SAI| Newsletter No. 3

 

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Newsletter Juli 2013

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NEWSLETTER www.sai.uni-heidelberg.de No. 3, July 2013 WELCOME CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT This newsletter starts with two news items that signify the strength of the SAI: With the end of the collaborative research project, the SFB 619 “Ritual Dynamics”, we are looking back at eleven years of highly successful research. The SAI has been housing the head office of the SFB and its speaker, Prof. Axel Michaels, Chair for Cultural and Religious History of South Asia (Classical Indology), who served as a tireless booster of this project that was committed to fostering inter- and transdisciplinary research. All good things (must) come to an end and thus we report on the ending ritual of this project (p. 3). However with the establishment of the Center for Asian and Transcultural Studies (CATS), the future of collaborative research is just around the corner (p. 2). CATS took a major step forward when governmental funding was approved in late June 2013. The SAI will be one of the formative parts of this centre-to-be on the Bergheim campus. We expect that our shift into this new research environment, which is scheduled to take place no earlier than 2018, will help to further increase and amplify the SAI´s impact. At the end of the summer term we look back at numerous activities and events that have been conducted at the SAI or elsewhere with active support of our staff. Among these were conferences and workshops in the academic fields of history, political science, geography and Buddhist philosophy of which you can find reports below. Further reports, e. g. about the very recent conferences on Indo-German exchanges in philosophy and science, the Bangladesh war tribunals as well as a conference on International Relations, Security and Democracy in South Asia, will follow in the next issue. SOUTH ASIA INSTITUTE Im Neuenheimer Feld 330 69120 Heidelberg T: +49-6221-54 89 00 F: +49-6221-54 49 98 M: info@sai.uni-heidelberg.de www.sai.uni-heidelberg.de Dr. Martin Gieselmann Executive Secretary Prof. Dr. Hans Harder Executive Director | Page 1

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 CONTENT NEWS ►German Federal Government and State Government Grant for CATS approved ►SFB Closing Ceremony ►The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture by Prof. Ludden ►Baden-Württemberg fellowship-holder Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra ►The new Resident Representative of the Delhi Office Dr. Elvira Graner ►Integrated Earthquake Risk Assessment for the Himalayan Region ►Photo Exhibition “At a tent near you” open until late July ►Documentary Film “Getting Married” ►Documentary “Mother Calling – Kali in Karachi” by Jürgen Schaflechner nEWs GERMAN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND STATE GOVERNMENT GRANT FOR CATS APPROVED The new research facility on the Bergheim Campus – named Centre for Asian and Transcultural Studies (CATS) – will be established on the basis of funding of about 20 million euros in total after the Joint Science Conference of the German Federal and State Governments approved the grant application on June 28th 2013. The infrastructure planned for CATS creates a platform for bringing together research activities from different disciplines for the study of South, East and Southeast Asia. With the SAI as one of its founding members the new CATS research facility will offer approx. 5,000 square metres of office, teaching and library space. As a multimedia “collaboratorium”, the new centre will provide central access to three departmental libraries focusing on South Asian, East Asian and Southeast Asian Studies. “From a scientific point of view, work at the CATS will allow us to approach the history and development of Asia more holistically: not solely from a western perspective, but from an Asian perspective as well”, explains Indologist Prof. Dr. Axel Michaels who, together with Sinologist Prof. Dr. Barbara Mittler, has been responsible for the application for the new centre. Research projects at CATS will focus on the socioeconomic and transcultural dynamics of power and the impact of social, demographic and cultural change. Other areas of interest include the controversial topic of religion, changes in the environment and health as well as the consequences of urbanisation and migration. TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 2

