ET Journal Spring Issue 2017

 

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ET Journal Spring Issue 2017

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The EARCOS Triannual JOURNAL A Link to Educational Excellence in East Asia SPRING 2017 Featured in this Issue EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2017 Theme: “Connecting Global Minds“ EARCOS Leadership Mentoring (ELM): Countdown to Launch for 2017/18 School Year

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The EARCOS JOURNAL The ET Journal is a triannual publication of the East Asia Regional Council of Schools(EARCOS), a nonprofit 501(C)3, incorporated in the state of Delaware, USA, with a regional office in Manila, Philippines. Membership in EARCOS is open to elementary and secondary schools in East Asia which offer an educational program using English as the primary language of instruction, and to other organizations, institutions, and individuals. Objectives and Purposes * To promote intercultural understanding and international friendship through the activities of member schools. * To broaden the dimensions of education of all schools involved in the Council in the interest of a total program of education. * To advance the professional growth and welfare of individuals belonging to the educational staff of member schools. * To facilitate communication and cooperative action between and among all associated schools. * To cooperate with other organizations and individuals pursuing the same objectives as the Council. EARCOS BOARD OF TRUSTEES Margaret Alvarez, President (ISS International School) Stephen Cathers, Vice President (Korea International School) Diane Lewthwaite, Secretary (Fukuoka International School) Tarek Razik,Treasurer (The International School of Beijing) Stephen Dare (Hong Kong Academy) Andrew Davies (International School Bangkok) Norma Hudson (International School of Kuala Lumpur) David Toze, Past President (International School Manila) Barry Sutherland (International School of Phnom Penh) Office of Overseas Schools REO: Larry Hobdell (ex officio) EARCOS STAFF Executive Director: Richard Krajczar Assistant Director: Joe Petrone Consultant: Bill Oldread Vitz Baltero Ver Castro Robert Sonny Viray Rod Catubig Jr. Elaine Repatacodo Edzel Drilo April Asino Editor: Joe Petrone Associate Editor: Edzel Drilo Letter from the Executive Director Dear Colleagues: The end of the school year is near, and 2016-2017 is flying by. I hope everyone is enjoying a smooth end to a good school year.This is the time of year when so much is expected and workloads are pushed to the limits. Breathe and try to stay relaxed during May madness! The Spring Heads’ Institute in Hanoi,Vietnam will have more than 50 school leaders in attendance, which is one of the largest retreats to date! These numbers reflect having the CIS Board, as our guests.We are always happy to collaborate with Jane Larson and the CIS Board. We also invited them to take part in our Institute, as an addition to their spring meeting at UNIS in Hanoi.This year Mark Milliron an award-winning leader, author, speaker, and consultant is the retreat facilitator. We look forward to working with him and EARCOS school leaders. The 2017 EARCOS Teachers’ Conference (ETC) had over 800 delegates. This year’s ETC – “Connecting Global Minds” was a definite hit according many unsolicited comments from delegates. This positive sentiment was confirmed in the results of our survey.The keynotes delivered by Christophe Galfard – The Universe In Your Hand - Physics For All; Kim Phuc Phan Thi – A Vietnam Journey; and, Aaron and Kaitlin Tait – Edupreneus: Changing the World from the Classroom – were outstanding! We had a host of other excellent presenters, including presentations from our own teachers. A total of 175 presentations! By all accounts, this may have been one of the best ETC’s to date. Please see the ETC conference write-up in this issue. Our EARCOS staff of Joe Petrone, Elaine, Vitz, Ver, Robert, and Edzel should be thanked for their tremendous efforts in organising thousands of details. As many know, we are initiating a new member service – EARCOS Leadership Mentoring (ELM). You will find explanation and schedule for its implementation on pages 16 and 17. Also, you will see that the article includes an invitation to join the inaugural cohort. I hope you will consider being a part of this exiting initiative. You will notice that effective for the 2017/18 school year Bill Oldread returns to his formerly held position as EARCOS Assistant Director in our Manila office. Joe Petrone is returning to his home office, where he will continue to assist us virtually.The transition has already begun and it will continue to be a smooth “passing of the baton”. Finally, as always, we hope you all have a great summer break (northern hemisphere) and enjoy time with family, friends, travel, and reflection. Our board and staff continue to work to make EARCOS a caring, supportive, and dynamic community of international schools. Please check out our website http://www.earcos.org to see all our sponsored events and read about my travels throughout the EARCOS region. Please visit E-Connect, the EARCOS blog, initiated by our own Bill Oldread. Happy Holiday! East Asia Regional Council of Schools Brentville Subdivision, Barangay Mamplasan Biñan, Laguna, 4024, Philippines PHONE: 63-02-697-9170 FAX: 63-49-511-4694 WEBSITE: www.earcos.org Dick Krajczar Executive Director

