HCTS Newletter Spring 2018

 

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HCTS Newletter Spring 2018

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NEWSLETTER SPRING 2018 Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Editorial Prof. Nikolas Jaspert Acting Director Dear colleagues and friends, the last few months have not been easy. Since it became clear that the Cluster “Asia and Europe” will no longer be part of the Excellence Strategy, many ideas have been discussed, some of which sadly could not be debated in public. This situation has put a strain on every member of the Cluster and the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies (HCTS). One result of the current situation is that as of now, our focus will lie on the HCTS. What started early in the second funding period as the platform designed to ultimately sustain the Cluster’s approaches and research agenda, will in the near future effectively need to fulfill this task. The HCTS is certainly smaller than the Cluster, but we are determined to continue what we have begun efficiently, while also using the new developments to recalibrate the HCTS’s strategic setup as a central research institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences. At the same time, and after an initial and necessary phase of disappointment and sorrow, new initiatives are beginning and first successes can be announced. It is my great pleasure to officially welcome Michael Radich as our new Professor for Buddhist Studies. Winning – and finally bringing – him over from New Zealand has not been easy to accomplish, but the fact that he has finally taken up his position at the HCTS underlines the continued support by the state of Baden-Württemberg. Michael is already rebuilding the team for Buddhist Studies and is looking forward to engaging with you! A modern institute is in need of up-to-date representation and innovative concepts. We are currently working on the launch of a new website for the HCTS. In addition, we have once again issued a call for Activity, Publication, and Startup Grants in our Transcultural Forays programme, supporting researchers in their transcultural visions. Content News (p. 2) Transcultural Forays Interview with Michael Brown HERA: East Asian Uses of the European Past People (p. 6) New members at the HCTS Interview with Michael Radich Grants and Awards Interview with Ivan Sablin Appointments Events (p. 13) HCTS Stadtgespräche Workshop for Barbara Mittler Publications (p. 15) E-Journal “Transcultural Studies” New publications Selected articles Member Activites (p. 18) Studies (p. 20) Exchange and cooperation Transcultural Studies Student Conference Next Issue Autumn 2018 Contact Press Office Anna Echtenacher Phone: +49-6221-54-4353 Fax: +49-6221-54-4012 E-Mail: press@asia-europe. uni-heidelberg.de

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” NEWS Also, CATS is visibly near to completion! The South Asia Institute, the Institute of Anthropology, and the Centre for East Asian Studies will soon join us next door on Campus Bergheim to form a strong, Asia-focused institutional compound. Admittedly, the difficult times are not over yet. This newsletter, however, is evidence that Transcultural Studies are in a process of transformation and will continue to be an invaluable asset to Heidelberg, to reap recognition and to produce excellent results. Any transformation is always both a challenge and a chance. We will definitely take the opportunity to achieve the best for the Humanities and Social Sciences here! Enjoy the read and have a fruitful semester! Sincerely, Nikolas Jaspert Studium Generale Lecture Series Nikolas Jaspert Acting Director Dr. Oliver Lamers Scientific Project Manager Christiane Brosius and Axel Michaels accompany German President on Travels in India Profs. Christiane Brosius and Axel Michaels joined the German Federal President Frank-Walter Steinmeier during his state visit to India. Both professors, who are experts on India, were part of the official scientific delegation from March 22–24, and participated in the programme of the Federal President and his wife. On the first day, Axel Michaels accompanied Frank-Walter Steinmeier to Varansi, where the President visited the Archeological Museum and the Buddhist place Sarnath, amongst others. Steinmeier also talked to students of the Benares Hindu University about religious diversity. On the same day, Christiane Brosius joined Steinmeier’s wife, Elke Büdenbender, for a private programme. On the second day, the delegation visited the Friday mosque Jama Masjid and Frank-Walter Steinmeier gave a talk at the University of Delhi and engaged in discussion with representatives of the civil society, science, and economy. The third day was dedicated to receptions and a meeting with the Indian president and the prime minister, but also to meetings with further high-ranking personalities from public life. The German Federal President continued his state visit until March 26. This semester’s topic in the Studium Generale lecture series at Heidelberg University is “Die Stadt von Morgen. Zukunftsfragen der Gesellschaft.” It takes place on Mondays at 7:30 pm at the Aula of the Neue Universität and comprises ten interdisciplinary lectures, which were conceptualized in cooperation with the Institute of Geography, the Reallabor Urban Office, and the IBA Heidelberg. On May 7, Prof. Christiane Brosius, the HCTS professor for Visual and Media Anthropology, reflected on the talk “Die Zukunft städtischer Vergangenheit: Bedeutung und Schutz urbanen Kulturerbes in Asien” by Prof. Dr. Frauke Kraas from Cologne University and commened on the topic as the respondent. Federal President Steinmeier and First Lady Büdenbender with Prof Amrita Narlikar (GIGA), Prof Axel Michaels, and Christian Schneider (UNICEF – right) © Stephanie Benke Newsletter Spring 2018 Prof. Christiane Brosius 2