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 CLOSING CEREMONY OF THE COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE “RITUAL DYNAMICS” Since 2002, the interdisciplinary Collaborative Research Centre “Ritual Dynamics” (SFB 619), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), investigated rituals as well as their change and dynamics. In 31 different subprojects more than 140 scientists, mostly from the field of humanities, have handled different issues. The SFB 619 conducted fundamental research in terms of the cross-cultural construction of models and theories. To establish scientific methods and theories, experiences from those who practice the rituals were integrated into the SFB 619’s research projects and provided explanatory models for the socio-cultural meaning of ritual actions. Collaborations with other research institutions, international conferences and workshops brought numerous visiting scholars to Heidelberg. There were also close links with the South Asia Institute and the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context”. On June 21st, the Collaborative Research Centre “Ritual Dynamics” invited to a scientific discussion on the subject “Where does the ritual come to an end?” This event marked the official end of a successful eleven-year research after the SFB. The ceremony was opened by Rector Prof. Bernhard Eitel. Prof. Bernd Schneidmüller, Deputy Speaker of the SFB “Ritual Dynamics”, Prof. Stefan Maul, the Dean of the Faculty of Philosophy, and Dr. Heike Bock, Representative of the DFG, gave farewell addresses. In a disputatio, two speeches in German discussed the key question: “Where does the ritual come to an end?” First, Prof. Angelos Chaniotis (Princeton) elaborated his thesis “Das Ritual kommt in der Griechischen Religion nicht an sein Ende, denn es deckt jede religiöse Gefühlslage ab, auch die Verinnerlichung, die in anderen Religionen zur Kritik an der Äußerlichkeit des Rituals geführt hat.” Prof. Michael Strausberg (Bergen) talked about his thesis “Das Ende von Ritualen wäre das Ende der Menschheit.” Members of the SFB referred to the theses. Finally, Prof. Axel Michaels, Speaker of the Collaborative Research Centre, gave the closing speech. The ceremony was concluded with a musical performance and a farewell reception. CONTENT NEWS ►German Federal Government and State Government Grant for CATS approved ►SFB Closing Ceremony ►The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture by Prof. Ludden ►Baden-Württemberg fellowship-holder Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra ►The new Resident Representative of the Delhi Office Dr. Elvira Graner ►Integrated Earthquake Risk Assessment for the Himalayan Region ►Photo Exhibition “At a tent near you” open until late July ►Documentary Film “Getting Married” ►Documentary “Mother Calling – Kali in Karachi” by Jürgen Schaflechner TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 3

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 THE DIETER CONRAD MEMORIAL LECTURE 2013 HELD BY PROF. DR. DAVID LUDDEN The historian Prof. Dr. David Ludden delivered this year’s Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture with a talk on ‘Asian Histories of Globalization: Long Distance Mobility and Territorial Power in the Longue Durée’ on June 27th at the South Asia Institute. The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture is held annually in honor of the tremendous contribution that Conrad has made while working at the South Asia Institute. After having served on the faculty of History at the University of Pennsylvania from 1981 until 2007, Prof. Ludden currently holds a professorship of Political Economy and Globalization and is Chair of the Department of History at New York University. Prof. Ludden looks back on 45 years of outstanding research in South Asia with a focus on southern India and, more recently, Bangladesh and northeast India. His numerous publications cover a broad range of topics such as ancient Tamil poetry, agrarian history, the intellectual history of subalternity, changing development regimes and the history of global capitalism. In his Conrad Lecture, Prof. Ludden proposed to understand the history of globalization in Asia from the vantage point of long distance mobility. The far-reaching movements of people, goods and ideas have shaped local realities in Asia over the long term and up to the present, especially as they pertain to coastal regions, inland frontiers and expansive cultural spaces of territorial power. The talk drew on material of a forthcoming book that is now called “History Inside Globalization: Spatial Power and Inequity in Asia”. The lecture began with a welcome address by the director of the South Asia Institute Prof. Hans Harder, followed by an introductory note by Prof. Gita Dharampal-Frick on Prof. Ludden’s influential body of work and academic achievements. After the event Prof. Ludden expressed his wish to facilitate future cooperation and exchange between his department and the South Asia Institute. http://www.sai.uni-heidelberg.de/en/conrad_video.php CONTENT NEWS ►German Federal Government and State Government Grant for CATS approved ►SFB Closing Ceremony ►The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture by Prof. Ludden ►Baden-Württemberg fellowship-holder Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra ►The new Resident Representative of the Delhi Office Dr. Elvira Graner ►Integrated Earthquake Risk Assessment for the Himalayan Region ►Photo Exhibition “At a tent near you” open until late July ►Documentary Film “Getting Married” ►Documentary “Mother Calling – Kali in Karachi” by Jürgen Schaflechner TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 4

