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1ST Issue 2017 Flash C atsThe Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy HAS YOUR CAT SUFFERED A STROKE? STRESS IN THE HOME and how if effects your Cat ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN PETS Are you doping your cat For the Show Bench? IT’S JUST A CAT BITE.... Says No-one Ever!!

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Making everyday an adventure, naturally. AWARD-WINNING NO BAD ANYTHING FOOD FOR CATS Proudly made in Canada by Hagen For more info and stockists visit www.nutrience.co.nz Join our community on Facebook www.facebook.com/nutriencenz

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EDITOR Gaynor Saxon 272 Kennedy Road Napier 06 842 1011 flashcatseditor@gmail.com ADVERTISING Wendy McComb 06 368 9991 allanandwendy@hotmail.com SECRETARY Chris Lowe secretary@nzcf.com 07 533 4347 TREASURER Marion Petley 259B Mill Road, Otaki 5512 06 364 6314 marion.petley@xtra.co.nz COVER PIC Gld Dbl Gr Ch ‘FLURMONZ GARVANTUA’ 2016 1st Longhair Entire Cat Owned by Judy Formby The Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. Inside this issue Issue 62 3 IT Report/Show News 4 Stress in the Home 5 Breeders Blog 6 Antibiotic Resistance in Cats 8 It’s Just a Cat Bite 9 Are You Doping Your Cat 11 What’s New on the Show Scene 12-17 2016 Annual Awards 19 Judges Update 20 Has your Cat had a Stroke 21 Cats are just as Smart as Dogs 22 What you Need to Know about Privacy 23 BSAC - Breeding Practices Project 24-28 NZCF Information A Cat is hthaevreeawnhyetnhinygoubecattlelrhteor difo.s..he doesn’t 2017 SUBSCRIPTION APPLICATION I would like to subscribe to Flash Cats Magazine This subscription entitles me to Associate Membership of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. I am enclosing $40.00 for four issues of Flash Cats. Please send them to the address below: Name: Address: Please copy or cut this form and post to: Executive Secretary Chris Lowe - 1614 Old Coach Road RD6, Te Puke 3186 New Zealand Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc or its officials, and advertised products or services are not necessarily endorsed by the NZCF For permission to reproduce material in this magazine please contact the authors directly or talk to Gaynor Saxon on 06 842 1011

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The Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. CHAIR CHAT Hello everyone.. As this is my last Chair Report for this year, I guess I had better make it a good one... My thanks to Chris, my right hand girl, who has given many years of devoted service to the NZCF and many Chairs before me, and thanks to Deb and the EC team for their hard work over the last three years. It’s not easy following the rules while still trying to keep everyone satisfied and it doesn’t always happen, but that’s the job. My congratulations to the National Award winners of 2016 they are a credit to their owners who devote many hours and dollars to present these beautiful cats on the show bench, however lets not forget the ones that don’t quite make it to the finals, no less time and money are spent on them, so congratulations to those too. Remember every owner takes home the best cat on the day. Which brings me to a concern I have regarding how we are preparing our cats for showing. You will all read an article I have sourced and included in this Issue with regard to doping cats for showing. It came to my notice via a vet who was very concerned that they were being asked by cat owners for Amitriptyline to calm down cats on the show bench. It is quite horrifying when you understand that this is a serious addictive drug. Prescribed mainly for depression in humans and only for serious behavioural problems in cats and should only be prescribed by vets for just that... serious problems. Does the NZCF need to consider drug testing at shows? PLEASE... read the article and understand the health dangers that some owners may be exposing their cats to. Now on a more productive note, at the AGM last year, some of our members raised the matter of a new, more modern and up to date logo and even maybe a new name for our NZCF organisation. While a new name must be accepted and passed by the members at an AGM. The EC did agree to investigate the possibility of both and I have therefore created a survey for you the members to complete. I am sure you will all want to have your say, this is your organisation and your opinions on the image of the NZCF going forward is important. Unlike the New Zealand Flag referendum, there is no cost and the decision is up to the members. There will be a chance to submit logo designs and get involved in new name suggestions should the members decide this is the way forward. Do take the time to complete the survey included in this issue. Regards to all, Gaynor Saxon NZCF Chair So what is happening that some showgoers are going to such lengths just to show a cat who otherwise is really stressed, doesn’t want to be at the shows and quite frankly shouldn’t be there. NOTICE CLUBS AND BREEDERS.... Please check that your website details are updated on the NZCF website. It seems that some are very out of date. To update your details contact Chris Lowe, NZCF Secretary at secretary@nzcf.com NZCF MEETING DATES 2017 13-14 MAY 2017 5-6 AUGUST 2017 25-26 NOVEMBER 2017 FLASH CATS CLOSE-OFF DATES FOR CONTRIBUTIONS March Issue - 30 January 2017 June Issue - 30 April 2017 September Issue - 30 July 2017 December Issue - 30 October 2017 Contact Gaynor Saxon (Editor) flashcatseditor@gmail.com Flash Cats 4 Issue 17/01