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” NEWS Transcultural Forays Call for applications renewed twice The Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies has renewed its call for applications in the Transcultural Forays programme twice during the last semester. Scholars in all career stages could apply for Activity and Publication Grants until January 8, 2018 and again for Activity Grants, Publication Grants, and Startup Grants until April 13, 2018. The Publication Grant aims at encouraging the writing of an academic publication – a monograph or peer-reviewed articles. The publication should either have originated in the context of the Cluster “Asia and Europe,” or have clear connections to the research agenda of the HCTS. The Activity Grant supports the organization of academic events, such as international conferences, workshops, lecture series, public outreach, and transfer. Only events planned in the context of preparations for future collaborative research projects at the HCTS and possible applications for third party funding will be supported. The Startup Grant is aimed at supporting the conceptualization of research projects and the preparation of third-party funding applications allocated to the HCTS. The application for third-party funding has to be applied for within six months of receipt of the startup grant. Applicants must have finished their PhD or equivalent at the time of application. The project should make intensive use of the transcultural perspective. Transcultural Forays: Michael brown You were one of the first researchers to start in the Transcultural Forays Programme. What made you apply for this particular grant? I was especially attracted by the scope of the transcultural perspective. My background is in landscape archaeology, which is all about putting ancient artefacts within their wider environmental context. The combination of the two methodologies allows you to ask big questions in a structured way. My cluster project is looking at a newly discovered centre called Rabana-Merquly of the Parthian Empire, which 2000 years ago stretched from Mesopotamia to South Asia, so the programme is a really good fit. How is the work on your project proceeding? Can you tell us a little about that? It’s been essential to have several months to concentrate on the project and prepare all the background material needed for applications. No detailed topographic maps have ever been drawn for the region of Iraq (Piramagrun) that I’m working in, so that’s a basic thing that I’ve had to produce. I’ve also been talking with local stakeholders in the Iraqi antiquities service. In addition to core academic research, an important long-term aim of the project is to provide colleagues in the region with interpretative materials which they can use to explain the site to the public. A preliminary fieldwork report has also been accepted for publication in the journal Iraq. How did you come up with the idea for this project in the first place? In 2016 I was a member of a survey team (led by Prof. Peter Miglus, ZAW) that was investigating rock-reliefs in Iraqi Kurdistan. When we visited the Rabana site it became obvious that there was a lot of massive architecture associated with the sculptures which hadn’t been recorded. In Spring 2017 I went back with a small team to take a closer look. What we found surpassed all expectations; it’s a major archaeological discovery that really adds to our understanding of Parthian civilization. The Cluster project is about putting the ruins in their broader global context, at the intersection of Occidental and Oriental cultures during the early first millennium AD. Newsletter Spring 2018 new projects starting April 2018 PD Dr. Maria Ivanova Revolution Reloaded: Risk and Sustainability in the First Agricultural Expansion in Europe (Sixth–Fourth Millennia BCE) Dr. Amelia Bonea Fragile Objects, Fragile Histories: Paleobotany and the Making of a Scientific Discipline in India Simon Cubelic State-building and the Formation of Political Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Nepal Stone staircase uncovered during trial excavations at Rabana in 2017 © Michael Brown 3

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” NEWS “Shaping Asia/s” network meets for first workshop in Bielefeld The “Shaping Asia” network is a bottom-up networking initiative by a number of scholars from the humanities and social sciences, all working on Asia, and based at 18 German universities (FU and HU Berlin, Bielefeld, Bochum, Bonn, Bremen, Erfurt, Göttingen, Frankfurt, Freiburg, Halle, Heidelberg, Leipzig, Marburg, München, Münster, Tübingen, Würzburg) plus six Asian partners so far. Prof. Christiane Brosius coordinates the network in cooperation with Prof. Joanna Pfaff-Czarnecka (Bielefeld University.) On February 6–7, the network members met for a workshop at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF) at Bielefeld. As a result of the workshop, the network defined three lines of research for further collaboration: public cultures and socio-spatial transformations, knowledge production and circulation, governance and governmentality. Also, the collaboration with researchers in Asia was brought to an institutional level with universities and their branch offices in Japan (University of Tokyo), China (Shanghai – Fudan University), Singapore (National University of Singapore), India (South Asia Institute Branch Office/HCSA), Nepal (South Asia Institute Branch Office) and Indonesia (Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University). The workshop was financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF) Bielefeld. Centre for Asian and Transcultural Studies is growing The Centre for Asian and Transcultural Studies (CATS) is being built at Campus Bergheim next to the Karl Jaspers Centre. Upon its completion, it will unite the South Asia Institute, the Centre for East Asian Studies, the Institute of Anthropology, and the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies. Besides four stock buildings, which will house the institutes mentioned above, a new research building, called the “Kollaboratorium,” will form the centre of CATS. When CATS is finished, it will open up a space of 5.000 square metres with teaching rooms, a media centre, and central access to the libraries of South-, East-, and Southeast Asian Studies. The local merger of the four institutes allows for an even more intense exchange about the past and present of societies and nature in Asia.The construction, which started in the summer of 2015, is continuing with great pace, and by the beginning of the winter semester 2018–19, the institutes, currently spread over various locations, will have moved to Campus Bergheim. Trafo Annual Conference in Collaboration with HCTS From December 7–9, the Forum Transregionale Studien in Berlin held its 2017 Annual Conference, entitled “Chronologics: Periodisation in a Global Context.” It was organized in cooperation with the Max Weber Foundation and convened by HCTS co-director Prof. Barbara Mittler, who is also a Board Member at the Forum Transregionale Studien, by Prof. Thomas Maissen from the German Historical Institute in Paris, and by Pierre Monnet from the Institut Franco-Allemand de Sciences Historiques et Sociales in Frankfurt. The conference explored epochal divisions and terminologies such as “Antiquity,” “Baroque,” the “classical age,” the “Renaissance,” “Postmodernity,” and the “long nineteenth” and “short twentieth” centuries. Many contemporary categories and periodisations have their roots in European teleologies, religious, or historical traditions, and thus are closely linked to particular power relations. As part of the colonial encounter they have been translated into new “temporal authenticities” in Africa, Asia, and the Americas, as well as in Europe. The conference thus addressed questions about the cultural conditionality of historical divisions and ideas, analysed their comparability and translations, and discussed alternative options in relation to national and cross-regional periodisations. Among the panelists and participants were several Cluster and HCTS Members and Associate Members, and the opening roundtable “Tracing Chronotypes in East Asian Perceptions of the Past” was organised by Prof. Joachim Kurtz and his collegues in the HERA project “East Asian Uses of the European Past.” The “Kollaboratorium” with its library will form the centre of CATS. Newsletter Spring 2018 4

