Lower Beeding Parish Magazine - July 2017

 

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Lower Beeding Parish Magazine - July 2017

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LOWER BEEDING PARISH MAGAZINE 50p - To arrange an annual subscription (£6) ring 01403 891710 Pet Service Sunday 16th July 10am Page 8 www.lowerbeeding.com www.facebook.com/LowerBeedingParish 0

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Lower Beeding Parish Worship Services 2nd 13th Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns July of 10.00am Parish Eucharist the year Readings: 1 Kings 4: 8-11 & 14-16; Romans 6: 3-4 &8-11; Matthew 10: 37-42 9th 14th Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns July of 10.00am Parish Eucharist the year 3.30pm Evensong at St. Johns (BCP) Readings: Zechariah 9: 9-10; Romans 8: 9 & 11-13; Matthew 11:25-30. 16th 15th Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns July of 10.00am Pet Service at 1 Mill Lane the year (See page 8) Readings: Isiah 55: 10-11; Romans 8: 1-11; Matthew 13: 1-23. 23rd 16th Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns July of 10.00am Parish Eucharist the year Readings: Wisdom 12: 13 & 16-19; Romans 8: 26-27; Matthew 13: 24-30. 30th 17th Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns July of 10.00am Parish Eucharist the year Readings: 1 Kings 3:5 & 7-12; Romans 8: 28-30; Matthew 44-52. BCP = Book of Common Prayer From the registers... (Baptisms, Funerals and Marriages) Natasha & George Wakefield, Married at Holy Trinity Church on 3rd June Joshua Etheridge, Baptised at Holy Trinity Church on 4th June 1

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Contents Features Pet Service Cathedral Events Horsham Artists Open Studios Fete Cake Stall Rabbit Patch Open Days 30 mph Update Jane Austen Anniversary 8 11 12 26 26 34 36 Regulars Worship From Holy Trinity Views from St John’s Thursday Club LBA LBHS Great Britons PCS Report Holy Trinity School Gardener’s World Sussex Wildlife Trust Our Page (children) Puzzle Page Guides Weather All in the Month of… Engage Update Cricket Health Walks Movie Moments 1 3-4 6 10 13-15 15 18-20 22 24 25-26 28 29 30 32 33-34 35-36 38 39-40 42 44 Copy date for next magazine – Thursday 13th July Welcome to the July 2017 edition of the Lower Beeding Parish Magazine. The front cover features a very happy looking Bonnie at the 2013 (believe it or not) Pet Service held at 1 Mill Lane! It was a fantastic day in 2013 with beautiful weather and a very moving, relaxed, well attended service. I’m sure it will be another lovely day and look forward to seeing some of you and your pets there. Details can be found on page 8. As always, if you have anything you’d like to include in the magazine or any comments or suggestion please do contact me. Have a lovely July. Christina Betson Editor cmbetson@hotmail.co.uk The views and opinions within this publication are not necessarily those of the editor or the Lower Beeding Parochial Church Council. 2

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From Holy Trinity The other half Despite the title of this piece I will not be discussing my lovely wife and your amazing editor this month. Instead I have been asked to write something about the other half of my job. As most people know my role here in Lower Beeding is half of what I do. The other half gets split between being: Rural and Environment Officer for the Diocese, South East Regional Director for the Farming Community Network (FCN) and Chair of the education committee for the South of England Agricultural Society (SEAS). With my Diocesan hat on I work with parishes on things like churchyards and on engaging with their local community and with the groups in the Diocese that deal with community and funding so that the rural areas don’t get forgotten. FCN is a Christian charity that provides pastoral support for farmers and faming families having problems of any faith or none. This can be anything from them struggling financially to mental health issues, to family issues. They run a national helpline and county groups of volunteers who will meet the farmer face to face to discuss the problems. My role is to support and develop the FCN groups in the South East, covering Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Hampshire. Finally I also chair the education committee for SEAS. SEAS is most well-known for the summer show at Ardingly, but what the society does goes much further than that. I wrote a bit about the show last month and for any of you that visited it I think it was a great show this year. Outside the show we host the largest STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) carers fair in the South East, where at the end of June we are expecting about 10,000 9-19 year olds to come and look at what they might want to do in the future. We also organise a special day this month for 2,500 year 5 and 6 primary school children from across Surrey and Sussex to come and learn about food, farming and the countryside. 3

