ON THE RISE, BUT THE CANADIAN AUTO MANUFACTURING SECTOR APPEARS TO HAVE MISSED THE BOAT. Unlike Mexico and the US--other players in the NAFTA triad, our economy isn’t benefitting from increased sales. In August, analysts determined that Canada’s auto output would decline by up to five per cent while our NAFTA counterparts would benefit from modest gains. In July, only Ford reported slight increases in production while GM and Toyota both revealed decreases, and Honda was flat. Pundits suggested that because sales increases were attributed to large pickups—which aren’t produced in Canada— and the fact that GM is beginning to phase out one of its plants in Oshawa, ON. It appears that Canada’s piece of the pie for North American light vehicle has dropped to about 15%, down from 16.6% between 2000-2010. With cost advan- I By Carter Hammett tages over our turf, the US benefits from increased investment. Likewise, Mexico, with its cheaper costs, and storied history with VW is garnering increased investment from auto makers. Demands from the swelling Latin American market haven’t hurt either. It’s Mexico where writer Kenneth Seaton sets his sites on this issue, in a lively history about the demise of VW Beetle. Some of the history is indeed surprising: In 1933, a former artist named Hitler began to make noises about developing a “people car” inspired by nature that was cheap, fast and reliable. The “people car” would eventually manifest as the “VolksWagen” and car manufacturing was forever changed. Twenty years later and Germany began a long and mutually-rewarding relationship with Mexico after Mexico began the successful assemblage of Volkswagen Beetles. I saw the plant when I visited Puebla, Mexico earlier this year. And it’s true: You see Volkswagens everywhere, almost as ubiquitous as the old American relics tottering throughout Cuba. Sadly, all good relations come to an end, and Seaton does an admirable job WHY BUY NEW WHEN USED WILL DO! 1-800-565-2433 n Recycled replacement auto parts n Rebuilders available n Parts locating service 4 autoandtruckingatlantic.com n n o v e m b e r 2013 of capturing the history of this venerable bug. The story also provides a sense of car manufacturing and its intricate role in balancing output with public demand. Over 165,000 cars are produced daily world wide, and this is a staggering number. With that kind of output, it’s little wonder that workplace injuries occur. The transport sector reports the third highest accident rate in Canada, nothing to be terribly proud of, but it could be far worse. We have some strong—and strongly enforced—standards that are world class when it comes to workplace safety and that is something we should be proud of. Nonethless, back injuries, driving with improperly inflated tires, faulty lifts, greasy floors and a host of other issues all contribute to injuries that could be preventable. Particularly vulnerable are accidents occurring with youth, who may or may not have been trained properly, are more prone to cutting corners and taking risks, belief in “personal fables”—(‘it’ll never happen to me!”)—all contribute to this. Instilling a culture of safety in youth is the focus of a new program from the Retail Gasoline Dealers Association during the past year. In concert with service stations, a focus on prevention and implementing new legislation has provided the thrust for safety in the workplace for young workers. Program components were thorough, included the TestDrive program, a tour of the HRM municipal fleet, mentoring and exposure to three auBrookside Road, Truro, NS tomotive trades. Clearly, safety Phone: (902) 897-0252 is taken seriously in these here parts! Fax: (902) 897-2854 And, let’s not forget the importance of safety standvancehanesautoparts.com ards when it comes to auto DAILY SHIPPING ANYWHERE racing. It’s about way more than safety belts and airbags for that sector and Tim Terry does an awesome job of enlightening the reader in his usual column. So there you have it car fans! Another awesome issue awaits. As always, we welcome your feedback and suggestions. After all, this is your publication and our chequered flag awaits your signal.