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IT REPORT Since the November meeting all EC members, including the Secretary and Treasurer, have been allocated an NZCF email address. Also the primary registrars (SH, PR, LH & Honours), have also been allocated NZCF email addresses. www.nzcf.com It These are the emails addresses, they need to be used for all official NZCF business. This will allow for continuity for future officers and officials, as people move into and out of the positions. If you have any other addresses previously created for these people, it would be preferential to remove those addresses from your address book/contact lists. So email doesn’t go to incorrect email addresses or people. Please Note that there are a number of works in progress in the background, that are progressing and as these are incorporated or advance through the appropriate stages EC will be notified. A position description was written for the role of Webmaster. A summary of other issues that have a risen and matters that have been resolved follows: was recommended that the current cost for using the show be lowered to $100 for the first time use and subsequent uses are charged at $50, as the initial program is with the clubs and all they require is the updated information. The clubs shouldn’t be having to continue to pay full costs. Honours Registrar queried the end of support for the OS – Vista – that she was running and it was decided that a new PC should be purchased. Also the printer had reached then end of its life expectancy so approval was given to purchase an updated wireless model. Show packages documents will need to be rewritten and updated to improve the usefulness to show secretary’s when using the show package software. Changes are happening behind the scenes getting things ready for the online payment gateway, which will allow easier completion of membership, registrations and transfers. Lastly, online voting should be available in time for this year’s (2017) elections and remits. Watch this space and an announcement will be made just prior to the elections taking place. Deb Armishaw Portfolio Manager - IT SHOW NEWS Welcome to a new and exciting show season. I would like to take this opportunity to remind all the clubs about making the show season fun, and above all, to have good sportsmanship at all times on the day. A reminder to all attendees at shows that it is expected that everyone acts in a friendly, respectful and professional manner at all times. We are still needing sponsorship for the Shorthair Ribbons for the National Ring Entire Cat/N-S Cats and Kittens, thank you to those who have sponsored a set of top ten Ribbons. Janice Davey Portfolio Manager - Shows At shows when vetting is taking place, and the vet wants to remove a cat from the show, a vet rejection form MUST be filled out this is compulsory. However if an owner wants to withdraw the cat/kitten the process of vetting out forms must still be completed. All clubs please present your Health and Safety talk before the show starts, also ensure that you have your Health and Safety Manual and Accident Investigation forms at the show. Remember the old adage from Benjamin Franklin “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail” we do not want this happening at our shows. Issue 17/01 5 Flash Cats

