Step Back In Time

 

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Oral history project.

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Step Back in Time A collectiloivnionfgoornalthhiesItsolreieosf oWfioglhdter people Created by pupils at the Island Free School

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Step Back in Time A coolldleerctpiIoesnolpeolofefoliWrvaiilgnhhgitsotnorthiees of Created by pupils at the Island Free School

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Memories Matter SbcoeinmencmeiunSnveioptltyve.emdbienra2p0r1o6j,e6c2t ptouprielcsofrrdomthethmeeImsloarnidesForfeeolSdcehropoeloipnleVfernotmnotrhheairve hrasPeclouohaspndotigeolhsdltemovrr.ieeiTslmkiahtri,ienestdoidiststicwhreaeeoncccfrotreeltelssereiecaddstnoeissmnoicontrnioioafspflptihmniloaoemtynmhiseneosogrcfiioonetmuhsVtemrewewnucitnootnrirhtdodyfrser,dfsimoeptrneohtldkeoesrrc,neeaosla-fiondfblrdedeoniewmntrshgptatfhethroeieypgtrolhaeeustatetwonenidcelolodfme apdofbeuootruphinlteegbf, iyaargrnetoaeanifneradcdrttaashyideas,.nsgdmetaetfliltneogrfntPoheoeanrbstuessaotacoprte.hTaethecedicnaoemwmboain,ndraeetmrifoeunmlobbfueyrzioznuognfgacoabnnavtdheorilsndaeftrrioonnt hThtmrTptthhhehiahhesaeeenoeimtdiistdporrpiooparnuegmfrrriaxgprieoteevpaisijtmlsoepcehshucirhaoepaotirenreasfmidhidntnetgaeetcshtsismhesvoaersnerveoaeI.aonercnasTltiolrdttehahrtohhsnitedinesesrfdaelmtaabyyndoFncoodfrcftrosuoiorseikcernre.tersWaghpipg,Stbaooirphecevssseedahdtetsobtoesetepieoryrhnaeylliioeretntothucoyunyoahc,pp,revrtesberwpehedouaioaencdkttritmuthctenthhuradfhoaeaoatnwegrttrnioeoeeletcrtesdxysaehedpthratefgtoeeaohdroerrrbsiiti‘oesnrhsoemfitgetblnnedth.aocegphTeyoeexrehkstbaloehee.papcfTyaeceaptrrmhkosrhwenpeteoictoylcntfpoeorihrrehotdtolrdaiuiosymomifvsonuehseeutpggaa’hc.hovenohekenrdfmoejaisonr.leysnbty(g‘IRot’oesdsnifdiocerenttth,oeDsotehweentmhsietdocehkHinlodourwesnew),ethheayd’raeliinfetebreefsotreednionww, bheaftowreewheavweetroesoalyd!a’ nd it's c‘vIhet’rislydbrieneentnearwneosdntsidnhegarrfqueu.le,Itst’htsieogcnivhsei. lnId’vrmeeenesnwojoemyreeudcvheitrpysloeraemssuuprcoehn.’s-(iVtvheeenatcnnhdoarwncreeersetiodasteaknlitkn) gtosome ‘gTrhaanndkpsartoentth’es ppraosjte.’c(tPIuapmil,mIsolraendkeFerneetoSfcihnodool)ut what happened in my ‘I enjoyed seeing the older people laugh and be happy’ (Pupil, Island Free School) Memories Matter

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Contents Child's Play 8 Lessons Learnt 18 There's No Place Like Home 32 We Will Never Surrender 42 Oh We Do Like to Be Beside the Seaside! 60 Stroll Back in Time to a Night on the Town 70 Happily Ever After 78

