Measuring, Enhancing, Empowering

 

Embed or link this publication

Description

School-to-School International 2016 Annual Report

Popular Pages


p. 1

Measuring, Enhancing, Empowering Photo Credit: Little Thinking Minds/ Integrated Services, Indigenous Solutions 2016 Annual Report

[close]

p. 2

ThougohutrsPfrreosmident 2 STS ANNUAL REPORT 2016

[close]

p. 3

Dear STS Supporters: In 2016, School-to-School International reached more countries and children than ever before. What kind of work did we do? Here are a few glimpses. MEASURING LEARNING Are kids learning in developing countries? We helped our partners find out. In Afghanistan, we conducted that country’s first national assessment of early grade reading. It turned out kids were reading better than expected, though security and appropriate teacher training remain areas of concern. We helped a dozen grantees measure whether using technology like tablets or smart phones improves children’s literacy. In most cases, it did, but making technology work in developing countries proved challenging. ENHANCING LIVES In Pakistan and Zambia, we helped partners and ministries of education interpret assessment results in more meaningful ways by establishing reading standards— e.g., children should understand at least 80% of what they read. Using standards, ministries can now determine how many children are reading at acceptable levels and in which areas, and make strategic decisions to help them learn to read better. We also helped change the way math is taught in schools in Ghana. There, we worked with the Ministry of Education and partners to develop a new math curriculum that asks children not just to count and do operations, but to think about what numbers mean and become agiler in their ways of working with numbers. We introduced this new system to Grade 1 and 2 teachers, whose learners made significant gains in only one year. EMPOWERING GIRLS In Guinea, we continued to explore new ways to support girls. The United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative gave us a grant to study our efforts. We found our girls’ scholarship recipients did significantly better in reading and math than their peers. However, because these same girls could not identify any professions beyond teaching and nursing, we introduced them to community role models—police officers, politicians, office workers. To ensure boys also supported girls’ success, we organized clubs where girls and boys could explore the arts, sociocultural practices, and self-esteem issues. These kinds of learnings continue to inform the development of the Whole Child Model, our approach to integrating education, health, and engagement. The commitment of people like you—our funders, partners, donors, and colleagues—has enabled us to improve the lives and learning of so many girls and boys worldwide. We are grateful for your support. Dr. Mark Lynd Co-Founder and President

[close]

p. 4

STS is committed to improving the lives and learning of girls and boys worldwide through thoughtful research, practice, and partnership. 4 STS ANNUAL REPORT 2016

[close]

p. 5

We began in Guinea in 2002, with eight schools. Our mission was to improve students’ learning and lives through collaboration and constant learning. Since our founding, we have continuously implemented and tested our Whole Child Model— a holistic approach rooted in the understanding that for students to thrive, their basic needs must be fulfilled. Since our founding, we have reached 34 countries. While the scope of our work in those countries has expanded and changed over the years, our commitment to improving the lives and learning of girls and boys has not. In 2016, we supported 19 educational and community-based projects in 24 countries, including our flagship initiative in Guinea. Wherever we work, we embody our enduring values and apply the lessons we have learned from developing the Whole Child Model, providing partners our expertise in research and evaluation, curriculum and training, and policy and planning. Everyone keeps an eye on attendance at school, especially for girls. I support my girls and… encourage them to study with the boys. – Guinean mother on the effects of STS’s girls’ education outreach Enduring Values

[close]

p. 6

MEXICO USA HAITI 6 STS ANNUAL REPORT 2016 MOROCCO MALI NIGER SENEGAL GUINEA SIERRA LEONE GHANA NIGERIA Countries Where We Worked in 2016 Other Countries Where We Have Worked

[close]

p. 7

KYRGYZ REPUBLIC A F G H A N I S TA N JORDAN UGANDA RWANDA D E M O C R AT I C REPUBLIC OF CONGO DJIBOUTI PA K I S TA N ETHIOPIA K E N YA BURUNDI TA N Z A N I A MALAWI ZAMBIA LESOTHO MADAGASCAR TA J I K I S TA N N E PA L INDIA VIETNAM PHILIPPINES CAMBODIA TIMOR-LESTE WorPldawrtindeership

