Year 9 Options

 

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Year 9 Options

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DATES FOR YOUR DIARY Options Evening Tuesday 16 January 2018 4.30 pm Option Form To be returned by Friday 19 January 2018

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CONTENTS Letter of Introduction from the Principal Mission Statement Advice on choosing your Options Steps to Success What Next? Option Form Sample CORE SUBJECTS English Language English Literature Mathematics Religious Studies Science Core PE OPTION CHOICES Art and Design Business Children’s Play, Learning & Development Computer Science Creative Media Geography Health & Social Care History I.C.T Modern Foreign Languages Music BTEC Music Performing Arts Physical Education Sports Leadership Technology Options: Resistant Materials Materials’ Technology Food Preparation and Nutrition Textiles & Fashion Key Skills 2017 GCSE Performance Results Driving For Excellence Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Page 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

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December 2017 Dear Parent(s)/Carer(s), I am pleased to be able to present the Carmel College Option Choices 14+ Booklet for 2018/2019 for your consideration. It contains a great amount of information and should serve to answer many of the questions we are asked each year by parents when their son or daughter is faced with making subject choices in Year 9. All students in Years 10 and 11 must study religious education, English, mathematics, science, physical education, a modern foreign language and a humanity. Choices can be made between Spanish and French and geography and history. This will give a very good balance between subjects and ensure each student can complete the English Baccalaureate (Ebacc) in Year 11. We are pleased to also offer students an additional two option choices from a range of academic, vocational and practical subjects. Given the requirement for young people to participate in Education or Training until their 18th birthday, it is important at this stage to consider your progression routes Post-16. Young people will therefore be able to choose how they participate in Post-16 which could be through Full-Time Education in College, an Apprenticeship or Part-Time Education or Training if they are employed for 20 hours or more per week. In arriving at your decision, Carmel College staff will, as always, be available to help you. You will have an opportunity to discuss any option subject with staff of that department at the Options Evening on 16 January 2018 at 4.30 pm. We are always happy for parents to visit the College to discuss their child’s options and how to ensure they make the best choices regarding their future progress. However, I would ask that you telephone first, in order to ensure that someone is available to see you. With every good wish. Yours sincerely, M Shorten Principal M Ed, NLE, NPQH

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Mission Statement We shall endeavour to be a community which witnesses to the Gospel and the values contained therein. 'I came that you may have life in abundance.' John Ch10 v10 We shall endeavour to be a worshipping community and celebrate this in daily prayer and liturgy. Our community must be characterised by supportiveness, a welcoming approach and a caring ethos, with justice given to all within it. We shall strive to provide opportunities and an environment in which all pupils develop according to their full potential. We must seek to ensure that all members of our community experience and find hope, joy and fulfilment and a sense of their own worth and that of others, by participating as fully as possible in College life. We shall strive to maintain fruitful links with parents, parishes, Primary feeder Schools and the local community, in the recognition that the College is dependent on the interaction and support of many agencies to achieve the aims embodied in this Mission Statement. We shall regularly evaluate our organisational and management structures to ensure that they reflect the spirit of this Mission Statement, especially through the effectiveness of the College's communication systems. 'Where there is no vision, the people perish.' Proverbs Ch 29 v 18

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Advice on choosing your options Options - Your Next Steps Choosing your options is your first chance to influence your educational future. Until now, such decisions about the school you attend, the subjects you study and the groups you are in, have been made by someone else. This is your chance to choose the subjects to study that will best help you to achieve your chosen career. With such an important decision it is crucial that you: Take your time and carefully consider your choices- you owe it to yourself to give serious thought to your choice of option. Talk to the following key people before making your final decision: your subject teachers, form tutor, academic mentor and pastoral learning manager. At this point, in Year 9, you may not know or be certain what your career next steps are and it would be sensible to make sure you choose a broad range of subjects. However, some universities and careers do demand certain subjects. It is important to research and consider your choices carefully in order to make a fully informed decision. To help with this, you can browse careers guidance websites called https://www.careersbox.co.uk/ , http://icould.com/ and https://www.unifrog.org/ . In addition, book an appointment with Youth Directions, our impartial careers service in the library to discuss your progression. How to choose your options Follow the “Steps to Success” on the next page. Give all your subject areas careful consideration before you make your choice. This is your future you are investing in.  Consider all the subjects you are good at and the ones you like. This is not always as easy as it seems. Subjects will become increasingly more difficult and you need to be confident that you can achieve your potential.  It is good to have a balanced timetable with opportunities for academic and practical work.  Don’t choose subjects because your friends are doing them, or you have a favourite teacher. There is no guarantee who will teach you or who your classmates will be.  Don’t drop a subject only because “you don’t like it”; that subject may be important for your future.  Do not assume that certain subjects are needed for certain careers; do your research and check the most up to date information. Remember, your education is not only about your future career. By studying a wide range of subjects, you will learn new skills, gain new knowledge and understanding which will shape you as a person and support you in leading a full and happy life. Sarah Thornton Pastoral Learning Manager

