PDC Manual

 

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PDC Manual

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 2014-2015 Professional Development Committee/Meeting Dates ……………… 3 2014-2015 PD Budget …………………………………………………………… 4 2014-2015 District Calendar.…………………………………………………….. 5 PDC Focus and Philosophy.……………………………………………………… 6 CSIP Goals/Indicators ……………………………………………………............ 7 PLC/CLT Focus Areas.…………….…………………………………………….. 8 PD Procedural Manual…………….…………………………………………….. 9-15 Missouri Educator Certification Classification & Renewals…………………….. 16-19 S.H.I.N.E.--New Teacher Induction Program…………………………………… 20-27 2014-2015 Mentor/Mentee Listing……………………………………………... 23-24 . Mentor/Mentee Documentation …………………………………..……………. 25-27 Guidelines for District Credit Hours …………………………………..…………. 28 PD Forms: MPS #2A through MPS #16 Forms………………………………….. 29-43 PLC/CLT Documentation Forms…………………………………………………. 45-62 2

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Moberly School District Professional Development Committee 2014-2015 Representative Sam Richardson Brandy Hackett Linda Lute Debbie Carroll Liz Crutcher Aundrea LeGrand Dana Ross Brandy Forsyth Parisa Stoddard Tara Link Ken Bailey Building Term Ends 2017 2017 2016 2015 2017 2017 2015 2015 MATC Sr. High School North Central Regional HS Middle School Chair South Park North Park Gratz Brown Elementary Representative at Large Central Office Representative Assistant Superintendent SHINE Coordinator Director of Assessment 2015 2015 Moberly School District Professional Development Committee Meeting Dates 2014-15 The committee will meet the third Thursday of each month as listed at the Moberly School District Administration office at 4:00 p.m. September 18, 2014 October 16, 2014 November 13, 2014 December 11, 2014 January 15, 2015 February 19, 2015 No March Meeting April 16, 2015 May 21, 2015 3

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PDC BUDGET 2014-2015 Curriculum Work in Vertical Teams As deemed necessary out of Building Level funding Supplies:  CPI Training--Books $400.00 $ 400.00 Stipends/Subs: “Mentor One” Program for Beginning Teachers  20 mentors @ $250 =  13 mentor training @ $75 =  SHINE I and II (Tara) PD Expenses:  Chairperson—  Stipend benefits ($7,025 x 15.95%) Subs/Stipends/Benefits  Subs(20 days @ $70) x 3 days  Sub benefits (7.65%) $5,000 $ 975 $150 $500 $1,121 $7,746.00 $4,200 $321 $4,521.00 Purchased Services: Professional Development Conference   Registration 11 @ $275--Columbia $3,025 $6,900 $ 9,925.00 Building—Travel and Subs        North Park South Park NCRS Gratz Brown Middle School High School Tech Center $3000 $3,000 $900 $4,875 $4,875 $4,875 $1,125 $ 22,650.00 Total $45,242 Budget Allocation: $74,383.11 4

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Moberly School District Professional Staff Development 2014-2015 The Professional Development Committee conducted and compiled a faculty professional development perception survey and reviewed district assessment data--from this information, the following is the 20132014 PD focus. Focus:  Continue implementing/refining PBS K-12.  Continue to implement differentiated instruction through the PLC process (Integrated technology, math strategies, RTI, Assessment for Learning, etc.)  Continue to refine the data team process to improve instructional practices (Assessment for Learning, Standards-referenced grading/practices) in the classroom and improve student achievement. Each staff member of the Moberly School District is responsible for understanding the Missouri Professional Development Guidelines. These guidelines are available at the Moberly School District website: www.moberly.k12.mo.us. Each building level Professional Development Committee Member has a hard copy of these guidelines for review. Philosophy:  PD needs to CONNECT current classroom teaching practices and student achievement data to desired classroom teaching practices and student achievement data.    PD needs to be the DRIVING FORCE behind improved classroom instruction and therefore student achievement PD needs to be an opportunity for teachers to INVESTIGATE areas of weakness, REFLECT on solutions, and PLAN actions for improvement. PD through PLC needs to be a continuous CYCLE OF CHANGE that is data driven. 6