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” NEWS HERA: EAST ASIAN USES OF THE EUROPEAN PAST Prof. Joachim Kurtz, the HCTS professor of Intellectual History, is the project leader of the HERA project “East Asian Uses of the European Past: Tracing Braided Chronotypes.” This is a collaborative project involving teams of researchers led by scholars at the universities of Heidelberg (Prof. Joachim Kurtz), Zurich (Prof. Martin Dusinberre), Madrid (Prof. Taciana Fisac), and the London School of Economics (Prof. Leigh Jenco). The project partners took up their work in the summer of 2017 in order to conduct research on emblematic historical moments in the European past and how such moments were shaped in global circulations of meaning. Prof. Kurtz explains: “We intend to investigate the thesis that the European past is not Europe’s exclusive property. Historical moments that became emblematic milestones gained their special significance only through global circulations of meaning. Their lasting relevance is the result of mutual exchange processes between Europe and Asia.” In the context of the HERA project, the researchers want to trace the way in which intellectual entanglements shaped conceptualisations of historical temporality between Asia and Europe. “In order to pursue this question we will analyse four different ‘chronotypes,’ i.e. patterns to interpret the temporality of historical events,” Kurtz adds. They include “awakening and rebirth,” “recurrence and return,” “decline and fall,” and “timelessness and permanence.” The teams of researchers will also study how non-European historical interpretations have been appropriated by Europeans to bolster their own sense of identity. The Heidelberg branch of the HERA project also consists of Dr. Pablo Blitstein, who now works as an assistant professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, Dr. Lorenzo Andolfatto, research fellow, and Kyonghee Lee, doctoral candidate at the HCTS. The Heidelberg team is concerned in particular with the chronotype of “awakening and rebirth.” They ask how the ideas of “Reformation,” ”Enlightenment,” ”Renaissance,” The Italian Risorgimento and the German Wiedergeburt gained discursive traction among East Asian thinkers such as Liang Qichao, Nishi Amane, or Yi Kwang-su, and how they contribute to the consolidationn of local discourses and existing conceptualizations of historical time. They also conduct research on how selected moments in Europe’s past were appropriated to reframe East Asian history, how new conceptual resources were adapted to old and new ideas, and how reconfigured chronotypes were enlisted to position the “East Asian” past in a global matrix of knowledge. Newsletter Spring 2018 Japanese translation of a European history textbook in Dutch from a Japanese library catalogue, courtesy of the Matsura Historical Museum, © David Mervart The frontispiece of Athanasius Kircher’s 1667 China Illustrata, depicting the Jesuit founders Francis Xavier and Ignatius of Loyola adoring the monogram of Christ in Heaven while Johann Adam Schall von Bell and Matteo Ricci labor on the China mission, © Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel HERA The Humanities in the European Research Area network is a partnership that connects 26 national research agencies and the European Commission to lead and develop funding opportunities for European researchers in the humanities. Their aim is to promote and establish the Humanities within the European Research Area, to bring together scholars from related disciplines and to engage in a dialogue with policy-makers, industry, and the public. Prospective applicants also include postdoctoral researchers and PhD students from the humanities conducting transnational research projects. The funding The project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and is part of the HERA Joint Research Programme 3 “Uses of the Past.” Horizon 2020 is the biggest research and innovation programme of the EU with funding of € 80 billion to support breakthroughs in science and pioneering academic findings to help great ideas as an investment in Europe’s future from 2014–2020. 5

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE PD Dr. Maria Ivanova-Bieg Simon Cubelic Prof. Magdolna Orosz Newsletter Spring 2018 WELCOME TO THE HCTS PD Dr. Maria Ivanova-Bieg is lecturer at the Institute for Early and Pre-History. In December 2017, she started working on her project within “Transcultural Forays.” The project is called “Revolution reloaded: risk and sustainability in the first agricultural expansion in Europe (sixth–fourth millennia BCE)”. It asks where, when, and why people first began to transform plants and animals into domesticates by focusing on the early farming system of Southwest Asia between 6000 and 4000 BCE. Dr. Amelia Bonea worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at Oxford University for five years, before she returned to the HCTS as a research fellow within the initiative “Transcultural Forays.” There, she works on the project “Fragile Objects, Fragile Histories: Paleobotany and the Making of a Scientific Discipline in India.” It considers the uniqueness of the institutionalization of paleobotany in India and asks why it turned into a modern scientific discipline. Simon Cubelic studied Classical Indology and Political Science of South Asia at Heidelberg University, where he received his PhD in 2017. He started his project in the “Transcultural Forays” programme at the beginning of April. It investigates the different forms of political knowledge produced in Nepal during the first half of the nineteenth century by drawing on a largely unexplored body of Sanskrit and Nepali manuscripts preserved at the National Archives in Kathmandu. Prof. Wen-Huei Cheng is associate fellow at the HCTS and the Institute for Chinese Studies. During her fellowship, she will conduct a research project on “Images, Ideas and Transcultural Circulation: The Writing of Foreign Land in Dianshizhai Pictorial in the Late Qing Period.” Prof. Cheng is Distinguished Professor at the Department for Chinese Literature at National ChengChi University, Taiwan. She is also director at the “Center for Digital Humanities” of the Liberal Arts College at NCCU and the “Digital Lab for History and Thought.” Prof. Dr. Magdolna Orosz is Tandem Research Fellow at the HCTS with her research project, “Conceptions of Mitteleuropa in early 20th century German, Austrian and Hungarian literature,” together with Prof. Barbara Beßlich. Prof. Orosz is Professor for German Literary Studies at ELTE Institute of Germanic Studies at Eötvös-Loránd University, Budapest. Her research focuses on Literary Theory, Narratology, Literary Semiotics, German Literary History between the 10th and 20th centuries, and Cultural Studies. Prof. Paola Zamperini, PhD, received a Tandem Fellowship at the HCTS in 2018 together with Prof. Barbara Mittler for their joint research project on European and Asian sexualities. It aims at breaking down barriers between Asian and European scholars related to the topic and at studying early gender and sexuality in a global context. Prof. Zamperini is also associate professor for Chinese Literature at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on pre-modern Chinese literature, gender studies, Chinese history, and popular culture. Dr. Amelia Bonea Prof. Wen-Huei Cheng Prof. Paola Zamperini 6