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As an extra this year we are going out into schools to talk a bit about farming beforehand to get them ready for the day – I have been into St Mary’s school in Horsham recently and will be going in to our school shortly to talk a bit about dairy farming in particular. As a spoiler for the session there is a lot of serious shaking of cream required to by all the students to see for themselves how it turns into butter. We also host a well renown farming conference and support the land based colleges, such as Plumpton and Brinsbury, across the region to help get their students the experiences they need to do well in their future carers. My role as chair is to oversee all of this and try to make sure it happens! You may ask what this has to do with being a Vicar? Well the Church does care about the world God created for us and what we do with it. It may sound obvious but it also cares about people and their livelihoods. Looking after our farmers and investing in our young people for the future is something we should all care about. The Diocese pays for half of my time so that I can do this as they see it as a good thing. It does take me out of the parish a lot, which is why you may not see me walking about very much. However I am always at the end of a mobile, text or email if anyone would like a chat and I’m more than happy to pop over and visit whenever asked. If you have any questions about the other half of what I do please get in touch (my contact details are always on the back of the parish magazine). God bless, Mark. To arrange an annual subscription of the magazine for only £6 per year, that’s just 50p per monthly edition delivered through your door, please contact Mandy Wicking on 01403 891710 or via email at mandywicking@gmail.com or by post at Two Oaks, Brighton Road, Monks Gate, RH13 6JD To advertise in the magazine please contact Kate Hough at info@lowerbeeding.com 4

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TREE SURGERY                   Jonathan Rotheray Ltd For all your computer problems! Troubleshooting Home networks Broadband Word/Excel/Access 01444 400043 ! PRIVATE CAR HIRE AND TAXI SERVICE * All types of Passenger Work Also Messenger and Small Parcel Delivery Service * Established over 20 years Barry Harding Partridge Green 01403 710975 ! Handcross Village Butchers High class family butchers Support your local butcher Freezer packs from £9.50-£34.50 All fresh game when in season Full Deli range of cheeses and continental meats Fresh Eggs and Chutneys Why not try our online ordering? Visit our website below S Big enough to cope and small enough to care High Street, Handcross, Tel No: 01444 400396 www.handcrossvillagebutchers.co.uk ATS Machinery Lawn Mower Sales, Parts & Repairs ! Honda & Stihl Main Dealer Horsham 01403 891580 ! www.ats-machinery.co.uk ! !

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News and Views from St. John’s, Coolhurst As I write this "News from St John's", ones thoughts are turning from "holy days" to "holidays". This is of course the derivation of the word, but this year feels particularly apt. There seem to have been a lot of long weekends recently as Easter fell so early: Whit Monday (the exciting message of Pentecost, which always fascinated me as a child at Holy Trinity - all tales of fire, speaking in tongues and the vicar in flame red robes seems rather diminished by the prosaic "fixed date Spring Bank Holiday"!) and before that May Day and the Easter long weekend. We have been blessed with some very fine late spring/early summer weather, and this, combined with all those "holy days" and the door open at St John's throughout the service bringing in the warm air and bird song, means that one really is looking forward to summer and the fun that goes with it. The most recent of these special ecclesiastical days, albeit not giving a bank holiday, was Trinity Sunday. Having been brought up in the Anglican tradition I have heard many sermons, offered many prayers, and read many articles on the subject of the Trinity and thought that I understood it but with the passing of years have realised this is hubris: if I thought I understood, I probably wasn't thinking enough! This Trinity Sunday, the parting thought that I took away from St John's was not a complex theological argument, but rather more simplistic. There are lots of terms for church communities and their relations with God: the church "family", the church as the "bride" of Christ, "God the Father" and so on. I was stuck this year by the "team" nature of the Trinity: three parts, with different strengths, skills and purposes, but always an indivisible unit. Having been brought up in a small family, I was always aware of the balance of a team of 3, and now am part of a team of 3 of my own. Do we put the same care and analysis into our own family units as we do when thinking of the Trinity? So with those thoughts in mind, the blessing of holidays and the promise of summer to come, I have been thinking of family and the need to take time to recharge ones own batteries. To put it another way, this last "holy"day reminded me of the importance of using holidays to spend time with loved ones: to rest from "work" and instead "work" on our faith and strive to value and nurture our relationships and family teams … whether a Trinity or otherwise. Happy holidays! Mark Bamford 6

