Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

 

Embed or link this publication

Description

Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

Popular Pages


p. 1

INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN THE 21ST CENTURY Global Challenges for Health and Society October 24-26, 2018 Friedrich Schiller University Jena Conference Program www.infectcontrol.de

[close]

p. 2

Scientific Organization Axel Brakhage Jörg Hacker Michael Hecker Werner Solbach Administrative Organization Hanna Heidel-Fischer heidel-fischer@infectcontrol.de Sandra Kumm sandra.kumm@leopoldina.org

[close]

p. 3

Greeting by the President of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena Walter Rosenthal Dear researchers, dear industry partners, dear conference participants, Welcome to the conference Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century; welcome to Jena! I am delighted that the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Hamburg are co-organizing this conference with the support of the consortium InfectControl 2020. Jena has a long-standing reputation as a city of science and technology, being the municipality with the highest density of research institutions in the eastern part of Germany. Next to the Friedrich Schiller University, the Ernst Abbe University of Applied Sciences and the University Hospital, research institutions include institutes of the Max Planck Society, the Leibniz Association, the Helmholtz Association and Fraunhofer Society, just to name a few. Thanks to their close collaboration, these institutions form a unique research environment in Jena. The consortium InfectControl 2020 is a prime example of this collaboration, connecting Jena to various science locations in Germany. Research at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena is bundled in three focus areas. They are the result of an intensive development in the last years, but they also create orientation towards future research excellence. The focus area “Light” covers the disciplines of photonics, optics, and innovative materials. The focus area “Life” includes microbiology, infection research, biodiversity, and chemical biology, whereas “Liberty” concentrates on social changes and ethics. We are excited that our efforts have recently resulted in Jena’s first Cluster of Excellence. The Cluster Balance of the Microverse bridges the focus areas “Life” and “Light”. It combines expertise in the life sciences with optics/photonics, materials science, bioinformatics, and ethics, thus creating an innovative and unique research cooperation. Infection research is an important focus within the Cluster of Excellence and the focus areas. It is also the topic of this conference. Infectious diseases represent a global threat that can only be tackled successfully if different scientific disciplines and the research-based industry unite their forces. Consequently, this conference brings together representatives from a wide range of research fields, such as evolution, clinical research, public health, and genomics. The interdisciplinary approach of the conference is also reflected in its programme, which includes nine thematically focused sessions. As a special highlight, we are looking forward to the evening lecture by the Nobel Prize laureate Harald zur Hausen. I wish you a rewarding conference and a good time in Jena! Sincerely Yours Walter Rosenthal Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 1

[close]

p. 4

Greeting by the Thuringian Minister of Economic Affairs, Science and Digital Society Wolfgang Tiefensee Dear participants of the conference Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century, The serious effects of infectious diseases worldwide are indisputable. Almost every day we receive media reports about new and multi-resistant pathogens. The topic is more than pressing as there is a lack of new active ingredients and reliable diagnostic and therapy methods. In order to address this worrying development, joint efforts by science, industry and politics are needed. Your work is therefore of enormous importance not only for Germany but for society as a whole. Infection research is furthermore a driving force for science and industry in Thuringia, and thus an important focus in Jena, the scientific core of Thuringia. The university and numerous other research institutions and companies have been working closely and successfully together for decades now, jointly developing an unmistakable research profile. In this profile infection research is a focal point, and here we have achieved world class quality - as the recently acquired Cluster of Excellence Balance of the Microverse impressively proves. The close connection of top research and application is also reflected in the leading position Jena has been taking now for years in the number of patent applications per capita. We are very pleased with this successful development in Thuringia, especially because within the framework of the European Thuringian innovation strategy “RIS3 Thuringia”, a major focus is in the field of “Healthy Life and Health Economy”. The nation-wide consortium InfectControl 2020, co-organizing this conference, is an important cornerstone in this field of innovation, particularly as one of the strengths of the consortium is its ability to connect science and business. I am delighted that with the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Hamburg two academies of outstanding importance have come to Jena to discuss the future of infection research and control together with InfectControl 2020 at the Friedrich Schiller University. Together you are laying the foundations for excellent science and healthy economic development in the coming decades. I wish you rewarding and successful days in Jena. Sincerely Yours Wolfgang Tiefensee 2 // Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