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE Welcome Michael Radich Prof. Michael Radich joined the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies in January and now holds the Professorship for Buddhist Studies. We met him for an interview. Hello Michael, welcome to Heidelberg! Did you have a chance to get settled yet? Jeiiiin... I already feel surprisingly comfortable in the city, and in the Institute. I am also much better settled into the German language than I expected so early, though that is largely because everyone around here is so gentle with my bumbling efforts. At the same time, I am constantly amazed by how much needs to be organised for such a large, long-term, permanent move. Our furniture is still somewhere on the high seas, and we only just moved a week ago into a permanent house, which is charming, but still very empty and echoey. You already spent more than a year in Hamburg, first as a Visiting Professor at the Hamburg University Numata Center for Buddhist Studies and then again as a Humboldt Research Fellow. How does it feel to be back in Germany, now in Heidelberg? Our previous stint has made the move this time much easier, certainly. I would never have contemplated applying for this job if we had not really enjoyed lots of things about our time in Hamburg. As a city, Heidelberg certainly seems so far to have a very different feel to Hamburg. At the same time, for an outsider, there are plenty of things about Germany that are, well, just plain German. It is for the most part huge fun to rediscover what I already knew and noticed last time, and be able to pick up where I left off learning about the language and culture – from the infuriating properties of reflexive verbs, to the strange custom of starting bureaucratic or business interactions with a stern manner, but somehow ending with a smile or a joke (the latest hypothesis in my ramshackle, homespun theory of Germanicities). You have been at the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies (HCTS) and the Cluster “Asia and Europe” since January. What is your first impression? Well, the mood was pretty sombre when I arrived, remember... But my impressions are also strongly conditioned by the fact that, as a Buddhologist and philologist of Asian languages, I really have just spent a decade in exile (I was, ironically, exiled in my cultural and familial home). In respect of my scholarly disciplines, New Zealand is virtually the dark side of the moon. The scholarly landscape here is, against that contrast, genuinely exciting. It strikes me that there is an amazing amount of intellectual vitality around, embodied in an impressive bunch of people. It seems to me that once the current pall blows over, there are still immense opportunities ahead of us. Can you tell us a little about what kind of research you are conducting at the moment? Over the past few years, for reasons best known to himself, a Digital Humanities programmer, Jamie Norrish, has donated a great deal of time and technical expertise to make some of my research ideas a practical reality. My life since has been overwhelmed by the task of sorting through the Aladdin’s Cave that opened up. I use software tools that we developed together to conduct super-scale, but simultaneously microscopic, digital comparison of texts in the Chinese Buddhist canon, applying relatively simple algorithms to collect possible evidence for a range of research problems. I have too many irons in the fire, but in one way or another, am working on the application of those tools to questions about attribution and dating of texts, detection of “apocrypha” among Newsletter Spring 2018 ABOUT Prof. Michael Radich Michael Radich received his doctorate from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University in 2007. In 2009, he spent three months at Kyoto University as a visiting scholar, at the invitation of Professor Shingū Kazushige. His first monograph, published in 2011, treats the history of the Buddhist story of the sins and redemption of King Ajātaśatru. In the winter term of 2013–2014, Radich was the Numata visiting professor of Buddhist Studies at the Hamburg University Numata Center for Buddhist Studies. He also spent the entirety of 2015 in Hamburg on a Humboldt Fellowship for Experienced Researchers from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, hosted by Prof. Michael Zimmermann. His second monograph was published in 2015 and focuses on the origins of Tathāgatagarbha thought in the (Mahāyāna) Mahāparinirvāņa-mahāsūtra. From 2005–2017, he taught at Victoria University of Wellington in his native New Zealand, where he was latterly associate professor and programme director of Religious Studies. As of January 2018, he is the professor of Buddhist Studies at the HCTS. 7

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE Welcome Michael Radich (continued from page 7) scriptural collections, the history of textual use, economies of textual circulation, and questions of influence in intellectual history, as well as the extension of the tools to the Pali and Tibetan canons. What is your vision for the Professorship “Buddhist Studies” at the HCTS? I see great potential in the intersection of Buddhist Studies and Transcultural Studies. I would like to see us contribute to two main sets of questions: What light can a transcultural perspective cast on Buddhism? What insights can the study of Buddhism contribute to our understanding of transcultural dynamics? I also hope it will be possible to ensure Heidelberg’s continued status as one of a few most important centres of Buddhist Studies in Germany and Europe. Building on our strength in distinctively transcultural approaches to Buddhist Studies should dovetail with that goal. The same goal may also be furthered by working to build distinctive strength in the study of East Asian and perhaps Central Asian Buddhism, where other centres in Germany have tended to contribute most to the study of Indo-Tibetan and Pali Buddhism. In an international perspective, I see an opportunity for us, in so doing, to make a distinctive contribution to East Asian Buddhist Studies internationally, by leveraging German strengths in philology and textual studies, supplemented by the powerful new extensions of those methods afforded by computational methods. Are you currently working on a new publication? One always has various publications at various steps in the production line. I just read galley proofs for an article soon to appear in the Journal of Chinese Religions, and I am a contributing editor for Volume II of Brill’s Encyclopedia of Buddhism, which should appear later this year. I was particularly excited about some work that I present in a very long article currently under review, which was inspired by collaboration with Sen. Prof. Lothar Ledderose here in Heidelberg, and his somewhat awe-inspiring “Stone Sūtras” project. My biggest current project, however, is a monograph (currently languishing somewhat on a back burner due to my move, and minor impediments like the ingestion of the German language). That work is a study, based upon internal evidence, of the corpus of the great scriptural translator Dharmarakṣa (Zhu Fahu, fl. ca. 265–308), and will present the biggest set of findings yet from the computer assisted methods I described earlier. Part of the HCTS is the Master in Transcultural Studies. What are your favorite topics to teach and why? As I said earlier, I think that Buddhist Studies, like some aspects of the study of religion more broadly, can make distinctive contributions to transcultural studies, and vice versa. I am keen to teach a range of courses in which I too, and not just the students, will explore such questions. Along with Ruixuan Chen, our new Assistant Professor, I also expect to find ways to contribute not just to the study focus “Knowledge, Belief and Religion,” but also to “Society, Economy and Governance” (for example, with a course on Buddhist kingship planned for WiSe 2018), and “Visual, Media and Material Culture” (with a projected course on the transcultural dynamics of material culture in Buddhist history). How did you get interested in Asian Religions and Buddhism in the first place? By a combination of chance, and naivety and romanticism. On the one hand, as a teenager, I was strongly attracted by literature and ideas I would now characterise as strongly “Orientalist,” more or less in Said’s sense, and which Newsletter Spring 2018 Welcome to the Cluster Camille Simon, PhD, took up the position as a lecturer in Tibetan Language at the HCTS. She is affiliated with the multidisciplinary (linguistics and anthropology) research institute “Langues et Civilisations à Tradition Orale” (LACITO) at the French national scientific research network CNRS. The CNRS is closely linked to Sorbonne Nouvelle University in Paris, where Simon received her PhD. She further worked at the “Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales.” Ruixuan Chen took up the position as assistant to the HCTS professorship of Buddhist Studies. Prior to joining the HCTS, he worked as a PhD employee at Leiden University’s Institute for Area Studies (LIAS). Ruixuan Chen is a scholar of Buddhism whose research interest mainly focuses on India and Central Asia in pre-Islamic times. He reads primary sources in a number of classical Buddhist languages and strives for a better historical understanding of transcultural dynamics in the transmission of Buddhism across geographical and cultural boundaries. 8