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advertise your business now! Get exposure in the Lower Beeding area by advertising in this magazine and on our website - www.lowerbeeding.com E-Mail josh now to find out more - josh.hough@mas-group.co.uk or call 01444 645017. PHYSIOTHERAPY SPECIAL INTEREST IN SPORTS INJURIES AND SPINAL PAIN KATIE KNAPTON MCSP Member of the HPC CHARTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST BRIGHTON ROAD, LOWER BEEDING TEL: 07711 531132 www.katieknapton.co.uk PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE APPROVED Absolute Arboriculture Crabtree, Lower Beeding Tree surgery & Hedge cutting Stump grinding & Logs Call Max Ferretti ND, NCH Arb T: 01403 730504 M: 07759 482934 E: max@absolutearb.com W: www.absolutearb.com Paul C. Avery INTERIOR & EXTERIOR DECORATOR FOR A QUALITY ASSURED FINISH To all your decorating requirements THE GATEHOUSE . SANDYGATE LANE . LOWER BEEDING . RH13 6LR Telephone (01403) 891017

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Pet Service Sunday 16th July 10am At 1 Mill Lane (1/2 mile down Mill Lane, past the barn conversion on your right) There will be a special service to celebrate the animals we share our lives with at 1 Mill Lane instead of the usual Holy Trinity Church service at 10am. All pets are welcome to join their owners in receiving a blessing at this service and stay afterwards for chat and refreshments. Many thanks to Mary Davies for hosting. For more information contact Mark on 07801 273074 8

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Mark and his staff welcome you to THE PLOUGH Lower Beeding A traditional, family friendly country pub, serving fine ales and beers. Lunchtime snacks from 12–2pm. Full evening menu available from 6–9pm. Sunday roast from 12 – 3 pm. Don’t forget Fryday is fish and chip day. Ring 01403 891277 to order – you’d batter hurry. Open all day Friday Saturday and Sunday. Darts Pool Bar See you soon Billiards ROY WICKING GARDENING SERVICES * Lawn & hedge cutting * Garden clearance * General maintenance * Fully insured TEL: 01403 891710 MOB: 075 2209 5930 MAIL: ROY.WICKING@GOOGLEMAIL.COM KEEPERS BOARDING KENNELS & GROOMING PARLOUR Leechpond Hill, Lower Beeding, RH13 6NR 5-star Accommodation with outside Astro Turf exercise ground Day Boarders Welcome Contact the owners Lisa & Sue. 01403 891 300      

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Important notice for July - please note we will not be meeting on Thursday 13th July in the hall. Our outing to Wey and Arun Canal is fully booked and is taking place instead of a meeting in the hall. The meeting in May was about The Inns of Lewes by John Davey and I believe it was an interesting meeting, only a few members present, but I am sure the tea was enjoyed by those attending. With the continued good weather we hope to have lunch at a pub in the area in August - ideas for this are welcomed. Carly 07581191185 or 891542 10