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Workplace Safety I FALL TO PIECES: H IN THE AUTOMOT 6 autoandtruckingatlantic.com n n o v e m b e r 2013

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HEALTH & SAFETY TIVE WORKPLACE By Carter Hammett ESPITE HUGE PROGRESS I N E DUCA TION AND LEGISLATION DEVELOPMENT, ACCIDENTS IN THE WORKPLACE ARE STILL AN ALL-TOO FREQUENT OCCURRENCE FOR AUTOMOTIVE AND TRANSPORTATION WORKERS IN THE ATLANTIC REGION. HERE, WE OFFER A BROAD ROUND UP OF SOME WORKPLACE REALITIES AND HEALTH AND SAFETY TIPS. “Oh that’s sore,” a librarian recently said, rubbing her wrist. “Rough day in the reference section?” her friend asked with a slight smugness. Aside from the odd paper cut, what’s the worst accident that could happen in a library? Turns out librarians have one of the higher rates of repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) across the board. Seems years and years of pulling and placing books on-and-off of shelves can lead to bruised wrists, pulled tendons and other injuries most of us wouldn’t think twice about. But that can also be perceived as “accident lite,” especially when the focus shifts to other sectors like transportation. In 2011, over 3,500 young Nova Scotians were injured on the job. And despite continued decline in serious workplace injuries, 650 of those mishaps were considered serious enough to result in lost time from work. That’s enough to have a big impact on your business’ bottom line, as well as having impacts on customer service, lost productivity, colleague overtime, and possibly increased insurance costs as well. D Young workers—those under 25-- are the most likely to be injured on the job. Part of the reason is because of insufficient training, a lack of experience, misunderstand risks or procedures or simply lacking the confidence to say something when encountering potential dangers in the workplace. The automotive and trucking sectors aren’t immune from this either. The auto and motor vehicle manufacturing industry is diverse, and includes a range of different sub-sectors such as major auto assembly, independent parts manufacturing as well as specialty vehicle manufacturing (e.g. locomotives, buses and  agricultural implement equipment). Overall, transportation clocks in third for injuries by sector, with over 24,000 claims filed in 2005 alone. “Back injuries are probably the number one injury we see,” says Linda Corkum, executive director of the Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association. “They’re caused by improper lifting and not standing properly or over-extension. The association, which monitors accident claims, and also offers safety training, has about 1,100 companies under its umbrella, and works with a wide variety of trucks, including flat beds, cube vans and refrigeration (“reefers”) units. “The agency develops safety management systems for the workplace and also conducts safety audits, says” Corkum. The agency conducts an annual review of all its agencies to determine what’s working well and companies that meet safety certified criteria receive a rebate from WSIB for protecting workers from injuries. That service is especially useful when the impact of workplace injuries is considered on a national level. A 2010 Conference Board of Canada study stated “According to the Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada, 995,757 claims were made in 2006 alone.In 2005, over 330,000 time-loss injury claims were accepted, with teenagers accounting for 15,000 of these claims. Furthermore, the number of fatalities in Canada associated with work has increased over the years— from 758 in 1993 to 1,097 in 2005. In 2005, workers 65 years old-andover accounted for one-third of these fatalities. This may be because of several variables that include skill loss over time, lower educational levels, changing job requirements that involve higher literacy skills, physical limitations, or any combination of these.” Overall, the socio-economic costs to employers, workers, families, the community and other stakeholders in the wake of injury or death is impossible to calculate. THE COSTS OF WORKPLACE SAFETY Workplace safety is a serious and real corporate concern. There are obvious economic realities associated with safe workspaces and the monitoring and enforcement of workplace safety provides incentive for businesses to achieve a certain standard. Every province and territory has a Worker’s Compensation Board (WCB), including Nunavit, which combines its own office with the Northwest Territories office. Part of the cost of operating a business is a premium by their WCB. This fee varies depending on the safety of the industry being monitored as well as the organization’s own safety rating. Naturally, some industries are more likely to have a higher rate of injuries than others, including those involving heavy machinery, speed, and moving parts. During a two-year period between 2003-2005, more than 300,000 time loss injury claims were filed HEALTH AND SAFETY BY SECTOR Between 2003 and 2005, there were over 80,000 timeloss injury workers’ comn autoandtruckingatlantic.com n o v e m b e r 2013 7