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Comprehensive School Improvement Plan (CSIP) Goals and Indicators: STUDENT PREPARATION- Students will be well prepared to be successful in the academic and/or career pursuit of their choosing.  Student Engagement and Responsibility  Academic Achievement  Academic Rigor and Expectations  Post-Graduate Readiness EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES- The district will practice fiscally responsible management which clearly supports outstanding quality classroom instruction.  Resources Support Classroom  Safe and Healthy School Environment  Learning Environment  Plan of sustainability for resources TEACHER SUPPORT- Teachers are provided the essential tools and support necessary to engage students and promote academic achievement.  Professional Development  Administrative Support  Instructional Time  Community and Parent Support COMMUNICATION AND CLIMATE- Effective communication within the district and community for all stakeholders will provide for true partnerships.  Parent/Teacher Interaction  Internal/External District Communication  Parent Involvement  Parent and Student Satisfaction 7

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PLC/CLT Activities and Focus Areas: Each PLC will identify authentic and relevant research questions to guide CLT investigations. These may be distilled from the following focus areas or developed following initial research, and all questions must include baseline data.  A Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum PK-12 By examining and conducting professional conversations regarding student data for strengths and areas for improvement, the professional development committee will work with teachers to analyze the written and taught curriculum. Bringing the written curriculum, the taught curriculum, and the assessed curriculum together has been a focus. The intent of this focus will be to capture and include in the curriculum research-based, technology-focused instructional strategies and common assessments (both formative and summative assessments). The curriculum will be available electronically for district staff and community stakeholders. Using PLC as a guiding principal, action research will occur during CLT to insure that data is driving the instruction. Utilization of Effective Instructional Practices Teachers will focus on development of performance assessments to prepare students for the Missouri Assessment Program. Recognizing that students are unique individuals with their own strengths, weaknesses, and learning styles, teachers will explore techniques to help each student succeed through a data driven process facilitated by PLC’s. Data analysis training to effectively utilize data to drive instruction will be a focus. Teaching strategies, questioning techniques and authentic assessments will be applied to better meet the needs of all the students in each classroom. Classroom Management Techniques (PK-12) Teacher will explore a variety of strategies which will increase the efficiency, and effectiveness of their learning environment. Positive Behavior Support Training (PBS PK-12) will continue this year. Enhancement of Professional Learning Communities to a Three Tiered Model of Interventions Moberly School District will continue to enhance a Professional Learning Community (PLC) which will focus on learning and cultivating a collaborative culture with a goal of learning for all. The CLT will serve as the major force utilized for PLC’s but with a switch to action orientation dedicated to continuous improvement driven by data and designed for classroom change based on results. The true measure will be increased student achievement.    Revised July, 2012 8

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROCEDURAL MANUAL I. Statement of Purpose It is the mission of the Moberly School District Professional Development Committee to provide planned professional development programs and activities which stimulate and encourage the professional growth of both new and experienced teachers. II. Philosophy of Professional Development The professional teacher should possess skills and abilities which focus on the student beyond the traditional theoretical approach to a demonstration of the critical teacher requirements to promote successful teaching experiences creating a performance-based instructional environment. These concepts should not only be measured against the number of clock hours of instruction a teacher may acquire, but also provide for recognition of each professional’s skills and abilities to be taught, assessed, valued, and recognized by their capacity to develop knowledge and skills in the students under their charge, and to adapt knowledge bases to address new challenges to their environment.. Certain principles should be addressed when a vision is developed of the teaching professional in relationship to career objectives. Accountability should be viewed as a cooperative evaluation of performance between the principles. It should equitably evaluate what a teacher must know, understand and be capable of doing in order to provide an authentic assessment that truly represents the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for the desired learning outcomes for programs and individuals. The need to examine the teaching professional as a lifelong learner incorporates the assumption that a career’s demands will alter with passage of time. Professional development opportunities should be viewed as a career investment. A system of service credit should be developed which recognizes the professional’s experience and continuing education programs outside of the institution environment for professional licensure purposes to ensure 100% of staff are Highly Qualified . Highly Qualified Teacher  Full State certification. Has obtained full State certification as a teacher or passed the State teacher licensing examination and holds a license to teach in the State, and does not have certification or licensure requirements waived on an emergency, temporary or provisional basis.  Bachelor’s degree  Passing a rigorous State Academic subject-matter test in each academic subjects in which the teacher teaches  Uses the high objective uniform state standard of evaluation (HOUSSE) for Lifetime Certified Teachers and Special Education Teachers 9

