Senior College Handbook 2018

 

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Senior College Handbook 2018

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RATHKEALE/ST MATTHEW’S SENIOR COLLEGE SENIOR COLLEGE CONTACT DETAILS Email: ajg@rathkeale.school.nz Phone: 06 370 0175 ext 7713 STAFF Mr Adam Gordon Head of Senior College ____________________ Mr Shay O’Gorman Yr 13 Dean Mrs Kiewiet van Deventer Year 13 Dean Mr Roger Boyce Year 12 Dean Ms Susie Leckie Year 12 Dean ____________________ SENIOR COLLEGE INFORMATION 2018 SCHOOL CONTACT DETAILS Email: office@rathkeale.school.nz Phone: 06 370 0175 1

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Deans......................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Senior College Philosophy and History................................................................................................................................. 5 Senior College Leadership...................................................................................................................................................... 6 Senior College Deans ......................................................................................................................................... 6 School Prefects .................................................................................................................................................... 6 Student Management .............................................................................................................................................................. 6 Pastoral Care ......................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Careers................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Chaplains............................................................................................................................................................... 6 Deans ..................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Guidance Counsellor........................................................................................................................................... 7 Learning Support................................................................................................................................................. 7 STAR, Transition, Gateway & PITA................................................................................................................... 7 Illness and Accidents .......................................................................................................................................... 7 Traumatic Incident Response............................................................................................................................ 7 Student Expectations........................................................................................................................................................... 7 Behaviour .............................................................................................................................................................. 7 Manners ................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Attendance............................................................................................................................................................ 8 Daily / Weekly Schedule .................................................................................................................................... 8 Lateness................................................................................................................................................................. 8 Leave ...................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Property................................................................................................................................................................. 8 Food and Drink.................................................................................................................................................... 8 Vehicles.................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Uniform and Grooming (Girls).........................................................................................................................10 Smoking ............................................................................................................................................................... 11 Alcohol .................................................................................................................................................................11 Cell phones /Computers ..................................................................................................................................11 Restricted/Prohibited Substances .................................................................................................................11 Discipline ............................................................................................................................................................. 11 Academic Introduction........................................................................................................................................................... 12 Recognition .......................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Teaching and Learning Expectations.............................................................................................................................12 NCEA ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 NCEA (Level 1, 2, 3) & Scholarship ..............................................................................................................13 Reporting.............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 Academic Mentoring and Monitoring............................................................................................................................14 Homework ............................................................................................................................................................................ 14 Learning................................................................................................................................................................................ 15 International Students.......................................................................................................................................................15 Learning Support ...............................................................................................................................................................15 Careers Counselling...........................................................................................................................................................15 Transition.............................................................................................................................................................................. 16 Senior College – An Holistic Education............................................................................................................................... 16 Leadership ..........................................................................................................................................................16 Prefects ................................................................................................................................................................16 Health and Life Skills........................................................................................................................................16 Houses x 2 ..........................................................................................................................................................16 Peer Support ......................................................................................................................................................16 Performing Arts..................................................................................................................................................16 Chapel ..................................................................................................................................................................17 Service.................................................................................................................................................................. 17 2

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Senior College Facilities ........................................................................................................................................................ 17 Student Facilities ...............................................................................................................................................17 Communication:...................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Publications ........................................................................................................................................................17 Student Communication ..................................................................................................................................18 Parent Teacher Evening ...................................................................................................................................18 Deans ...................................................................................................................................................................18 Assemblies ..........................................................................................................................................................18 Prizegiving ..........................................................................................................................................................18 Departure: ............................................................................................................................................................................... 19 ROA (Records of Achievement) ......................................................................................................................19 Testimonials ........................................................................................................................................................ 19 3

