2013 October Columbian

 

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2013 October Columbian

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OFFICAL PUBLICATION OF THE MICHIGAN STATE COUNCIL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS COLUMBIAN MICHIGAN All. ne. In Service to In Service to O Volume 65 No. 2 October 2013 From The State Deputy Michael J. Malinowski As I write this article for the Michigan Columbian we are preparing for the fall season. Finishing the first quarter and moving into the second quarter of this fraternal year. Fall to me is a time of change. It gives us a gradual change from the hot days of summer to the cold days of winter. Kind of a buffer. October gives us a chance to review how we did last quarter and make changes to improve this next quarter. How did we do in the year of faith? Did we do anything? Did we say that’s not for me that is for the other guy? There is still time to do something for the year of faith; it does not end until November 24th. Think about it. Think if my council brought in one new member per month last quarter? Or that’s not for you, but for the other guy, the guys that go to the meetings. Was there a first degree in my district every month last quarter? Or that’s not your problem; let the District Deputy worry about that. How did you do as a Knight of Columbus? November is a month that we as knights to try to remember those brother knights that went to their final reward during the past year. In the last couple of months the state council has lost some long time and active members that will truly be missed. Every council bulletin that I receive, I notice there is always a section to remember the sick and to remember those who have died. They mention how these members who died were long time members and how active they were. This year at the beginning of the fraternal year, I asked the council leadership not to recruit new members for just numbers, but to recruit to replace those men who joined us at our meetings and in our activities and are no longer with us. December is the month of Advent. A time for us to prepare for the birth of the Christ Child. Or is it a month that we worry about Christmas decorations, and the buying of gifts, and oh yea I almost forgot, this is the year we have Christmas at our house, so we have to prepare the dinner for everyone. During the last couple of months I have been thinking about how we the older members have not done a good job of asking the next generation to join us. Those men who are our sons. I was talking to a Grand Knight a couple of days ago and he said to me he was giving the gift of the Knights of Columbus to his son and nephews for Christmas. What a great idea, to offer to pay for one of your relativities to join the Knights of Columbus. Because when they join and become active they will be better husbands, better fathers, and better Catholics. What better gift to give than to sponsor someone into the Order. State Membership Article William LeVeque My Brother Knights The Supreme convention’s theme, “Be Protectors of God’s Gifts,” is drawn from Pope Francis’ inaugural homily delivered in March. In a letter to the Knights; Pope Francis reminded the Knights of the importance and responsibility of the lay faithful in the Church, and encouraged every Knight and council to continue “to bear witness to the authentic nature of marriage and the family, the sanctity and inviolable dignity of human life, and the beauty and truth of human sexuality.” Included in those gifts are, in our country, religious freedoms. The ability to practice our faith. The ability to belong to any organization that we feel is for us. We don’t have the freedom to ignore the needs of people who need our charity. We need to provide the basics of human need, we need to accept then as they are, we are all God’s children. We may not agree with some choices they have made in their life, but we need to show Gods compassion. The Knights of Columbus gives men that opportunity. We need to now more than ever offer the means for men to live their faith, and being a part of Knights is one way. I am asking you, to recruit one member to help lead our faith in charitable works. We are going to be sending some exciting contest for the rest of the year so please pay attention to your emails and the State website (mikofc.org). The horse race will be updated soon and take a moment to see where your council is. The Major Degree continued on page 5

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2 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN Pope to canonize Blessed John XXIII, John Paul II April 27 By Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Recognizing that Blessed John XXIII and John Paul II have widespread reputations for holiness and that years of studying their lives and actions have proven their exceptional virtue, Pope Francis announced he would declare his two predecessors saints at a single ceremony April 27. The pope made the announcement Sept. 30 at the end of an "ordinary public consistory," a gathering of cardinals and promoters of the sainthood causes of the two late popes. The consistory Blesseds John XXIII and John Paul II will be canonized took place in the context of a prayer together next April 27, Divine Mercy Sunday. (CNS photos) service in Latin and included the reading of brief biographies of the two sainthood candidates. Cardinal Angelo Amato, prefect of the Congregation for Saints' Causes, read the biographies and highlighted the "service to peace" and the impact both popes had "inside and outside the Christian community" at times of great cultural, political and religious transformation. The testimonies of their lives, "completely dedicated to proclaiming the Gospel, shine in the church and reverberate in the history of the world as examples of hope and light," the cardinal said. Blessed John Paul, known as a globetrotter who made 104 trips outside Italy, served as pope from 1978 to 2005 and was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI on Divine Mercy Sunday, May 1, 2011. Blessed John XXIII, known particularly for convoking the Second Vatican Council, was pope from 1958 to 1963; Blessed John Paul beatified him in 2000. Asked by reporters if retired Pope Benedict would participate in the canonization ceremony, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, told reporters it was possible, but given the retired pope's preference for staying out of the public eye, he could not say for sure. The choice of April 27, which will be Divine Mercy Sunday in 2014, was not a complete surprise. Speaking to reporters traveling with him from Brazil to Rome July 28, Pope Francis said he had been considering Dec. 8, but the possibility of icy roads could make it difficult for Polish pilgrims who would travel by bus to Rome for the ceremony. The other option, he said, was Divine Mercy Sunday, a celebration instituted worldwide by Pope John Paul. Since the beginning of his pontificate in March, Pope Francis has emphasized God's mercy and readiness to forgive those who recognize their need for pardon. He told reporters on the flight from Brazil that Pope John Paul's promotion of Divine Mercy Sunday showed his intuition that a new "age of mercy" was needed in the church and the world. Asked on the plane to describe the two late popes, Pope Francis said Blessed John was "a bit of the 'country priest,' a priest who loves each of the faithful and knows how to care for them; he did this as a bishop and as a nuncio." He was holy, patient, had a good sense of humor and, especially by calling the Second Vatican Council, was a man of courage, Pope Francis said. "He was a man who let himself be guided by the Lord." As for Blessed John Paul, Pope Francis told the reporters on the plane, "I think of him as 'the great missionary of the church," because he was "a man who proclaimed the Gospel everywhere." Pope Francis signed a decree recognizing the miracle needed for Blessed John Paul's canonization July 5; the same day, the Vatican announced that the pope had agreed with members of the Congregation for Saints' Causes that the canonization of Blessed John should go forward even without a second miracle attributed to his intercession. Except in the case of martyrdom, Vatican rules require one miracle for a candidate's beatification and a second for his or her canonization as confirmations that the candidate really is in heaven with God. However, the pope may set aside the rule. Michigan State Council Knights of Columbus Publisher State Officers Michael J. Malinowski State Deputy Rev. Scott A. Thibodeau State Chaplain Robert W. Fox State Secretary Kenneth B. Unterbrink State Treasurer Antonio G. Vittorini State Advocate State Warden Thomas A. Marcetti, Sr. Immediate Past State Deputy Thomas M. Wegener, PSD Supreme Director Michigan State Council Office 2184 Beech Daly Dearborn Hgts., MI 48127 Office Phone 313-274-3223 Fax 313-274-0704 Email: mikofc@sbcglobal.net Lawrence T. Grabowski Executive Secretary Editorial Gary M. Kolbicz, Editor g.kolbicz@mikofc.org Michigan Columbian Publication Schedule Copy Deadline Month March 1st……………April 2013 June 1st………………July 2013 September 1st……….October 2013 December 1st………..January 2013 Please Send All Copy Material To: Gary M. Kolbicz 39373 Durand Drive Sterling Heights, MI. 48310 Phone: 586-939-3886 Home Fax: 586-939-3886 Email – g.kolbicz@mikofc.org Moving? Notify your local council. Send your new address and mailing labet to: Knights of Columbus Membership Records PO Box 1670 New Haven, CT 06507-0901