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Child’s Play

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Fun and games were good to play, when we were kiddies in the olden days. Looking back when we lived with Mum, being a kid was way more fun. The books we read and the films we saw, made us laugh, we wanted more. I always loved the sandy seas, the warming sun made me pleased. The sweeties always tasted great, when Mother placed them on my plate. All the games we played outside, made me smile go warm inside. These are the memories we collected, just to make sure they never ended. What kind of clothes did you wear when you were little? Jo Scott (born 1 936) Well, as you can see I was always dressed in dresses. You didn’t dress little girls in trousers, except I obviously must have had a play pair of trousers or shorts on there. I bet they were somebody else’s hand-me-downs, I bet they were. Oh, that’s a point. Oh, that dress was one. My auntie’s husband was chauffer to J B Priestley when they lived at Billingham and therefore some of J B Priestley’s daughter’s dresses came my way and that was one of them. ...Yes, that was… it was handed down to my cousin and then when my cousins had finished with it, it was handed down to me and I had another one which I never had a photograph of me in it. It was pink silk with frills and edged with blue ribbon and I loved that dress. 9 Jo Scott as a young girl

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What games did you play as a child? Gwen Croad (born 1 931 ) We had to make our own fun as children, we played hide and seek, rounders, climbed trees, played hopscotch and skipping. Alan Smith (born 1 943) We played outside a lot as a children. One of my favourite games was Cowboys and Indians. I also liked reading cowboy books. Peggy O’ Rourke (born 1 920) Well I had two brothers, they liked football so we all played football. Yes, and cricket in the summer. I was reasonably good at sports. I won’t say I was very good. Reasonably good at tennis. I was very good at netball. I had a very good eye and I used to get the ball in without any problem at all. Hockey was another one. That was quite good except you could get hurt with a cricket ball. PwgeaigrthdgeyhneO,rF'sRaisiortulearrwks einn(, bVthaecenkirtnleofrt) 10

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Ted Busbridge (born 1 928) Two village boys who were close friends of mine, Jeff and Graham, were often to be seen around the village. We were known as "The gang". I remember so clearly  the things we used to do and the games we played. Village life was never dull.  Climbing trees to swing on the branches was natural to us... We made our own bows and arrows and played happily for hours. We made catapults, kites, go carts and all kind of things depending on the current craze brought about by the stories we read. The countryside of Birling seemed to be set out especially for us with plenty of open parkland, lots of woodland, a large, shallow lake and an old ruined Manor House. All this was free for us to explore which we certainly did. We played conkers as well. We would make log rafts and sail the lake, playing heroes and pirates, Cowboys and Indians on the prairies, hide and seek in the woodland and countless other inventions that took our fancy. Roller skating and cycling was good fun too... Indoor games were mainly draughts, ludo, hide and seek and reading comics, listening to the wireless was another pastime. The wireless set was a new invention in the 1 930s. TtaeldkiBngustboripdugpeils giGnaerhodiresgnge.rLanydopnasraegnet'ds 3 John Sandell (born 1 929) TskeadtiBnugsobnridVgeentannodr fsreiaefnrdosntroller Well, my father would have games with me up in the attic. We had battles with lead soldiers and we threw corks and such like to try and knock out the opposite side. Then we had Hornby electric train which we built our own lines and shot it round (laughs). I don’t remember much else that we had as games... My father had this sailing boat with an engine inside so he could take the sailing boat out onto the Solent and sail it there. Stop the engine and put the sails up. It’s called ‘The Wild Duck’ but he was very keen. He even slept in it sometimes, go for a weekend down to where the sand pit was and slept down there. 11

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What were your favourite foods when you were a child? Madeleine Wray (born 1 940) When I was growing up my favourite foods were rabbit, stews, suet puddings, jam roly poly, rice pudding, apple pie and rock cakes. Did you have any favourite books? Madeleine Wray (born 1 940) I remember my favourite books as a girl were Little Women and What Katy Did. Madeleine Wray aged 3 What kind of things did you used to listen to on the radio? Alan Smith (born 1 943) Radio programmes I enjoyed as a child were Dick Barton’s Special Agent and Jet Morgan’s Journey into Space. Gwen Croad (born 1 931 ) Oh golly! ‘In Town Tonight’, ‘Children’s Hour’, five o’clock Children’s Hour wasn’t it?... Children’s stories, plays, poetry I think it was. It was a whole hour especially for children between five and six in the day. 12