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Welcome to Senior College It is a great pleasure to extend a warm welcome to all new students, parents, guardians and staff, and to all those returning to the Senior College this year. I hope that your time in the Senior College is marked by wonderful opportunities for the advancement of learning and for the development of cultural, sporting and social skills. The aims of the Senior College are to: • Encourage all students to achieve their full potential in the classroom, on the sports field, and in cultural activities. • Provide an autonomous course of study suited to individual abilities in preparation for tertiary study and the world of work. • Create an environment in which young men and women can learn to live together and respect each other as individuals. The Senior College operates in the following manner: • There is a natural progression of students to the Senior College from St Matthew’s and Rathkeale. • Applications to enter the Senior College are welcomed from students in schools other than St Matthew’s and Rathkeale. • A carefully planned orientation ensures that all students are familiar with the Rathkeale campus facilities. • The Senior College is accredited through Rathkeale College and St Matthew’s Collegiate to assess Achievement and Unit Standards for NZQA Qualifications. The courses available at Senior College include: • The possibility of multi-level courses which students may plan where appropriate. • Specialist courses through outside providers such as Taratahi, UCOL, and Open Polytechnic which cater for individual needs. All assessment will be by Achievement and Unit Standards towards NZQA qualifications. Senior College Student Welfare: • Deans have overall responsibility for both Year Groups in the Senior College. • Students are divided into groups under a registrar who will carefully monitor their academic progress and general welfare. These groups meet regularly. • Students are regarded as young adults who should take full responsibility for their progress and should exercise constructive self-discipline. Staff are always on hand to guide, monitor and encourage. Mr A Gordon Head of Senior College 4

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DEANS Year 13 Mrs K van Deventer Mr S O’Gorman Year 12 Ms S Leckie Mr R Boyce SENIOR COLLEGE PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY St Matthew’s was founded as an Anglican Parish school in 1913 under the leadership of Miss Ella Hampton. Rathkeale was founded in August of 1963 with Mr E J Norman as Headmaster. College in 1988. Since then, changes to the name and to methods of operation and practice have ensured the ongoing success and enhanced reputation of the College. Both colleges have strong affiliation to the Anglican Church but are not diocesan schools. Both have Anglican chaplains and religious instruction is at the heart of the special character of both colleges and of the Senior College. Girls and boys have been taught together on the Rathkeale site since 1967 when the Upper Sixth Consortium was created combining students from Rathkeale, St Joseph’s (later Chanel College) and Solway. They were joined by students from St Matthew’s and St Bride’s in 1968 and later still welcomed students from Makoura and Wairarapa Colleges. In time, pressure of numbers reduced the Colleges involved to just Rathkeale and St Matthew’s and led to the establishment of the Trinity Senior On October 3, 1987 the Senior College was launched under the Deanship of Dr Liam O’Gorman and Mrs Arlene du Cann. It featured its own crest, uniform, separate facilities in School House, a mentor system and a strong rapport between staff and students. By 1989 its roll had exceeded 250. Today the Senior College draws senior (Year 12 & 13) students from Rathkeale and St Matthew’s along with a significant number of students from other colleges in New Zealand and overseas. It is expected that students will enter the Senior College with the desire to advance their education in a collaborative, respectful and mature environment. They will be expected to be increasingly independent in their studies but 5

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sensitively aware of the opinions and beliefs of others. Small classes and an easy rapport between staff and students within the Senior College contribute to a special atmosphere. The College curriculum is broad and is tailored to cater for most students’ needs and to foster wellrounded individuals. Senior College Teachers, Deans and Senior Management are expected to offer quality feedback to students, to recognise their success and to guide their progress. However, students are encouraged to be personally accountable for their own academic and social progress. The Senior College Centre is available for the use of all senior students and recognises their seniority. It is a place for social interaction, study and relaxation. It is hoped that the holistic education available in the Senior College, and throughout the Trinity System, prepares our young people for the challenges and diversity of life. SENIOR COLLEGE LEADERSHIP SENIOR COLLEGE DEANS Ms S Leckie & Mr R Boyce are Deans of Year 12. Mrs K van Deventer and Mr S O’Gorman are Deans of Year 13. They share responsibility for the well-being and educational progress and performance of all students in the Senior College. In addition, significant social events, the Year 12 Camp and Prefects Leadership training enjoy significant input and organisation from the Deans. (ref Student Management). SCHOOL PREFECTS The School prefects from both St Matthew’s and Rathkeale have shared responsibilities and duties within the Senior College. In addition, staff with responsibilities at the two colleges e.g. Chaplains, Guidance counsellors etc. have important roles within the Senior College. (Ref Student Management). STUDENT MANAGEMENT PASTORAL CARE CAREERS A full time Careers Advisor, Mrs McKeown, has an office adjacent to the Senior College Centre and is available for individual interviews and careers advice. Careers days are organised for senior students as part of the Panorama life skills programme. In addition, the Careers Advisor has responsibility for making University Liaison Officers available to senior students. CHAPLAINS Both the St Matthew’s and Rathkeale Chaplains have a role to play in the spiritual life of all students and often offer additional support to the Counsellor and others at times of need. Senior College Chapel Services are regularly held. The Rathkeale Chaplain’s office is located in St Martin’s Chapel. DEANS The Senior College Deans have wide ranging responsibilities in: - • Academic progress of individuals within a year level. • Academic and discipline issues, e.g. refusal to do prep, poor academic work ethics, unacceptable classroom behaviour. • Follow up of individual students, e.g. interim reports. • Communication with Deputy Principals, re concerns about curriculum momentum, pastoral & disciplinary issues. • Student option advice and processing. • Liaise with registrars as required. • Conduct level assemblies as necessary. • Communicate where appropriate with Housemasters, Parents, Guidance Counsellor, Registrars, Senior staff, re student progress. • Organise and co-ordinate special events, e.g. Camps, Work Experience, Social Events, Parent/Teacher Interviews. 6