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 3 It is up to each of us to keep the order strong. Thomas M. Wegener, PSD Supreme Director My Dear Brother Knights and Ladies, In October we begin our 4th month of the fiscal year and begin the last quarter of the calendar year. Our schools are busy, our activities seem to never end, and in a few short weeks we will brave the forest for deer, celebrate with family and friends at Thanksgiving, prepare our hearts and homes for Christmas and steel ourselves for another New Year. All that and some Knights of Columbus business too. The 131st Annual Supreme Convention was held the first week of August in San Antonio, TX and we celebrated the Order’s record-setting year in which Knights donated more than $167.5 million to charity, volunteered more than 70 million hours of their time, and raised the insurance program to new heights. So many wonderful projects that we do, so many gifts we give, all in the name of our First Principle of Charity. Michigan was once again one of the top states for charity dollars, charity hours, vocations gifts, etc. We can be very proud of the Knights of Michigan and their families for the work and sacrifice that we exhibit each and every day. We are an important jurisdiction in the order, a big state with a big heart. However (of course there is a however) while the Order’s membership numbers are up, Michigan’s is not. As our State Deputy illustrated during the Diocesan Meetings in July, Michigan is going through a 4 year period of declining membership. Not just slow membership growth, but actual reduction in total members from year to year for the past 4 years. My brother Knights and Ladies – ever wonder why the same old faces show up event after event? Why you seem to be working more and more? It’s probably because your council isn’t growing. Isn’t it time for you to contact your Council Grand Knight or Membership Director and ask if there is something that you can do to help grow your council? There are several membership drives scheduled for this year, perhaps you can ask to help during one. While helping on a charity project you can wear your K of C hat, shirt, or jacket promoting the Order during your good works. You can ask a friend or neighbor to join you during your charitable work, give him some exposure to the Knights. When there are corporate communions at a Mass that you don’t ordinarily attend, perhaps you can join your Brother Knights at that Mass. And of course there is that most direct way and ask a friend, family member or co-worker if they have thought about joining the Knights of Columbus, or ask if there are any questions you may answer for them. We all can’t wait for our sons or grandsons to turn 18 and ask (or otherwise entice) them to join. My family has three generations of Knights now, but it’s going to be 16 to 18 years before the next generation is ready. The same for many families I am sure. As it has been said before - that Catholic man is just waiting to be asked. That may be outside of our comfort zone, but really, it doesn’t hurt to ask. He could say no, but really why would he? If he says he is too busy, then try the 24 Hour Knight program on him. If he doesn’t want to attend meetings or be an officer, let him know that his talents as a Knight are needed now and in time he may feel drawn to taking a part in meetings or donating time as a director or officer. If he feels he isn’t a ‘good enough Catholic’ let him know that by being a Knight he will become a better Catholic, a better man and a better father, just as we all have become. It is up to each of us to keep the order strong in membership. It has always been up to us. One or two cannot do it. One or two should not do it. We are the friends, the relatives, the acquaintances, and we are the proposers. We are who these prospective members have as their first contact in the membership recruitment process, and we are the ones that will see him through the first degree and beyond. Let us be those friends, relatives, acquaintances, those proposers that help our council’s membership by offering the gift of membership. It is up to us, it is up to you. The historical events of the last few weeks and those that are coming in the next few weeks remind me of the topic of my article in last quarter’s Michigan Columbian. Much was made of the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech and much will be made of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy this November 22nd. Both men became great leaders, followed by millions, initiating movements and programs that are affecting our lives to this day. Dr. King was 34 years of age when he stood before 250,000 people on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to deliver that speech. President Kennedy was 43 when he took the oath of office as President of the United States and 46 on that terrible day in Dallas 1963. These two young men were world and national leaders. They were given the chance to prove themselves at an early age by leaders in their fields. They showed those benefactors and the world that youth is not, in and of itself, an obstacle in leadership. My Brother Knights, I am sure that in every council there is a young Knight ready and willing to take on greater challenges. Perhaps the examples of Dr. King and President Kennedy will allow today’s Council leaders to give our young Knights a chance to prove themselves. Imagine the legacies that both generations will leave when both are given the chance to flourish! On behalf of Joyce and me we wish you and your family the very best Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and that peace is your gift at Christmas and your blessing all year through!

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4 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN From The State Advocate Antonio G. Vittorini As State Advocate, I am the chief legal officer for the Michigan State Council and I represent the State Council in all legal matters and opinions in regards to the By-Laws, Rules and Regulations of the State Council. It is imperative that we uphold the Charter Constitution Laws of the Knights of Columbus and that each officer is responsible for understanding and following these documents. You have probably heard the saying that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Please make sure all council issues are addressed and escalated appropriately. All issues should be addressed first within your local council and with your Council Advocate, and then escaladed appropriately through the council Grand Knight, then District Deputy, if the issue still cannot be resolved on the council level then call me. Worthy Grand Knights, it is very important that your council follows the Charter Constitution Laws of the Knights of Columbus as well as following the proper escalation of council matters so they can be addressed appropriately. Under no circumstances should a council member call Supreme and discuss council issues. Worthy Council Advocates, it is your responsibility to ensure that your council is following the Charter Constitutional Laws. Please do read them often and become very familiar with the laws of our order. It is also your responsibility to resolve all issues at the council level. Worthy District Deputies, you are the appointed leaders of the Knights of Columbus and the leader of your district. Please help your councils and give them the proper guidance that they need, so that they will follow the Charter Constitutional Laws of our order. For additional assistance, you can also go to the Supreme Website - kofc.org – Right Corner click on Officers - Log in – Officers Desk Reference, Office of the Supreme Advocate – Then go to the tab you need. Let’s have a Great Fraternal Year. God Bless Everyone Knights Fill Mary’s House for Year of Faith Pilgrimage 9/9/2013 Celebration Marks 50th Anniversary of Knights Tower Carillon On Sunday, Sept. 8, several thousand Knights of Columbus and their families traveled to the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. Filling the Great Upper Church of the nation’s preeminent Marian shrine, they gathered for the a Year of Faith Pilgrimage, as music from the 56-bell carillon of the Knights Tower called them to prayer. The pilgrims joined Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson and Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, together with other K of C leaders and guests, at “America’s Catholic Church” to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Knights Tower Carillon and to reconsecrate the Order to the Blessed Virgin Mary. An honor guard of approximately 500 Fourth Degree Knights led the opening procession for the Solemn Mass, which was celebrated by Archbishop Lori and concelebrated by Archbishop Gérald Cyprien Lacroix of Quebec, Primate of Canada, among others. Immediately following Mass, a prayer program commenced that included exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, a Marian meditation led by Archbishop Lacroix, the recitation of the rosary, remarks by the Supreme Knight, and an act of reconsecration to the Blessed Virgin Mary led by the Supreme Chaplain and Supreme Knight. Sept. 8 traditionally marks the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, nine months after the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception. Archbishop Lori began his homily, noting the relevance of Jesus’ words in the Gospel reading, which seemed “tailor made for this occasion”: “Which of you wishing to construct a tower does not first sit down and calculate the cost to see if there is enough for its completion?” (Lk 14:28) The 329-foot Knights Tower, funded by a $1 million grant from the Order and completed in 1957, together with its 56-bell carillon that was dedicated on Sept. 8, 1963, has a symbolic purpose, the supreme chaplain said. “I would submit that the Knights Tower should be seen as a tower of faith, that rises in our midst as sign and symbol of the Church’s faith.” The 329-foot Knights Tower, funded by a $1 million grant from the Order and completed in 1957, together with its 56-bell carillon that was dedicated on Sept. 8, 1963, has a symbolic purpose, the supreme chaplain said. “I would submit that the Knights Tower should be seen as a tower of faith, that rises in our midst as sign and symbol of the Church’s faith.” After Mass, Archbishop Lacroix led the congregation in prayer and meditation before the Blessed Sacrament. The recitation of the Glorious Mysteries of the Rosary followed, with the decades being led by State Deputies from throughout the East Coast who traveled to the Basilica with delegations from their State Councils. Supreme Knight Anderson echoed the supreme chaplain’s sentiments in his remarks: “Just as the carillon of the Knights Tower sends beautiful music into our nation’s capital and reminds all who hear it of this place of God, our lives as Catholics and as Knights of Columbus must also reach out to enrich others and remind them of Our Lord’s presence among us.” continued on page 19