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The Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. Stress can help animals survive, but it can also be unhealthy. Infrequent, stressful events can save lives because they instantly motivate animals to flee or fight. On the other hand, chronic stress and sudden traumatic events can cause behavior issues as well as serious medical problems. We can all suffer stress at home both humans and pets alike. Certain triggers can cause behavioural and medical problems with stress in cats. Many of the obvious triggers that cause stress include relationship problems between resident felines, neighborhood cats hanging around, moving to a new residence, litter box issues and remodelling the home. There are also subtle situations that can cause as much anxiety as the obvious ones. It’s easy to overlook the effects that loud noises, unexpected movements and household dynamics can have on sensitive kitties. Upheavals and emotionally charged situations are stressful for everyone in the household, including resident animals and people. Cats are sensitive — in addition to reacting to overt problems between their people, many become anxious when there are subtle, underlying tensions in the home. It’s not just emotional family dynamics that can stress kitties. Changes in schedules, vacations and deaths are a few of the other situations that can cause anxiety. Stress can of course help animals survive by causing the flee or fight process. It can be due to a move of address or other cats in the neighbourhood. Events like Guy Fawkes can cause huge anxiety in pets. You must try to limit stress wherever possible and reassure your pet it is safe and loved. Some actions you can do to reduce stress is have some new toys or cat furniture such as a scratching post. If experiencing toileting issues, place more litter boxes temporarily in the home. Place some comfy “hidey hole” boxes and if possible give them an elevated area to sit and feel safe. Try not to raise your voice at inappropriate behaviour when your cat is stressed as this will just elevate your cats stress levels even further. Try also to give your cat a reasonably consistent routine with feeding etc so it knows when things will be happening. The very best stress reliever for both humans and cats is of course lots of cuddles and playtime. Just enjoying the companionship is the biggest (and cheapest) stress reliever available. It may be hard to recognize when cats are starting to feel anxious and stressed. Some of the issues you may experience are as below. • Excessive vocalising • Spraying • Aggression • Litterbox avoidance • Eating either excessively or stopping eating • Overgrooming • Fur pulling • Trying to eat inedible objects, such as wool, plastic and wood. • Hypervigilance • Lethargy • General avoidance of family by hiding These issues above could be signs of stress or a possible medical condition such as Feline Interstitial Cystitis, obesity and not eating, among other conditions. Whenever a cat changes its behavior and exhibits unwanted behaviors, it needs a thorough examination by a veterinarian. Sometimes it takes a combination of medical and behavioral intervention to take care of the problem. Information souerced from various websites. Flash Cats 6 Issue 17/01

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www.nzcf.com BREEDERS’ BLOG By Zena Pigden Well it has been quite a journey with Finn. I decided soon after writing the last blog that the urine testing as well as being quite a hassle wasn’t really giving me accurate enough information. I visited a couple of feline diabetes sites – felinediabetes.com and tillydiabetes.net and decided I needed to bite the bullet and learn how to test his blood sugars. Also, while his sugars were still high/ unstable he was having to have them tested every so often at the vet – it was stressful for him and not cheap. Doing it myself turned out to be not too hard at all, there are some encouragingYouTube videos to show you how, and Finn turned out to really not mind the process much at all. I bought a CareSense human glucometer from the vet (from memory, about $30) and some testing strips as you only get 12 in the starter kit.You get a little meter a bit smaller than an old style flipfone, a lancet device that you load tiny needles into, and the testing strips which are inserted in the meter just before you do the ear prick. The videos and websites tell you where exactly to use the lancet – the reality is sometimes you get it right and get a nice bead of blood that the testing strip can suck up and sometimes you don’t and have to try again. It must be said that Finn is an incredible cat and has cooperated really well with his sugar testing. He will come when called and hop up onto his bed for me to do it. I recorded (and am still recording) his sugars in the little notebook that came with the glucometer. From time to time I scan this and send this to my vet with an update. I’m so glad I did learn how to do it - as we knew exactly when we had got Finn’s insulin up to an effective level (which turned out to be 6.5units twice a day). And following the protocol on the tillydiabetes site (and with my vet’s approval), when we could start reducing it. Once his sugars stabilised in the normal range (mostly 4s and 5s) we could gradually reduce his insulin every 5-7 days. It’s absolutely not recommended to stop it suddenly or reduce too fast. The good news is that Finn is now on only 1.5 units twice a day and that we have every expectation that he will be able to come off it completely (although he will be at higher risk of diabetes recurring than a cat that has never had it). And what about the peeing? Finn now consistently uses a litter tray or goes outside to pee – but he’s still spraying and marking. This was not well received by my family (or to be honest by me, I got fed up with cleaning up little spot wees and wall spray). On thinking about Finn’s behaviour, I felt this was largely anxiety driven. He did it least in his safe place (our bedroom) and more the further away from our room that he was. Also he looked anxious when he came into our living area and was reluctant to come through it to go outside. Anti-anxiety medication is one option vets consider with a cat that is territory marking. But my daughter suggested I try Petcalm which is a herbal remedy containing well known calming herbs such as valerian, hops, skullcap, passiflora, and St John’s Wort. Nothing to lose I thought, although because Finn is a large cat (10kg) I decided to dose him twice a day rather than once. We’ve been doing this for about two weeks and there’s been a definite reduction in the spraying. And he’s coming out into the living room more. No adverse effects that I can see either. One additional strategy that helped a bit was putting a litter tray in the toilet at the other end of the house, which is just off the living room. When he feels like making his presence felt he goes in there and uses the litter tray. It’s too soon to say he’s stopped entirely and I plan to keep him on the Petcalm until he shows me he’s completely relaxed around all the areas of our house that he visits. Issue 17/01 7 Flash Cats