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What fun did you have as children? Madeleine Wray (born 1 940) Oh, penny for the Guy. We used to do that. Well, every November, you know the 5th of November, we used to make a big bonfire... so we used to have an old Guy, dressed up in old rags… and it would be put onto the bonfire... before that we used to stand outside, I can’t remember where, outside a shop somewhere. Any passersby we used to say, “Have you got a penny for the Guy please?” and then you’d take the money to buy fireworks. You had to dress them up, you know in an old raincoat, jumper, scarf and make a funny face out of it. Mike Wood at Scout camp at Niton Undercliff Mike Wood outside his house in Albert St, Ventnor Mike Wood (born 1 939) I was in the 3rd Ventnor Scouts, the uniform was khaki then. We always had a big camp out at Corf on Whitsun weekend, I also remember camps at St Lawrence, Niton Undercliff and Gatcombe Farm. This photo was taken after a camp, we are outside our house in Albert Street, I must be about 1 3 or 1 4. I’m in the middle, I was patrol leader, my brother Ted is on the right, that’s Derek Winters on the left and my cousin David Corby at the front. 13

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Did you have a favourite toy? Madeleine Wray (born 1 940) When I was a girl I had my dolls, I loved my dolls, they were called pot dolls, not china dolls then, they were hard to get, a lot of girls had rag dolls. Did you have pets when you were young? Madeleine Wray (1 940) Yes we did. A black cat called Timmy and we had a dog and later on we had a budgie... My father... he was very fond of Joey and he taught it to talk. Did you have a teddy bear? Jo Scott and her teddy bear Jo Scott (born 1 936) My baby Ted... I had him when I was nine months old, but he’s only a little fellow, very scruffy, but he’s filled with straw. Well that wouldn’t be allowed now would it? He’s been everywhere with me... He went with me to college, to the schools I’ve worked in, he’s been on holidays, he’s been all over the world. My Pink Ted I had when I was four. He’s a bit bigger but he… when he… you know when you have a teddy bear, he normally growls. You tip him up and he growls. Mine plays a tune. In cuddling, not so much when pressing his tummy with your hands, you’re supposed to cuddle him and he plays a tune called ‘D’ye ken John Peel’... And he plays that in a musical box inside his tummy, and he still plays… he’s missing one or two notes now after all these years, but he still plays... 14

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Did you get sweets and chocolates? John Peace (born 1 947) Sweets… funnily enough I got caught out eating sweets. We always… Friday afternoon or Friday lunchtime, going back to school we had sports mixtures… you know sports mixtures in these bags now. Well they used to sell five different sports mixture for an old penny which is… 240 old pennies to a pound, so you used to buy a couple of pence worth of those and take them with you. George Lyons (born 1 923) Well we had… in those days there used to be they called a farthing. I don’t know whether you’ve heard of them. There were a farthing which were like a half penny and when you went for any sweets, with a halfpenny, you maybe got five sweets, you know. Just depends whether your parents could afford to give you a penny or half a penny, but in many times you know it were half and when we used to run errands and that they used to give us a half a penny for running errands which was spent on chocolate or, well on sweets. Anything that lasted, you know, pear drops or anything like that lasted. Ken Lawrence (born 1 934) They were the last thing to come off the ration, about a year after the War finished. 'Cos I remember we went in this sweet shop, Maynards, and there was a window, and there wasn’t a sweet in it. Everybody went mad. Chocolates in the window and there was nothing there. That didn’t last long but even, I mean, rationing, the last things, I think it was sweets, it was 1 954 which is nine years after the War finished. Oh yes, you can say the good old days, but there was nothing good about them. People were more closer and more helpful to each Ken talking to pupils other in those days, you know, people would help each other. Peggy O’Rourke (born 1 920) Oh, now you’ve got me going. When we came down to live in the town, about 1 0 minutes walk I should think from the house where we lived, was a little old lady. Now she really was a little old lady and had a bun on the top of her head and she sold everything from paraffin to butter. You name it, she had it in the shop, but she also had a window, an ordinary house it was, this window was full of sweets. We were given six pence a week and we used to go up there and buy gobstopper, soda fountain, liquorice strips, something else, did I say soda fountains? There was something else. I think it was a creamy chocolate bar and we used to go and buy our six penny worth of sweets a week. That was it! 15

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