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III. Role of the Professional Development Committee The role of the Professional Development Committee is to define, assess, plan for and implement programs to meet the professional growth needs of teachers by carrying out the four responsibilities in the law. A. To work with beginning teachers and experienced teachers in identifying instructional concerns and remedies. B. To serve as a confidential consultant upon a teacher’s request. C. To assess faculty needs and develop in-service opportunities for school staff. D. To present to the proper authority faculty suggestions, ideas and recommendations pertaining to classroom instruction within the school district. 10

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I. MEMBERSHIP A. Board Policy The committee shall have no more than twelve members with membership on the committee spread across disciplines and attendance centers. Committee members shall be certified staff members with a minimum of three years of teaching experience and of at least two years experience in the Moberly School District. Membership Term Committee members shall serve a term of three years. Terms shall be staggered so that approximately one-third of the committee will be new each year. New members shall be selected no later than May 1. Election of Members Committee members shall be selected by the classroom teachers, librarians and counselors of the district. Administrators may be selected to serve on the committee but may not participate in the selection process. Appointed Members The Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum/Instruction shall appoint Ex Officio member to the committee as is deemed appropriate. Appointed members shall not be voting members. B. C. D. Those who serve as Professional Development Committee (PDC) members should be familiar with: 1. How to identify the roles and responsibilities of the Professional Development Committee (PDC) and how members interface with other “key” people in the district as they relate to the professional development process and plan. How to develop and use effective communication skills, conflict resolution skills, and collaboration strategies with teacher colleagues and administrators. How to consistently treat individuals and teams fairly while employing sound ethics and maintaining confidentiality. How to assess, prioritize, and align the professional development needs and candidates of the teachers, school sites, district and state. How to access high quality resources to provide services and information to the district. How to incorporate research-based “best practices” into curriculum, instruction and staff training. How to design and use evaluation strategies to review and refine professional development plans and activities. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 11

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Member Training If Professional Development Committees (PDCs) are to be effective, they must plan, implement and evaluate their professional development programs. To accomplish this they may wish to seek help from one or more of the following services: the Northeast Missouri Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC) and the Heart of Missouri RPDC, The Leadership Academy PD Series, the Missouri Staff Development Conference, Missouri Partnership for Educational Renewal, Missouri Council of School Administrators, colleges, universities, associations, and organizations. The topics for Professional Development Committee (PDC) member training may include:  The roles and responsibilities of committee members in assisting both beginning and practicing teachers defined by statute and district policy. In addition, the roles of other key people in the professional development process should be discussed. Guidelines and suggestions for effective group interaction including the committee’s role in improving communication among teachers, administrators and higher education representatives. Conversations, panel discussions and round table discussions could be planned. The ethical responsibilities of members including the need for confidentiality. Effective assessment methods for determining learning needs of practicing teachers and how to use assessment information to establish priorities. Good resources (people and publications) that provide information and services related to professional development. For example, the Standards for Staff Development from the Learning Forward Organization is an excellent resource for Professional Development Committee (PDC) member training. Effective tools for evaluating professional development activities in order to promote teacher development and improve student learning. An overview of theoretical foundations of teaching and learning to help committee members design programs for their districts. Needs identified in the district’s Comprehensive School Improvement Plan (CSIP). National, state and district models of school improvement. Case studies of best practices. Characteristics of effective staff development. Effective models of staff development. Principles of adult learning and group dynamics. Stages of change. Data based decision-making.               12

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Meetings The committee shall convene for monthly meetings throughout the school year. Monthly meeting dates and locations shall be published. Additional meetings or workshop sessions shall be scheduled if deemed necessary by a simple majority of the voting members. Monthly meetings shall be open to all certified staff members. Elected Offices The committee shall elect a chairman, vice-chairman and recording secretary each school year. Candidates shall be nominated and the officers elected by simple majority of the members present. The election shall proceed during the first yearly committee meeting of the school year. DUTIES OF THE OFFICERS CHAIRMAN The committee chairman shall be responsible for arranging meeting dates and locations; formulating monthly meeting agendas, convening and adjourning meetings and drafting an annual committee report to the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction prior to the September board meeting. RECORDING SECRETARY The recording secretary shall record minutes of all regular and special committee meetings. The minutes shall be submitted for committee amendment and approval at the following regularly scheduled meeting. The recording secretary shall also be responsible for any correspondence between the committee and other agents. 13