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Workplace Safety pensation claims annually in Canada. Almost 24,000 were in occupations in transport and storage. Compare this with 284 claims stemming from the arts sector, no doubt resulting from all those library smackdowns. Of particular note is the mirrored rate of workplace fatalities, with transportation clocking in the thirdhighest. It goes without saying that these sectors are more likely to adhere to health and safety requirements. The onus is on employers to adhere to and enforce, OHS safety procedures. Usually these processes and procedures are extremely well developed. OHS includes issues like worksite inspection, protective equipment (hats and boots), handling and material storage, right to refuse unsafe work, stop-work orders, OHS committees, confined spaces, first aid and Workplace Hazardous Materials Information Systems (WHMIS). Interestingly, the Conference Board report throws some tantalizing light on the subject of OHS by discussing the fact that many of those issues are influenced by literacy levels. Indeed, numeracy and literacy levels, as well as computer skills can often dictate an employee’s success or failure on the job, and these skills can include reading and comprehending policies, which may or may not include the right to refuse unsafe work. Literacy can also have an impact the ability to meet regulatory obligations, such as handling regulated substances, prevention and training materials. of chemicals. Even the smallest of businesses should have some kind of a plan in place to prevent accidents in all their myriad of forms. While this space is not nearly enough to supply comprehensive guidelines, we can nonetheless offer some broad suggestions and tips to help auto mechanics and related workers increase their safety. Always check with your WCB or Occupation Health and Safety Association to ensure guidelines, standards and practices are the most current. Good companies not only provide reliable assessments but also the documentation and training to back it up. FASHION VICTIMS Several factors contribute to the mechanic’s safety and part of that includes knowing the proper gear that protects eyes, ears, hands and feet. Good safety goggles with side shields protect eyes from debris and caustic liquids. Boots with steel toes and skid-free soles protect toes from heavy objects. Wear fitted clothing; nothing too lose, to prevent getting caught in machinery. Precautions like tying hair back and removing jewelry are good common sense practices, as are ear plugs to lessen injury from loud noises like impact tools and compressors. LIFTING ME HIGHER Automotive workers need to have intimate knowledge of how each piece of equipment and machinery in the shop works. Ensure that regular maintenance and inspections are conducted so problems can be identified early and resolved. Even small power tools should be assessed regularly and replaced when they show signs of wear. The primary concern for auto mechanics is ensuring that the vehicle lift is in good working order and be aware that not all lifts were created the same. They have different controls, operating systems and features, and technicians need to familiarize themselves accordingly with the type of hoist being used. Common errors include overriding safety devices and the absence of nonfunctioning arm restraints. Perhaps the most frequently reported error is the wrong spotting of the vehicle on twopost above-ground hoists. Proper weight distribution is critical and adapters have to make stable contact with the vehicle’s lifting points. It goes without saying that hoists should be inspected daily by the shop workers and annually by a third party. CHILLS IN THE SPILL Mechanics work with a wide variety of chemicals and these require specific precautions during use, handling and storage. Always follow safety guidelines and have these easily accessible. Keep heavy containers on lower shelving units and ensure that flammable matter is kept away from any major source of ignition. OW, MY ACHING BACK! “Oh that should be easy to move by yourself,” said no good mechanic, ever. We tend to take our bodies for granted until that fateful day we bend slightly in the wrong direction, drop something heavy or use the wrong muscle group to move something apparently harmless. Safe lifting, means keeping a straight back while bending the knees and using leg muscles. It’s generally easier to push using your entire body to lighten stress on back muscles , rather than pulling, heavy loads. ON THE JOB Ensuring your customers, co-workers and other stakeholders safety is, of course, paramount, and includes everything from heavy lifting, to proper clothing to the use RESOURCES With a subject as extensive as this, one of the greatest challenges of this article was deciding what to exclude, so some concerns, such as working with tires, may be of interest to some readers. Furthermore, OHS is often considered a provincial