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 5 K of C LADIES “CORNER” Hello Ladies – As October creeps upon us and the candy is plentiful, thoughts wander to Christmas! Now is the time for action! Please ask the ladies and men of your council to prepare gifts for the Holy Cross Children Services clients and residents. Most ladies love to shop and what better way to cure us? We shop for dollar store bath items to slip them into the baskets that the girls and ladies love to use. Others crochet and knit hats, scarves and blankets for the babies and young mothers who have chosen life. Still others crochet lap robes for the elderly. The senior living center at the Samaritan Center houses some of the forgotten residents. They have been forgotten by their family and society. When we visited last year, the ladies and gentlemen of the Greatest Generation were giddy with delight as Santa gifted them with presents furnished by you. We sang carols, held hands and were uplifted by their grateful spirits: grateful for a safe residence, warmth, a sweet treat and camaraderie. We are privileged to be your representative. We see the joy and gratitude of the faces as the residents and clients receive the only gift some will receive. We share a meal with them. We sing with them. It is our pleasure to do all this on your behalf. The Knights of Michigan and their wives are by far the most generous people. Thank you for the donations on behalf of Holy Cross Children Services! Love and Gratitude, Maureen, Sandy, Ellie, Sue and Mary Beth State Membership Article William LeVeque schedule is being updated all the time so check website for any updates. Check front page of the website something new will be up each week. Thanks God Bless Prayer for Vocations Heavenly Father, call many holy young people to consecrated life for the sake of your kingdom. Call an abundance of virtuous men to serve in ordained ministry, as laborers for your harvest. Call numerous others to faithful, chaste and fruitful love in the sacraments of marriage, as signs and witnesses of Christ’s love for his Church. Through baptism you have called your children, in whatever state of life, to love and serve you. Fill us with your Holy Spirit and grant us each the grace to follow you in perfect obedience and charity. With Mary and Joseph as our models and intercessors, we ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen Meet the New Chaplains Program Director As the new head of the chaplains program, Father Jonathan Kalisch, O.P., said he will be building on the groundbreaking work of Father John Grace, O.S.A., who has retired from his position as the first full -time director. With the title of Director of Chaplains and Spiritual Development, Father Kalisch began his work September 23rd at the Supreme Council headquarters in New Haven, where he will live at the Dominican Priory at St. Mary’s Church, on the grounds where Father Michael McGivney founded the Order in 1882. Father Kalisch, 41 years old, grew up in New Jersey and joined the Knights of Columbus in 1991 as a freshman at Georgetown University. He served as the college council’s church director, deputy grand knight, and for two years as grand knight. Working closely with the council’s two chaplains, he saw for the first time the full life of a priest, and the seed of a vocation was planted. After graduation, he worked for an international accounting firm for one year in Warsaw, Poland, before going on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, where he heard a strong call to discern a priestly vocation. He entered the Dominican order in 1996, was ordained in 2003 and received a licentiate in sacred theology the following year from the Dominican House of Studies. Over the years, he served as chaplain of the two councils he helped to found on campuses where he served in campus ministry: Quinnipiac University and Dartmouth College, and he also helped to start the council George Washington University when he was seminarian in Washington, D.C. Next Copy Deadline December 1, 2013

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 6 Take 5 I am pleased to report another successful year for our Knights of Columbus “ Take 5 Charity” Program, while we didn’t reach our goal of $100,000, we did collect a respectfully $97,242. We were able to reach this amount with only 75% of the councils participating. This means about 96 did not report one donation to our “Take 5” Charity Program. Even more disturbing is that 46 of these 96 councils contributed last year but not this year. Had they contributed in the same amount as last year, we would have an additional $9,185 bringing the total to $106,428. Another concern is that 41 of these 96 councils have not participated in at least the last 2 years. WHY? Were their members not given the opportunity to donate. While it’s probably unrealistic to expect every member to participate, but certainly every council should be included on the enclosed list of councils participating. As a State Council program, Financial Secretaries must include the information sheet showing our recipients of those funds along with your new year dues billing, thus allowing each individual member the opportunity to contribute to this most worthy cause. I would be remiss however, if I didn’t congratulate those councils and dioceses that did an outstanding job. In the Detroit Archdiocese, Holy Innocents – St. Barnabas Council #14213 collected $9.55 per member closely followed by Our Lady of Victory Council 14427 at $9.45 per member and then Fr. John Howard Council #8500 at $7.46 per member and St. Perpetua Council 13600 at $5.05 per member. In the Grand Rapids Diocese Father Rudy & Clem Council #13035 collected $5.49 per member. Four diocese had an increase over last year, The Archdiocese of Detroit with a gain of $4,600, Kalamazoo Diocese with a $1,450 gain, Lansing Diocese with a $796 gain and the Saginaw Diocese with a $870 gain. Finally, we certainly don’t minimize this total of $97,242 because with it your State Council has been able to assist many worthy causes on your behalf. On the other hand, however, they have had to turn down numerous other worthy appeals. This amount, while sizable, is small compared to our total potential. So again our sincere thanks and congratulation to those members and councils who donated this past fraternal year. We would ask both members and Councils who didn’t participate or give, to seriously consider doing so to this MOST WORTHY Charity Program during the present fraternal year. Thus helping all to fulfill the cardinal principle of our order “Charity”. Listed below is each diocese total collected and the councils that contributed. If you made a donation and don’t find your council listed below, please contact your Grand Knight or Financial Secretary and ask him why not. Archdiocese of Detroit $40,625.22 521-600-744-856-1266-1802-1987-2251-2463-2660-2690-27332739-2819-2950-3021-3042-3078-3129-3160-3191-3292-33123577-3615-3725-3774-3830-3848-3860-3956-3959-4064-41884401-4513-4872-5436-5452-5460-5492-5981-6824-6865-70117018-7200-7227-7239-7340-7413-7444-7561-7586-7780-79188274-8284-8441-8500-8659-8698-8710-8902-9346-9526-956810501-10724-11430-11658-11689-11756-11772-11811-1195712102-12121-12403-12408-12479-12808-13319-13340-1336213453-13475-13485-13600-13607-13645-13673-13731-1379313799-13810-13930-13950-13980-13983-13992-14187-1442714883-14928-15204. Diocese of Gaylord $5,695.40 791-853-1224-1705-1982-2022-2709-2781-5083-6548-65936657-6851-7329-7365-7688-8041-8390-8556-8948-9979-1166412294-13432-15186. Diocese of Grand Rapids $10,017.00 389-944-1300-1492-2084-2168-2198-2199-2975-3111-43624404-7115-7487-7585-7719-7761-7869-8071-8117-8291-84258564-9909-10992-11113-11581-12258-12985-13035-1349913526-13641-13653-13865-13939-14206-14404-14598-1464215213-15337-15454-15548. Diocese of Kalamazoo $5,007.95 575-708-1120-2113-2508-2515-2900-3447-3798-4036-40554141-5255-5999-6980-7796-9962-11114-12998-13305-1363313749-13942-14409-15439. Diocese of Lansing $23,205.45 587-609-695-788-1139-2659-2890-2959-3092-3230-3281-40904285-4354-6223-6534-6674-6687-6694-6742-7237-7304-73117418-7545-7587-7816-7891-7945-7955-8113-8245-8391-83928489-8605-8669-8820-8858-9182-9301-9711-9937-1000610170-10542-11099-11532-11694-11761-11875-12044-1209012295-13360-13450-13703-13782-14031-15417. Diocese of Marquette $3,146.00 646-649-689-692-1396-1541-1585-2173-2713-2894-2929-29316447-7100-9523-13115. Diocese of Saginaw $9,544.50 414-1297-1546-2141-2291-2724-2740-2943-2966-2986-32243505-3651-3823-4102-4232-4693-5280-7255-7337-7571-75828043-8554 “Nothing speaks like results. If you want to build the kind of credibility that connects with people, then deliver results before you deliver a message. Get out and do what you advise others to do. Communicate from experience.” ~ John C. Maxwell