[close]

p. 5

Greeting by the conference organizers Dear colleagues, dear participants of the conference Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century, Management of infectious diseases still poses a great challenge for society and health care systems. According to WHO data, infectious diseases still account for 12% of annual deaths. In the late 1960s, the optimism deriving from the success of improved hygiene measures, vaccines and antibiotics had generated the belief that infectious diseases will be defeated soon. Changes in society, technology and the microorganisms themselves though are contributing to the emergence of new diseases, the re-emergence of diseases once controlled, and to the development of antimicrobial resistance. The spread of infectious diseases is partially caused by changes in human behavior: Increased mobility and trade, globalized food distribution, growing urbanization, and inappropriate use of antibiotics facilitate the fast distribution of pathogens. Furthermore climate change is exerting a profound influence on infectious diseases, by changing their geographic distribution and vector conditions. In addition, mutations, gene transfer and recombination are responsible for pathogen variability. This situation requires a range of measures including the development of new and effective vaccines, effective monitoring systems, and faster and more reliable diagnostics. The development of genome sequencing technology has revolutionized infectious disease research offering new data-generating platforms and an innovative knowledge base. It thus enables a better understanding of diseases and the associated pathogens. To combat these new infection dynamics and the evolving diseases themselves, an integrated and holistic approach is needed. We are therefore elated to bring together representatives from a wide range of disciplines to discuss recent developments in infection research at this conference. This was only possible by a joint effort of the National Academy of Scienc- es Leopoldina, the Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Hamburg and the consortium InfectControl 2020. If we want to succeed in controlling infectious diseases in the 21st century we need to form partnerships at all levels. We wish you rewarding and inspiring days in Jena that we hope will contribute to shaping this global alliance. Sincerely Yours Axel Brakhage Spokesperson of the consortium InfectControl 2020 Jörg Hacker President of the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina – National Academy of Sciences Michael Hecker German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina – National Academy of Sciences Werner Solbach Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Hamburg Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 3

[close]

p. 6

Program Wednesday, October 24 11:30 Arrival, Registration, Refreshments 12:30 Opening Remarks by Walter Rosenthal President of the Friedrich Schiller University 12:45 Opening Remarks by Wolfgang Tiefensee Thuringian Ministry of Economics, Science and Digital Society 13:00 Opening Remarks by Axel Brakhage Friedrich Schiller University and Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology 13:10 15:10 Vaccines and host-based Therapies | Chair: Werner Solbach, Co-Chair: Emil Reisinger Rino Rappuoli | GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, an achievement of civilization and health insurance for the future Stefan Kaufmann | Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology The TB vaccine VPM1002: from drawing board to clinical efficacy testing Alexander Scheffold | University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein Pathogen-specific T cells reveal the host-pathogen interaction status Carlos Guzmán | Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research Tailoring immune responses to vaccines Coffee break 15:30 17:00 InfectControl 2020: One Health | Chair: Oliver Kurzai, Co-Chair: Peter Schmid Thomas Mettenleiter | Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut One medicine – One health – One planet Fabian Leendertz | Robert Koch Institute Identifying innovative sentinels for emerging infectious diseases Petra Gastmeier | Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin Better use of antibiotics by better information and communication Coffee break 17:30 18:30 Barriers to Development and Clinical Research | Chair: Emil Reisinger, Co-Chair: Axel Brakhage Helga Rübsamen-Schaeff | AiCuris Lessons from virology: how can research for resistance-breaking antibiotics be improved? Karl Broich | Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices How can regulators foster new developments? Coffee break 18:45 19:45 Evening Lecture | Chair: Axel Brakhage Harald zur Hausen | German Cancer Research Center Specific infections causing random mutations – concept and data for human colon and breast cancers Reception 4 // Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