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• Collate effort grades/exam results and promote student success as much as possible. • Liaise and communicate with Deputy Principal re the measurement of student academic success and value added. GUIDANCE COUNSELLOR Ms T Ahipene is a full time counsellor on the Rathkeale site and available to Senior College students for all manner of confidential issues. Her office is conveniently located adjacent to the Senior College Centre and appointments are able to be made. LEARNING SUPPORT Generally speaking, special learning needs will have been identified prior to a student entering the Senior College. Reader/Writers are available in accordance with NCEA regulations and may occur as required or requested. STAR, TRANSITION, GATEWAY & PITA Mr S O’Gorman has responsibility for these programmes which assist with skills training and access to work place employment / placements.Well-being ILLNESS AND ACCIDENTS In the case of illness, the school office needs to be informed at the start of the school day on 06 370 0175 or email office@rathkeale.school.nz or via the Rathkeale App. Students who become ill during the school day must report in the first instance to the school office. This applies to both day and boarding students. A day room is available for girls who need a place to retire to. The guidance counsellor is available for students who need assistance with health conditions such as mental health, sexual health and contraception, stress, relationship problems, smoking and other addictions. Any accidents of a significant nature which occur on campus or involve students travelling to or from school should be reported via the office to senior management. TRAUMATIC INCIDENT RESPONSE The College maintains a TIRP (Traumatic Incident Response Plan) which outlines the procedures which need to be followed when a traumatic incident occurs within our community. STUDENT EXPECTATIONS BEHAVIOUR In the Senior College students are seen to move from a dependant environment to a more independent one which offers intrinsic rewards. Correct and appropriate attitude results in the retention of privileges: the Senior Common Room, Senior Uniform, the ability to have a car on campus, tutorials, social fixtures, study leave and the Leavers’ Ball being examples. Privileges can be withdrawn if circumstances warrant. Mutual respect and common courtesy underline the relationship between staff and student. Staff should be addressed appropriately using titles such as Sir, Ma’am, Mr, Mrs, Miss etc. Similarly, they should act appropriately towards their peers. Behaviour and relationships which demonstrate a desire to make the most of all that the Senior College has to offer will be respected. Behaviour which brings the College into disrepute will not be tolerated. MANNERS A high standard of courtesy should be maintained at all times. Guidelines and reminders are frequently given, but it is expected that courtesy will apply to all areas of activity and relationships. Especially it should apply towards visitors to the school and when visiting outside the school; towards adults and staff, both teaching and nonteaching; towards one another, both male and female. An important focus is the Dining Hall where behaviour at tables, courtesy to staff, queuing for food, and clearing of tables all afford an excellent opportunity to promote good manners. • On all occasions students should stand up when an adult stops where they are sitting, indoors or outdoors, and find him/her a seat if required. • In town a high standard of dress and behaviour is expected from students at all times, and students should not eat or drink in the streets. 7