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE Welcome Michael Radich (continued from page 8) would now interest me primarily as data evidencing the strange transcultural dynamics characterising the very latest phase of Buddhism and Asian Religions in world history—typical Western receptions of things like “Zen,” “Daoism,” and the Book of Changes, for instance. On the other hand, my best friend when I was sixteen was Chinese, and I was oddly fascinated when he and his parents spoke Shanghainese together. Then, fatefully, he invited me to visit China with him. From there to here was a long, meandering path, but the thread has never broken. You speak an impressive number of languages. Can you tell us a little about that? I grew up in what I would describe as a linguistically impoverished cultural context, and until my encounter with Mandarin when I was eighteen, I was a confirmed monoglot. Perhaps I have since been driven to make up for lost time, but I do have an irrational, masochistic love for language-learning, which pushes me to almost live beyond my intellectual means. I am unsure if I know my languages because I need them for Buddhology, or if I took up Buddhology because it provided a pretext for playing with languages. Of course, my ability varies wildly. To start with, “speak” is the wrong verb for half of the languages I use or abuse, especially dead ones. Some I approach more like a crossword puzzle. At one end of the spectrum, I can only barely read Italian scholarly literature in my field, with a dictionary and considerable hocus-pocus. At the other end of the spectrum, I like to kid myself I have some facility with English, my native language (though the famous Buddhologist Gregory Schopen is on record expressing doubt whether New Zealand English counts as English at all; Cluster folk might sympathise, if they struggle to understand my accent). Among classical Buddhist languages, I feel fairly well at home in Buddhist Chinese; but every time I return to Tibetan, I have to endure a moment of panic, in which I suspect I only ever hallucinated knowing the language at all. Like many scholars, who are conducting research on foreign countries and even other continents, you have travelled a lot and lived in many different places. Is there one that you liked in particular? My impressions are probably coloured by the different life phases in which I lived in various places, but I don´t love anywhere else quite the way I love Japan. New Positions Since October 2017, Tobias Graf has been a research associate for the project “Stories of Survival. Recovering the Connected Histories of Eastern Christianity in the Early Modern World” at the Faculty of History of Oxford University. From 2009 to 2012, Graf was part of project A7 “Dynamic Asymmetries in Transcultural Flows at the Intersection of Asia and Europe: The Case of the Ottoman Empire” at the Cluster “Asia and Europe,” where he also received his PhD in 2014. Dr. Jonathan Samuels, who was lecturer for Tibetan languages within the remit of the Professorship for Buddhist Studies, has been appointed as a junior research fellow for Tibetan and Himalayan Studies at Wolfson College, the largest graduate college within the University of Oxford. There, he will be investigating Tibetan monastic education and the practice of public debate in the fourteeth century, before the identities, canons, and tenets of the different Tibetan Buddhist schools had solidified. Samuels further hopes to deiconize this stage of Tibet’s religious past and to reveal how networks, regional rivalries, and social structures shaped religious discussions. Former Cluster member Max Stille took up a position at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development Newsletter Spring 2018 in Berlin in January 2017. He joined the project “Emotional Transitions: Religious and Non-Religious Emotions in North India, ca. 1840–1920” at the Center for the History of Emotions, led by Prof. Ute Frevert. Stille was a member of project MC2 “Sufism” at the Cluster. In 2017, he received his PhD in South Asian Studies at Heidelberg University. Dr. Markus Viehbeck, former assistant professor for Buddhist Studies at the HCTS, was appointed as Postdoctoral Research Fellow for the Department of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at the University of Vienna. He took up this new position in May and will work on the project “Kanjur Sammlungen in Grenzgebieten Tibets,” which is led by Prof. Helmut Tauscher. The project documents Tibetan Buddhist canonical literature und provides openly accessible resources for Kanjur and Tanjur Studies. Carolin Liebisch-Gümüş is now a research assistant at the Chair for Modern History at Kiel University. In Kiel, she will proceed with her doctoral thesis, titled “Die ‘Neue Türkei’ in der Internationalen Ordnung: Globalhistorische Dimensionen einer Nationalstaatsbildung 1919–30er,” which is also supervised by former Cluster director Prof. Dr. Madeleine Herren-Oesch. From 2013 to 2016, Carolin Liebisch was a member of project A13 “Subaltern Diplomacy” at the Cluster. 9