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In this Issue contents 2 EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2017 Theme: “Connecting Global Minds” 6 Middle School GIN2017 - “Get INvolved” Press Release - Congratulations to Casey Stevenson, Brent International School Manila for receiving the 2017 SENIA Student Advocacy Award 8 SENIA Conference 2017 37 Earth Matters - Lupa Masa (forget time) with Earth Matters! 9 (SEAPAC) 2017 38 Amy Yang Fund 10 Faces of EARCOS Student Poems - Tim Carr leaving EARCOS region 39 High School Art Gallery 11 Curriculum Initiatives - “MakerSpace” powered by STEAM 44 On the Road with Dr. K - Global Citizenship – The next phase in promoting gender equality in the classroom Back cover: EARCOS Weekend Workshops SY 2017-2018 - Embedding Reading for Pleasure in the KS3 Curriculum - Digital Learning Resources in Demand by International Schools Front cover photo By Dari Extension Says New Research Nepenthes, also known as tropical pitcher plants or monkey cups, is a 16 Professional Development (Featured Article) genus of carnivorous plants in the monotypic family Nepenthaceae.The genus comprises roughly 150 species, and numerous natural and many - EARCOS Leadership Mentoring (ELM): Countdown to Launch cultivated hybrids. for 2017/18 School Year 18 Green & Sustainable - Building Towards a Better Tomorrow - Sustainability @ Nanjing International School EARCOS and CIS - Institute On Higher Education Admission and Guidance EARCOS and CIS are pleased to announce the 3rd INSTITUTE ON HIGHER EDUCATION ADMISSION AND GUIDANCE. 22 Campus Development September 22-23, 2017 - Taipei American School Breaks Ground on Tech Cube Shangri-La Hotel, Bangkok,Thailand visit www.earcos.org 23 Service Learning - Time Out:Taking a Gap Year - Great Student Council Initiatives! Contribute to the ET Journal If you have something going on at your school in any of the following 26 Community Service - Adult Enrichment Program’s “Knitting Blankets for Charity” categories that you would like to see highlighted in the Fall issue please send it along to us: Class Faces of EARCOS - Promotions, retirements, honors, etc. 27 Action Research - “Creating Real Life Problem-Solving Tasks to Increase Engagement, Improve Perceptions, and Develop Collabortive and Thinking Skills in the Mathematics Classroom” Service Learning Campus Development - New building plans, under construction, just completed projects. Curriculum - New and exciting curriculum adoptions. Green and Sustainable - Related to campus development or to 30 Curriculum Development - IS Manila: Inclusion as a Priority - Concordia Shanghai to Dive into New School Year with Curricular Aquatics Program curriculum efforts. Community Service Student Art - We showcase outstanding student art in each edition. (E.S. Fall Issue, M.S.Winter Issue, H.S. Spring Issue) Student Writing 32 Press Release Press Releases - International schools market around the world continues to expand Thank you for your help in allowing us to highlight the great things that are - Seisen Firebird Lifts Off for Scientific Development going on in EARCOS schools. - The British School Manila students triumph in the South East Asian Mathematics Competition - NIST Students Take Top Honors at Bangkok Vex Robotics Competition - Tokyo International School an Apple Distinguished School Spring 2017 Spring 2017 Issue 1