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IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN PETS AN INCREASING PROBLEM With antibiotic resistance emerging as an urgent public health issue, much of the focus has been on the rise of drug-resistant bugs in humans and farm animals. But what about those animals that share our homes, our hearts, and sometimes even our beds? That question has been raised in light of a recent study by researchers in China, who found that a pet shop worker, along with four dogs and two cats in the shop where he worked, were infected with a strain of Escherichia coli bacteria carrying the MCR1 gene—a molecule that can confer resistance to the last-resort antibiotic colistin. These findings suggest that mcr-1–producing E. coli can colonize companion animals and be transferred between companion animals and humans. The findings also suggest that, in addition to food animals and humans, companion animals can serve as a reservoir of colistin-resistant E. coli, the authors of the study wrote. The study was one of several in recent years to examine whether humans and pets can share drug-resistant bacteria. In 2014, researchers in the United Kingdom analyzing strains of methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in cats and dogs showed that humans and companion animals readily exchange and share isolates from the same strain, a finding that suggested pets and humans can pass MRSA backwards and forwards, as one of the authors told the BBC. With the intimacy we have with our pets, there is a chance that some of these resistance elements can move back and forth, Good hygiene practice, not letting your pet lick your face, washing your hands regularly, are good precautions to take. In addition, pet owners can minimize their risk by taking their pets to the vet for regular check-ups and vaccinations. Healthy pets are much less likely to carry diseases that can infect you. Rising drug-resistant infections in pets While the possibility of pets spreading drug-resistant bacteria to their owners may be limited, there is growing concern in the veterinary community about the rise of antibiotic resistance in companion animals, particularly drug-resistant skin infections, urinary tract infections, and surgical site. infections. As in human medicine, this is limiting the treatments that can be used by vets, as more and more antibiotics become ineffective. In a 2009 study, investigators swabbed household surfaces at 35 randomly selected homes and found MRSA in more than half of them. In looking for factors that might make a home more likely to harbor the bacteria, they discovered that the presence of MRSA was eight times more likely in homes with cats.  So should pet owners be keeping a wary eye on their four-legged friends? There is much concern about antimicrobial infections. Some of these bugs—like MRSA—are coming from humans. Others, however, are the result of antibiotic overuse in veterinary practices creating selection pressure. And while antibiotic overprescribing in the human healthcare system has been well documented, there is no way of telling what the rate of antibiotic overuse is in companion animals. Not necessarily. But the problem appears to be increasing, experts said. Risks of pet-human exchange are low. Although the possibility of any disease is an important factor to think about, the risk is low, and often considered to be outweighed by the benefits of pet ownership. But they say the risk of an individual getting a MRSA infection from their dog, to use one example, is very limited. The reverse scenario is more likely, given that MRSA strains exist in the nostrils of roughly one in three people. Another concern among experts is the fact that companion animals are not included in the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS), which tracks antibiotic resistance among Salmonella, Campylobacter, and other bacteria transmitted commonly through food. Experts believe pets would probably be a good sentinel for monitoring exchange of resistance elements, as well as the bugs we might see. Information sourced from www.cidrap.umn.edu The issue is worth discussing as an increasing number of people share their homes with pets. Flash Cats 8 Issue 17/01

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www.nzcf.com A premium pet transport booking service, at discounted prices at www.pettravel.nz NOW SHIPPING INTERNATIONALLY Issue 17/01 9 Flash Cats