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE ERc grant for ivan sablin Associate Cluster member Ivan Sablin will lead the Research Group “Entangled Parliamentarisms: Constitutional Practices in Russia, Ukraine, China and Mongolia, 1905–2005.” The group is funded by the European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant and is based at the Department of History at Heidelberg University. The project addresses the entangled histories of political representation and constitutionalism on the territories of the former Russian and Qing Empires and focuses on the cases of Russia, Ukraine, China, and Mongolia between 1905 and 2005. Employing the perspectives of the New Imperial History and Transcultural Studies, the project explores parliamentary developments, the interactions among imperial and post-imperial intellectuals, shared imperial legacies, mutual borrowings and references, and translatability of concepts. It seeks to refute the stereotypes about inclinations towards democracy in particular national contexts by tracing relevant transnational practices and interactions and providing a nuanced political and intellectual history of parliamentarism. The group will consist of five people, including three PhD students. Dr. Ivan Sablin was part of the Graduate Programme at the Cluster “Asia and Europe” from 2011 to 2014 and published his dissertation on “Buryat-Mongol, Buddhist, and Socialist: Transcultural Spaces and Boundary Construction in Post-Imperial Asia, 1917–1923.” He then held positions as assistant professor, associate professor, and senior research fellow at the National Research University Higher School of Economics in Saint Petersburg and was research fellow at the Käte Hamburger Kolleg at Ruhr University Bochum. Ivan, what was your first reaction when you received notice about the grant? I was very glad, of course, as it is a fantastic opportunity to develop a major collaborative project on a topic of particular interest to me. The whole idea of a fully independent research project developed from scratch is, perhaps, the best present a researcher can get. I have strong interest in Russian, Chinese, Ukrainian, and Mongolian history and always wanted to unite them in one study, as their histories were deeply interconnected in the twentieth century and still are. Of course, one researcher can do only so much on each of the cases, so I am especially happy that we can create a group and study the histories of popular representation in these four contexts, seek and analyse the many connections between them, and compare the major transformations of the early twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Why did you decide to come back to Heidelberg? Heidelberg University has a very open-minded Department of History, which has consistently broken new theoretical and regional grounds, and several prominent research centres with regional specialisation. In this project, I would like to have intellectual history and history of concepts to be the main theoretical approaches, and it was Heidelberg where both of them have been extensively developed. At the same time, my regional focus requires the host university to have an excellent center for East European history, broad expertise and good libraries in East Asian studies, and, what is especially important, good connections between the centers of regional expertise. My previous experiences in Heidelberg made me confident that it is the place which meets all the requirements of my project. On a personal level, I really enjoy working in Heidelberg. Why are you also “returning” to the HCTS? Although the project is based at the Chair for East European History, I am very interested in going beyond regional focus and breaching the divide between different Area Studies. I think that both the HCTS, which has an especially strong focus on East and South Asia, and my project can benefit from our cooperation. Indeed, three of the four countries – Russia, Ukraine, and Mongolia – are occasionally lost in between Area Studies. Russian history cannot be properly understood without a close scrutiny of the developments in its Asian part and the extremely important connections to both China and Mongolia throughout the twentieth century and again in the twenty-first century. The notions of Asia in Ukrainian and Mongolian political discourses are key to understanding their democratic development. Last but not least, one of the participants of our group will work on China, and the HCTS is one of the best centers for cooperation on the topic. Newsletter Spring 2018 10

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE Awards and grants DFG funding for Cathrine Bublatzky Dr. Cathrine Bublatzky, assistant professor for Visual and Media Anthropology at the HCTS, was granted funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for the network “Entangled Histories of Art and Migration: Forms, Visibilities, Agents.” The project brings together 15 scientists from anthropology, art history, and visual studies to research migration and globalization. “Entangled Histories of Art and Migration” sets out to conduct research on the interrelationship of migration and globalization as an important phenomenon of social transformation in the 20th and 21st centuries and in its role for art historical research and artistic production. In the upcoming 3 years, it will enhance the research on migration with art-historical perspectives and methodologies in a field that has primarily focused on social- and political scientific as well as anthropological studies. The network’s members are also part of the working group “Art Production and Art Theory in the Age of Global Migration,” and include Prof. Christiane Brosius, the HCTS professor of Visual and Media Anthropology, and Dr. Franziska Koch, assistant professor to the HCTS professorship of Global Art History. Dr. Bublatzky’s network project will be based at the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies (HCTS). The project starts on November 1, 2018 and will continue for 3 years, funded by the German Research Council (DFG). Franziska Koch in Bosch Foundation’s Fast Track Programme Dr. Franziska Koch, assistant professor for Global Art History, won a place in the programme “Fast Track: Excellence and Leadership Skills for Outstanding Women in Science.” It is offered by the Robert Bosch Foundation and aims to smooth the participants’ path to a leadership position in research. The Fast Track Programme invites twenty female postdoctoral researchers to several seminars that promote professional skills and abilities. “Attending the first of four seminars at Schloss Marbach at the Lake of Constance was eye-opening and one of the greatest experiences I have ever had regarding professional seminars,” said Dr. Koch. “I already feel very much encouraged by the professional presentation training as well as the many constructive conversations with the impressive fellow ‘fast trackers’ from all disciplines and look forward to grow along and benefit from the series of inspiring trainings to come.” Also, the programme enhances cross-disciplinary networking and the professional exchange with leading scientists, politicians, and business and media representatives. It was inaugurated in 2007 and has since then successfully enhanced gender equality in academia by supporting female scientists affiliated with German universities. Furthermore, the programme grants financial support for further professional activities to advance participants’ careers. Newsletter Spring 2018 The Toshiba International Foundation again granted Prof. Harald Fuess, Professor for Cultural Economic History at the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies, funds for a Visiting Professorship. The funding enables a professor from a Japanese HeKKSaGOn University to stay in Heidelberg during the academic year 2018–19. The first TIFO Visiting Professor was Prof. Tatsuji Fujihara from Kyoto University, who taught in the Transcultural Studies degree programme in the winter semester 2017–18. Prof. Joachim Friedrich Quack received a grant from the German Research Foundation (DFG). It promotes his “Demotic Paleographical Database Project,” which decodes ancient Egyptian documents from the 7th century BCE to the 5th centry CE and presents them in an open access publication. The DFG has already granted about one million Euros for the first three years of the project, which can be extended up to seven years and will start in May 2018 at the Institute of Egyptology. Quack is director of the Institute of Egyptology at Heidelberg University and Deputy Speaker of Research Area C “Knowledge Systems” at the Cluster. Prof. Joachim Friedrich Quack © DFG David Ausserhofer 11