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EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2017 A moment of silent while watching one of the most powerful images of the 20th century. Best known as the nine-year-old child depicted in the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph taken during the Vietnam War on June 8, 1972.The well known photo, taken in Trang Bang by AP photographer Nick Ut, shows her at nine years of age running naked on a road after being severely burned on her back by a South Vietnamese napalm attack. One can’t begin to imagine a better venue to hold a conference for over 800 delegates than the stunning Sutera Harbour Resort in picturesque and captivating Kota Kinabalu in Sabah, Borneo. Every night we were dazzled by stunning sunsets and the exceptional hospitality shown by the staff of the Pacific and Magellan Hotels. The theme of the 2017 Conference was “Connecting Global Minds.” The conference focused on Science, Math, Social Studies/ Humanities, Global Issues/Global Citizenship, Middle School, Service Learning, S.T.E.M,Technology, Counseling and general education topics. with us is to have a life purpose. Kim understood over time that hers was to help others who have suffered. Kim’s wish is that we could all live in peace with no fear and for us to discover the places in our hearts that are peaceful and loving and for us to realise that “peace and love are more powerful than bombs”. I don’t think I have ever been in a room where a speaker was able to make every single person cry and yet make us laugh in such a short time. Kim had a truly profound impact on every single person in the room that morning. Her incredible journey and ability to have been able to forgive and share her message of peace and love is something none of us will ever forget. The conference opened with our first keynote speaker, Kim Phuc Phan Thi. Kim is perhaps known to many as the “napalm girl, or simply “the girl in the picture.” Kim was nine years old when napalm bombs landed on her village during the Vietnam War on June 8, 1972. She is now a lifetime UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador for the Culture of Peace and travels the world sharing her message of love and forgiveness. Kim spoke of her inspiring journey and the lessons learned from her ordeal and her amazing survival; inner struggles and how she learned to forgive. From Kim, we learned five lessons. The first lesson was that we can learn from our experiences and these experiences make us stronger.The second was that the power of love can heal us. The third was the value of education. When at school Kim felt like she was normal and that she could have power in her life. The fourth lesson was forgiveness. Through time and prayer, Kim was able to learn to forgive. The last lesson she shared Day one ended with the job like sessions for every strand. Many sessions discussed things that were happening every day and how everyone is working on these issues. Many shared great strategies that we could take away immediately and apply to our pedagogy upon our return to school. Everyone enjoyed the chance to network and listened to some unique approaches. That evening many delegates joined together for the Welcome Reception in the impressive lobby of the Magellan. Participants were greeted with local Kota Kinabalu crafts and were each presented a local beaded necklace at the entrance.The atmosphere was one of excitement and enthusiasm. Sabah Tourism Malaysia Troupe Dancers performed during the reception and managed to coax a few “performers” from the audience. It was an excellent night, and all had a good time. 2 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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“Connecting Global Minds” Day two commenced with a film showing of winners from the Shanghai Film Festival. To think those high school students created these excellent and thought-provoking films is incredible. The keynote speaker was Christophe Galfard. Christophe gained his Ph.D. on Black holes at Cambridge University and has since worked under the supervision of Professor Stephen Hawking. Christophe began his keynote telling us the fundamental laws of physics are our senses. They are the windows of our realities. Personally, I was hooked. Christophe is well known for spreading scientific knowledge to the general public and is widely praised for his ability to explain complicated ideas with simple words.They were not far wrong! We were taken on a journey starting from Earth to travel through the known and unknown universe to figure out what today’s vision of our reality is.We were helped to understand how stars and planets formed and how that our universe like everything, has a history which leads us to the idea that it may have started in our past. Christophe is indeed a master of scaffolding the universe for all to understand. Kim Phuc Phan Thi After the announcements for the third and final day, delegates viewed another finalist film from the Shanghai Film Festival.The keynote speakers for the last day were Aaron and Kaitlin Tait. Aaron and Kaitlin shared their personal experiences and stories as educators and entrepreneurs taking us from war zones to the Australian outback and African slums. We learned from this inspirational couple that stronger than ownership is authorship and the importance of giving opportunities to local leaders in a community to cause changes within their community and then once successful get them to share and scale their success for their nearest communities, then region, country or even the world. In conclusion Aaron and Kaitlin shared with us eight rules that edupretuers live by: help kids get better outcomes, help teachers get better, build better communities, improve well-being, be doers and not just talkers, keep ideas super simple, always get better, and it’s not about them, it is about their idea. Commitment is key. Christophe Galfard In addition to the compelling and engaging keynote speakers there were over 180 workshops on offer, presented by outstanding special presenters and teacher practitioners.  The conference provided many valuable opportunities for teachers to network, connect, often re-connect and have the chance to have in-depth professional development opportunities. As always, the warm-heartedness, hospitality, and responsiveness of the Sutera Harbour staff was incredible. We would like to thank Hasnaffina Hassnar Director of Events Management and Noorhayati Amat Events Manager for all that they and their staff do to ensure that EARCOS is a success. Furthermore, thank you to all of you who purchased raffle tickets donated money or participated in the fun run for the Kim Foundation International to help child victims of war. Aaron and Kaitlin Tait We look forward to seeing you at next year’s conference in Bangkok. The theme for 2018 is “Voices United In Purpose.” The focus areas will be Literacy / Reading, Children’s Authors, Early Childhood, Special Needs (SENIA), Modern Languages, Media Technology, Child Protection, Counsellors, ESL, and Technology. See you there! By Skylie Bevear, ETC Advisory Committee Member Hong Kong International School Spring 2017 Issue 3