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 NEW BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG FELLOWSHIP-HOLDER DR. ANIL KUMAR MOHAPATRA Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra is from Bhubaneswar, the capital city of the Indian state of Odisha, where he is working as Assistant Professor at the P.G. Department of Political Science, Utkal University. Since 1993 he had been engaged in teaching at different colleges in the said state until his joining Utkal in 2010. Before his present assignment of Baden Württemberg fellowship at the South Asia Institute, he was a British Council fellow in 2012 and undertook a project on “Democratic Consolidation in South Asia: Developments in Nepal” at the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford. At the SAI, he is working on a project called “Regional Integration and Governance in South Asia: What lessons does the EU hold for the SAARC?” Moreover, Dr. Mohapatra is the author of the book “Small States in South Asia: A security perspective of the Himalayan States” and published more than fifty scholarly articles. CONTENT NEWS ►German Federal Government and State Government Grant for CATS approved ►SFB Closing Ceremony ►The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture by Prof. Ludden ►Baden-Württemberg fellowship-holder Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra ►The new Resident Representative of the Delhi Office Dr. Elvira Graner ►Integrated Earthquake Risk Assessment for the Himalayan Region ►Photo Exhibition “At a tent near you” open until late July ►Documentary Film “Getting Married” ►Documentary “Mother Calling – Kali in Karachi” by Jürgen Schaflechner THE NEW RESIDENT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE DELHI OFFICE DR. ELVIRA GRANER Since January 2013, PD Dr. Elvira Graner has been heading the Delhi Office of the SAI Branch Office as well as the Heidelberg Centre South Asia (HCSA) as the new Resident Representative. Her previous assignments include being a (Senior) Lecturer at the Dept. of Geography at the South Asia Institute from 1995 onwards and the Resident Representative of the SAI’s Kathmandu Office (1996/97 and 2003/05). From autumn 2009 to December 2012 she was employed as a Research Fellow at the Institute of Governance Studies (IGS) of BRAC University in Dhaka as an integrated expert, co-funded by the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation (BMZ, via cim). Her fields of research focus on social and economic policy analyses. This includes conceptualising the first-ever national Youth Survey in Bangladesh (2011) and organising annual Joint Regional Conferences on Youth Policies (Colombo 2012 and Kathmandu 2013). Other research projects focus on Education Policies, Labor Market Policies as well as on Integrated Natural Resource Management. TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 5

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 NEW RESEARCH PROJECT: INTEGRATED EARTHQUAKE RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE HIMALAYAN REGION The Heidelberg Karlsruhe Research Partnership (HEiKA) is funding a joint project between the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Department of Geography, South Asia Institute. The project bundles specific expertise of the involved institutions in analyzing human-environmental interactions in the high-risk setting of an expected major earthquake in Nepal. The dynamic setting of the fast, but haphazardly growing capital of Nepal, Kathmandu is being used as case study to develop a holistic understanding of the interaction between the built environment and socio-economic factors aggravating vulnerability. An indicator-based vulnerability and resilience index will be developed using state-of-the-art remote sensing technique, probabilistic multi-variKathmandu Valley 1883 able modeling and field (J.C. White 1883) surveying. The proposed project integrates the assessment of direct physical damage (i.e., damage to housing stock) and the socio-economic dimensions of specific vulnerability taking into account dynamic interactions among hazards and development processes such as urbanization and rapid population growth. Kathmandu Valley 2011 Local stakeholders like (M. Nüsser 2011) the National Society for Earthquake Technology Nepal (NSET) are working towards an earthquake save city and share their experience and knowledge with the Karlsruhe-Heidelberg group. More information can be found on: www.sai.uni-heidelberg.de/geo CONTENT NEWS ►German Federal Government and State Government Grant for CATS approved ►SFB Closing Ceremony ►The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture by Prof. Ludden ►Baden-Württemberg fellowship-holder Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra ►The new Resident Representative of the Delhi Office Dr. Elvira Graner ►Integrated Earthquake Risk Assessment for the Himalayan Region ►Photo Exhibition “At a tent near you” open until late July ►Documentary Film “Getting Married” ►Documentary “Mother Calling – Kali in Karachi” by Jürgen Schaflechner TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 6