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• Students should always be prepared to initiate a conversation, look directly at other people and speak clearly. • Students should open doors for adults and staff and, without prompting, offer to carry books and heavy loads. • If visitors to the school ask directions, students should be prepared to take them to their destination. • When an outsider or visiting speaker gives his/her time to help, students should make sure that one of the group writes and/or makes a speech of thanks. • If a student is asked out for a meal at anyone’s house, he/she should always offer to clear the table and wash the dishes. • When students are billeted out with other people on away games or in the holidays, they should always write a letter of thanks immediately on returning home. Presentation of a small gift is often appropriate. • When students are invited to attend any social function, they should always reply in good time in correct formal terms. ATTENDANCE All students are required to attend school on the prescribed term dates. • Punctuality is expected on all occasions. • All students must attend each morning from 8.20am (on occasions during the week girls go to St Matthew’s first). • If a student is late for school, s/he must bring a note from home to explain the lateness and check into the school office on arrival. • If a day student is to be absent from school for the day for sickness/emergency situation, a parent or guardian should ring the school office between 8.00am and 8.30am or leave a message on the answer phone earlier in the morning. Boys’ parents ring Rathkeale and girls’ parents ring St Matthew’s. This should happen on each day that a student is absent. • Absence for reasons other than sickness/emergency situations should be requested in advance by contacting the Principal via mail, fax or email. • Appointments for dentist, driving lessons etc should not normally be made during the school day. When this is necessary students must check out at the school office on leaving and check in on return. DAILY / WEEKLY SCHEDULE The College follows a 10 day timetable and cycle of activities. Timetables are distributed to all students at the commencement of the school year. Replacements may be obtained from the school office. Registration occurs every morning at 8.20am. 8.20-8.55am School day begins 9.00-9.50am Period 1 9.50-10.40am Period 2 10.40-11.00am Break 11.00-11.50am Period 3 11.50-12.40pm Period 4 12.40-1.30pm Lunch 1.30-2.15pm Period 5 2.15-3.00pm Period 6 Calendared events, Panorama days, events such as Young Leaders’ Day and Model United Nations can impact on timetables from time to time. LATENESS Punctuality is to be encouraged and it is discourteous to arrive late to class, practices etc. If a student is late for no valid reason, lateness will be recorded and followed up on. LEAVE Permission to leave the College during the school day should be sought from the Dean and the Office needs to record all comings and goings. It is the student’s responsibility to do this. Applications for longer periods of leave should be directed by email to one of the Co-Principals. PROPERTY Senior College students, as young adults, are responsible for their own property. It is not advisable to bring valuables and large amounts of money to school. Uniform, books and other personal items should be named and secured in locked lockers. Prevention of loss in the first instance is advisable as the recovery of stolen items is often unlikely. As members of the College community, students are expected to respect College grounds and property. FOOD AND DRINK The College maintains a healthy food policy. Food may be purchased from the Tuckshop. 8

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Food from the Dining Hall should be consumed in the Dining Hall area. Food should not normally be eaten in classrooms, assemblies or Chapel. Students in uniform are asked not to wander around town eating. VEHICLES Clear guidelines exist pertaining to a student’s use of a motor vehicle. Because of the location of the College, it is increasingly necessary for senior students to have the use of motor vehicles. Any student bringing a car to school needs to do so in accord with national law and school rules. The following points need to be noted: • To have a vehicle at school on a regular basis, requires both a NZ Drivers’ Licence and a school licence • School licences are available to seniors only and boys require parent and Housemaster (boarders) and Dean (dayboys) permission. Forms are available from the Office. Girls obtain licences application forms from St Matthew’s. • No student may drive another student if on a restricted licence • Parental permission for students to be transported by other students needs to be lodged with the school • School licences should be displayed on vehicle dashboards • Day students who find it necessary to bring a vehicle without a school licence need to notify the Dean • Speeds – School campus 15km and Willow Park Drive 70km Breaches of the above, and of school licence provisions, will result in a cancellation of the school licence for up to one term. UNIFORM AND GROOMING (BOYS) APPEARANCE A high standard of appearance is expected at all times. The chewing of gum, hands in pockets, dirty and untidy dress are all unacceptable. Boys are not to wear jewellery other than a watch. Earrings and other studs are not to be worn whilst boys are under the control of the College. (nb this includes time after 3.00pm) HAIR Un-natural looking or obviously dyed hair is unacceptable. Extreme cuts (i.e. less than number 3, severely undercut or “mullet”) are also unacceptable. Use of hair gel, wax etc. is not permitted. Parents will be billed for hairdressing costs should these standards be breached. Shaving must occur as required, sideburns must not be below the ear and no beards or moustaches are permitted. • Students must present themselves appropriately at the beginning of each new term and can expect to be inspected on day one. In instances of hair dyed/extreme haircuts: • Immediate referral to Dean/Senior Management who will take immediate action. • Possible action taken: (a) Immediate transfer to town for remedial action. (b) Parent phoned. (c) Appointment made to redye hair to an appropriate colour (d) Removed from class until hair colour is remedied. (e) For extreme haircuts, a consequence could be gating until hair grows back. TATTOOS These are not encouraged and must not be visible at any time. UNIFORM General: (a) Long grey trousers may be worn during the winter terms for school wear by those who are in Year 11 and above. 9

