CAS Student Handbook

 

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CAS Student Handbook SY 2017-2018

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CAS students are expected to: • approach CAS with a proactive attitude • develop a clear understanding of CAS expectations and the purpose of CAS • explore personal values, attitudes and attributes with reference to the IB learner profile and the IB mission statement • determine personal goals • discuss plans for CAS experiences with the CAS coordinator and/or CAS adviser • understand and apply the CAS stages where appropriate • take part in a variety of experiences, some of which are self-initiated, and at least one CAS project • become more aware of personal interests, skills and talents and observe how these evolve throughout the CAS programme • maintain a CAS portfolio and keep records of CAS experiences including evidence of achievement of the seven CAS learning outcomes on Managebac • understand the reflection process and identify suitable opportunities to reflect on CAS experiences • demonstrate accomplishments within their CAS programme • communicate with the CAS coordinator/adviser and/or CAS supervisor in formal and informal meetings • ensure a suitable balance between creativity, activity and service in their CAS programme • behave appropriately and ethically in their choices and behaviours. The relevant section of the IB Programme standards and practices document states that students should have opportunities to choose their own CAS activities and to undertake activities in a local and international context as appropriate. This means that, as far as possible, students should “own” their personal CAS programmes. With guidance from their CAS Coordinator/advisers, students should choose activities for themselves, initiating new ones where appropriate.

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Students are required to: • Self-review at the beginning of their CAS experience and set personal goals for what they hope to achieve through their CAS programme. • Plan, do and reflect (plan activities, carry them out and reflect on what they have learned). • Undertake at least one formal interview in Year 1, a second formal interview at beginning of Year 2 and a final CAS interview at the end of Year 2 with their CAS Adviser. • Keep records of their activities and achievements, including a list of the principal activities undertaken in Managebac. • Show evidence of achievement of the seven CAS learning outcomes in Managebac. • For the student on taking the Brent Diploma or Course Track, they are required to do 1 Creativity, 1 Activity and 2 Service CAS Experiences within the 2 years. • For the student on taking the IBDP Track, they are required to do 2 Creativity, 2 Activity and 2 Service CAS Experiences within 18 months. • The IBDP track also requires the student to undertake a CAS Project that is at least on month long. This CAS Project is in partial fulfilment of the IBDP CAS requirement. This may also be counted as one of their CAS Experience.

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CAS Experiences A CAS experience is a specific event in which the student engages with one or more of the three CAS strands. CAS experience can be a single event or may be an extended series of events. A CAS project is a collaborative series of sequential CAS experiences lasting at least one month (see the section on CAS project for additional criteria).

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Guidelines to CAS experiences There are four guidelines that should be applied to any proposed CAS experience. A CAS experience must: • fit within one or more of the CAS strands • be based on a personal interest, skill, talent or opportunity for growth • provide opportunities to develop the attributes of the IB learner profile • not be used or included in the student’s Diploma course requirements To further assist students in deciding on a CAS experience, the following questions may be useful for students to consider. • Will the experience be enjoyable? • Does the experience allow for development of personal interests, skills and/or talents? • What new possibilities or challenges could the experience provide? • What might be the possible consequences of your CAS experience for you, others and the environment? • Which CAS learning outcomes may be addressed? While it is not necessary for each CAS experience to address a CAS learning outcome, upon completion of the CAS programme, CAS students are required to present evidence demonstrating achievement of all CAS learning outcomes.

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CAS Stages The CAS stages (adapted from Cathryn Berger Kaye’s “five stages of service learning”, 2010) offer a helpful and supportive framework and continuum of process for CAS students as they consider what they would like to do in CAS, make plans, and carry out their ideas. The CAS stages are applicable to the three strands of creativity, activity, service, and the CAS project. There are two parts as noted in the diagram. The center represents the process with four key parts: investigation, preparation, action, and reflection (occurring intermittently in response to significant experiences). The outer circle has two parts and guides students in summarizing their experience: reflection and demonstration.

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