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 CONTENT NEWS ►German Federal Government and State Government Grant for CATS approved ►SFB Closing Ceremony ►The Dieter Conrad Memorial Lecture by Prof. Ludden ►Baden-Württemberg fellowship-holder Dr. Anil Kumar Mohapatra ►The new Resident Representative of the Delhi Office Dr. Elvira Graner ►Integrated Earthquake Risk Assessment for the Himalayan Region ►Photo Exhibition “At a tent near you” open until late July ►Documentary Film “Getting Married” ►Documentary “Mother Calling – Kali in Karachi” by Jürgen Schaflechner PHOTO ExHIBTION “AT A TENT NEAR YOU” OPEN UNTIL LATE JULY As final event to celebrate its 50th anniversary, the South Asia Institute (SAI) held an exhibition of photos entitled “at a tent near you” that was opened on January 16th 2013.The SAI and the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” in collaboration with the Deutsch-Indische Gesellschaft (German Indian Society) had invited to this event. The multi-site exhibition by Amit Madeshiya and Shirley Abraham was on display in the lobby of the institute as well as on the courtyard of the cafeteria until late July. Amit Madheshiya and Shirley Abraham locate, narrate and reimagine a story of the traveling cinemas in India through their research and artistic interventions. DOCUMENTARY FILM “GETTING MARRIED” The documentary “Getting Married - The Wedding of Mahesh and Benela” (2012, 55 min) by Niels Gutschow and Axel Michaels was shown in May 2013 at a film show of the Collaborative Research Center. The film documents the preparations and rituals as part of a Hindu wedding ceremony in Bhaktapur, Nepal in November 2010. Further information is available on the website of the thede film production and on the website of the Collaborative Research Center 619 “Ritual Dynamics”. DOCUMENTARY “MOTHER CALLING – KALI IN KARACHI” BY JÜRGEN SCHAFLECHNER Jürgen Schaflechner presented his documentary on the DevipujakVagris of Karachi, a small Hindu community that worships a Mother Goddess on June 17th. To ensure the members well being, the community is obliged to sacrifice a minimum of one male goat to the Goddess on the festival of Navaratri, which occurs twice a year. Due to this bond the Mother speaks regularly to the community through the mouth of the Bhopa, the Vagri’s medium and ritual healer. In these weekly sessions, called “Hazri”, the community seeks guidance and the fulfillment of particular wishes. This documentary portrays the communities’ daily life and focuses on their desire to return home. TEACHING RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 7

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 CONTENT NEWS TEACHING ► Advanced course in spoken Sanskrit in Goa ► Saraswati Sanskrit Prize 2012 TEACHInG ADVANCED COURSE IN SPOKEN SANSKRIT IN GOA From the 11th of February to the 1st of March 2013 the advanced course in spoken Sanskrit took place at Shadvala – Centre for Sanskrit Studies, located in Narve, 14 Kms east of Panjim on the banks of Mandovi River, in central Goa. This advanced course organized by the Department of Classical Indology, Heidelberg University, aimed at extending and deepening the skill of spoken Sanskrit and using the language on a regular basis. It was in continuation with the beginner‘s level course in Heidelberg. Advanced grammar was introduced to strengthen the lucid style of speaking such as using passive and intransitive passive voices in all three tenses to express day-to-day conversation. Eight Sanskritists from seven different countries gathered for this course. The teacher was Dr. Sadananda Das of the University of Leipzig, and the daily classes took place on reed mats in the all-purpose ‘class room’, where morning and evening meditation and recitation were also performed. All classes were taught entirely in Sanskrit. Starting with relatively simple grammar and phrases, such as api bhavān kushalī? – ām, aham kushalī, dhanyavādah, the Sanskritists progressed quickly to more complicated forms and syntax, such as the past and future passive, the co-ordinating conjunctions, and the cases required by different prepositions and verbs. Sadananda encouraged them to speak Sanskrit among themselves as much of the time as possible. He also ensured that for three weeks a constant stream of Sanskrit language flowed into their ears, whether in the form of ancient subhāshitas, modern songs, snippets from the Sanskrit radio or television, or constant repetition of conjugations and declensions; by the end of the three weeks, this stream was at least beginning to be converted into a (halting) stream of Sanskrit conversation. And it was not all study: They also rehearsed and put on a modern Sanskrit drama, Gurubhakti and afternoons and weekends they walked in the surrounding countryside and villages. All in all, much Sanskrit was learned, in a traditional and inspiring environment, and everybody had a good time. The students are very grateful to their teacher Sadananda and to everyone else who made the course possible. For a more detailed report see: http://www.sai.uni-heidelberg.de/abt/IND/aktuelles/report.pdf RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT Students at the Shadvala – Centre for Sanskrit Studies, Narve | Page 8