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7 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN 41st Annual March for Life Washington, D. C. Michigan State K of C Agenda Departs: Council 788 in Lansing: 5:00 p.m., January 21, 2014 Departs: St. Mary Church in Chelsea: 6:30 p.m., January 21, 2014 Arrive: Basilica, Washington D.C.: 7:00 a.m. Mass, Jan 22, 2014 Meet: March staging area: 11:30 a.m., January 22, 2014 After March: Depart for Hampton Inn, Old Towne Alexandria, Va Cost for Hampton Inn: $109 per room plus tax for up to 4 people Reservations: Call Hampton Inn directly at 1-703-329-1400 Place on your credit card Rooms under Michigan Knights of Columbus Depart: Hampton Inn: 8:00 a.m., January 23, 2014 Estimated Arrival: Chelsea – 6:30 p.m. Lansing – 8:00 p.m. Cost of Bus: $100.00 per person Make check for bus payable to: Michigan State Knights of Columbus Mail to: Paul and Sue Thorn 768 Lockmoore Ct. Rochester Hills, Mi 48307 Phone Inquiries: 248-852-1758 Deadline for Reservations: December 15, 2013 “Light Up For Christ” On the first Tuesday of December (Dec. 3) the Knights of Columbus will begin celebrating the Christmas season with the annual “Light Up For Christ” celebration. Councils throughout Michigan are invited to light a Nativity scene and/or Christmas tree at 8 p.m. local time. The ceremonial lighting of the Christmas tree is just part of the celebration; other activities can accompany it, such as caroling, collecting clothing and food for the needy or serving snacks and refreshments to commemorate the event. As part of their “Light Up For Christ” celebration, some councils or assemblies visit veterans at nearby medical centers and present them with gifts. Others set up playful activities for all of the council children. If your council has not participated in the past, this is the year to start a great tradition and help spread the joyful tidings of Christmas. The “Light Up For Christ” celebration is a wonderful way to kick off the season and celebrate with brothers, family and friends. A “Light Up For Christ” poster is available (#2757) from the Supreme Council Supply Department. The poster is a great way to promote your council’s “Light Up For Christ” program. Here are a few suggestions to help you spread the joy of this celebration: • Begin the ceremony with the blessing of an Advent wreath by the council chaplain and the lighting of its candle. • Consider having the council chaplain bless the Nativity scene. • A Christmas tree can be decorated with ornaments made by Knights, and their families and friends. • Sing Christmas carols to start off the Christmas season. • After the ceremony, participants may return to the council home for refreshments. One Member per Council per Month 0ne Star Council per District One New Council per Diocese, per Jurisdiction, per Year One First Degree per Council (or per District), per Month It started as Fr. McGivney’s Vision. The primary goal of the Knights of Columbus: “To render Financial Aid to its members and the beneficiaries of members.” - From the Knights of Columbus Charter. Over 131 years later the goal of Fr. McGivney has not changed. It all started with a dream and a vision, then the vision became a mission. We have all heard the saying “If you have a goal, write it down. If you do not write it down, you do not have a goal – you have a wish.”- Steve Maraboli. The same holds true when putting together your family protection goals, a written plan keeps you on track. The goals of each individual family will be different. Older individual are more concerned about social security, safety of the nest egg and income taxes where younger people are more concerned with day to day living. So it is important to make sure you have the right type of life insurance for your situation. Is Term, Whole Life or Survivorship life insurance best for your plan? What is the right type of life insurance for each situation? Well I can’t make a blanket assessment, but this I know, the best life insurance out there is the type that’s in-force when you need it most, at death. Life Insurance is about protecting the unforeseen or maybe predictable risks we deal with everyday. What are the risks that life insurance can protect? Well, these risks vary; mortgage protection, income protection, funeral expense, daycare costs, debt protection, retirement income protection, income tax protection, market fluctuation, charitable giving to name a few. A field agent can help you develop a plan to protect you and your family against these risks. Fr. McGivney wanted every Catholic to have the ability to protect themselves and their families from life’s risk. The Knights of Columbus offer a variety of products to assure your family can be protected, but you must take the first step. I believe the Knights of Columbus stands for the Catholic faith, family, friends and the financial strength for all our Catholic families and completing Fr. McGivney’s vision is the goal. Call your field agent today to secure you family needs today, tomorrow and in the future. Don’t forget to ask about the new chronic illness and terminal illness benefit and how those new benefits can protect your portfolio. Daniel Thelen, GA of South Central Michigan