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Announcements/Remarks by Christine Baker(ISKL), Alicia Lewis(SAS), and Peter Kimball(TAS). Delegates wearing their school shirt. 15th EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2017 Delegates with keynote speaker Kim Phuc Phan Thi with workshop presenter Ron Lancaster. Paul Andersen workshop on New Generation Science Strands. Teachers were engaged in every workshop sessions. 4 EARCOS Triannual Journal Mark Crowell with Eric Schoonard both from Saigon South International School workshop on “Gamification, Differentiation, and Documentation”.

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James Tanton workshop on “The Power of the Area Model.” Martin Robinson workshop on “Connecting Global Minds through Drumming”. Theme:“Connecting Global Minds” Technology workshop session. Bron Narsiman, Jenny Snively, and Jeff Ormrod workshop on “Be The Change & Breakout”. Workshop session on “Pioneering STEM Education: Aerospace Engineering and Big Data Analytics”. >> More photos available at the ETC website http://earcos.org/etc2017/ Aaron and Kaitlin Tait workshop on “Ideas That Change the World“. Spring 2017 Issue 5

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Anna, Celia, and Valeria GIN conference organizers. The theme was Get INvolved, and that’s what everyone did at the MIddle School GIN conference at Hong Kong Academy on 4 and 5 March 2017. Over 200 students and teachers from more than 20 schools attended this year’s Asia regional MS GIN conference. Participants travelled to Hong Kong from as far away as Kazakhstan, and EARCOS Executive Director Dick Krajczar was also on hand for the excitement and learning. Over the course of two days, students took part in challenging workshops and simulations, embarked on adventurous field trips, and heard riveting keynote speakers on topics such as human trafficking, children at risk, animal welfare and education for all.The emphasis throughout was on translating vision into action. cipal explained, the conference “was an awesome opportunity for middle school kids to see how even small actions can have profound impact”. One of the highlights of the weekend was hearing from Michi Ferreol, a recent Harvard University graduate and a member of the Class of 2011 at the International School of Manilla. While at ISM, Michi was the recipient of the EARCOS Global Citizen Award. She’s now at the African Leadership University in Mauritius, continuing her commitment to education for all. With two other ISM alums, she founded an NGO in the Philippines to help students there gain access to higher education. It was exciting to see the EARCOS and GIN vision come full circle in her presentation. Michi Ferreol, a recent Harvard University graduate and a member of the Class of 2011 at the International School of Manilla. As the looks on the faces attested, the attendees had a great experience. As one student described it, the conference was “like being in a really good humanities class where everyone really wants to learn and act on what they’ve learned”. In addition to keynote addresses, students shared their interests and actions with their peers in workshops and during a service learning fair. And new friendships were formed over lunches and during breaks. Several presenters talked about the process of founding their own non-profit organizations and demonstrated how individuals can make a difference.As Leanne Dunlap, HKA’s Secondary School Prin- 6 EARCOS Triannual Journal The event had a profound impact on the student organizers, too. The two faculty members who oversaw the conference, Ellen Thorne and Richard Reilly, were committed to making the experience an opportunity for authentic student leadership.With Thorne’s and Reilly’s support, three Grade 10 students, Anna Loretan, Valeria Riquelme Lara and Celia Shin, took on the major responsibility for the two-day gathering. They designed the conference’s schedule and content, developed and selected topics and presenters for