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 SARASWATI SANSKRIT PRIZE 2012 At an award ceremony held in New Delhi on 25th March 2013, Mr. Rohana Seneviratne received the Saraswati Sanskrit Prize 2012 from Dr. Karan Singh, president of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR). The prize is instituted by the ICCR together Presentation of “Saraswati Sanskrit Award 2012” to Mr. Rohana P. Seneviratne by Dr. Karan Singh with the Department of (Hon’ble President, ICCR) Cultural and Religious History of South Asia (Classical Indology), South Asia Institute, Heidelberg to recognize the contribution of bonafide students in promoting the understanding of Sanskrit and to foster deeper appreciation of the Indian heritage. The prize includes a 10 day visit to India with all hospitality from the ICCR. Mr. Seneviratne visited the Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan and Special Centre for Sanskrit Studies at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi as well as the Sampurnanand Sanskrit University and Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi. Mr. Seneviratne is currently engaged in his D. Phil. research on philosophy of Sanskrit grammar at the University of Oxford, UK. Earlier he completed his M. Phil. in Indian philosophy at the University of Liverpool and Bachelor’s degree in Sanskrit from the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. The oral presentations for the Saraswait Sanskrit Prize 2012 were held on 31st August 2012 at the South Asia Institute, Heidelberg on the topic: Why should we study Sanskrit? Photo gallery of oral presentations at the South Asia Institute, Heidelberg. CONTENT NEWS TEACHING ► Advanced course in spoken Sanskrit in Goa ► Saraswati Sanskrit Prize 2012 RESEARCH PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 9

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH ► International Workshop in Ellora ► International Conference on Ladakh ►Third Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group ► Practices of Argumentation in Ancient India ► International Conference: Memories of Post-Imperial Nations ► Pakistan General Elections 2013 REsEARCH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP IN ELLORA by Gita Dharampal-Frick and Yaaminey Mubayi PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT Daulatabad Water Reservoir Jain cave, Ellora Tomb of Ambar Mallik From February 18th to 23rd 2013 the International Workshop on “Water & Sacred Spaces: A Case-Study of the Ellora-Khuldabad-Daulatabad Historic Region” organized by the South Asia Institute was held in Ellora. The Indian village is well-known for its cave-temple-complex, which belongs to the UNESCO world heritage site. This intergenerational event represented a collaborative project sponsored by the Indian Council of Historical Research (ICHR) and the German Research Foundation (DFG). The workshop emphasized on the investigation of the synergistic connection between the variety of water management techniques and the historical and cultural evolution of the region. For this purpose, political state-formation, socio-economic activities as well as the efflorescence of religious cults and their edifices were analyzed. The main objective of this workshop consisted in the conduction of preliminary discussions to define a more extensive interdisciplinary research project within the new Indo-German research collaboration. The workshop was opened with remarks by Shri. V.M. Pandhari Pande, Hon’ble Vice Chancellor of Aurangabad University (BAM) followed by Dr. Hans-Dieter Bienert, Programme Director in the Humanities and Social Sciences of the German Research Foundation (DFG). The daily schedule consisted of two major elements: extensive site visits and intensive paper presentations. On the first day the Ellora caves were visited to examine the technical engineering skills manifest in the construction of the monumental edifices. Other site visits were carried out in Grishneshwar temple, the Sufi Dargahs in Khuldabad, the Bibi ka Maqbara with the adjacent ASI-office, the Daulatabad Fort and the surrounding water management systems (step-wells, tanks, reservoirs and dams). The presentations were held daily in two sessions, with a chair-person and discussants. Among the most important contributions was the talk “The Movement of Ideas and Technologies along the Dakshinapatha” by Prof. R.S. Morwanchikar, Former Head, Department of History, Marathwada University, Aurangabad, which gave an overview of the introduction and development of water systems in the region. This talk was followed by the presentations “The Linga Cult and Water: Myths from the Verul Mahatmya” by Dr. Yaaminey Mubayi, New Delhi; “How Archaeology may contribute to an understanding of traditional hydraulic engineering” by Professor Burkhardt Vogt, Bonn; “Sacred Water Cisterns at the Ellora Caves in an Archaeological Perspective” by Dr. M. Mahadeviah and “Water and Architecture in India: The Aesthetic and the Sacred” by Dr. Jutta Jain-Neubauer, New Delhi. Finally the paper on “The Basics of Water Management at Sacred Spaces in the Near East” by Prof. Matthias Grottker, University of Applied Sciences, Lübeck highlighted crucial aspects of ancient water management technology in Saudi Arabia. | Page 10