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PEOPLE Appointments Fellowship for Harald Fuess at Marsilius-Kolleg Prof. Harald Fuess, Professor for Cultural Economic History at the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies, was appointed as a fellow of the Marsilius-Kolleg, starting in April 2018 for a duration of one year. The fellowships are appointed by the rectorate on the basis of a recommendation by the selection committee. The Marsilius-Kolleg aims to enhance an interdisciplinary dialogue between participating scholars and bridges the gap between the sciences and the humanities. Fellows join weekly colloquiums and participate in interdisciplinary projects Marsilius Arkaden, © Heidelberg University to explore an important topic or pressing problem of our time. The appointment followed a selection by the University’s rectorate. It applied criteria such as scholarly excellence, confirmed by publications, and a proposal that demands collaboration with other scholarly disciplines and an interdisciplinary background – in Prof. Fuess’s case, with Profs. Till Bäringhausen (Public Health) and Axel Dreher (Economic Science). Prof. Fuess’s main interest lies in the exploration of health issues in Japan with a focus on Japanese medical history, its public health, and long-term government policy. Within his fellowship, Fuess will do research on Japan’s solutions to demographic challenges as a paradigmatic case and looks forward to interchange with colleagues of related fields such as medical and public health or economics. Prof. Harald Fuess was also recently appointed to the Collegio Dottorale of the Department of Asian and North African Studies of Ca’ Foscari University in Venice in order to facilitate the workings of the double degree doctoral programme with the Faculty of Philosophy at Heidelberg University in Asian and Transcultural Studies. Fuess was further invited to serve as a Visiting Professor in the Graduate School of Letters of Kyoto University in 2018. Kyoto University is a core member of the HeKKSaGOn Alliance and is Heidelberg University’s strategic partner in Japan. The GPTS and MATS programmes at Heidelberg University cooperate intensively in graduate education with Kyoto University, for example through the newly-established Joint M.A. in Transcultural Studies. picture and ©: Ca’ Foscari University in Venice Newsletter Spring 2018 picture and ©: German Historical Institute London Prof. Monica Juneja, Professor of Global Art History at the HCTS and co-director of the Cluster, was appointed as a member of the Academic Advisory Board of the German Historical Institute London (GHIL). As a member of the board, she will be associated with the planning and further development of the India Research Program of the Max Weber Foundation. The GHIL is an academically independent institution and part of the Max Weber Foundation, promoting research on medieval and modern history. Dr. Davide Torri was confirmed as a member of the Executive Board of the International Society for Academic Research on Shamanism with the role of Secretary at the 13th ISARS (International Society for Academic Research on Shamanism) conference, held at the Vietnam Museum of Ethnology in Hanoi from December 1–4. Torri is Research Fellow at the HCTS in the Transcultural Forays programme. 12

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” EVENTS Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies initiates Stadtgespräche The HCTS Stadtgespräch was initiated in 2017 to establish a lasting connection with the city of Heidelberg and its citizens. The format seeks to create a platform for dialogue and discussion and wishes for researchers and citizens to come together and connect. The events, which can be lectures, discussions, film screenings, or concerts, amongst others, also always include a representative of the city of Heidelberg and take place in well-known places across the town. On November 3, 2017, the series opened with an event at the Karl Jaspers Center for Transcultural Studies. “Building Nature – Stadt, Natur und Kunst” was a cooperation with the Heidelberg Center for the Environment. Prof. Christoph Kueffer, urban ecologist from the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, opened the event with his lecture on “Designing Nature – Stadtnatur zwischen Ökologie und Kunst. After the lecture, Dr. Dominik Collet moderated a roundtable that functioned as a response to the lecture. Prof. Michael Braum, urban planner and managing director of the IBA Heidelberg, Prof. Annette Hornbacher, and HCTS co-director Prof. Monica Juneja, each commented on Prof. Kueffer’s talk and then engaged in a discussion on the general theme of the evening. Prof. Barbara Mittler opening the Stadtgespräch Panel discussion at the first Stadtgespräch The series continued on January 17 with a Stadtgespräch at the Kulturhaus Karlstorbahnhof. “Im Gedenken: 80 Jahre nach dem Massaker von Nanjing” featured readings, a movie presentation, and a panel discussion. The event focused on the Nanjing Massacre and was an HCTS cooperation with the Heidelberg Institute for Chinese Studies, the Konfuzius-Institut e.V. at Heidelberg University, the Office for Cultural Activities of the city of Heidelberg, and the Karlstorkino Heidelberg. It was presented as part of Heidelberg’s UNESCO City of Literature programme. It opened with a reading about the Nanjing massacre and its cultural adaptions in memoires, graphic novels, comic books, schoolbooks, and documentaries. The reading was followed by a panel discussion on how to “read” Nanjing and the massacre. The panelists were Thomas Rabe, Hans Martin Krämer, Professor at the Institute for Japanese Studies, Anja Senz, Professor at the Institute for Chinese Studies, and Andrea Edel, Head of the Cultural Office of the City of Heidelberg. HCTS co-director Prof. Barbara Mittler moderated the discussion that functioned as a response to the readings. After the panel discussion, the movie “City of Life and Death” by director Chuan Lu was screened at the Karlstorkino. The poster for the second Stadtgespräch at the Kulturhaus Karlstorbahnhof. Workshop on World War I in East Asia Prof. Harald Fuess, Professor for Cultural Economic History at the HCTS, organized a workshop on World War I in East Asia and Japan that took place on Friday, January 26 at the Karl Jaspers Centre. It explored alternative views on wartime dynamics to overcome Eurocentric perspectives. The workshop included a keynote by Toshiba Foundation Visiting Professor Tatsuji Fujihara from Kyoto on “World War I and the Food Crisis in Japan.” Afterwards, Dr. Takuma Melber presented his thoughts on “Insights into camp life: German soldiers in Japanese war captivity during World War I.” Focusing on “The ‘White Pacific’ at War: Britain, the Dominions, and Japan, 1914–1919,” Dr. Cees Heere from Leiden University gave a talk after a short break. Finally, organizer Prof. Harald Fuess talked about “World War One and the End of Globalization: Anglo-German Rivalries and the Destruction of German Trade in East Asia.” Newsletter Spring 2018 13