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workshops, and simulations, chose field trip destinations, and identified and recruited keynote speakers. Internally, they worked with members of the school’s administration to design the conference logo, create content for the conference website, and liaise with the school’s food service to ensure that various dietary restrictions were accommodated.They coordinated with their peers as well, creating a team of ambassadors to help run events during the conference and enlisted the support of HKA’s Student Media Team to take photos and leverage social media. As Ellen Thorne described it,“From our first meeting to the last, the student leaders really grew. They started out with more ideas than could possibly be accomplished. They had enormous vision. Then they had to make that vision a reality.They had to take their brilliant ideas, say goodbye to some of them, and then figure out how to implement a plan on a practical level.They learned a lot about setting priorities, dealing with the realities of a budget, and engaging busy adults who don’t always respond to emails right away.” The conference represented a major milestone in the life of HKA as well. Several years ago, HKA was asked to host the local HKA GIN852 conference. At the time, the school had just moved into its new campus — its first permanent home — and had a small GIN Ambassadors Field trip to an organic farm (but growing) Secondary School. Everyone was enthusiastic about GIN, but HKA’s own GIN program was nascent with only a handful of students involved. HKA’s educational leadership team knew that HKA was not prepared at that time to host such a significant convening of students. Fortunately for HKA, by 2017 the school was both eager and ready to serve as the host school for an effort so closely aligned to the school’s mission and values. While HKA was ready to host in 2017, the school still faced some logistical challenges. Typically, schools hosting MS GIN Conferences offer visiting students a “green option” of sleeping on campus. For a variety of reasons, HKA was not able to offer this option and instead organized hotel accommodations. This represented a shift in the way GIN has been organized, and the school greatly appreciated EARCOS’s flexibility as HKA adapted MS GIN in this way. In the end, the conference more than fulfilled expectations for both the participants and the organizers. As Assistant Secondary School Principal Richard Reilly put it, “From my perspective, Middle School GIN has two enduring values. First is that it gets kids roughly 11-14 involved in meaningful and responsible action when they are enthusiastic and bright-eyed. It brings them together to make a difference at a time in their development when they have a nearly limitless sense of hope and possibility. Second, for the older students who organize the conference, Middle School GIN is an amazing opportunity to develop as leaders. At HKA, our student leadership team truly led the process.This was not something where the adults orchestrated things behind the scenes and the kids slotted in. The student leaders did it all.” By Laura L. Mitchell, Ph.D. Director of Institutional Advancement, Hong Kong Academy Spring 2017 Issue 7

