Charter 2017

 

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Charter, Strategic and Annual plan for 2017

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Charter- 2017 Learning Skills for Life! MOE Number: 1547

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An introduction to Waiau Pa School Location: Waiau Pa School is attractively situated in a semi-rural location, 21 kilometres from Pukekohe and Papakura. The rural setting contributes to the culture of the school which remains focused on positive social interaction and education of the ‘whole child’. History: Waiau Pa School officially opened in October 1890, in an unlined shed built by the first settlers. By 1900 the roll numbers had increased and the tiny shed became inadequate. A larger building was built on the Waiau Pa – Kingseat Road, which had then become more central. Once again in 1915 the roll growth exceeded the size of the building and the school was moved to its current position on Waiau Pa Road. Since this time the school has continued to rise to its present level of approximately 350 students. Features:  The environment continues to be semi-rural and the grounds are spacious.  A sense of community is important with the parents supporting their child’s learning.  The school ethos incorporates a rural school approach where students look after and support each other  The school operates 14 classes from New Entrants to Year 8’s At Waiau Pa School… “Students are very engaged in their learning. They confidently contribute to classroom discussions and support each other by providing feedback about their ideas, successes and areas for improvement.” “Students are confident, capable learners. They have a strong sense of their identity and make decisions about how they can contribute to the life of the school. Students represent and advocate for themselves and others. Teachers support students to develop skills, knowledge and social capabilities in their academic, sporting, social and cultural endeavours. The school’s set of values and learning traits are well understood by students and are used to support their learning.” Education Review Office Report – 2015

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What makes us Waiau Pa The Waiau Pa School community believe the following features make us unique; Calf Club Calf Club is an important event on the school calendar. Students from Year 4 and above are expected to compete with a calf, lamb, goat, chicken, garden or project. There is a large involvement from the wider community in the judging of the indoor section of the Calf Club as well as contributing to the Event. Education outside the classroom School camps are viewed as a valuable part of the wider school curriculum. It is an expectation that the classes from Year 5 and above experience an overnight camp each year. Excellence We want students who aim high and persevere in the face of difficulty. There are high expectations from the school community. Parents want their children to extend themselves and reach or exceed expectation for their age. Culture of caring for others Waiau Pa School is determined to retain the ethos of small rural school where students show care and respect for each other. Students are given responsibilities to enable them to feel connected to the school. The school promotes our RICH values through all aspects of daily life. Digital Learning Tools The use of digital tool for learning is an integral part of life at our school. Digital technologies are blended into the normal classroom programme to enhance and support learning programmes. All classrooms have a range of digital tools available. Students in Rimu & Kauri syndicates being able to bring a school approved digital device. This is made possible through the support of the Apopo Educational Trust.

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Learning Skills for Life! Believe- Whakapono “We believe that we can all be powerful learners.” Key Objectives Ownership of Learning: Develop people who are empowered and have influence on their learning. Current state - 2016  Collaborative learning environment (Senior Hub) implemented within Rooms 15 & 16. Strategies for 2017 Strategies for 2018  Student choice included in all Deep Learning activities.  Continued collaborative learning environment within hub setting and wider Kauri team.  Collaborative learning environment implemented within Yr 5&6 area. Strategies for 2019  Collaborative learning environment implemented within Yr 3&4 area.  My Learning folders used to collate evidence of students learning.  All senior students (Kauri & Rimu) completing a blog post about their learning each week.  Over 50% of whanau accessing student results using Parent Portal on ETap.  A “live” report being available and accessible online by parents / whanau.  Google docs used to collate evidence against Professional Standards.  All senior students experiencing an E.O.T.C event at the beginning of the year. Successful: Create a range of opportunities for people to experience success  Completion of school production.  Formation of Kapa Haka group with performance at Matariki celebrations.  Staff appraisal and attestation programme to meet new Education Council criteria implemented.  Coaching and mentoring structure implemented across the school.  Professional Learning groups established based on teacher needs.  All senior students (Rimu & Kauri teams) experiencing an overnight camp.  Re-formation of Grease Monkeys programme.  All senior students (Rimu & Kauri teams) experiencing an overnight camp.  Water based activity week using local resources of Clarks Beach Yacht Club.  All senior students (Rimu & Kauri teams) experiencing an overnight camp.  Overnight bus survival experience for group of senior students.  Contribution to the Franklin Arts Festival.  Completion of school production.  Contribution to the Franklin Arts Festival.  Kapa Haka involvement in the Puni Cultural Festival.  Powhiri and overnight marae  Holding our own Powhiri and experience. welcome for visiting group.  Passion Project implemented with new project each term  Spark programme implemented to allow staff to share a passion with others.  50% of spark sessions being facilitated by senior students.  Community experts supporting student led Spark sessions.

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Believe- Whakapono “We believe that we can all be powerful learners.” Key Programmes Ownership of Learning: Develop people who are empowered and have influence on their learning. Targeted Actions Who Completed Measures of Success by  Student choice within topic programme. Use of rubric to provide student choice of learning activities. All Term 2 Student’s rubrics used in all Karaka, Rimu and Kauri classes for topic.  Deliver PD to staff on developing student agency and ownership.  All senior students (Kauri & Rimu) completing a blog post about their learning each week. Simon Rimu & Kauri teams Term 1 All Year All teaching staff attending and implementing one action from PD. All senior students (Rimu & Kauri) to make weekly reflections.  Review of feedback and assessment for learning. What information is given to drive learning? Visible success criteria. Student feedback. All Classroom teachers End of Term 2 Classroom observations Outcome Learning Skills for Life! Successful: Create a range of opportunities for people to experience success  Development of staff appraisal and attestation programme to meet new Education Council criteria.  Spark programme implemented to allow staff to share a passion with others. Programme to operate one day per week covering a range of topics.  All senior (Rimu & Kauri) students to participate in at least one Spark workshop during the year.  Funding one day per week (0.2) release to allow a teacher to be released to deliver spark programme.  Kapa Haka group formed Term 1 2017. Senor Leadership Team End of Term 2 All teachers to be assessed using new rubric based on Education Council criteria All Staff Implemented at the beginning of Term 1 Spark programme operational for the beginning of Term 1. All students All senior (Yr5-8) students can identify a spark programme that they have participated in during the year. BOT, Principal Shannon Mainey Start of 2017 All interested students Funding available to release one teacher per week to deliver the spark programme. A group of engaged and committed students. Overall Measure of Success: 2016 results to student question.. “I believe I can be a Powerful Learner?” Percentages Number of students Scale 0% 0 1 Not at all 1.9% 1 2 20.8% 11 3 41.5% 22 4 35.8% 19 5 All the time