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Steps to Success

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What Next? Carmel is an 11 - 19 RC College offering opportunities for students in Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4 and the Sixth Form. We are unique in two ways: we promote Christian values and we are the only maintained school with a Sixth Form in Darlington. Year 9 students should be thinking very carefully, not just about the subjects they are choosing for GCSE but also about what they would like to do in the longer term. It is not too early to consider what type of work or career they would like and how they are going to achieve that goal. Changes in the raising of the participation age mean that current Year 9 students will be required to continue in Education or Training until their 18th birthday. Generally speaking, to study A Levels, students must have a minimum of 5 passes at GCSE at grade 4 or above including English and maths. These examinations will be necessary for entry into university as well as many careers where work-based training is more appropriate. In the Sixth Form at Carmel we are able to offer a broad range of A-Levels, Applied A-Levels and BTECs. The Sixth Form currently approximately 30 courses at post-16. Prospective sixth from students are supported through their option choice to ensure they follow an appropriate pathway to maximize their potential for success at the end of the two years.  Excellent examination results  Wide choice of programme of study - tailored to individual requirements  New courses introduced if there is a demand for them  Close monitoring to ensure continued success and optimum results  A varied programme of enrichment courses  Leadership opportunities  Special privileges that are not extended to students in other year groups  Closer relationships with teachers  Dedicated teachers and contemporary teaching methods  Free books and equipment and laptop leasing scheme  Superb common room and Bistro facilities  New clubs, societies and sporting opportunities

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What Next? There is a wide range of extra-curricular courses/activities available in the Sixth Form at Carmel including:  Young Enterprise Scheme  Dinner dances/Christmas and Summer Balls  Opportunity to go on the annual pilgrimage to Lourdes  Challenging and enlightening retreats  Duke of Edinburgh Scheme Foreign Language students are usually able to spend some time in France or Spain. The College is also involved in many international projects and students often get the chance to attend conferences in other countries. There is also the annual pilgrimage to Lourdes with HCPT (The Pilgrimage Trust) where Sixth Form students have the opportunity to look after children less fortunate than themselves. Carmel Sixth Form is an excellent place to study and students go on to study at universities across the country, including Cambridge, Oxford, Durham, York, Warwick, Bristol, University College London and Newcastle to name but a few. Ex-students have been very successful in their routes through Higher Education to challenging and exciting careers. If you would like more information on any aspect of our Sixth Form then please contact Loraine Dodds, our Sixth Form administrator on 01325 523421.

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English Language AQA English Language Syllabus Code 8700 QAN 601/4292/3 Why study English Language? GCSE English Language studies is designed to develop your ability to decode and interpret information, identify and explain techniques in a piece of writing, as well as develop your own writing abilities. Course outline You will be familiar with many of the activities on this course but you will be expected to respond to more challenging materials throughout Years 10 and 11. English Language involves decoding, summarising and evaluating the use of words and structure across fictional extracts and non-fiction texts. You will need to show that you can write about the effects of language in assisting a writer in creating effects in a piece of writing. You will also develop the skills to adapt your writing style to cope and tailor your ideas to a variety of different audiences. A final component of the course is also the development of your speaking and listening skills. Your ability to present ideas and arguments verbally, and in a detailed and sophisticated manner. How will I be assessed and examined? GCSE Language is a linear course. At the end of this course you will be expected to sit 2 examinations. Everyone on the course sits the same examinations. Examinations are as follows:  Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing – 50% of the course: Duration 1 hour 45 minutes  Paper 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives – 50% of the course: Duration 1 hour 45 minutes. Throughout the course there will be various opportunities in class to practise exam style questions and develop the skills needed to succeed in your final exams. Compulsary Non-examination Assessment: Spoken Language Candidates present, respond to questions and feedback whilst demonstrating the use of Standard English. This unit is assessed by the class teacher throughout the course. What are the career opportunities and progression routes? You need English skills in reading, writing and speaking to cope with the demands of modern life and a qualification in English is needed for almost all further education courses and most jobs. It is a subject which opens doors, helping you to achieve any ambition you may have and enabling you to play your full part in society. What is more, the GCSE course offers you the chance to cultivate habits, which will hopefully be a source of pleasure and recreation for the rest of your life. Make the most of the chances offered! 1