[close]

p. 8

Our AHpoplrisotaicch STS SPOTLIGHT A Holistic Approach to Girls’ Education Our Whole Child Model focuses on three areas of need—education, health, and engagement. In 2016, we published A Holistic Approach to Girls’ Education, thanks to support from the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative. The case study captured our innovative efforts to help girls and inspired us to do more, including inviting Guinean women to share their career stories so girls could broaden their professional interests. Our girls’ education activities include a scholarship program, which provided a bag of rice monthly to 47 girls in 12 schools. Eleven scholars finished in the top five of their class, and eight moved on to secondary school. THE WHOLE CHILD MODEL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES --Equipped teachers and provided curricula in reading and math --Established bi-weekly teacher coaching sessions --Supported girls through scholarship program HEALTH ACTIVITIES --Constructed one community well --Educated teachers on health and nutritional issues --Organized days for communities to clean school grounds COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES --Trained school management committees on school management and health policies --Conducted outreach on girls’ education and gender equity 8 8STSSATNS NAUNANLURAELPROERPTO2R0T162016

[close]

p. 9

During the 2015-16 school year in Guinea, we: GUINEA supported 5 schools awarded 47 scholarships to girls trained 38 teachers reached 2,632 students

[close]

p. 10

STS SPOTLIGHT Reaching Children with Disabilities We expanded the canon of research on the literacy skills of children with disabilities through our work with All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development. In Morocco, we supported the adaption and administration of the first-known Early Grade Reading and Sign Language Assessment for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. We also aided efforts to improve the literacy skills of children who are blind or have low vision by providing technical assistance to groups working in India, Lesotho, and the Philippines. In collaboration with USAID World Vision Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 10 S10TSSATNS NAUNANLURAELPROERPTO2R0T162016 We supported 19 projects in 24 countries, providing our expertise in three core areas— research and evaluation, curriculum and training, and policy and planning. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION Among our projects in 2016, we administered formative assessments in Pakistan; conducted a knowledge, attitudes, and practices study in Mali; organized a teacher motivation study in DRC; ran a math pilot in Ghana; supported research on the fidelity of implementation of projects in multiple countries; and monitored the use of technology in teaching early grade reading in nine countries. CURRICULUM AND TRAINING In Niger, we partnered to develop and implement reading materials according to a systematic approach to literacy. In Ghana, we launched an innovative numeracy project that helps teachers shift from procedural methods to more conceptual ways of teaching and understanding mathematics. POLICY AND PLANNING In Malawi, we collaborated with government officials and other stakeholders to ensure their National Reading Program was implemented in accordance with the country’s approved reading strategy, built consensus around key policy decisions, and reviewed teaching and learning materials for alignment with the national reading strategy.

[close]

p. 11

IEnxnpovearttiisvee In 2016, STS implemented numerous Early Grade Reading Assessments (EGRAs). 8We implemented assessments in countries Morocco Mexico Lesotho Ethiopia STS SPOTLIGHT Large-scale Assessment in Afghanistan The numbers associated with Afghanistan’s first nationally representative EGRA were immense—238 enumerators and supervisors trained, 1,087 schools in 34 provinces visited, and 16,557 students assessed. Afghanistan Zambia Pakistan India conducted 14 EGRAs customized the tool for 11 languages assessed 39,467 students We supported the design and implementation of EGRA tools in Dari and Pashto, cleaned and analyzed the data, and produced a report detailing students’ reading skills and highlighting contextual factors associated with strong reading outcomes. In collaboration with USAID Chemonics International, Inc. The Ministry of Education within the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

[close]

p. 12

THOUGHTS FROM STS’S STAFF STS stands out thanks to our collaborative, talented, and dedicated staff as well as our management’s commitment to building and maintaining that staff. Our holistic Mo Schroeder-Sanai Operations Director approach to research and interventions allows STS to add value at every stage of a project. A commitment to thoughtfulness and quality permeates the organization. STS is an organization filled with smart, dedicated individuals, who, day in and day out, demonstrate their commitment to producing quality research and collaborating internally and externally to improve STS expertly Candace Debnam Executive Director children’s education worldwide. navigates a balance between being an open and flexible partner Casey McHugh Program Manager while providing experience-tested and realistic guidance; our approach enables us to execute high-quality products within changing environments. STS’s mission is deeply infused into every level of the organization. Everyone has brought with them a commitment to service, which creates an agility that Lauren McAskill Business Development Manager matches the challenges present in global education. Randy Tarnowski Junior Research Associate Partners say they can count on STS to respond quickly, be a thought partner in the design of research and interventions, and do high-quality work. – Mark Lynd President and Co-Founder 12 STS ANNUAL REPORT 2016