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: “SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT IN LADAKH: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES AND RECENT DYNAMICS” by Juliane Dame CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH ► International Workshop in Ellora ► International Conference on Ladakh ►Third Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group ► Practices of Argumentation in Ancient India ► International Conference: Memories of Post-Imperial Nations ► Pakistan General Elections 2013 PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT The 16th Conference of The International Association for Ladakh Studies (IALS) took place at the South Asia Institute from April 17th to 20th 2013. The conference was for the first time hosted by Heidelberg University. Organiser was the Department of Geography in cooperation with the Heidelberg Center for Environment (HCE) and the IALS. The event was made possible with financial support granted by German Research Foundation (DFG), SAI and HCE. More than 80 scholars and scientists from Germany and abroad met to discuss historical, societal, and political developments in the region as well as issues of environmental research related to Ladakh and its neighbouring mountain regions. Following the tradition of the IALS, the conference had an explicitly interdisciplinary character, it aimed at enhancing cross-disciplinary academic exchange on Ladakh and its neighbouring regions. The event had a wide range of participants, including a number of young researchers and local actors from political and non-governmental organisations. The conference was inaugurated by Prof. Dr. Hans Harder, Executive Director of the South Asia Institute, followed by introductory speeches given by IALS President John Bray and Dr. Juliane Dame on behalf of the local organising committee. Under the issue “Society and Environment in Ladakh: Historical Perspectives and Recent Dynamics” a total of 14 sessions covering a wide range of research topics were carried out during the four day event. These included presentations and discussions on historical perspectives, history of art and architecture, political and cultural change. Current topics of sustainable regional development, such as urban development of Leh as well as climate change and water management were also discussed. Further highlights of the programme included a keynote address by Prof. Dr. Marcus Nüsser, Head of the Department of Geography on “Landscape Changes on a Himalayan Scale” and a welcoming reception at SAI. A half-day fieldtrip to the historical sites of the old town of Heidelberg was part of the social programme. On Friday evening, the General Assembly of the IALS was held, followed by the conference dinner with a South Asian buffet. | Page 11

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 THIRD ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOUTH ASIA STUDY GROUP By invitation of the Department of Geography some 40 participants met in the South Asia Institute library to attend the 3rd Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group of the German Geographical Society (DGfG). This Study Group was founded in 2011 to provide a platform for geographers and researchers from neighbouring disciplines as well as for practitioners with a regional focus on South Asia. The two-day conference was organised by Thomas Lennartz, research associate at the SAI and one of the Study Group’s spokesmen. It offered the opportunity to exchange ideas, experiences and insights from current and emerging research projects and to discuss present and future challenges of the South Asian subcontinent. The meeting presented a broad spectrum of topics. Stimulated by 15 oral presentations, the attendees discussed spatial conflicts on different scales as well as challenges of resource use and urbanisation on the background of global change. Other talks focused on the ways societies deal with natural hazards and questions related to tourism and energy supply. Proceedings of the conference will be published on the online platform SavifaDok in the near future. Additional information on the Study Group and its activities is available online on www.geographien-suedasiens.de or please contact Thomas Lennartz: www.sai.uni-heidelberg.de/geo CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH ► International Workshop in Ellora ► International Conference on Ladakh ►Third Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group ► Practices of Argumentation in Ancient India ► International Conference: Memories of Post-Imperial Nations ► Pakistan General Elections 2013 PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 12