[close]

p. 7

Thursday, October 25 09:00 10:00 Epidemiology and Public Health | Chair: Konrad Reinhart, Co-Chair: Oliver Kurzai Flavia Machado | Federal University of São Paulo Sepsis: a global threat that needs a global solution Petra Dickmann | Jena University Hospital Public Health and Health Security – re-thinking the societal challenges of infectious disease Coffee break 10:30 12:00 Pandemics | Chair: Lothar Wieler, Co-Chair: Tanja Schneider Christian Drosten | Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin MERS, Zika, and other puzzles in global infectious diseases Richard Neher | Biozentrum, University Basel Real-time tracking of RNA virus evolution and spread Stephan Günther | Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine Viral hemorrhagic fevers in Africa: research and disease control Lunch 13:00 Antimicrobial Resistances | Chair: Carmen Buchrieser, Co-Chair: Tanja Schneider Lothar Wieler | Robert Koch Institute Stemming the tide of antimicrobial resistances: conservation through innovation Rotem Sorek | Weizmann Institute of Science Regulation of antibiotic resistance with small RNA sensors 14:00 15:00 Antibiotics and Anti-Infectives | Chair: Rolf Müller, Co-Chair: Axel Brakhage Christian Hertweck | Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology Antimicrobial discovery inspired by ecological interactions Helen Zgurskaya | University of Oklahoma Molecular determinants of antibiotic activities and permeation in Gram-negative bacteria Coffee break 15:30 17:00 Pathogenicity and Genomics | Chair: Michael Hecker, Co-Chair: Thomas Mettenleiter Pascale Cossart | Institut Pasteur New insights in Listeria pathogenicity Bernhard Hube | Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology Virulence or avirulence? Dual function genes in Candida albicans Carmen Buchrieser | Institut Pasteur Legionella: virulence strategies shaped by interdomain horizontal gene transfer Coffee break 17:15 19:00 Pathogenicity and Genomics | Chair: Michael Hecker, Co-Chair: Thomas Mettenleiter Ron Fouchier | Erasmus Medical Center Molecular determinants of pathogenicity and transmission of influenza viruses Julian Parkhill | Sanger Institute Signatures of emergence and transmission in bacterial pathogens Conference Dinner – invited guests only – Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 5

[close]

p. 8

Friday, October 26 09:00 Infections in the Media | Chair: Petra Gastmeier Volker Stollorz | Science Media Center Infectious media: why and when outbreaks get viral? 09:30 Diagnostics | Chair: Stefan Kaufmann, Co-Chair: Oliver Kurzai January Weiner | Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology Predicting the onset of tuberculosis with host biomarkers Alexander Mellmann | University of Münster Real-time genome sequencing of resistant bacteria provides precise infection control Susanne Häußler | Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research Antimicrobial resistance profiling in Gram-negative pathogens 11:00 Coffee break 11:30 Demand and Market | Chair: Peter Schmid Jochen Maas | Sanofi Research on anti-infectives and antibiotics: is it still economically attractive? 12:00 Evolution of Man and Microbe | Chair: Werner Solbach Johannes Krause | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History The genetic history of the plague: from the stone age to the 18th century 12:30 Lunch and Departure 6 // Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

[close]

p. 9

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 24, 2018 Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 7