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Cathedral Events: July 2017 Exhibition at Chichester Cathedral: ‘400 Days’ and ‘Alternative Values’ – An exhibition by Frieda Hughes. Wednesday 14th June – Thursday 17th August A unique opportunity to see 400 paintings created over 400 days by the artist and poet Frieda Hughes. In November 2015 Frieda decided to create a painting every day for a year… This fascinating project is an exploration of how our days change in mood and tone – what does it look like when a person describes their actual experiences in shape and colour every day? All 400 paintings are exhibited alongside ‘Alternative Values’, a collaboration between Frieda’s poetry and her artwork, which amongst other things, addresses her experience as the daughter of poets Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. In the North Transept. Open daily with free entry. Come and see the famous Chichester Cathedral Peregrines Friday 20th April – Sunday 18th June 2017 Every year a pair of Peregrine Falcons raise new chicks in the Cathedral’s south east turret. View them on the Cathedral website and in the RSPB marquee off the Cloisters Café. Later in the project the birds can be viewed through telescopes in the Cathedral grounds. Entry is free. See Behind the Scenes at Chichester Cathedral - Saturday 15th July: 1.00pm – 4.00pm As part of the Festival of Chichester, areas of the Cathedral normally closed to the public will be open to visitors. The Song School, located high up in the Cathedral’s triforium and reached only by a winding spiral staircase. Come and discover its secret chamber! The Cathedral Library in the Cathedral heights, where a fascinating collection of rare books is stored, and the Bishop’s Chapel, the private chapel of the Bishop of Chichester. (Please be aware there are 40 spiral stairs up to the Song School and Library). Free entry. All are welcome. Family Activity – ‘Up, up and away!’ Friday 28th July 10.00am – 3.00pm (Last entry 2.30pm) Come along to the Cathedral for some holiday fun! Join us to create your own flying beast or peregrine falcon, butterfly, kite or aeroplane. Find out about the many things that fly in the Cathedral by following a trail before collecting a prize from the shop. £2.50 per child (aged 3-12 years). No need to book, just drop in. For further details call 01243 812497 or see www.chichestercathedral.org.uk Services are held daily and all are welcome – see www.chichestercathedral.org.uk for details. 11

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The Horsham Artists Open Studios Art Trail is taking place over the weekends of 8th/9th and 15th/16th July 2017. A wide variety of art and crafts will be on display in and around Horsham in artists’ own studios and other settings. This year the trail includes two local venues and artists: Church Lane House, Church Lane, Plummers Plain will be open again featuring work of four artists – Edith Pargh Barton’s unique textile sculptures, embroidered tea lights and oil paintings, Jean Holder’s handmade earthenware, raku and pit fired pottery, Bruce Ringrose, designer and maker of traditional handmade jewellery and Jill Mills, hand knitted jewellery. The new venue is “Wildwood”, Winterpit Lane, Mannings Heath where Jo Willis will be showing her oil paintings and prints and in the garden will be Claire Morris with her hand carved sculptures. For further details please see http://www.horshamartistsopenstudios.co.uk Art Trail maps will be available from the Mannings Heath Village Store, Holy Trinity Church and both Lower Beeding and Mannings Heath Village Halls as well as Horsham Museum and a wide variety of other venues. 12