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8 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN The Art of Family Prayer The practice of family prayer helps your home to grow in faith, peace and joy by Robert Alzapiedi “The family that prays together stays together.” Popularized in the 1950s by Holy Cross Father Patrick Peyton, a Knight of Columbus, this famous slogan is still relevant and applicable today. For many families, though, saying grace before a holiday meal or attending Mass on Sunday may be their only experience with family prayer. Changing family habits and behaviors can be uncomfortable, especially if parents don’t have a model to follow. If we are not praying with our families, it is often a case of not knowing where and how to begin, or not having the tools and materials to lead our families in prayer. Fathers can be very private about praying, particularly as we share our weaknesses and concerns with God. Often, we want to be strong for our families and diminish any of their concerns about our struggles. However, just as we grow in peace through regular private prayer, that same peace and positive spirit can unite a family that prays together. When families come together to pray and share their joys and struggles, they become unified in the petitions they put before God. Family prayer can bring a peace and closeness like no other experience. Sharing personal prayer intentions builds trust and allows family members to stand together in confidence before God. As we strive to be models of faith to our families, let us remember to look first and foremost to Jesus Christ as our model. In his book A Community of Love (2007), David Thomas reminds us that Jesus taught his disciples a “family prayer” when they asked him how to pray. Thomas notes, “The familiar opening words, ‘Our Father,’ identify immediately that we are part of God’s family.” Like any spiritual exercise, family prayer requires discipline. It may not be easy to turn away from televisions or computers, but our families are worth the sacrifice of shutting off all media for a brief time each day. In his book Building Better Families (2008), Matthew Kelly shares his understanding for how praying as a family can be difficult to start, especially for those who did not grow up with such practices. “It may be hard enough to get your spouse to consent and participate, never mind the children,” he writes. “If you have very young children you are at a distinct advantage. Begin the practice now as a couple, and invite them to join you as they get older. In the meantime, have some version of family prayer on a regular basis.” If you already pray together as a family, consider adding a new form of prayer to help your family grow deeper in the faith. There are many ways to pray together as a family. If you and your family are new to praying together, keep it simple and start small. It may simply be starting with “grace” on those evenings that you do have a family meal together or a short discussion after the mealtime blessing, asking family members to share how God has been working in their lives. The family rosary is also a way for families to reflect on their day and to help children see how they can model their lives after Jesus and Mary. As the mysteries are prayed, the children can share how they lived the mysteries in their day. Did I say “Yes” to God today as Mary did in the Annunciation? When visiting with family and friends today, was I as attentive to them as Mary was to her cousin Elizabeth? In this way, the family rosary can help our prayer come alive as we see how we are living the mysteries of the rosary every day. However you pray now or decide to pray in the future, each experience of family prayer unites the family and strengthens the ties to each other and to God. For newcomers to family prayer, I think you will find it much easier than you expected and much more fulfilling than you could have imagined. ROBERT ALZAPIEDI is the chief administrative officer of Holy Cross Family Ministries (HCFM.org), a worldwide ministry in 17 countries headquartered in North Easton, Mass. He is a member of Pope John Paul II Council 13764 in Bolton, Mass.

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 9 The Best Presents Can’t Be Wrapped This holiday season give the gift of yourself within your council, community and family. Give these or similar presents of friendship, understanding, kindness, love and compassion: • Serve or prepare meals at a soup kitchen. • Bring presents to children or elderly people in the hospital. • Clean, repair and refurbish a church in a poor neighborhood. • Visit someone who’s shut-in. • Send a Christmas card to someone you have not seen or talked to in years. • Invite a friend or neighbor who will be alone to share your Christmas celebration. • Reconcile with a friend or relative with whom you have quarreled. Apologize if you were wrong. • • • Christmas Public Service Announcements Available • • • • • • Each year, the Supreme Council office coordinates the distribution of Knights of Columbus produced public service announcements (PSAs) as part of the annual “Keep Christ in Christmas” is available. This PSA reminds viewers to make the time amid the hustle of the season to remember and celebrate the holiday’s religious nature. The Supreme Council forwards these PSAs to program directors of radio and television stations for use during the holiday season. PSAs are used most frequently by stations, however, when local councils make Provide transportation to shelters for homeless people. a personal appeal and deliver copies to station managers. The television PSA is availWish people you meet a good day and a happy and holy Christmas. Get the family together to clean out all the closets and dressers. Donate able on DVD and in Beta format. Radio usable clothing, shoes, blankets and other items to a program for needy PSAs are available on compact disc (CD). Contact the stations in your area to inquire if families. they received the PSA in the general mailSend care packages to military personnel stationed overseas. ing. If the station hasn’t received one and is Sing Christmas carols at nursing homes or hospitals. interested in using the program, contact the Collect baby clothes, blankets, food, diapers or money and donate these Department of Fraternal Services at (203) items to an organization that helps needy people. 752-4044 to order copies of the video or raSupply car seats or cradles to underprivileged mothers. dio PSAs. Consider contacting a local cable access staSponsor a drive for children to donate their old toys to youngsters. tion and producing a “Keep Christ in ChristBe a part of the holiday spirit by undertaking one or more of the items listed above and help make Christmas merry for someone else and yourself. mas” program that features your council’s activities. Contact your diocesan communications diWe don't stop playing because we grow old; rector about the availability of this PSA prowe grow old because we stop playing. gram and encourage usage of “Keep Christ - George Bernard Shaw in Christmas” items and public service announcements. The Mighty Carillon of the Knights Tower Rising high above the northeast sector of the nation’s capital as a defining feature of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, the Knights' Tower stands in testament to the devotion American Catholics hold for the Blessed Mother. Funded by a $1 million grant from the Knights of Columbus, the 329-foot tower was completed in time for the dedication of “America’s was held on Sept. 8, 1963, with Arthur L. Bigelow, bellmaster of Princeton University, playing such familiar tunes as Exsultate Deo, Faith of Our Fathers, Ave Maria and Tantum Ergo. The 56 bells, which vary in weight from 7,200 lbs. to a mere 21 lbs., were manufactured under a joint contract by two European companies, one in France and the other in Holland. Following ancient tradition, some of the bells are named and inscribed with words that the bell is given to “sing.” Appropriately, Mary is the name of the largest bell, or bourdon, and sounds the note B-flat. The inscription on the bells reads: “MARY IS MY NAME / MARY IS MY SOUND / BELOVED MOTHER / QUEEN OF HEAVEN AND EARTH / QUEEN OF THIS DEAR LAND / FOR KNIGHTS TO GOD AND COUNTRY BOUND / AND ALL WHO HEAR MY VOICE / I SING THE PRAISES OF GOD.” The inscription includes an explanation how the bell got its name: “Supreme Knight Luke E. Hart, under whose leadership both the carillon and tower were donated to the Shrine, continued on page 18 Catholic Church” Nov. 20, 1959. Almost four years later, with an additional donation from the Knights of Columbus, the 56-bell carillon was finished on two levels of the Knights Tower. The inauguration concert of the bells