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(b) Shirts are to be worn at all times around the school grounds, except when working on manual tasks or for legitimate sunbathing. (c) Footwear should be worn within the central school area at all times. (d) If t-shirts or thermal underwear are worn, they (e) must not be visible with an open neck shirt. If it is, a tie must be worn to hide it. (f) Ties are to be worn with winter shirts. (g) Scarves and hats are not to be worn indoors. Boarders: (a) Blazers and ties are to be worn on special occasions, at the beginning and end of term, to and from exeats, when on buses and public transport and when on town leave. (b) Full boarders should have two sets of mufti: i. Working clothes ii. A good set for social occasions Dayboys: (a) Must wear ties, blazers and either trousers or grey shorts with long socks and shoes to and from school. This includes those on buses as well as those in cars. (b) Dayboys are to wear formal uniform when they come in at the beginning of the year. (c) Regulation shoes are to be worn to and from school, but dayboys may change into sandals within the school grounds. (d) During hot weather permission may be granted to wear sandals to and from school. INCORRECT UNIFORM: Should have a School Permission Slip (PLUM) from SM/Office/Housemaster. UNIFORM AND GROOMING (GIRLS) MAKEUP Makeup should be natural looking and not excessive. Eye makeup and heavy foundation are not appropriate. NAIL VARNISH Is not permitted. HAIR Strongly contrasting highlights are not permitted. Hair should be clean, tidy and of a natural colour. Dramatic colour change is not appropriate. Hair below the collar should be tied back off the face with green, brown or black hair ties. Black hair bands and dark green ribbons are permitted. JEWELLERY No jewellery is permitted other than a wristwatch and a single pair of stud earrings in the ear lobes. Jewellery of cultural significance may be worn. A letter to the principal outlining this request is required. The earrings should be small, and only gold, silver or white pearls are permitted. COLD/WET WEATHER GEAR Black coats are permitted but not in chapel, assembly or in the classroom. School scarves and gloves are not to be worn in the classrooms, Dining Hall, Chapel or assembly. Blazers should not be worn in the classroom. SHOES Regulation shoes and sandals should be clean. MUFTI DRESS GUIDELINES The guidelines given below are to be followed on both the St Matthew’s site and at Senior College. We would really appreciate parental/Caregiver support on these issues because we believe that our standards are worth upholding: dress must be appropriate to being worn in a school situation. Tops may be sleeveless but low cut tops which are revealing of cleavage or shoe string type tops may not be worn. No bare midriffs or exposed stomachs/backs. Shorts or skirts should be a reasonable length. No torn jeans or trousers regardless of whether they were bought as such. In addition to the above – for technical subjects, Laboratories, Design Technology, Technology, Art Department etc. hair must be tied back, dangly earrings which may get caught in equipment should not be worn. Covered shoes should be worn. 10