responsibility so slight variations documented here may vary from province to province. Legislation and standards are constantly being reviewed, revised and updated as new and improved methods for enforcement and application come along. Always be sure to check with your local WCB or regulatory OHS body to ensure your policies, procedures and materials 8 autoandtruckingatlantic.com n are up-to-date. Even WHMIS provides some exemptions for employers in certain circumstances. Here are some resources to help you along the way: Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance: http://www.cvsa.org/home.php Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Alliance : http://www.nstsa.ca/news/ Truckers Association of Nova Scotia: http://www.tans.ca/ Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations: http://laws-lois.justice. gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-86-304/index. html Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety: http://www.ccohs.ca/ Workers Compensation Board of Nova Scotia: http://www.wcb.ns.ca/wcbns/ index_e.aspx?ArticleID=715 Canadian WCBs: http://www.wcb. ns.ca/wcbns/index_e.aspx?DetailID=770 Hazardous Materials Review Commission: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occup-travail/whmis-simdut/hmira-lcrmd/ index-eng.php n o v e m b e r 2013

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Workplace Safety Use two people or moving equipment to stay extra safe. “IF YOU FALL, I’LL BE HERE” SINCERELY, THE FLOOR Garage floors are major spill collectors, and this includes gasoline, oil and other, potentially harmful fluids. Therefore cleaning spills immediately is critical to avoiding exposure to chemical fumes, as well as slips. Reflective paint and strips increase safety as will replacing or resurfacing floors when appropriate. Last but not least, keep air hoses overhead if possible. In the trucking sector, Linda Corkum suggests that the weakest link in the trucking inspection industry is pre-trip inspection and here the major culprit is brakes, she says. “Drivers may not be aware that they’re supposed to be inspected; they may be in a rush. We do a lot of education around this in Spring,” she says. “Brake Safety Day identifies if it’s being done right.” Indeed, The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance, an international NGO with representatives from Canada, Mexico and the United States that promotes safety and leadership in monitoring unsafe transpor- tation processes and vehicle safety, sponsors an annual event called Roadcheck, a three-day blitz during which representatives complete thousands of safety inspections. As recently as September of this year, 73,023 truck and bus inspections occurred, the majority of which were Level 1—which assesses violations of Canadian safety regulations—and determined that almost 25% of recorded violations were out of service (OOS) violations. Interesting to note that 899 seatbelt violations were also issued. “Brakes routinely stand out in the mix of OOS violations issued during Roadcheck. This year, 49.6% of vehicle OOS violations were related to brake adjustment and other brake system violations. Additionally, performance based brake testers or PBBTs were used during Roadcheck 2013. Nine U.S. states and one Canadian province are equipped with PBBT systems for enforcement use. Of the 287 enforcement inspections conducted with a PBBT, 36 vehicles or 12.5% were found with overall braking efficiency below the minimum required by U.S. regulation and the North American Standard OOS Criteria,” stated this year’s press release. WHIMIS No article about safety in the workplace can exclude at least a brief discussion of The Workplace Hazardous Materials Informaton System (WHMIS). This national program is designed to provide accurate and current information on hazardous materials used on the job. WHMIS has far-reaching implications for workers, suppliers and employers. Composed of three parts, WHMIS includes: Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) which provides health and safety information about the product; labels on hazardous materials to notify people working directly or indirectly with them and worker education, which provides training on workplace procedures and working with hazardous materials. New updates became available earlier this summer in Nova Scotia. Materials meeting WHMIS criteria are called “controlled products” and include items like compressed gases, oxidizing materials, flammable products, and materials considered corrosive, poisonous and “dangerously reactive.” Under WHMIS guidelines, employers using controlled products are obligated to perform three functions, including ensur- 10 autoandtruckingatlantic.com n n o v e m b e r 2013