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” EVENTS Lecture by Karin Zitzewitz On February 1, Prof. Karin Zitzewitz, Humboldt Research Fellow at the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies, gave a talk about “Painting and the Image Condition in Millennial Mumbai.” Her lecture reflected the contemporary Indian art scene and was presented by the Professorship for Global Art History. In her talk, Prof. Zitzewitz focused on the period from the mid 1990s to 2008, when new image forms and the influx of the internet rapidly changed painting in Mumbai. Both television channels, including MTV and Channel [V], and duplication technologies like Xerox and fax, shaped new practices in the Indian Art Scene. Furthermore, in 2000 the “irrational exuberance” of the dot-com boom landed in Mumbai mere months before its global crash. These new image forms nevertheless enhanced a boom market in painting that engaged with the contemporary image condition, with photorealistic renderings of mediatic images becoming particularly desirable. This eruption of multiple technologies of image-making and circulation permitted a new internet-facilitated market for art. “HCTS Salon – Lectures in Dialogue” with David Damrosch On November 29, the “HCTS Salon – Lectures in Dialogue” took place at the Karl Jaspers Center for Advanced Transcultural Studies as a cooperation with the Institute of Chinese Studies, the Institute of Japanese Studies, and the Department of English Studies at Heidelberg University. David Damrosch (Har- vard) talked about “Those Retrobates at New Youth: Modernist Magazines in Asia and the West.” In his lecture, Damrosch looked at the turn of the twentieth century in East Asia Modernist Magazines in Asia and the West. and in the West, when progressive newspapers and avant-garde magazines proliferated, and explained that these new outlets were crucial for the development of modernist writing. After his lecture, Damrosch discussed the role of Modernist magazines in Japan, China, and Europe with Judit Árokay, professor at the Institute for Japanese Studies, and Tim Sommer, teaching assistant at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies. Prof. Barbara Mittler, then acting director of the Cluster “Asia and Europe,” moderated the event. Workshop held in honour of Barbara Mittler The workshop participants During the workshop Newsletter Spring 2018 On February 16, a workshop was held in honour of Prof. Barbara Mittler, co-director of the HCTS and Cluster. The workshop took place to celebrate her 50th birthday and reflected her outstanding research. The workshop, “Where is China in the World? Going Beyond Cultures to Get Past Post-Colonialism,” set out from one of the central research paradigms developed by Prof. Mittler and her colleagues: the concept of transculturality. As a form of academic inquiry, it is an approach that holds potential especially in the field of Chinese studies, but also in the larger field of the humanities more generally. By analyzing China in a global context, two pitfalls can be avoided, of which Mittler has repeatedly cautioned her fellow researchers: the victimization narrative and an overemphasis on separate spheres of culture. The basis of this conference, thus, was the conviction that global and transcultural processes and developments have a tremendous impact on the local, and that cultures are never stable, fully coherent, or pre-existing, but always already constructed, fluid, and ever in motion. The workshop included talks by many of Prof. Mittler’s former and current PhD students as well as musical performances, lively discussion, and a lot of space for conversation. 14

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Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” PUBLICATIONS Markus Viehbeck publishes volume with heiUP Dr. Markus Viehbeck recently edited the book Transcultural Encounters in the Himalayan Borderlands. It was published as the third volume of the open access book series “Heidelberg Studies on Transculturality” with Heidelberg University’s publishing branch heiUP. The publication reflects current trends in the field of Transcultural Studies and offers new insights into transformative cultural processes. With the Eastern Himalayan town of Kalimpong as a paradigmatic case, the study provides an in-depth analysis of the entanglement of different regions and cultures in borderlands. Based on Mary Louise Pratt’s notion of “contact zone,” the book elaborates a nuanced analytical perspective to investigate cultural encounters – however, it also re-reads Pratt’s ideas in a more transcultural light. New book edited by Kerstin von Lingen PD Dr. Kerstin von Lingen edited the book Transcultural Justice at the Tokyo Tribunal: The Allied Struggle for Justice, 1946–48, which includes contributions from Dr. Milinda Banerjee, Lisette Schouten, Anja Bihler, Valentyna Polunina, and Ann-Sophie Schoepfel. It offers an innovative approach to the Tokyo Tribunal as an arena of transcultural engagement, and contextualizes legal agents as products of transnational forces, constituted through dialogues about legal concepts, frameworks of international legal institutions, and processes of faction-making. Von Lingen explains her methodology: “We scrutinized the selection of judges and prosecutors, and obstacles of procedure like translation and scarce evidence. We also analyzed faction-making behind the scenes, so this book provides a fresh look onto one of the most complicated trials in history.” Selected Articles Monica Juneja: “Transkulturalität und Kulturerbe,” in: Kulturpolitische Mitteilungen, Heft 156 I/2017: Europäisches Kulturerbe in einer globalisierten Welt: 2017. Franziska Koch: “Nam June Paik: Catching up with the West? Institutionelle Bedingungen und Grenzen transkulturell konstituierter Autorschaft,” in: Christiane Dätsch (Ed.), Kulturelle Übersetzer. Kunst und Kulturmanagement im transkulturellen Kontext, transcript: 2018. Axel Michaels: “Rites of Passage: Saṃskāras” and “Ritual” in: Patrick Olivelle, Donald R. Davis (Eds.), The Oxford History of Hinduism: Hindu Law, Oxford University Press: 2018. Barbara Mittler: “Licht aus dem Dunkel: Renaissance? Topographien chinesischer Intellektualität,” in: Jürgen Fohrmann, Carl Friedrich Gethmann (Eds.), Topographien von Intellektualität, Wallstein Verlag: 2018. Patis of Patan” launched HCTS professor Christiane Brosius colaunched the interactive platform “Patis of Patan” with members of Kathmandu University, the Kathmandu Valley Preservation Trust, and the Akademie der Wissenschaften. It aims at looking at urban transformation and everyday dynamics of a unique form of public life in Asia: the pati, or phalcā (Newari) in the Kathmandu Valley and was designed by the Heidelberg Research Architecture (HRA) in cooperation with the Chair for Visual and Media Anthropology at the HCTS. “Latest Thinking” with Carsten Wergin Dr. Carsten Wergin, who is a new member of the Cluster’s Steering Com- mittee, collaborated with the open access video journal Latest Thinking to talk about his current research in the environ- Dr. Carsten Wergin mental humanities on global crises and Australi- an Indigenous views of the world, titled “How Can Australian Indigenous Experience Change Western Perspectives of the World?” Latest Thinking has already published open access videos with Prof. Christiane Brosius, Prof. Axel Mi- chaels, and Prof. Klaus Oschema. Newsletter Spring 2018 15

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