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 10 Knights of Columbus Expand to Ukraine, Lithuania Supreme Knight’s Annual Report Highlights Record-Breaking Charity and Service (SAN ANTONIO) – As the 131st annual convention of the Knights of Columbus began in San Antonio, Supreme Knight Carl Anderson delivered an annual report that chronicled the recordsetting activity of the organization during the fraternal year just ended. The new record includes donations of more than $167.5 million to charity and the volunteering by members of more than 70 million hours of service. The supreme knight highlighted various charitable programs carried out by Knights in more than a dozen countries. Activities ranged from providing new winter coats to children, to helping amputee victims in earthquakedevastated Haiti, to stocking food pantries, to helping victims of disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, the recent explosion in West, Texas, and the tornados in Oklahoma. “We help change countless lives and communities around the world,” Anderson said. “Our charitable service not only helps the temporal needs of our neighbors, but our personal witness of charity can also evangelize as we live Christ’s commandment of love.” In a reference to the powerful witness of Christian charity provided by the new pope, the supreme knight tasked every member with bringing “the example of Pope Francis into his home, his parish and his community.” The supreme knight also highlighted several other achievements from this past year, including a new record for total membership of 1,843,587, the expansion of the Knights into Ukraine and Lithuania, and an insurance milestone of more than $90 billion of life insurance in force. Anderson also spoke of the organization’s defense of life, marriage and religious liberty, saying, “The culture of life and civilization of love will not be built overnight. But we will continue to work day and night to build them through our example, our words and our prayers.” Announcing this year’s convention theme, “Be Protector’s of God’s Gifts,” a line chosen from the inaugural homily of Pope Francis, Supreme Knight Anderson said: “For over the past year you have been good stewards of God’s gifts! Our Order is stronger today than ever before, and, my brother Knights, the best is yet to come!” The 131st Supreme Convention will continue from Aug. 6 -8, as more than 2,000 attendees – consisting of Knights and their families and more than 100 members of the Catholic hierarchy including 11 cardinals – come together to celebrate and review the previous year and to look forward to the year ahead. San Antonio, Texas – The Knights of Columbus have established a presence in Ukraine and Lithuania, it was announced at the organization’s 131st annual international convention in San Antonio, Texas. The two countries are added to a list of nearly a dozen countries in which the organization is active, and are the second and third Central and Eastern European countries with active Knights. The Knights of Columbus entered Poland in 2006. The Knights began working in Ukraine after being encouraged by Cardinal Lubomyr Husar, Major Archbishop of Kyiv-Halyč at the 123rd Convention in 2005. Since the invitation, the Knights have established two councils in the country. In Lithuania, the Knights have established a roundtable. Members of the hierarchy from both countries were among the more than 90 bishops and cardinals at the gathering in Texas. Archbishop Mieczysław Mokrzycki of Lviv, Ukraine and Archbishop Gintaras Grušas of Vilnius, Lithuania addressed the convention during the business session on Aug 7. Blood Drive in Honor of Pope Francis This fraternal year, in October, the Michigan State Council has been directed by Supreme to do an activity in honor of Pope Francis. Well come to find out Pope Francis is travelling to Assisi for his first visit to his holinesses namesakes homeland on October 4th which is also Saint Francis’ Feast Day. The Michigan State Council is asking each council to support/sponsor a blood drive during October, if possible during the weekend of October 4-6, in Pope Francis’ honor. Supporting a blood drive is as simple as going down to the local blood center and donating. Get a car load of brothers, family members or friends go to the blood center on that weekend, or, you may go to an existing drive already scheduled in your community and make a donation in the Pope’s honor. The biggest impact of course would be to sponsor a drive at church or another suitable location that weekend or sometime during the month of October. Let’s show our support for Pope Francis and help those in need of blood during October, and please remember to report your results on your MI-1 form! VIP AWARD STAR COUNCIL AWARD SHINING ARMOR AWARD

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11 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN Memorial Mass Features Relic of Blessed John Paul II A new Knights of Columbus Marian Prayer Program centered on the Immaculate Conception was inaugurated. A new Knights of Columbus Marian Prayer Program was inaugurated during Mass on the second day of the 131st Supreme Convention on Blessed John Paul II “had a strong relationship with the Knights of Columbus,” August 7. The Prayer Program features framed said Archbishop Mieczylaw Mokrzycki, who served as personal secretary to the copies of an image of Mary as the Immaculate pope for a number of years. “I believe that he is still close to us and he remains an inspiration for our Order.” Conception that were carried in procession by Head of the Archdiocese of Lviv in Ukraine since 2008, Archbishop Mokrzycki each state deputy of the Order at the end of Mass during an inauguration ceremony. Presiding at spoke at the end of the annual Memorial Mass offered for all deceased Knights of Columbus on Aug. 8, the final day of the Supreme Convention. He was at the con- the ceremony was Supreme Chaplain Archbishop vention as part of the announcement that Supreme Knight Carl Anderson made two William Lori, who prayed for God’s blessing days earlier, that the Knights of Columbus has formed two councils in Ukraine and upon the state deputies as they prepared to “carry one round table in Lithuania in its further expansion into Europe. these images of Our Lady to councils and countries throughout the world.” The Memorial Mass featured a special relic – a small amount of blood from The Immaculate Conception image is a copy of Blessed John Paul II – that was carried reverently in procession and displayed in the sanctuary for veneration. Contained in a gold vial attached to a monstrance, the the original painting that is housed in the Cathedral Basilica Notre-Dame de Quebec in Canada. relic was a gift to the Knights of Columbus from Cardinal Stanislaw Dziwisz, archbishop of Kraków and who also was personal secretary to the pope for many The church and the Archdiocese of Quebec are years. It is part of the holdings of the Order’s Blessed John II Shrine in Washingcelebrating their 350th anniversary. Also taking part in the ceremony was Archbishop Gerald ton, D.C., where it is displayed to foster devotion to the late pope. In his remarks, Archbishop Mokrzycki recalled that in the last months of his life, Lacroix of Quebec, primate of Canada. He said before going to sleep at night, John Paul would pray in his private chapel and then that like Mary, Knights must “be open to the Holy Spirit” as they engage in the new evangeligo to his bedroom window to offer a blessing. “He would bless the pilgrims walking on the square, bless the Eternal City of Rome, bless the whole Church and the zation in their own states, dioceses and parishes. whole world. He would do it every day,” the archbishop said. The principal celebrant of the Mass was Cardinal Donald Wuerl of Washington, D.C. DeliverConcluding his remarks, Archbishop Mokrzycki told those at the convention Mass, “So today, through this holy relic, may he also bless our work as we continue ing the homily was Cardinal Francis George of to grow in faith and holiness.” Chicago, who remarked on the theme of the conThe principal Mass celebrant was Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William Lori, vention, “Be Protectors of God’s Gifts,” taken who said that the requiem liturgy “reminds us that this life is short and the life to from Pope Francis’ words at his inauguration come is eternal.” A special remembrance was given to the seven Knights of Colum- Mass on March 19. “The most important gift is the gift of God’s bus Mexican saints, all of whom died under religious persecution in the past cengrace, which gives meaning to all the other gifts tury, and four Knights who have been beatified. “The saints are the ones who have lived and loved in such a way that the grace of God bestows,” said Cardinal George. He added God was able to change them inwardly so as to make them capable of eternally that other gifts include life itself, the Church, receiving the love of the living God,” Archbishop Lori said. They “support and religious liberty, marriage and family. These must be protected on a personal level by prayer pray for us” so that all Knights may follow them to heaven, he said. After the homily, Deputy Supreme Knight Dennis Savoie read the Order’s necrol- and avoidance of sin, which is a “distortion of human desire,” and on a societal level by public ogy, a list of the names of members of the hierarchy and Knights of Columbus witness and practical action, he said. leaders who passed away in the past year. He urged Knights to be leaders in protecting all that God has given them, to the Church and to the world. SNINING ARMOR AWARD