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Lower Beeding Association News Charity No. 267433 The results of the 250 Club draw held on Thursday 8th June at the Crabtree are as follows: £50 C Smith £50 M Wicking £50 A Clarke £30 P Arbuthnot £30 R Wicking £30 C Christian £20 T Clarke £20 S Langton £20. C Fake 180 167 241 219 64 142 238 50 12 The next Draw will be held at the Wheatsheaf on Thursday 14th September from 9 p.m. We do have a few tickets left – only £20 and helping your village hall. The Village Fete report will appear next month. We say farewell to Norma and David Bennett from 4 Mill Close. After thirty or so years they have moved to Marlborough to be near their daughter Rachel. We wish them happiness in their new home. Welcome to Natalie and Les Shaw who have just moved into 4 Mill Close from Cheam and we hope you too will be happy in your new home. Welcome to Jessica born on the 7th June to Anna and Matt Knight. Lovely granddaughter to Hilary and Roy Broadhurst in Mill Lane. Congratulations to you all. Sussex Place Names: What lies behind the place names of some of our Sussex villages gleaned from English Place Name Society based at Nottingham University...Arundel It is thought that the name originates from the Old English har-hun dell which means horehound valley. It is said that there is still a profusion of the plant, a member of the mint family thereabouts. The name of the River Arun is a “back formation” from that of the town. The River’s previous, pre-Anglo-Saxon name was Tarrant still contained in a local street name. Billingshurst: This is an interesting one based on a settlement group and means the wood of Billa’s people. Hyrst means wood, and the form -ingas, the use of which generally denotes an early settlement, means the people of. 13

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Clemsfold: a possession name, meaning the fold (falod) belonging to Climpe. Cowfold No guesses for this one – a fold, as previously, where cows were held. Henfield: I always used to think this neighbouring name was pretty clear as well, but in fact the likely meaning is high (hean) open land (felde), not hen as in chickens. Horsham: it used to be said that the name of our town featured Horsa (of Hengist and Horsa fame). But this is not so. Horsham is a compound name, once a place or ham where horses, or hors, were pastured or bred. In Anglo-Saxon times horses were not generally used as draught animals, but more for hunting, warfare and transport for traders such as salt pedlars. Mundane farm work such as ploughing was left to oxen. A Saxon lord would be responsible for supplying his men with armour and horses, to be returned to him on death in what was termed heriot, so animals might have been supplied from places such as Horsham. The centre of Horsham is the Carfax and one or two fanciful suggestions have been put forward as to its meaning. But it’s best to rely on the Place Names of Sussex and the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary which state it derives from Middle English and “is a common name for a place where four roads meet”. Chesworth: again local, is likely to derive from an enclosure, or worth, belonging to Ceorr or perhaps Ceolred. Itchingfield: Another -ingas name, this time referring to open land or field, of the people of Ecci. Lower Beeding: this -ingas form refers to the people of Beada. As for the prefix, it connects, of course, with Upper Beeding, and it may be that Lower Beeding was the district in the Weald which formed the swine pastures of the original Beeding settlement (today’s Upper Beeding). As the Place Names of Sussex says: “the application of the terms Lower and Upper is obscure and paradoxical, for Lower Beeding is on the higher ground and further up country than Upper Beeding. Possibly Upper is used to denote the chief or more important part of the parish. Loxwood Fairly straightforward meaning the wood (wudu) belonging to Locc. Nuthurst: Little change from the Old English – the name means nut wood, or hyrst. Parham: Another name with a fruity connotation, this is a compound of the words pear (peru) and homestead (hamm) – thus pear homestead or enclosure presumably with an orchard significant enough to warrant a mention in its place name. Pulborough: There are two possibilities here. One is that the name means the hill by the pool, or it could contain the name of someone named or beorg. Rudgwick: This refers to the location of a farm (wic). Rusper: Also a location name, it means rough enclosure, from the Old English words ruh and spaer. Shipley: The name describes the farming that went on there, namely the tending of sheep, and means a sheep clearing from sceap and leah. Slinfold: This has caused some debate but probably means the fold on the slope (slind). Storrington. Another difficult name. The most likely and interesting explanation is that it derives from storc meaning stork and tun, meaning farm – so stork farm. White storks are now classified as scarce migrants (one was reported at Pulborough Brooks in early August 2016), but bred formerly and are likely to have been resident pre-Conquest. Warnham: The place or ham of a person named Werna. Weald: As we know the Weald was once very densely forested. It was said it was quicker to get to London from the coast by sea, seemingly the long way round, rather than via the 14

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