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SENIA 2017 SPECIAL EDUCATION NETWORK IN ASIA SENIA, the Special Education Network in Asia, held its annual conference on February 9 – 11, 2017. Hosted by Yokohama International School, this year’s conference provided 250 delegates a unique opportunity to experience Japanese culture firsthand, while keeping abreast of the recent developments in special education. Leadership Scholarship; Max Simpson, Founder and Vocational Programme Coordinator of Steps with Theera; Ikuko “Bea”Tsuboya-Newell, Director of the International Secondary School in Japan; Dolores Cheng, Founder and Director of the Center for Possibilities Foundation Philippines; and Nilda Delgado, Director of MindHaven School in Roxas City, Capiz, Philippines. Keynote presentations were delivered by Dr. Brian Willoughby, Co-Director of Achieve New England and Clinical Research Associate at the University of Massachusetts Boston (“‘If My Child Is So Smart, Why Is He So Slow?’: Supporting Students with Slow Processing Speed”); Dr. Steve Chinn, Chair of the British Dyslexia Association’s Dyscalculia Committee, member of the ESRC Peer Review College, and Honorary Advisory Member of the Register of Educational Therapists (Singapore) (“How beliefs help children to fail maths. Lessons from the UK [on what not to do]”); and Dr. Madeleine Portwood, Clinical Director of the Witherslack Group, Education Advisor for the Dyspraxia Foundation UK, and Executive member of the Education and Services for People with Autism (“Developmental Dyspraxia and co-occurrence with Dyslexia, ADD/ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder”). Since 2012, SENIA has recognized individuals who have gone above and beyond to raise awareness and advocate for those with special education needs in their local as well as global communities. Rhodora Palomar Fresnedi, Executive Director of Unilab Foundation Philippines, received this year’s SENIA Advocacy Award. Through Unilab Foundation, Ms. Palomar Fresnedi established Project Inclusion which, for the past four years, has been helping Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (PWIDs) gain better employment opportunities by establishing relationships with the families of the said PWIDs, schools, and other government and private institutions. The Honorary SENIA Advocacy Awards were given to Michelle Ressa Aventajado, Country Director of Best Buddies Philippines; Uwe Maurer, Director and Co-Founder of Taiwan Sunshine; Ana Kristina Arce, the first deaf Filipino scholar of Gallaudet University and recipient of the World Deaf Casey Elaine Stevenson, a member of the SENIA Manila Chapter Youth Group and student at Brent International School Manila, received the SENIA Student Award for helping raise awareness and advocacy for special needs through public speaking, service and art. The Honorary SENIA Student Awards were presented to John V. Nepomuceno, a college student of the University of Santo Tomas, Philippines with ADHD; Kan Jiraphongtrakul, a student-athlete of Concordian International School,Thailand who was diagnosed with dyslexia; Nathan Marcus V. Canon, a student diagnosed with bilateral, profound, sensorineural hearing loss who now serves as Treasurer of his school’s Student Council and a volunteer-artist for Teach Peace Build Peace Foundation’s storybook project; Sohankumar Motwani, a college student of De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, Philippines who, despite losing his eyesight in high school, is currently completing a bachelor of science degree in Information Systems; Jason Philip De Los Santos, a Grade 11 student of Create and Learning Paths School, Philippines who was diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD; and Stephen Patrick C. Quiogue, a BA Psychology student of San Beda College Alabang, Philippines who was diagnosed with a developmental disorder and serves as a junior facilitator and apprentice facilitator for the inclusive summer camp of Candent Learning Haus. SENIA is looking forward to having their second joint conference with EARCOS in March 2018 in Bangkok! By Ericson J. Perez Founder & Headmaster One World School 8 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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South East Asia Primary Administrators’ Conference (SEAPAC) 2017 On Thursday, March 2nd, Primary principals and administrators from South East Asia arrived on the beautiful island of Bali for the 5th annual SEAPAC conference hosted by Canggu Community School. Participants from Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore and Indonesia, including Bali, gathered for three days of networking, sharing, learning and developing leadership skills.We are grateful to EARCOS for their sponsorship and support of SEAPAC 2017. As international educators, we frequently highlight the importance of collaboration.Teachers work in teams so that they can share ideas and build on strengths. In classes, students are purposefully grouped so they can learn from each other and develop interpersonal skills. But as school leaders, it can be more challenging for us to have avenues for collaboration with people who have similar responsibilities and job descriptions. To address this challenge, the first South East Asia Primary Administrators’ Conference (SEAPAC) was held at UWCSEA, in Singapore in March, 2013.The mission statement was developed and still stands as providing “a forum for school leaders in international primary schools throughout Asia to explore current research, shared interests and common trends in a bid to leverage learning for students across the region”. One of the strengths of SEAPAC is that it is targeted specifically at Primary school leaders. It is not for Primary school teachers aspiring for leadership, nor is it for Heads of School. It is for primary leaders who are already in that role, facing similar challenges, dwelling on similar issues and exploring similar ways to improve practice. and recently been involved in a drive to ban plastic bags from Bali. He encouraged the Primary leaders to empower the students in their own schools to take action. Following Ben’s presentation, we spent the rest of the day on school tours. I was proud to show the beautiful campus of CCS, where participants visited classes in action and spoke with students about their learning. From there we visited the new campus of the Montessori school and then the Green School. It was fascinating to see just how different, and similar, the three schools were despite the close geographical location. Saturday saw us break into various participant-led workshops, exploring topics such as digital citizenship, homework, communication, effective leadership strategies and bilingual education. Using current research, discussions were held with the aim of developing deeper understandings of these issues. It was heartening to hear that similar issues were being discussed in many schools across the region. Throughout the conference, we enjoyed local delicacies for snacks and lunch and the dinner at La Lucciola, on the beach at sunset, was a highlight. I’m sure participants went home a kilo or two heavier. It was a wonderful three days of professional development and a valuable experience to be part of. By Warren Bowers, Head of Primary Canggu Community School, Bali, Indonesia Opening the conference at Canggu Community School was ourYear 4 activist, Ben Breeze. Ben has raised money for impoverished local children, been active in highlighting the issue of sustainable palm oil Spring 2017 Issue 9