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BEGINNING TEACHER ASSISTANCE The Excellence in Education Act requires establishment of professional development programs specifically for beginning teachers who have no prior teaching experience. By offering collegial support and practical assistance, these programs should help beginning teachers polish their skills, improve their chances for success and encourage them to stay in the profession. MENTOR TEACHERS: The Excellence in Education Act requires that beginning teacher support systems include a mentor program. A mentor teacher has been described as a “coach, training, positive role model, developer of talent, (and) opener of doors”. Any teacher who has five years of experience and is willing to be trained will be eligible to volunteer to serve as a mentor. Ideally, a mentor should be teaching the same grade level and in the same area of certification as the beginning teacher. A mentor also could be a faculty member with certification and experience in the same area as the beginning teacher, or one teaching at the same grade level as the beginning teacher. An administrator certificated in the same grade level as the beginning teacher could serve as mentor as well. MENTOR SELECTION: The principal should be responsible for identifying mentor teachers. Mentors should be identified in sufficient time to allow for training. Also, mentors should receive their assignments with adequate time to help beginning teachers prepare their initial professional development plans. Thorough and consistent training of mentor teachers is very important to the success of the program. A district’s professional development committee should arrange summer training programs for mentors. The training should address these topics: 1. The role and responsibilities of all members of the new teacher’s professional development team, including the new teacher, the mentor teacher, the supervisor (typically the building principal) and the higher education representative. 2. The role and responsibilities of the professional development committee. 3. Techniques of coaching and counseling. 4. The format and content of the professional development plan. 5. How to use teacher evaluation to help the beginning teacher draw on areas of strength. 6. Resources (people and publications) available to beginning teachers at the district, higher education, regional and state levels. 7. Techniques of classroom observation. 8. Current theory and models of instruction and classroom management. 14

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Beginning Teachers:  Develop and implement a professional development plan.  Take steps to complete thirty (30) hours of in-service training.  Participate in beginning teacher assistance program.  Meet with mentor on a regular basis (at least once a month) and document contact using the log provided in the Mentor Handbook.  Observer “master” teachers during classroom instruction. Professional Development Plan According to law; school districts must provide a “professional development plan” for each faculty member who has no teaching experience. A district may wish to delegate to its professional development committee(s) responsibility for ensuring that each beginning teacher has a plan. The plan must address at least the teacher’s first two years in the classroom. The goals identified in the plan should be related, in part, to the competencies outlined in the Missouri Model Teacher and Leader Standards. The plan also may reflect the findings of other education research on effective teaching. It must be emphasized, however, that the purpose of the professional development plan is to assist, not to evaluate, the beginning teacher. The plan must respond to individual needs and may take into account results of the fourth-year college assessment, if provided. The beginning teacher’s mentor should initiate preparation of the professional development plan. Ideally, this process should begin as soon as the new teacher is hired by the district. Subsequent planning between the mentor and beginning teacher should occur prior to or during the first month of the school year. These initial professional development plans will probably appear very similar, since most new teachers have comparable training and the mentors have had limited opportunities to assess individual needs. Each district also will have similar goals for its new teachers. At this stage, the plan should include goals that deal with areas such as discipline, understanding of district policies, and use of curriculum guides, equipment and materials. As soon as appropriate, or at least by the beginning of the second semester, the beginning teacher should elaborate upon the original professional development plan, tailoring the goals to his or her needs. The new teacher’s mentor, supervisor (typically the building principal) and high education representative may wish to form a professional development team to help the teacher with this process. The beginning teacher should continue to adjust the plan as he or she gains experience during the first two years in the profession. Copies of the initial plan and all subsequent revisions should be filed in the new teacher’s building where it will be readily available for review and updating. Convenient access to the plan is important since progress often depends on frequent review and mid-course adjustments. 15

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