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ing that the MSDS label is easily accessible to employees working near or with the product. Employers must also ensure that supplier labels are applied to all controlled products, including those produced at the employer’s business. The label clearly identifies the product and how to safely handle it, as well as indicating the availability of a MSDS. Lastly, employers are obligated to provide training that includes knowledge transfer about labelling, contents, purpose and significance of data on the labels and any variables affecting procedures for proper handling, storage and other types of labelling. Workers’ application of WHMIS labelling is the cornerstone of its success on the job. Employees are obligated to work with the employer to develop, review and update professional development on controlled products and inform the employer if more data is required to ensure worker health and safety, as well as, most importantly, learning about the controlled products the employer works with. In Nova Scotia, WHMIS partners include employees, employers, Workers’ Advisers Program (WAP) Workers’ Compensation Board and other partners to ensure that WHMIS guidelines are regularly revised and updated. At the end of the day, it’s everyone’s responsibility to ensure the health and well being of a vital workplace. Your reputation and bottom line depend on it. It’s a sentiment Linda Corkum appears to agree with. “Workers are our biggest asset. By reducing accidents, everyone is working toward the same goal. It’s a win-win for everyone.” Reading this? You’ve just proved that ads work. We can help sell your product. Visit us online: www.autoatlantic.com

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From the Showroom Floor COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN By Gavin Brown N ANY KIND OF SERVICE INDUSTRY, COMMUNICATION IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT KEYS TO SUCCESS. FOR BOTH YOURSELF AND YOUR CUSTOMERS, IF YOU ARE UNCLEAR ON WHAT IS HAPPENING OR IF YOU ARE LEFT WITHOUT COMMUNICATION IT CAN BECOME EXTREMELY FRUSTRATING AND ONCE THE FRUSTRATION TAKES HOLD EVERYTHING TENDS TO GO DOWNHILL FROM THERE. I encountered an experience like this personally as a customer just last week. I I was desperately overdue for a haircut and hadn’t been able to make an appointment at my usual shop; rather than wait until after the weekend I decided to take a risk and stopped into a small hair salon in the local shopping mall. When I walked to the front counter one of the girls at the back came over and asked what I needed; after stating that I needed a quick haircut, she instructed me to sign my name on the sheet on the desk but it would be about a twenty to thirty minute wait. I was not in a big rush, I had walked in without an appointment and thought to myself half an hour was a reasonably acceptable wait time given the circumstances. I sat down in the lounge area and proceeded to read the news and send a couple of emails on my phone. I noticed half an hour had passed and looked around, all the girls were still busy cutting hair; I understand things can run a little longer than planned so I wasn’t too concerned at this point. Another fifteen minutes passed, no one had spoken to me since I had first come in, so I started to wonder what could be taking so long. Your typical customer gets irritated at this point and while I can’t say I wasn’t, I decided to use it as a learning opportunity. I started watching the girls work away at the clients they had in their chairs, waiting to see if someone would make eye contact or acknowledge me. Fifteen minutes passed again, no one spoke to me, looked in my direction, or even acknowledged I was there. This is where your typical customer gets irate and starts yelling and demanding something to be done; there was no visible progress of anything being anywhere closer to being done than when I started waiting an hour previously, my experiment was over and I had no interest in staying, I simply got up and put my jacket on and walked out, no one chased me or called to me to try to save the business; (though they could have offered me 12 autoandtruckingatlantic.com n n o v e m b e r 2013

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a half price service at that point and I still wouldn’t want to give them the chance to salvage the opportunity). In the above scenario there were many opportunities for them to keep the business, either at the start or even throughout the wait. While this example was a hair salon, this type of event can happen at almost any type of business, your showroom and service departments included. I will leave that challenge to you as a reader to think of all the ways the business could have been saved by that salon. The best advice I have ever received, (it’s actually been said to me by a few different people), is: “Under promise and over deliver”. If you promise something to someone and raise their expectations and aren’t able to fulfill that promise there is no way you can ever redeem yourself in the eyes of the customer; on the other hand, if you prepare people for the worst and then deliver above and beyond what you have promised, you cannot help but appear as a hero. Clear communication needs to happen if there is anything that does not go according to the plan for you customer. If