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The Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. ...Sa ys, n o Ju dge ,Vet ,Vet Nur se,B reed er or Handler EVER. By Sue MacKay Did you know a cats mouth is usually a cesspool of bacteria? It can be likened to a snake bite, their canines and other teeth injecting that bacteria under your skin, via a tiny puncture that seals over almost immediately. The bacteria are now sitting in a lovely warm moist environment cooking up a storm, and within almost any time frame an infection or abscess can form. Bacteria are grouped in many different ways, but the topic of this is anaerobic or aerobic bacteria. Aerobic bacteria have a metabolism that can’t survive without oxygen. Anaerobic bacteria exist in an environment free of oxygen, and exposure to it can cause a toxic effect. Testing for anaerobic bacteria can be difficult as exposure to oxygen can create a false negative result. In the cats mouth, bacteria from the anaerobic group can be kept in check by exposure to oxygen from eating, breathing etc. Under the skin this bacteria will now grow at a sometimes rapid rate causing pain, swelling, redness and often throbbing. Some people will have an immune system that copes with this type of infection, controlling or defeating it. In many though, it can create an infection that the body can’t fight, or that spreads at a fast rate. If the bite is on a hand or finger where blood circulation isn’t as good the infection can be harder for the body to fight. Redness surrounding the wound, or moving up the limb can be seen. It can become very painful, and throb like crazy!!! I’ve heard some say that the older the cat, the worse the infection they can give, and conversely, the younger they are, the least likely they will be to give you one. No age is better than any other. A younger cat can have sharper teeth, which can go deeper, while some older cats can have blunted teeth that bruise more than they break the skin, or broken teeth that penetrate easily. Cats are individuals, and any bite can be a problem. Just what the cat did or ate just prior to biting you can add to the concoction. Cat bites infections can sometimes take a while to fester before overwhelming your body’s defences, so you will need to keep an eye on it, and go to the GP or hospital if it worsens. Marking the edges with a biro, and take a note of the time to show the Dr what has been happening. Some people have Co-Morbidities which make it more difficult to fight infections. Those with diabetes, poor circulation, obesity or other long term illnesses may need to see their GP as soon as they can after being bitten. This is because their bodies may not be as good at fighting infection, so they are more at risk of the localised infection becoming systemic (body wide). Recently a cat got out of a cage and into an area where it was difficult to retrieve it. The owner was bitten when they scuffed the cat, on their knuckle. Although they went straight to the hospital that night, they were turned away by staff and told to come back if it got worse. They were back the next morning, seen by a Dr who marked the edges, and put them on an antibiotic. It was disappointing that treatment wasn’t offered sooner, this infection took 10 days to get under control. The cat was unharmed, and returned to its cage, it only bit out of fear, this was completely out of character for it. I remember a judge being bitten a number of years ago. They were on the plane home when they started to feel unwell, and the redness was climbing up their arm. It was a short flight, and by the end of it, they needed to see a doctor quickly. Infection can spread rapidly for any number of reasons. To reduce your chances of getting an infection, immediately after being bitten, wash the area thoroughly, using chlorhexidine if available. This is a surgical scrub preparation designed to put on skin, contact time (the period required to be on the skin for it to be considered effective) is around ten minutes. This doesn’t mean it has to be wet during this period, but it should not be washed off the skin. If the bite is bleeding, this can be useful to reduce contamination, but if bleeding is profuse, it should be stopped. Ice can be useful, but only if it provides pain relief. Some believe ice may ultimately slow the healing process, so if it increases symptoms, remove the ice. After being thoroughly cleaned, it is up to the individual to decide if they want to put a first aid cream on. Make sure that any products used do not counteract the other for instance don’t use an iodine cream after cleaning with chlorhexidine, as it reduces the effectiveness of it.You can dress the wound, or leave it open if preferred. Pain relievers may be taken to control pain. Its probably a good idea to get the bite checked at a medical facility. An initial consult should be covered by ACC, and the foundations are laid should the wound become infected and the ACC claim is already underway. Sometimes ACC require the accident is reported within 24 hours or it isn’t covered. If you notice swelling or redness, use a biro to mark the edges, and make a note of the time. If it changes rapidly seek help quickly, it means your body is not coping with the infection. Make sure you have completed a report with the club before you leave. It is normal to suffer some swelling and pain, but seek help if you are concerned. Cat scratches can cause problems of their own, causing discomfort, itching and pain. Again, clean the area thoroughly, keep an eye on the injury and seek medical attention if you are concerned. Flash Cats 10 Issue 17/01