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Appropriate dress for field trips/camps is also required but variations to the code may be allowed by the teachers in charge. PE gear is still required for PE/Sports activities on mufti days. SMOKING The School is, by law, a smoke free zone. • Smoking is prohibited, as is the possession of tobacco, lighters and matches. • It is an offence to be in the company of smokers in out of bounds areas. ALCOHOL The consumption, acquisition or distribution of alcohol on school property by students is prohibited, except in controlled circumstances involving the supervision of an adult and then only according to the guidelines laid down. It is emphasised that the school sees itself as having a prime responsibility with regard to enforcing the law of the land on the purchase and consumption of alcohol. Similarly, in order that students are aware of the health implication, an education programme beginning with the Year 9 & Year 10 Health Education course is included in the school curriculum. The mains points of the Alcohol and Drug Policy are: a) No student shall be in an intoxicated or drugged state or consume, sell, purchase, supply or have in his possession alcohol or illegal drugs while under the authority of the College. b) “While under the authority of the College” is taken to be on the school premises, travelling to and from the College, while in school uniform, and while on any schoolsanctioned activity. The full policy is available in the School Policy File CELL PHONES /COMPUTERS The College acknowledges the role cell phones play in personal security. However, clear guidelines pertain to their use and to that of computers: • Cell phones are not to be used or in evidence during the school day in classes, assemblies, Chapel etc. • Offensive texting and inappropriate use of cell phones will be viewed seriously. • If confiscated it will be for two weeks in the first instances and until the end of term for a second offence. • Computers must be used appropriately at all times. • Respect and do not interfere with staff computers. • Access computers using your own password only. • Computer Suite Rules: • Any questions regarding the use of the computer suite should be directed to Mr Macri. • Do not consume food or drink in the Computer Suite. • Ensure that your hands are clean before entering the room. • No attempts are to be made to access the files of other users. • All equipment to be treated with care and respect at all times. • Keyboards, mouse and mouse pads to be left neat and tidy. • No changes to be made to monitor set up. • No programmes to be loaded onto computers by students. • All bags to be placed tidily so as not to cause a hazard. • Chairs to be left tidily under the workbench. RESTRICTED/PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES The use or possession of marijuana or any other illegal drug is completely prohibited and can only result in the most serious of consequences. DISCIPLINE All Senior College students should be able to enjoy the opportunities available to them. Any behaviour by an individual that impedes or prejudices the right of other students is unacceptable and will have consequences. Students will be expected to abide by expectations and rules designed to facilitate the aims of the Senior College. We want students to be responsible for their own behaviour and aware of the rights of others. In particular, students will not: 11

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 Disrupt any teaching, study, cultural activity or meeting.  Misuse, damage, litter or steal any property of the College or of its staff, students or visitors.  Indulge in hurtful, abusive or insulting language, bullying or sexual harassment.  Fail to comply with any of the College regulations as set out in this Handbook. A seven step MSB (managing student behaviour) system operates within the Senior College. Each step has an escalating set of consequences. Dean’s Detentions will be held once per week (or at other times at the discretion of the Dean or Deputy Principal) at lunchtime. Principal’s Detentions are held after school as bulletined. It must be made clear to students that unacceptable behaviour, inside and outside of the classroom, will have negative consequences for them. The more they behave unacceptably the tighter the negative consequences become. Positive behaviour is recognised through a student being allowed to slip down one level if they have been clear over four school weeks. ACADEMIC INTRODUCTION At the Senior College students are encouraged to accept academic challenges in a mature manner. It is the desire of the College that all students will strive to achieve their potential and to maintain a high level of academic achievement. It is also our desire to equip students for the diverse challenges outside our gates whether it be in the workforce, at a tertiary learning institution or during an OE/gap year. No matter what the destination, the quality of a student’s qualifications/credits is a foremost concern. The College offers a relatively wide choice of subject options. Choices need to be made carefully and option interviews at Year 11 and Year 12 will be important. Discussions with Teachers, Deans and the Careers advisor will also prove advantageous. Similarly, it is important to be aware of the important role liaison officers play in preparing students for university enrolment. Refer to the College’s Curriculum Booklet for detailed information on subjects and courses. From the start of the year, Senior College students will be treated as responsible young adults. Those who are unable to comply with College regulations will be warned about their behaviour. For those who continue to offend, College procedures will apply. These may include sanctions such as class withdrawals, loss of tutorial time, loss of vehicle licence, daily report, banned from attending Senior College being functions, stand down, suspension. Most students enjoy Senior College without ever having to be punished. This is our hope for every student. However, students must understand that when their behaviour falls short of our high expectations, they and their parents can expect the College to take appropriate action. RECOGNITION During the course of a year academic prowess is celebrated in a variety of ways:• Presentation of excellence certificates. • Academic competitions • Scholarships • Academic prizes • Academic colours • Proxime Accessit • Dux Colours may be secured within the Senior College (e.g. Academic, Drama and Music) but are usually presented at assemblies at Rathkeale or St Matthew’s. TEACHING AND LEARNING EXPECTATIONS The following expectations should be applied consistently by all staff: 1. Expectation – Class teacher arrival in a classroom as practicable: • Both student and staff arrival to be punctual 12