[close]

p. 13

Leading with Integrity President Dr. Mark Lynd and Executive Director Candace Debnam lead School-toSchool International. Lynd co-founded STS as an independent nonprofit organization in 2002, and Debnam heads the Senior Management Team. We have employees in the U.S., Guinea, DRC, Ghana, Kyrgyz Republic, Pakistan, and Tajikistan. Mark Lynd President Candace Debnam Executive Director SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM Mo Schroeder-Sanai Director of Operations Kristina Solum Director of Programs Hetal Thukral Director of Research Beth Odenwald Deputy Director of Programs BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kevin Rubio – Chair Deputy Director of Communities and Governance, International Research and Exchanges Board Molly McMahon – Vice Chair Program Lead for the Teachers Guild, IDEO’s Design for Learning Studio Laura Stahl – Secretary Director of Operations, The Project for Education Research that Scales, Stanford University Mark Hoffman – Treasurer Certified Public Accountant, Professional Contracts Manager, and Independent Consultant Helen Boyle Associate Professor of Education, Florida State University Dipanjan Chatterjee Vice President and Principal Analyst Serving CMO Professionals, Forrester Kevin McLaughlin Senior Associate in the Democracy & Governance Sector, Tetra Tech ARD Alex Pompe Growth Lead, Premise Data Katherine Young Research Analyst, EMC Research

[close]

p. 14

Partners and Donors 14 STS ANNUAL REPORT 2016

[close]

p. 15

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES Support and Revenue Contracts...........................................................................................................................................$3,346,726 Contributions and Other Income............................................................................................. $191,564 Total......................................................................................................................................................$3,538,290 Expenses Program Services..................................................................................................$2,574,678 General & Administrative........................................................................................$921,370 Fundraising................................................................................................................$11,850 Total........................................................................................................................$3,507,898 Net Assets January 2016.........................................................................................$316,788 Net Assets December 2016....................................................................................$347,180 PARTNERS Chemonics International, Inc. United States Agency for International Development United Kingdom Department for International Development World Vision Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade FHI 360 Education Development Center, Inc. Alcoa Foundation Plan International NORC at the University of Chicago Creative Associates International, Inc. United States Department of Agriculture Project Concern International Ministry of Education of Afghanistan Ministry of Education of Ghana Ministry of Education of the Democratic Republic of Congo Ministry of Education of Ethiopia Ministry of Education of Guinea Ministry of Education of Mali Ministry of Education of Morocco Ministry of Education of Niger Ministry of Education of Pakistan Ministry of Education of Tajikistan Ministry of Education of Zambia Ministry of Education and Science, Kyrgyz Republic Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology, Malawi Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology, Tanzania Ministry of Education and Sports, Uganda Agora Center at the University of Jyväskylä Beneficent Technologies, Inc. Catholic Relief Services Institute for Disabilities Research and Training École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Rabat Kampuchean Action for Primary Education Little Thinking Minds Oeuvre Malienne d’Aide à l’Enfance du Sahel Qué Funciona para el Desarrollo A.C. Réseau d’Acteurs pour le Renouveau de l’Education Resources for the Blind, Inc. Sesame Workshop India Trust Women Educational Researchers of Kenya Kenya Community Development Foundation Africa Educational Trust Link Community Development Ethiopia International Institute of Rural Reconstruction, Ethiopia Emmanuel Development Association Defense for Children International International Rescue Committee Sierra Leone World Education Nepal INDIVIDUAL DONORS Stig Abelsen Carol Bell Carolyn Benson Helen Boyle Toni-Joy Burke Allyson Carlyle Theresa Clarke Mary & Paul De Rosas Candace Debnam Anne Dodge Barbara Fincham George Greer Sarah Griswold Candice & Andrew Healy Rene Kokott Lynn Lederer Mark Lynd Karen McLaughlin Gary Moore Jeanne Moulton Joshua Muskin Israel Nava Deise Nishimura Christina N’Tchougan-Sonou Arlene Odenwald Joan Owomoyela Diane Proudfoot Alastair Rodd Laura Stahl Evan Zasoski

[close]

Comments

no comments yet