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Faces of EARCOS >> Dr. Chip Barder Head of School Congratulations! We are delighted to announce that Dr. Chip Barder, from United Nations School of Hanoi has been named the Ernest Mannino International Superintendent of the Year by the Association for the Advancement of International Education (AAIE). This award, in honor of the first Director of the Office of Overseas Schools and the founder of AAIE, Dr. Ernest Mannino, judges nominated candidates on four leadership qualities: Leadership for learning, Communication, Professionalism and Community Involvement. Timothy Carr Head of School Head of School Leaving EARCOS Region The EARCOS region bids farewell to one of its most popular figures. After serving at two of Asia’s most prestigious schools, American School in Japan for seven years and Jakarta International School for seven years,Tim Carr will be returning to the USA for a “Gap Year” in which he will tend to his house and explore the trails nearby with his wife, Barbara.Wherever Tim has worked, he has brought with him a passion for learning, a commitment to the students in his charge and a deep empathy for those with whom he works. His dedication and professionalism have been demonstrated time and again, but most especially in the recent, challenging years. Even when the pressure was at its greatest, Tim’s first thoughts were for those around him, and his cheery smile will be much missed. Despite the rigors of his day-jobs in Tokyo and Jakarta,Tim served as an EARCOS Board Member and then as an insightful and influential President. We thank him for his services and wish him the very best of luck. Head of School Leaving EARCOS Region Dr.Theodore Faunce Headmaster Ted Faunce became headmaster of Chinese International School in 2006. Dr. Faunce was previously Director of the American Section of the Lycée International in St. Germain-en-Laye and a teacher of French at Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia. He holds a B.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University and is a graduate of the Hotchkiss School. A fluent French speaker, he speaks conversational Mandarin. He is a director of Teach for China. 10 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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CTuhrreicuBluemijiInnigtiaCtivietsy>I>nternational School “MakerSpace” powered by STEAM to keep them safe when using these instruments in the future. The autonomy that emanates from hands-on exposure to tools gives our students a great sense of pride and satisfaction. Their sense of relief and accomplishment becomes evident with the smiles that spread across their faces as their handsaw slices through their portion of wood and a piece topples onto the floor. The students walk out of the Makerspace, completed projects in hand, with a new excitement for learning, constructing and innovation. They take great pride in knowing that they don’t have to be one of the secondary students to produce something special and operate tools that have real-life applications. Second graders are not the only students exploring their creativity in this space. At the beginning of the year, Grade 5 students used the Makerspace as an integral part of their How the World Works unit. Students explored efficiency with energy by designing and building their own small cars.The students’ learning was greatly enhanced by the resources they were exposed to within the Makerspace. The area gave them opportunity to tinker and select materials that functioned best for their cars. The Makerspace staff guided students with mini-lessons and workshops that analysed innovation through experimentation with materials that would make their cars run more efficiently. Shaman screws together a tongue-depressor and a block of wood, held tight in a vice. Photo credit: BCIS Photographer Ming Jin The smooth, back-and-forth droning of handsaws grating through portions of recycled timber…the snap of a hole-puncher breaking through a tongue-depressor…and the pitter-patter of hammers echoing from all corners, creating a melodic workshop ambience. Piles of sawdust have formed, symbolizing the perseverance it takes to force the tiny teeth of a handsaw against the strength of raw oak. Everyone is focused on their imaginative mission to create, following their respective step-by-step procedure. No one has been told “what” to produce; only “how.” One might ask if I’m describing a workspace full of teens or adults who tend to be typically entrusted with such tools, but this is an area full of engaged second grade students with goals to construct. Entrusting students with tools such as these gives our students a sense of independence and responsibility, not to mention a jumpstart on respect for a tool’s capability. Students are able to recognize and mitigate the risks that come with handling these types of tools independently. Each tool creates a unique set of challenges for the students to overcome and the exposure has great potential The Makerspace has also been an excellent resource in recent Grade 5 maths classes. During the Shape and Space unit, students inquired into the properties of 3D shapes and how to create a 3D shape from a 2D net. As part of this unit, the students designed a net for an irregular 3D polygon to build a box for their pencils.The students used Sketch Up to design the 2D faces of their shapes, and were then able to use the laser-cutter in the Makerspace to create each individual face. Students then used the materials in the Makerspace to customise the box they designed and adhere the joints between each piece by hand. BCIS’ Makerspace has created an environment where students can test their resourcefulness and resilience through each unique challenge. Whether it be adhering a tongue-depressor to a piece of recycled timber, manufacturing a small car or constructing a pencil box with a 3D printer, students rise to the task. The environment speaks for itself as you step in and observe students in a near-meditative state with minds transfixed on their craft. They define that zone of productivity and focus where time ceases to exist; which is so highly sought after and valuable in today’s world. The BCIS Makerspace serves as a reminder that we can all set aside our distractions and become engulfed with purpose; at least for a little while. Written by Kelli Cochran, Grade 2, ELL Teacher and Kieran O’Grady Grade 5 Teacher Spring 2017 Issue 11