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• Teacher arrival signals the start of learning • Students stand and cease talking • Next instruction given by the teacher after above has occurred • Learning objective/outcome for that lesson to be made known at the start of the lessondisplayed on whiteboard where possible. • All students are to stand, as practicable, whenever an adult enters the classroom. 2. Expectation – Student equipment It is expected that all students will have the correct equipment for every lesson, including: • Text book and/or work book • Notes folder and/or exercise book • Equipment needed for learning in that subject such as biro, ruler, calculator, coloured pencils. 3. Expectations - Homework • It is expected that all students will complete homework as requested. • Those who fail to do so may be warned in the first instance and may expect to be placed on academic detention for repeat offences. 4. Expectation – End of lesson • Classes are to be dismissed by the teacher after the bell has rung. • Classrooms should be left tidily with chairs in/lifted off floor, whiteboards clean and rubbish placed in bin. 5. Expectation – Learning environment • Every student has the right to learn in an appropriate learning environment • Every teacher has the right to teach in an appropriate learning environment • Student behaviour that has a negative influence on the learning environment is to be regarded as serious. • Examples of student behaviour that have a negative influence are uninvited comments, harassment, bullying, unacceptable language, disrespect, belligerence to staff. 6. Expectation – respect when talking with/to students When students talk to any member of the College staff our expectation is that they: • Address staff by Sir, Ma’am, Mr, Mrs, Ms. • Listen • Do not raise their voice Do not refer to another staff member by their • Christian/nickname. NCEA Students are promoted from Year 9-13 based on age. However, there are prerequisites for studying individual subjects at each level. Students at Year 11-13 level may take subjects at any of the following levels, subject to meeting appropriate standards and prerequisites. All students at Year 11 & 12 levels will study six subjects. In some cases a special course will be designed for students with special needs and this will replace one subject. Students at Year 13 level will normally study five subjects, but may choose to study a sixth subject. NCEA (LEVEL 1, 2, 3) & SCHOLARSHIP A separate handbook concerning NZQA internal assessment has been issued to all students/parents taking Year 11/12/13 courses. Students usually study for NCEA Level 1 in Year 11, Level 2 in Year 12, and Level 3 in Year 13. Each subject at each level is assessed through a number of standards. These may be Unit Standards or Achievement Standards, or a mixture of both. Each standard is worth a number of credits on the NZQA framework and Achievement Standards can be awarded at Merit or Excellence Level as well as Achieved Level. There are specific requirements to gain a National Certificate at each level. These are listed below. All NCEA Certificates can be endorsed with Merit or Excellence. For Excellence the student must have gained 50 or more credits with Excellence at the level of the certificate or at a higher level. For Merit the student must have gained 50 or more credits with Merit or Excellence at the level of the certificate or at a higher level. Students can also earn Course Endorsements in each subject they study if they gain 14 or more credits at Merit (merit or excellence course endorsement) or 14 or more credits at Excellence (excellence endorsement) including at least 3 Credits from the external examinations. 13