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www.nzcf.com ARE YOU DOPING YOUR CAT FOR THE SHOW BENCH? EFFECTS OF THE USE OF AMITRIPTYLINE IN CATS There seems to be a trend going around the cat world of asking vets for Amitriptyline in order to dose up cats and kittens to calm them down on the show bench, and yes it’s happening right here in New Zealand. I am aghast at this information, and it’s becoming common practise I hear. AMITRIPTYLINE IS A SERIOUS DRUG! Originally used to treat anxiety in humans, amitriptyline is now used by small animal vets to treat several serious conditions in cats and dogs. The drug increases the amount of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the body. It takes at least a week, sometimes more, for the drug to begin working in the feline patient and then, you need to wean your cat off the drug, as it is VERY addictive. USES IN CATS Amitriptyline should ONLY be prescribed by Vets for conditions like: inappropriate elimination, which means that the cat is pooing and peeing outside of the litter box, to treat separation anxiety, feline lower urinary tract disease and obsessive grooming. It can also be prescribed for house cats who are serious fighters, but whether it's the bully or the victim who receives the drug it should be the vet's call. SO LETS LOOK AT THE SIDE EFFECTS Side effects of amitriptyline are many and It can have serious long-term effects. In a worst-case scenario, your cat can go into a coma or experience convulsions. More common side effects include both constipation and diarrhea, drooling, disorientation, sleepiness, weight gain, urinary retention, low blood pressure, changes in appetite, skin irritations, puffy face and heart rhythm changes. It should not be used in pregnant or lactating cats or in felines with diabetes. In other words, this is pretty serious medication. LONG-TERM EFFECTS Used too often, amitriptyline might effect major organs. One of the most common long-term side effects of amitriptyline concerns the heart. For this reason, before the cat takes the medication, your vet should perform on EKG on it to make sure its heart is healthy. It may also suppress your cat's bone marrow, damage the kidneys and affect its liver. • Amitriptyline can be highly toxic in large doses, which can lead to death. • Since Amitriptyline is bitter, it may be difficult to administer in a tablet form it is often dispensed in a liquid form or a topical gel. Amitriptyline has shown to have many side effects, ranging from concerning short term effects to serious ramifications. A thorough knowledge of these is needed to understand and so avoid medical emergencies which is why vets should not be dispensing this drug willy nilly. So let’s just look at these side effects again... • Excessive salivation • Drowsiness • Dry mouth (displayed by licking of lips) • Urinary retention • Constipation • Marked change in appetite • Weight gain • Dishevelled fur • Confusion and disorientation • Abnormal heart rhythm • Easily bruised skin • Irritated skin due to the gel • Low blood pressure • Allergic reactions • Facial puffiness • Rapid onset of diarrhea • Convulsions • Discoloured gums • Limbs feel cold • Coma PRECAUTIONS • Do not administer Amitriptyline if your cat is allergic to drugs that belong to the class of tricyclic antidepressants. • Since there is a high chance of your cat developing a cardiac disturbance, an EKG should be done before starting this medication. • If your cat has a liver impairment or is diabetic, avoid the use of Amitriptyline. AMITRIPTYLINE IN COMBINATION DO NOT use Amitriptyline along with other psychotropic substances. • When used in conjunction with the wrong drugs, Amitriptyline may alter blood glucose levels or cause a dangerous drop in the white blood cell count. • Amitriptyline is a prescription drug and can only be obtained from a veterinarian. Although it's primarily a drug meant for human use, it can be prescribed legally by a vet as an extra-label drug and ONLY FOR SERIOUS BEHAVIOURAL PROBLEMS. So if you are one of the owners dosing your cats up on drugs in order to calm them down for showing, ask yourself this question... Are your concerns really for the health and welfare of your cat? or just to win at the show. And... if your cat is not happy at shows, why is it there. Is drugging them the answer? Sourced by Gaynor Saxon Issue 17/01 11 Flash Cats