there was a mistake made, if there is a delay, or if something is not available, the best way to communicate it to the client is as soon as possible present the issue with a possible solution. It is bad for a customer to be left waiting in the dark without updates on progress if something is running behind but it is far worse for them to find out that there was a major issue and that you kept it from them intentionally. In all realms of business mistakes can happen, problems can arise; being up forthcoming with information and keeping the lines of communication open with your customers will increase their trust in you. A problem is not a problem, it is just another opportunity to be a hero for your client. n o v e m b e r 2013 n autoandtruckingatlantic.com 13

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All about lifts ALI LIFT INSPECTOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM EXPANDS INTO CANADA C ANADIAN CANDIDATES ENROLLED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE LIFT INSTITUTE (ALI) LIFT INSPECTOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM NOW HAVE MORE OPTIONS FOR TAKING THE TWO REQUIRED PROGRAM EXAMS. ALI had previously offered only paper and pencil versions of its Pre-Course Exam and Course Exam on specific dates in Canada. The organization will now offer computer-based versions of the exams on-demand at testing centers across Canada. “The digital format makes it much easier for participants to take the exams,” said R.W. “Bob” O’Gorman, ALI president. “Canadian inspectors previously had to wait for a paper and pencil test to be scheduled or they would have to travel to a U.S. border state to visit a testing center. With computer-based testing, Lift Inspector Certification Program participants can take the exams when their schedules allow at locations that are convenient for them.” In order to complete the Lift Inspector Certification Program, CANADIAN PARTICIPANTS IN THE AUTOMOTIVE LIFT INSTITUTE’S (ALI) LIFT INSPECTOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM CAN NOW TAKE THE REQUIRED PRE-COURSE EXAM AND COURSE EXAM AT 28 CONVENIENTLY LOCATED COMPUTER-BASED TESTING CENTERS ACROSS CANADA. 14 autoandtruckingatlantic.com n n o v e m b e r 2013

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each inspector must pass the Pre-Course Exam followed by the Course Exam. Exam fees are not included in the program initiation fee, which is discounted to $1,000 (U.S.) through Dec. 31, 2013. The new computer-based tests cover the same material as the paper and pencil tests. ALI partners with Applied Measurement Professionals (AMP) to administer the computer-based tests in Canada. Candidates must submit a Lift Inspector Candidate Examination Application and payment to register for an exam. To find an AMP-affiliated testing location and register, participants can visit www.goamp. com and click the “Schedule/Apply For An Exam” box. In the first and second drop-down menus, select “Other” and then “Automotive Lift Institute, Inc.” Applicants choose which test they need to take, either the Pre-Course Examination or the Course Examination, in the third drop-down. After the initial information is entered, AMP’s portal will show a “Locate Testing Center” link that takes participants to a country selection page. Canadian testing centers are located in: Alberta - Calgary, Edmonton British Columbia - Castlegar, Kelowna, Nelson, Prince George, Trail, Vancouver, Victoria Manitoba - Winnipeg New Brunswick - Fredericton Newfoundland and Labrador St. John’s Nova Scotia - Halifax Ontario - Burlington, Courtice, Hamilton, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Pickering, Scarborough, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Vaughan, Windsor Quebec - Montreal Saskatchewan - Regina, Saskatoon The ALI Lift Inspector Certification Program was created to provide third-party qualification of vehicle lift inspectors and to certify those who demonstrate that they are capable of properly inspecting vehicle lifts in accordance with provincial requirements in Canada and the ANSI standard governing vehicle lift inspection. Detailed materials can be found at www. autolift.org/certified-inspectors. To learn more about ALI, visit autolift. org or call (607) 756-7775. You can also connect with ALI on Facebook at facebook.com/LiftInstitute, on Twitter at twitter.com/LiftInstitute, and on YouTube at youtube.com/LiftInstitute. About ALI - Founded in 1945, the Automotive Lift Institute (ALI) is a trade association of North American-based lift manufacturers. ALI’s mission is to pro- mote the safe design, construction, installation, service, inspection and use of automotive lifts. In 1947, ALI developed the first Commercial Standard covering vehicle lifts published by the National Bureau of Standards. Today, ALI sponsors several U.S. lift safety standards and offers thirdparty certification programs for automotive lifts and automotive lift inspectors. n o v e m b e r 2013 n autoandtruckingatlantic.com 15

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