[close]

p. 10

Vaccines and host-based Therapies Wednesday - October, 24 13:10 – 15:10 Vaccines have significantly contributed to the control of many infectious diseases and they remain amongst the most cost-efficient intervention measures in medicine. Protection afforded by vaccines is based on stimulation of a specific protective immune response in the host. Efficacious vaccines are primarily based on the induction of antibodies which neutralize or block toxins, adhesion molecules, virulence factors etc. Yet, for several major diseases, efficient vaccines have not yet been developed. In most of these cases, protection largely depends on acquired cellular immunity mediated by T lymphocytes in addition to humoral immunity mediated by antibodies pro- duced by B lymphocytes. Increasingly, a better understanding of the delicate immune balance underlying protective immunity is being harnessed for novel vaccination strategies. Recent advances in bio-technology have allowed for rational vaccine design against such threats including the major infectious killers HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and hepatitis C. The vaccine concept has been broadened to include host-directed therapies which modulate protective immune responses and re-establish functions of subverted or misused host reactions against pathogens. This session provides an overview of novel vaccination strategies notably on reverse genetics and fine-tuning of immune responses for vaccine development; gives an example of rational vaccine development against the major threat tuberculosis; and offers insights into mechanisms underlying host-based interventions. 8 // Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

[close]

p. 11

Rino Rappuoli GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, an achievement of civilization and health insurance for the future Alexander Scheffold University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein Pathogen-specific T cells reveal the hostpathogen interaction status Carlos Guzmán Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research Tailoring immune responses to vaccines Stefan Kaufmann Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology The TB vaccine VPM1002: from drawing board to clinical efficacy testing Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 9

[close]

p. 12

InfectControl 2020: One Health Wednesday - October, 24 15:30 – 17:00 In the 21st century, the development of solutions for improved prevention and control of infectious diseases is no longer the preserve of an isolated group of medical specialists. In contrast, it has become a challenge for society as a whole, requiring joint efforts of experts from a broad variety of disciplines who work together locally, nationally and globally to achieve optimal health for people, animals and the environment. This concept is key to the One Health approach. For the first time in Germany, the diverse expertise required to achieve these goals has been combined under the umbrella of InfectControl 2020. InfectControl 2020 is a nation-wide research network funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and has set itself the goal of developing new strategies to combat human infections and to contain new and resistant pathogens. The consortium focuses on the responsible handling of antimicrobial substances and addresses prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. The particular strength of InfectControl 2020 lies in the composition of the consortium, which for the first time brings together partners from all different subject areas in order to jointly break new ground in infection control. The session „InfectControl 2020: One Health“ provides insights into some of these interdisciplinary and innovative approaches to infection control and prevention. 10 // Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

[close]

p. 13

Thomas Mettenleiter Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut One medicine – One health – One planet Fabian Leendertz Robert Koch Institute Identifying innovative sentinels for emerging infectious diseases Petra Gastmeier Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin Better use of antibiotics by better information and communication Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 11

[close]

p. 14

Barriers to Development and Clinical Research Wednesday - October, 24 17:30 – 18:30 Due to overboarding and non-harmonized regulations, the number of clinical trials and trial participants in Europe has markedly declined during the last years. Enormous costs of conducting clinical trials and long waiting times for official permissions and contracting have additionally hindered clinical trials throughout the EU. Another reason for the steady decline of clinical trials is the increase of new therapeutic agents, for which no regulatory pathways exist. Phage therapies and personalized therapies are examples of such novel developments. To support their further development it is crucial to establish corresponding guidelines. Nevertheless, the quality of clinical studies in the EU is known to be excellent. Safety, tolerability, efficacy, informed consent, pharmacology, toxicity, ethics, statistics, privacy protection, contracting and many more categories are to a certain extent necessary for the benefit of patients and products, but contraproductive when overambitious. New standardized regulations for clinical trials in the EU could prompt to focus on the real challenges of safety, efficacy and informed consent and should minimize meticulous bureaucracy. The expansion of Clinical Trials Networks will furthermore enable efficient corporations across different institutions. 12 // Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century

[close]

p. 15

Helga Rübsamen-Schaeff AiCuris Lessons from virology: how can research for resistance-breaking antibiotics be improved? Karl Broich Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices How can regulators foster new developments? Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century // 13

[close]

Comments

no comments yet