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English Literature GCSE AQA English Literature Syllabus Code 8702 QAN 601/4447/6 Why study English Literature? English Literature gives you the opportunity to consider the ways in which our world is shaped, and influenced, by the power of words. Poems, books and plays not only offer us a chance to escape from our hectic lives, but also offer an insight into the lives of those who have taken the time to transfer their thoughts to paper. Throughout this course you will develop your ability to understand and decode meaning within a literary text. You will develop your powers of perception and develop your reading, writing and speaking skills whilst gaining one of your two GCSE’s in English. Course outline During the course, you will study the following texts:  One modern play.  One Shakespearean play.  One Nineteenth Century Novel.  A selection of 15 poems selected from the AQA Poetry Anthology. How will I be assessed and examined? GCSE Literature is a linear course. At the end of this course you will be expected to sit 2 examinations. Everyone on the course sits the same examination. Examinations are as follows:  Paper 1: Shakespeare and 19th –century novel – 40% of total GCSE. (Duration: 1 hour 45 minutes.)  Paper 2: Modern Texts and Poetry – 60% of total GCSE. (Duration 2 hours and 15 minutes.) These will be closed book examinations. (This means that you will not be allowed to take any notes or copies of the texts that you have studied into the exam.) Throughout the course there will be various opportunities in class to practise exam style questions and develop the skills needed to succeed in your final exams. What are the career opportunities and progression routes? A GCSE in English Literature means more than just being a bookworm. Your studies in English Literature allow you to develop your perceptive abilities and your ability to evaluate and interpret information. Obvious careers can include working within the publishing industry and producing magazines, articles or even the next best-seller. Digital publishing is another ever growing market and you could find yourself producing websites, e-books and news sites. These examples can apply to English Language as well! You may even consider a career in teaching, advertising, marketing, PR, administration, law and these are just some of the careers which can link into English. As a versatile subject the possibilities are almost endless. 2

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Mathematics EDEXCEL Syllabus Code 1MA1 QAN 601/4700/3 Why study mathematics? Most universities and employers will want you to have a pass at GCSE and future career prospects will be limited without it. Having an understanding of mathematics underpins many areas of our lives and studying mathematics also develops transferable skills such as problem solving and reasoning. Course outline The aims and objectives of GCSE Mathematics are to enable students to:  Develop fluent knowledge, skills and understanding of mathematical methods and concepts  Acquire, select and apply mathematical techniques to solve problems  Reason mathematically, make deductions and inferences and draw conclusions  Comprehend, interpret and communicate mathematical information in a variety of forms appropriate to the information and context Mathematics GCSE will assess content covered in the following areas 1. Number 2. Algebra 3. Ratio, Proportion and Rates of change 4. Geometry and Measures 5. Probability 6. Statistics How will I be assessed and examined? Each student will be entered for one of the following tiers: Foundation or Higher. Students will take three examination papers within each tier. At each tier Papers 2 and 3 are calculator papers. Tier Grade Range Foundation 1 -5 Higher 4-9 Certificate of Achievement Assessment Component Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Time 1 hour 30 minutes 1 hour 30 minutes 1 hour 30 minutes 1 hour 30 minutes 1 hour 30 minutes 1 hour 30 minutes If it is felt that students are unlikely to gain a grade 1 at GCSE, they can take the Certificate of Achievment. What are the career opportunities and progression routes? A grade 5 at GCSE in Mathematics is an important qualification to enable students to progress both in education and in work. Higher Grade (7, 8 or 9) would enable students to progress to A level and beyond. Grade 5 or above would enable students to progress to Core Maths. Some possible careers include: actuary, chartered accountant, data analyst, data scientist, investment analyst, investment banker and research scientist. 3