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 12 Look Below the Surface Religious liberty is subtly assaulted by recent court decisions and government mandates by Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori During the second Fortnight for Freedom, which ended July 4, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its rulings on marriage, and the Department of Health and Human Services issued the final version of its “preventive services” mandate. Both developments were troubling, and both constitute affronts to religious freedom. On the surface, it may seem as though religious freedom is not seriously threatened. For many people, the HHS mandate seems to be a fight about contraception and the intricacies of health insurance plans. And for many, the Archbishop William E. Lori Supreme Court decisions — which went a long way toward legalizing same-sex “marriages” throughout the United States — seem to be a step in the direction of tolerance. After all the shouting, we might be tempted to think that things will go back to normal. In other words, our churches will continue to function; our schools, hospitals, and charities will continue to fulfill their mission; no one will go to jail; and it will be business as usual. However, we need to look below the surface. Sometimes, the devil really is in the details. THREATS CLOSE AT HAND Let’s begin with the impetus that the Supreme Court gave to same-sex marriage. The court all but struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and signaled to the states that they should consider passing laws redefining marriage to include people of the same sex. The 5-4 majority opinion further opined that those who defend traditional marriage do so because of bigotry. Century after century, civilized societies have held that marriage is between one man and one woman for the sake of children and for the common good. Christianity has even held that marriage between a man and a woman is a sign of the love of Christ for his Church. Yet, with the stroke of a pen, the Supreme Court has held the content of that teaching to be a form of discrimination. This cannot bode well for men and women of conscience and for religious institutions that continue to teach the truth about marriage. Very likely, we are in for a rough ride. Proponents of same-sex marriage say that religious freedom is protected because no minister with conscientious objections will be forced to “solemnize” such a union. But we need to look deeper. The legalization of same-sex marriage will have many ramifications for religious freedom. There will be pressure on the Church, for example, with regard to hiring practices, insurance benefits and the use of facilities. We can look for discrimination charges to be brought against those who speak out boldly in defense of traditional marriage. These and other threats are close at hand. The religious freedom threats posed by the HHS mandate are also imminent. This mandate would require that virtually all employees be covered for certain medications and procedures that are contrary to Church teaching. These include the abortioninducing drug Ella, reproductive counseling that extends to minors with or without their parents’ knowledge, contraception and sterilization. Houses of worship and a handful of other religious institutions are exempt. Faith-based universities, hospitals and charities are not exempt, but instead were given an “accommodation.” This means that the proscribed services will be provided either through the insurer or a third-party administrator, but these “accommodated” institutions will still have to cooperate at some level in the provision of these so-called services. The final HHS rule made no accommodation whatsoever for conscientious forprofit employers who have moral or religious objections to providing this kind of coverage. IN DEFENSE OF FREEDOM What’s wrong with this picture? For one thing, the Department of Health and Human Services, using a part of the IRS code that was never meant to deal with the rights of conscience, has divided religious institutions and people into three categories: houses of worship, institutions of education and service, and conscientious individuals who want to run their businesses according to religious principles. If we look beneath the surface, we see what has been lost. In the 40 years since Roe v. Wade, the government has recognized the religious freedom of all three groups without distinction under an amendment to the Public Health Service Act. The much-needed legislation, authored by the late Democratic Senator Frank Church, had broad bipartisan support. Now, that has been swept away. By creating a three-tiered structure, the administration is regulating our God-given, constitutionally guaranteed religious freedom. And HHS means business. Any religiously affiliated educational or service institution that fails to comply with the mandate faces crippling fines. If a diocesan Catholic Charities, for example, provides excellent health care coverage for its employees but does not include the so-called preventive services, it will be fined $100 per day per employee. Alternately, if the same Catholic Charities decided not to offer its employees any health care coverage, it would be fined $2,000 per year per employee. The way the fines have been structured tells us how intent HHS is on providing these services. Consider how easily the list of so-called preventive services could be expanded to include elective abortion and other procedures contrary to Church teaching. Fortunately, many conscientious for-profit private employers have filed lawsuits against the HHS mandate; so far these lawsuits are faring well. With the publication of the final rule for non -profits, the lawsuits brought by many church-related institutions will now go forward. We should pray that these institutions will prevail in court, as intense study is currently underway to determine other responses to the final version of the HHS mandate. Looking below the surface is important, allowing us to defend religious liberty in the public square and the ballot box. Even continued on page 13

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13 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN Newtown Pastor and Knights of Columbus Council Receive Inaugural Caritas Awards included Knights from an assortment of countries and their guests. “They did so at a time as so many around them faced suffering the likes of which we can hardly imagine,” said Anderson. “In the midst of tragedy, as so often happens, heroes rise to the occasion; Msgr. Weiss was heroic.” Anderson said Msgr. Weiss is among those who, in the recent words of Pope Francis, can “step into the night without being overcome by the darkness and losing their bearings ... able to sympathize with the brokenness of others without losing their own strength and identity.” In the heartbreaking work that began on Dec. 14, the day of the shootings, Anderson said, Msgr. Weiss was supported by his brother Knights of Newtown’s St. Virgilius Council. The first priority was spiritual as the council established a program that asked people to pray a minimum of three Hail Marys for the victims and their families; the first responders and teachers; and the Newtown community. With the help of the Knights’ websites, the efforts spread and more than 105,000 people signed up, offering a total of more than 3.25 million prayers. The Knights also served as ushers at eight funerals, most of which were for children, and helped in the parish when it was overwhelmed with messages of condolence and other logistical challenges. Caroline Previdi, one of the children killed, had been saving money to help in the council’s annual Christmas toy drive for children in need. In her honor, council members raised more than $70,000 for toys in her memory. “There was no playbook, no planning for such a situation,” said Anderson. “Despite the enormity of what lay before them, the warm hearts of Msgr. Weiss and his brother Knights powerfully demonstrated to all the spirit of the Good Samaritan.” The new award was established earlier this year by a vote of the Knights of Columbus Board of Directors and will be conferred on future recipients when merited. The Caritas Award becomes the second international award given by the organization. Previously, the Knights of Columbus has, on occasion, given its Gaudium et Spes Award, which has been conferred in recent years on Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Cardinal John O’Connor of New York, and Jean Vanier, the internationally renowned founder of l'Arche, a network of faith-based communities that care for people with developmental disabilities. (SAN ANTONIO) — The Knights of Columbus has created a new award to recognize extraordinary works of charity and service. The first to receive the Caritas Award were the pastor of the Catholic parish in Newtown, Conn., and its Knights of Columbus council. Supreme Knight Carl Anderson conferred the awards Tuesday night, Aug. 6, with the first going to Msgr. Robert Weiss, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Church, and the second to St. Virgilius Knights of Columbus Council 185. The council, located at St. Rose of Lima in Newtown was represented by Grand Knight Timothy Haas. The awards were announced at a dinner gathering in San Antonio that included approximately 90 members of the Catholic hierarchy, including Boston’s Cardinal Sean O’Malley, OFM, Cap., who delivered a keynote address. Newtown was the scene of last December’s elementary school shooting that gripped the nation and the world as the small community mourned the loss of 26 residents, most of whom were young children. The Knights have also announced financial support of $100,000 for ongoing parish programs of help and healing in the community that will be conferred at a later date. The Caritas Award was presented to Msgr. Weiss and the Newtown Knights “for exemplary works of charity” as part of the Knights of Columbus’s 131st international convention. “Those we honor, like the Good Samaritan, treated their injured and suffering neighbors, classmates and friends with mercy and love,” said Anderson before a dinner audience of some 2,000 that Look Below the Surface more important is prayer. I ask all members of the Knights of Columbus and their families to pray — and to pray intensely — for the restoration of religious freedom for U.S. citizens and for peoples throughout the world. May we strive to ensure that the light of truth and the lamp of freedom will burn brightly everywhere! Prayer to Know My Vocations Lord Jesus, up until now You have been quietly preparing me to be Your disciple. Now the time of preparation is ending. I seem to hear You say to me as You said once to Peter: “Will you also go away?” Peter replied, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.” I stand with Peter. Through prayer and council, show me, Lord, where it is in Your vineyard that You want me to serve. Then give me strength to be faithful. Mary, Mother and model, help me to respond in generous love to the call of your divine son. Amen “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.” ~ John F. Kennedy