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 PRACTICES OF ARGUMENTATION IN ANCIENT INDIA – A NEW RESEARCH FOCUS IN HEIDELBERG by Birgit Kellner and Patrick McAllister CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH ► International Workshop in Ellora ► International Conference on Ladakh ►Third Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group ► Practices of Argumentation in Ancient India ► International Conference: Memories of Post-Imperial Nations ► Pakistan General Elections 2013 PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT The Ancient India is commonly considered as one out of three cultural settings in which logical theory developed independently, with first traces of the formation of explicit categories to analyse proofs and inferences dating to the second century CE. But argumentation is generally not fully determined by logical theories. Making arguments, rejecting or accepting them – all this is governed by a host of implicit norms, many of which will be culturally variant. Revealing such norms and tracing their operation then also helps to historically and socially situate the place of logical theorizing within a broader frame of intellectual history. Investigating dialogical aspects of argumentation practices suggests itself as a special research focus for ancient India, because argumentation in scholarly and scientific treatises in Sanskrit frequently proceeds in imaginary dialogues between the author and one or several opponents. As recent advances in mathematical logic, computer science, and artificial intelligence have created precise tools for the formal modelling of dialogues, this turns out to be a fertile ground for interdisciplinary collaboration. In two workshops held at the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” in Heidelberg in 2011 and 2012, Sanskritists, philosophers and experts in dialogical logic set out to employ new tools as a heuristic for the study of dynamic and dialogical features of argumentation. The workshop in 2011 focussed on Jayantabhatta’s Āgamadambara, a 9th century play, while the workshop in 2012 took Ratnakīrti’s Īśvarasādhanadūsana for its textual basis, an 11th century Buddhist refutation of the Nyāya concept of a god. The promising results of these workshops contributed to the successful constitution of a new research group on “Practices of Argumentation in Transcultural Perspective” at the Cluster. Led by Profs. Birgit Kellner (Buddhist Studies/South Asia and Tibet) and Joachim Kurtz (Intellectual History/China), the group combines and integrates three sub-projects in dialogical logic, Indology/Buddhology, and Chinese Studies. A new DFG-project “Systems of Epistemology in Classical Indian Philosophy”, with Dr. Patrick McAllister as the lead researcher, complements this growing research focus. Expanding their research agenda into a teaching context, Birgit Kellner and Dr. Sara Uckelman, a logician in the aforementioned research group, will also for the first time offer an introductory seminar on Buddhist logic at the University of Heidelberg in the winter term 2013/14. Sara Uckelman modeling Jayantabhatta’s Āgamadambara, a 9th century play (2011 workshop) John Taber analysing Ratnakīrti’s arguments against God (2012 workshop) | Page 13

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: MEMORIES OF POST-IMPERIAL NATIONS. THE AFTERMATH OF DECOLONIZATION, 19452010 Organized by Prof. Dr. Gita Dharampal-Frick and Prof. em. Dr. Dietmar Rothermund, the conference, held at the IWF on the 27th and 28th of May 2013, focused on the cultural memory of former colonial powers. International historians and social scientists from seven countries came together to try a comparison between the consequences of their countries´ imperial past. Italy, Japan, Belgium, France, Great-Britain, the Netherlands and Portugal had to give up their colonies at the end of World War II or during the era of decolonization. John Darwin (Oxford) divided British memory into three phases: First, the country sought to keep its international standing by replacing “Empire” by “Commonwealth”. Second, doubts concerning the “success” of the Commonwealth came up and the third phase is marked by a “New Imperial History” that raises shadow issues such as exploitation and racist suppression. Gert Oostindie (Leiden) pointed out the impact the waves of immigrants had on the Netherlands, such as granting Dutch civil rights and building a monument in memory of the slave trade. The following speaker, Pedro Monaville (Michigan) specified a particularly strong conspiracy of silence in Belgium until the nation was shaken by the publication of two books on the reign of terror of King Leopold in the Congo and on the murder of the first Prime Minister Lumumba. Another aspect is according to Mr. Monaville, that the Flemish are of the opinion that the colonial rule was only a matter of Walloon bourgeoisie. Eric Savarèse (Perpignan) emphasized the role of the “pieds noirs”, the about one million French repatriated from Algeria. Due to these “memory makers”, a law was passed in 2005 which honored the achievements of the French in North Africa – it was received with outrage and had to be revoked. His colleague Antonio Costa Pinto (Lisbon), specified the Portuguese cultural memory as being shaped by the pride of seafarers, not being associated with the violence of colonial rule. Moreover the end of Portugal´s colonial era was caused by a revolution that brought democracy to Portugal which has crucially influenced the Portuguese culture of remembrance. Nicola Labanca (Siena) reported that the post-imperial culture of memory in Italy has been characterized by a long conspiracy of silence. One of the reasons lies in the fact that the Italian imperialism was fascist in its last phase. Takashi Fujitani (Toronto) identified a similar, even stronger conspiracy of silence that was later called the time of “frozen memories”. Professor Fujitani stressed that the long silence was favored by the American victors who needed Japan as an ally in the Cold War. Partha S. Ghosh (New Delhi) reminded the audience of the South Asian cultural memory and the role the partition of India played in it. He identified a long time silence about the sacrifices the division demanded. Aleida Assmann (Constance) gave a final comment pointing out that the heroic memory cultures of earlier years have in recent times been replaced by tragic ones and that the recognition of “historic wounds” has led to transnational sensibility. After the successful conference, the next target will be to publish the anthology in 2014. CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH ► International Workshop in Ellora ► International Conference on Ladakh ►Third Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group ► Practices of Argumentation in Ancient India ► International Conference: Memories of Post-Imperial Nations ► Pakistan General Elections 2013 PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT | Page 14