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Curriculum Initiatives >> CGiltoizbeanl ship – The next phase in promoting gender equality in the classroom “Ms. XX, a boy teased us for playing with another boy during play time and we don’t think it’s nice.” “Why don’t you play with the boy who teased you every day until the end of the week? “Really, can we do that?” “Of course, you can!” That was the beginning of a series of deep conversations and discussions on the topic of gender equality in Year 4. Two days later, the girls returned to say that they were not welcome by the kids playing rugby during lunch play. We discussed what they could do to be included in the game. Later that day, this discussion was repeated with the whole class and we reflected on what it meant to show international- mindedness through gender equality.The analogy of the wings of a bird was used to demonstrate the cooperation of female and male, humanity being the bird. If the world of humanity was to soar to the heights of progress, it would be dependent entirely on the movement of its wings. If the wings of humanity, female and male, were united in their efforts and maintained equality in all endeavours, then we would undoubtedly soar in the firmament of progress. Conversely, if one wing was injured or failed to work properly, the bird would not be able to fly and would circle around aimlessly in the dust, the progress of humanity would be severely compromised. Included in the discussion was the recent Fiji Rugby Sevens gold medal win and the Fijianas (Fiji Rugby Sevens Women’s Team) who also participated in the Olympics. The atmosphere was subdued, it felt as if something had taken place but no one could say what exactly. The next day, one student shared a proposal to start a new rugby club that was inclusive of everyone. She requested to share aYouTube video titled ‘Always#likeagirl’ (http://tinyurl.com/mjfhs85) to share her perspective with her classmates. Once the video ended, the students were encouraged to practice gender equality so that they would spearhead the next phase in attaining the equality of men and women for their generation. That week, three boys signed up for the new rugby club. After sharing their idea with the Head of Primary and getting her support, the students shared their invitation with other students in the upper primary classes. More students started to show interest in this initiative. Signup sheets were strategically placed in the upper primary block. The journey still remains long and arduous. But, if our Year 4 students have shown their capability to come together and consult peacefully about this sensitive issue and take small steps, rapid and sustained, towards a united resolution, then the future is in great hands. May these children show us how to attain new heights of international-mindedness and global citizenship envisioned by the IB mission statement. By Shantini Saberi Year 4 Teacher, International School Suva Photo from FreeImages.com 12 EARCOS Triannual Journal

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ECumrrbiceuldumdiInngitiaRtiveeasd>i>ng for Pleasure in the KS3 Curriculum It all began over a coffee and a chat back in 2015. Could we bring the great ideas from Reading for Pleasure into the curriculum at KS3, and convince a bunch of early teenagers that reading was the secret joy they were all seeking? Or should we instead plan the more achievable Machu Picchu hike? There was a lot to consider. Seriously though, we all know that in international schools the key to enabling students to access the materials necessary for success at KS4 and KS5 is a certain standard of functional literacy.The question is how do we, as educationalists, help them get there? Joanna had attended a PD with a keynote speech on Reading for Pleasure delivered by Nicola Morgan and returned keen to bring these ideas into the English Department.The central point of Reading for Pleasure is to get students wanting to read in their own time. It is therefore important, not only that they have a completely free choice of reading material, but also to communicate with them that they don’t have to finish a book that they are not enjoying. Nicola Morgan’s excellent additional point was that reading, if enjoyable and absorbing, can become a form of relaxation that is as essential to wellbeing as sleep, food and exercise. I guess the real key was how to get to a place where they wanted to read and didn’t have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the library.We sat down and began to plan… Our focus was therefore twofold, from both an English Curriculum and a library point of view. We wanted to increase levels of functional literacy in English, increase exposure to English in written form and at the same time develop student relationships with the library, boost borrowing levels at KS3 and increase the productive usage of the library space. All this, but, most importantly, to instil a love of reading in students, and a reading culture throughout the school community. We did this by moving away from a culture of the teacher handing over to the librarian, and towards a co-delivering dynamic in the classroom. Firstly we foregrounded the reading as part of the curriculum. The first lesson every week was a reading lesson where the librarian came into the classroom and then took small groups of students to the library to choose books. All homework was based around reading and developing a response to the book. This began with book reviews and then expanded to storyboards (to develop sequencing and sentence skills), book trailers and finally book conferences where students discussed author techniques. As a teacher, I was keen to measure skills acquisition, the effectiveness of my teaching and the impact of reading on the students’ acquisition of skills. It was decided to focus on Year 7 and 8 and benchmark using Cambridge checkpoint exams (Language and Literacy paper). Answers were then analysed and a skills breakdown by student and class was produced. This was incredibly illuminating and revealed a range of issues from basic punctuation errors, sentence structure and lack of vocabulary.What was also clear was that students lacked a core understanding of how and why authors write. They seemed to have difficulty understanding the aim and purpose; which is to engage and entertain! Spring 2017 Issue 13

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