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The Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. WHAT’S ON THE SHOW SCENE 2017 TOSCA Best Entire Kitten Tasanee Drop Red Gorgeous Overall Supreme Exhibit Pawsondanile LiquiriceTwist Supreme and Runner Up, Pawsondanile Liquirice Twist and Pawsondanile Miss Moody Blues Colourfield Serious Moonlight Best NS Kitten - Sunset Moonlight Shadow, Blue Bicolour Cornish Rex Jo-anne Frank and Pawsondanile B B Blues CONTACTS: PAM COLTMAN - pamelacoltman@gmail.com or ROSE BOULTON - boulton.elite@xtra.co.nz Flash Cats 12 Issue 17/01

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P E T K I Twww.nzcf.com The technology that cares FIT P2 Pet Activity Monitor EVERSWEET Smart Pet Drinking Fountain FRESH Smart Antibacterial Bowl MATE Multifunctional Pet Remote Moni- Issue 17/01 For further information and stockists contact: customerservice@ppd.net.nz 13 Flash Cats

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NZ Cat Fancy Inc. 2016 Annual AwardsThe Official Publication of the New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc. Longhair Entire Cats Longhair Entire Kittens 1st 1st Gld Dbl Gr Ch FLURMONZ GARVANTUA MCO s/FD Judy Formby 2nd CHALFONT UNCLE SAM SBI Lyall T Payne 2nd 3rd 3rd FLURMONZ ZZAMBUKKA Sil Dbl Gr Ch JUST CATNAP’S BATMAN (IMP. SWD via AUST) MCO sD/W Josephine Stanners, Malcolm Stanners WINDEACRES WISHFUL THINKING PER sFD/WW Barbara R Beatson, V Beatson CH NFO /W Denise Grace 4th 5th 4th 6th Sil Dbl Gr Ch AMOENTA IZZA LUCKY - SBI Kevin Murphy,Yvo nne L Murphy, Renee Murphy 8th 7th 9th Flash Cats KIWIMAGIC COVER GIRL 5th RAG A/W Margaret M Downes 6th JAYMLYNKATZ WHITE CHRISTMAS NFO W Denise Grace 7th FLURMONZ TE MIKKA MCO FE/W Judy Formby 8th DIXYKATZ KLEINER ENGEL PER W/FEA Noeline Cullum 9th 10th PADDINGTON JOHNNY RINGO EXO s/F Annamaria Martin 10th 14 PADDINGTON PANSY POTTER EXO Annamaria Martin JAYMLYNKATZ VALKYRIE NFO /W Denise Grace Issue 17/01

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NZ Cat Fancy Inc. 2016 Annual Awardswww.nzcf.com Longhair Neuter/Spay Cats Longhair Neuter/Spay Kittens 1st 1st Gld Dbl Gr Pr DIXYKATZ FERRERO MILCH - SCHNITTE PER A/WW Lesley Parker nd 2 2nd 3rd FLURMONZ YIMIKI YOUSER MCO sF/W Griffin Brown 3rd RANCHDOLLS ALEXANDER RAG /W Sheree Russell, Tim Russell EASTSIDE MR DARCY EXO Colleen McCready 4th 4th 5th 5th ADORADOLLS NOTHING BUT THE BEST RAG /W Carey-Ann Barber, Simon Barber th 6 th FLURMONZ Y SAINT LAURENT 7 6th ARISTARCHUS MCO FD/W Paul M Henry, Tony Finlayson DUSTY TREASURE - SBI A Judi Sibley, Susan Edwards 7th Gld Dbl Gr Pr DIXYKATZ BLAUBEEREN MUFFIN PER W/A Lesley Parker 8th Dbl Gr Pr & Gld Dbl Gr Ch JAYMLYNKATZ OBERON NFO sPD/W Denise Grace 9th 8th TAITIROHANGA ZEDS NO BETA PER sW/FA Louise Fenn MAINELANDERS KISS AND TELL MCO s/F Heather Begbie, Samantha Begbie 9th Gld Dbl Gr Pr CONCERTO SNOW FLAKE - SBI Judy James Br Dbl Gr Pr TNT CARELESS WHISPER (IMP. AUS) - EXO Colleen McCready 10th Gld Dbl Gr Pr VLADIMIR TUMBLEWEED - MCO F Vicki Walls KIWICOONS FIRE AND ICE MCO W Anne K Williams 10th REBELPAWZ BOSS MCO sFD/W Paula Pollard Issue 17/01 15 Flash Cats

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