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Religious Education Religious Studies C120PB WJEC EDUQAS GCSE 601/88790/0 Why study RE? Catholic schools exist to provide a Catholic Education and a life based on Gospel values. It is because of this that Religious Education has been described as “the core of the core curriculum” and something which should occupy pride of place in our College. In this subject, students have the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of themselves and the part they have in life. It helps them to consider and explore the origins, meanings, purpose and value of life. Students are encouraged to reflect on their own personal response to God, other human beings and moral issues. Course outline The new GCSE Religious Studies includes three components, each component is made up of two modules: Judaism includes beliefs and teachings and Practices; Foundational Catholic Theology includes Origins and Meaning and Good and Evil; Applied Catholic Theology includes Life and Death and Sin and Forgiveness. Within these areas students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions and of key sources of wisdom and authority; understand the influence of religion on individuals, communities and societies; understanding significant common and divergent views between and within religions and beliefs; apply knowledge and understanding in order to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values; construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values. How will I be assessed and examined? The assessment will be based upon the candidate’s performance in linear examinations in Year 11. There will be three examinations for each of the components. The GCSE will comprise of three examinations. Students take all exams at the end of Year 11. Within each exam there are two sections: Judaism - Beliefs and Teachings and Practices, Foundation Catholic Theology - Origins and Meanings and Good and Evil, Applied Catholic Theology - Life and Death and Sin and Forgiveness. What are the career opportunities and progression routes? A qualification in Religious Studies is highly suitable for careers in medicine, teaching, social work, publishing, journalism, nursing and the religious life. Banks, broadcasters, the police force and the Law Society also recognise the positive benefits of such a wide-reaching subject. Religious Education encourages particular skills of listening, understanding, communicating and the ability to form and express a personal opinion. It gives an insight into human nature, how people relate to each other and it helps them to develop human concern and tolerance for others. As a result, it not only helps the student grow as a person but also has much to offer as a subject for anyone considering a career where relationship/social awareness is concerned. 4

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Science AQA “Trilogy” Combined Science / GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry, GCSE Physics Specification: Trilogy (Combined Science) 8642, Biology 8461, Chemistry 8642, Physics 8463 QUAN: Trilogy 601/8758//x, Biology 601/8752/9, Chemistry 601/8757/8, Physics 601/8751/7 Why study Science? Students who do not choose science as one of their options will follow the Combined Science course, leading to the award of two GCSE grades.Students who wish to study Biology, Chemistry and Physics as separate subjects and gain three science GCSEs have the opportunity to do so. In order to do this, science must be taken as one of your options. Choosing the separate sciences gives students a much greater breadth of study in science and is strongly recommended for any student with an interest in doing science at post-16 level. Due to the demanding nature of the courses, students wishing to take triple science must achieve at least a level 5 at the end of year 9. Course outline Italics indicate the extra areas within each topic that are studied only by those students who take triple science as an option. Biology  Cell biology (culturing microorganisms)  Principles of organisation  Infection and response (monoclonal antibodies; plant diseases)  Bioenergetics  Homeostasis and response (the eye; the brain; thermoregulation; plant hormones; osmoregulation)  Inheritance, variation and evolution (types of reproduction; DNA structure; cloning; Darwinian evolution; Mendelian genetics)  Ecology (decomposition; impact of environmental change; trophic levels; food production) How will I be assessed and examined? Chemistry  Atomic structure & the periodic table (properties of transition metals)  Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter (size and properties; nanoparticles)  Quantitative chemistry (yield and atom economy; molar solutions; moles of gases)  Chemical changes (titrations)  Energy changes (chemical cells and fuel cells)  The rate and extent of chemical change  Organic chemistry (alkenes and alcohols; polymers)  Chemical analysis (ion testing)  Chemistry of the atmosphere  Using resources (using materials; the Haber process) Physics  Energy  Electricity (static electricity)  Particle model of matter(pressure in gases)  Atomic structure (radiation hazards; nuclear fission and fusion)  Forces (moments, levers & gears; pressure in fluids)  Waves (sound waves; waves for detection and exploration; lenses; light; black body radiation)  Magnetism and electromagnetism (loudspeakers; induced potential; transformers; the National Grid)  Space physics Assessment is all by terminal examination at the end of Y11. The exams include multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions. All students will have two exams in each science subject i.e. six in total. For combined science the papers are each 1hr 15 minutes long, for triple science they are 1hr 45 minutes. What are the career opportunities and progression routes? The sciences are very useful general qualifications as they develop the skills of planning, evidence gathering, analysis and critical thinking. Because of this, as well as obvious careers and higher education courses such as medicine, engineering, pharmaceuticals, etc. the sciences are also regarded favourably for entry into other fields, such as law. 5

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