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NCEA LEVEL 1 Minimum of 80 credits at level 1 or above including a minimum of 10 credits in literacy and 10 credits in numeracy. (Literacy and numeracy credits can be gained from a range of subjects). NCEA LEVEL 2 A minimum of 80 credits with at least 60 being level 2 or above, plus the level 1 literacy and numeracy requirement. NCEA LEVEL 3 A minimum of 80 credits with at least 60 being level 3 or above, plus the level 1 literacy and numeracy requirement. UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE From 2014 the University Entrance requirements are: • NCEA Level 3 (see above) • 42 credits at level 3 or above, made up of 14 credits each, in three approved subjects; • 10 credits, in Literacy; 5 in reading, 5 in writing; • 10 credits in Numeracy at Level 1 or above Note that these are minimum requirements and will not guarantee entry to all University courses. Universities are introducing a grading system for entry. Details will be given to students as they become available. SCHOLARSHIP Monetary awards will be given to the top scholars in a subject nationwide. Students must specifically enter for Scholarship and sit an extra exam. twice during the year. Additional meetings with staff may be requested. • Written reports are produced twice a year. • Effort Grades are produced 4 times a year. • Derived Grade Examination results are mailed out following exams. • Special Daily Reports are completed as needs arise. • A full Record of Achievement is produced at the end of Year 13. ACADEMIC MENTORING AND MONITORING Deans, Heads of Department and subject teachers maintain systems designed to track and illustrate students work, attainment and progress. Regular reporting, Effort Grades and Parent/Teacher interviews are designed to keep parents/caregivers informed of an individual’s progress. Parents / caregivers are welcome to discuss academic progress with individual teachers, Deans or Senior Management at any time. HOMEWORK Homework is a requirement of all academic programmes and some options. It is a student’s responsibility to see that all course requirements are met. As a guideline, it is expected that Year 12 students will complete a minimum of 10 hours of independent study over a seven day week and Year 13 students 12 hours over a seven day week. Individual students will be counselled by staff concerning entry to Scholarship level. If you have any questions about academic qualifications, please do not hesitate to telephone Mr Gordon, or email ajg@rathkeale.school.nz . Parents have a responsibility to ensure that homework is done and students are free from distractions. Parents should communicate with the Dean if the amount of homework appears excessive or inadequate. REPORTING The Senior College seeks to keep students, parents and care givers well informed about student performance, progress and attainment. To that end the following strategies are in place:• Parent/Teacher interviews. These are calendared and take place for all students During the College week (Monday to Friday) students’ evening study is their first responsibility and only under exceptional circumstances should they consider neglecting it for another engagement. If no homework is set for a subject, time should be spent on revision or recommended reading to widen the student’s background knowledge. 14

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Students are encouraged to use their Senior College Diary as a means of personal organisation and reminders. LEARNING ATTITUDE • Students should view learning as an opportunity rather than a chore. • Do not give in to peer pressure against being conscientious. • If you are unsure about a section of your class work, or whether you are doing something correctly, ask for help. APPROACH • Have long-term goals (e.g. career), intermediate goals (e.g. get in the top six for maths) and short-term goals (e.g. get better than Achieved equivalent for this section or piece of work). • Be clear about the purpose of a task. Check that what you are doing is the best way to complete it successfully. If not, do something about it. • Be active rather than passive. Do not expect merely to “soak it up”. • Read thoughtfully. Effective reading is more than merely word recognition. The mind follows the development of what is written, checks statements against one another and thinks of other examples. • Adapt your strategies. Do not have one basic, inflexible way of learning such as reading over and over material for all tests. Different sorts of tests – essays, projects, reading, listening – need different plans of attack. • Know your strengths and weaknesses as a learner. Are you better at visual representations (graphs, diagrams, charts) than verbal ones? • Follow good models. What do good learners you know seem to do? Will it work for you? ACTION • Transfer your skills and knowledge. Do not keep what is learned in maths to maths, or art to art only, but use what you know wherever you can. • Put together whole strategies to do the job. For example, when learning a new skill, carefully observe the fine details of how it is done, break it into stages to make it manageable and practise each stage carefully. Put them all together, and have your work checked by somebody familiar with the skill. • Translate difficult ideas into your own terms so that you get your own grasp of them and “own” that knowledge. • Practise what you have just learned. Do it again and get it right the second time. Get it right often enough to “fix” it in your mind so that it will not be lost. • Check yourself frequently. Find out whether or not you understand, whether or not you have got it right, whether the tactics you are using are going to do the job required or whether you need to change your strategy. • Change ineffective methods for ones that have a better chance of working and be open to new insights and possibilities for doing it better as you work. Always look for a better way- never be satisfied. INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS A number of international students attend the Senior College. Their presence contributes significantly to all aspects of College culture. Mr McIntosh has overall responsibility for International Students whilst Mrs Cheetham is also closely involved through her role as ESOL teacher. Activities for International Students are organised throughout the year. LEARNING SUPPORT Mrs Price co-ordinates the Learning Support and Development programme which works with individuals and small groups who need learning support. Teacher aides assist as required. CAREERS COUNSELLING Mrs McKeown, the careers advisor provides up-todate resources and information about a wide range of tertiary education and employment opportunities. Representatives from a range of institutions visit the College during the year and these visits are advertised in the Term Calendar, Bulletins and for year group assemblies. 15

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