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MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN O CT O BER 201 3 14 SAVE THE DATE FLORIDA TO HOST MICHIGAN KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS AND V E N E R A B L E F R E D E R I C B A R A G A D AY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2014 The day will start with Mass at 11:00 A.M. at St. Vincent De Paul Church, 4843 Mile Stretch Dr., Holiday, FL 34690, followed by a luncheon and program. The following may be called to make reservation for the luncheon. Map and directions are available upon request. Please RSVP by February 10, 2014 to: Mr. Herbert Wegener 4046 Passport Lane, Apt. 102 New Port Richey, FL, 34653 727-376-2743 hgwegener@gmail.com Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Barry 2951 Westmoreland Ct. New Port Richey, FL, 34655 727-375-5342 g.s.barry@comcast.net Lansing Lugnut’s Friday August 9, 2013 was a beautiful night for baseball, as the Knights of the Lansing Diocese of Michigan helped to fill Cooley Law School Stadium for the Lansing Lugnut’s Annual Vocations Night. The priests, Bishop Earl Boyea of the Lansing Diocese nuns, deacons, and gives State Deputy Malinowski tips on the seminarians of the Diocese were invited to attend the game free of charge, and during special pregame ceremonies, Bishop of Lansing, the Most Rev. Earl Boyea was joined by several other dignitaries and religious to throw out ceremonial first pitches. On hand for the event were the State Council officers of Michi- gan, including State Deputy Michael Malinowski, State Secretary Robert Fox, State Treasurer Ken Unterbrink, State Advocate Tony Vittorini, and State Warden Bill Chasse. State Deputy Mike Malinowski was one of the dignitaries to throw out a “first pitch.” The Lansing Lugnut’s are a Class A minor league affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays, and this game produces one of their largest crowds of the season. Total attendance for the game was 11,166, constituting a sell-out, and an estimated 2,200 members of the Knights of Columbus their families were present. The Lugnut’s won the game against the West Michigan Whitecaps in exciting fashion 7-5, with a walk-off home run in the 12th inning. One Member per Council per Month 0ne Star Council per District One New Council per Diocese, per Jurisdiction, per Year One First Degree per Council (or per District), per Month Editors Note Next Copy Deadline December 1, 2013 In order for the Michigan Columbian to achieve it’s goal of cutting costs we need your help. If you have moved or you are in the process of moving it is very important that you inform the financial secretary of your council that you have a new mailing address. The financial secretary will send the changes to the Supreme Office.

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15 O CT O BER 201 3 MICHIGAN COLUMBIAN Knights Are ‘Vital’ Throughout the World, Archbishop Says Archbishop Gustavo García-Siller of San Antonio, TX The international character and worldwide appeal of the Knights of Columbus were on full display at the Opening Mass of the 131st Supreme Convention in San Antonio, Texas, with more than 2,000 Knights and their family members from many countries attending the liturgy that was concelebrated by prelates and priests from around the world. The principal celebrant was Archbishop Gustavo García-Siller of San Antonio, who also delivered the homily. Concelebrating were 11 cardinals, dozens of other archbishops and bishops and more than 100 priests. The Mass was celebrated August 6, the feast of the Transfiguration, in the grand ballroom of the JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country. Leading the opening procession was an honor guard of more than 100 Fourth Degree Knights. The four state deputies from Mexico also processed carrying a large reliquary containing relics of all the Knights of Columbus martyrs from their country. In his homily, Archbishop García-Siller thanked Knights of Columbus for their worldwide work of aiding those most in need, efforts that amounted last year to more than $167 million in charitable donations and 70 million volunteer hours. He mentioned in particular the Order’s relief work after the devastating hurricane in Oklahoma and the plant explosion in West, Texas. In both events, the Supreme Council supported the work of local Knights who provided immediate help to those directly affected. The archbishop said, “Your principles of charity, unity, fraternity and patriotism are vital for the Church and vital for our country and nations throughout the world.” At the beginning of his homily, he echoed the words of Pope Francis at the recent World Youth Day in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, saying, “My brother bishops, priests, Knights and family members, it is good for us to be here in the presence of the Lord – gathered from throughout the world.” The account of the Transfiguration from the Gospel of St. Luke tells of the brilliant divinity of Jesus, but also contains suggestions of shadows in the world, the archbishop explained. “The Transfiguration is both a dazzling experience that confirmed who Jesus is – the Son of God – and a frightening event that reduced the disciples to silence. There is both light and shadow in this story,” he said. Among the shadows in today’s world, he continued, “is the constant migration of peoples” who are fleeing situations in their own countries and seeking a better life in another. The Church and all believers must seek ways to reach out and assist these people because they are brothers and sisters in the Lord, the archbishop noted. He concluded, “Pope Francis’ words still ring for us a true challenge that shines with the light of the very principles of the Knights of Columbus: ‘Go. Do not be afraid. Serve.” Open Christmas Celebrations to Prospects Christmas is fast approaching! Among the food, fun, presents and preparation, let us not forget the real reason for the season...the birth of Jesus Christ. It is the birth of God’s only Son that we celebrate; and with the sense of the holiday cheer, the holiday season is the perfect time to recruit “A Knight before Christmas.” Your Christmas celebrations can be opportunities to add new members to your council. At these events highlight your council’s accomplishments and the various types of projects you have conducted as well as items that will show your council’s history. As the host, your council is on display for all to see, so be sure to portray yourself in a positive light. Appoint a committee to plan an event and choose a representative to spearhead and coordinate all the arrangements. The Christmas season is a council’s chance to celebrate the holiday and incorporate new members at the same time. For a successful Christmas event, set a date and time that is convenient for as many members as possible. This will ensure a positive turnout from your council and their family members. Decide beforehand on who will set up, who will run activities, serve food, clean up, etc. The Christmas season is a time to open your doors and celebrate, so remember to invite your pastor and others from your community besides council members and their families. Make sure you cover the details. What will you serve at your event? Will it be a sit-down dinner or a standing social with a variety of snacks? What about advertising? Make arrangements to announce your event at Mass if possible, in the church bulletin, or even with mailed invitations. The point is to get the word out to your guests, and to all possible prospects. Don’t forget to plan entertainment for both adults and children; a good family celebration consists of both. A celebration such as this will be sure to draw entire families of both council members and prospects alike. Contests, raffles, sing-alongs, and Christmas videos are just the type of things to keep your guests entertained. Display photos from council events and scrapbooks. Along with members, community guests, widows and children of deceased members, and prospects, invite former members, inactive members and their families. Let these former Knights see how alive your council is and how they can still experience the fraternity that originally attracted them to the Order. Let your inactive members see the satisfying experiences they are missing by not being active. Inviting them can be the first step to generating their interest and having them return to your council

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