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SAI Newsletter No. 3, July 2013 PAKISTAN GENERAL ELECTIONS 2013 A POST-ELECTION ExPERT BRIEFING IN BRUSSELS “Elections yes, but democracy not yet”- this was the verdict from European experts following a high-level briefing in the European Parliament on May 14th on the impacts of the recent Pakistani general election. “Last Saturday’s general elections constituted the first regular transfer of power between two civilian governments in Pakistan. Undoubtedly, this is a milestone in the country’s chequered political history” – started Dr. Siegfried O. Wolf, Lecturer at South Asia Institute and Director of Research of the South Asia Democratic Forum (SADF). Nevertheless, it is not a reason for optimism. “The 2013 elections were the bloodiest elections in Pakistan’s history. More than 200 Pakistanis lost their life and at least 700 got injured” – continued Dr. Wolf. Since its inception in 1947, Pakistan has had an extraordinarily problematic history with elections. It took more than two decades until the country experienced its first general elections in 1970 which ended up in a break-up of East Pakistan (today Bangladesh) due to the fact that the regime of Yahya Khan did not accept the electoral outcome. Since then, all elections, apart from those held in 2008, were rigged by the Pakistani army and intelligence agencies. However, in March 2013 a democratically elected civilian government completed its full five-year term and a democratic transfer of power was facilitated. Contrariwise, Dr. Martin Axmann, former Resident Representative of the Hanns Seidel Foundation in Islamabad, reminded the audience that first, Pakistan is still a military state and second, the next Prime Minister, Nawaz Sharif, had already held power twice and had been dismissed both times due to alleged corruption and misgovernment. Mr. Michael Meyer-Resende, Director, Reporting Democracy International, identified positive aspects including the mobilization of youth, the increased number of candidates and certain electoral reforms such as the improvement of the role of the Electoral Commission and the involvement of the opposition in appointing its members. Nevertheless, women voters are still underrepresented in Pakistan. The following speaker, Dr. habil. Christian Wagner, German Institute for International and Security Affairs, specified the foreign policy options of the new government. According to Dr. Wagner, due to the difficult economic situation, Pakistan will continue to expand the economic and political rapprochement with India as well as with the West. However, he noted that relations with the U.S. might be complicated by the decision of Pakistan’s government to open talks with the Taliban and its sharp criticism of U.S. drone attacks. All speakers concluded that elections are necessary but not a sufficient condition for democratic rule. Democracy is also characterized by the existence of individual rights of protections which means the grant of protection of life, freedom and property. Looking at the elections of May 11th 2013 as well as at the electoral campaigning the weeks before election day, the discussion came to the conclusion that Pakistan is still far away from matching these commonly accepted democratic principles. Contacts: SAI: Dr. Siegfried O. Wolf (swolf@sai.uni-heidelberg.de) SADF: Ekaterina Chirkova, Policy Advisor, SADF (ekaterina@sadf.eu) CONTENT NEWS TEACHING RESEARCH ► International Workshop in Ellora ► International Conference on Ladakh ►Third Annual Meeting of the South Asia Study Group ► Practices of Argumentation in Ancient India ► International Conference: Memories of Post-Imperial Nations ► Pakistan General Elections 2013 PEOPLE BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS CONTACT On the photo: (from the left) H.E. Mr P.M. Amza, Ambassador of Sri Lanka, Mr Michael Meyer-Resende, Director, Reporting Democracy International, Dr. Siegfried O. Wolf, Director of Research, SADF, Lecturer, SAI, Mr Paulo Casaca, Founder & Executive Director, SADF, Dr. habil. Christian Wagner, German Institute for International and Security Affairs, Dr. Martin Axmann, former Resident Representative of Hanns Seidel Foundation in Islamabad, Pakistan. | Page 15

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