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Belong- Whakamana “We belong and contribute to making a positive difference.” Learning Skills for Life! Key Objectives Positive Difference: Encourage people to be involved in the opportunities available and to consider others. Contributing: Create opportunities for people to contribute to making our community a better place. Current state - 2016  60% of parents attending Sharing My Learning evening.  80% of parents attending Parent Interviews (70% Maori whanau)  Achieve Bronze Enviroschools award.  Formation of “What’s on the Menu?” programme.  Review of Thinking Room trends, patterns and procedures.  Inclusion sport programme at lunchtimes for junior students. Programme run by school leaders.  What’s on the Menu programme run by Bronwyn Sims and parent volunteers.  Agreement to join the Pukekohe Community of Learning. Strategies for 2017  70% of parents attending Sharing My Learning evening.  85% of parents attending Parent Interviews (75% Maori whanau)  Achieve Silver Enviroschools award. Strategies for 2018  75% of parents attending Sharing My Learning evening.  90% of parents attending Parent Interviews (80% Maori whanau)  Begin work towards achieving Green-Gold status.  Continuation of “What’s on the Menu?” programme with inclusion of school produce for sale.  Identification of local based environmental project for change.  Magic minute programme implemented for students identified as being at risk.  Senior students mentoring junior students who are having difficulty academically or socially.  Lunchtime sports (touch, soccer, basketball etc.) organised by school leaders.  An Enviro Green Warriors representative within each classroom.  Lead parent volunteer coordinating “What’s on the Menu” programme. BOT funding.  Library clubs with chess, draughts,  Community clean-up project initiated by school.  Build connections with local iwi and professional learning organisations within the Pukekohe Community of Learning structure.  Develop a range of opportunities to partner with local iwi.  In school Community of Learning positions in place. Strategies for 2019  80% of parents attending Sharing My Learning evening.  95% of parents attending Parent Interviews (85% Maori whanau)  Achieve Green –Gold Enviroschools award.  Positive difference through local based environmental change project.  Making a positive change programme. Senior students identifying a school wide issue / challenge / change that they could make.  Lunchtime clubs run by senior students.  Young Enterprise project completed by Senior student group.  Be part of a professional network, sharing resources within the Pukekohe Community of Learning.

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Belong- Whakamana “We belong and contribute to making a positive difference.” Learning Skills for Life! Key Programmes Positive Difference: Encourage people to be involved in the opportunities available and to consider others. Contributing: Create opportunities for people to contribute to making our community a better place. Targeted Actions  Coffee & Chat sessions set up. These would involve a small group of parents meeting with staff to discuss a school topic with a member of school leadership team.  Maori community engagement. Face to face korero in whanau groups. Discussion about Maori student achievement and cultural practice at Waiau Pa.  Use Across School teachers from the Pukekohe Community of Learning to help build and maintain connections with local iwi and hapu.  Magic Minute programme. How can we make time to connect and make others feel that they belong?  Staff to develop actions based on the question-What do we need to feel a sense of belonging?  Appoint a parent volunteer to co-ordinate the “What’s on the Menu?” programme. Board to fund 2 hours per week for this position.  Classes to be rostered through the What’s on the Menu? programme.  Produce from garden marketed and sold to community to fund further developments.  Two in school ‘beacons’ appointed from within school staffing.  Continued involvement in the development of the Pukekohe Community of Learning.  Action plan developed towards achieving CoL goals. Who Simon & Senior Leaders Simon, BOT & Senior Leaders End of Term 2 All staff Enviro Schools leader, Principal, BOT Principal, Pukekohe CoL Leader & In school ‘beacons’ Completed by Two chat sessions per term. Two chat sessions per term. Simon, Senior Leaders and CoL Across School people. Implemented at beginning of the year. Co-ordinator in place at beginning of the year. Class roster beginning Term1 End of 2016 Ongoing End of Term 1 Measures of Success Parent feedback used to review and refine school programmes. Parent feedback used to review and refine school programmes. Higher rates of Maori whanau at school events. Contacts made with local iwi and hapu. Kaumatua or mentor established for the school. Increased confidence and social ability show by students identified. “What’s on the Menu?” programme continuing to grow with an established parent coordinator. All classes experiencing the programme throughout the year. Roles and responsibilities of in school ‘beacon’ positions outlined and delivered. School action plan delivered to increase student achievement against CoL goals Overall Measure of Success: 2016 results to student question.. “I feel that I belong and can contribute to making a positive difference?” Percentages Number of students Scale 0% 0 1 Not at all 3.7% 2 2 27.8% 15 3 Outcome 38.9% 21 4 29.6% 16 5 All the time

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“We become capable and creative participants in a changing Become- Whakanui world.” Learning Skills for Life! Key Objectives Capable: Develop people who are capable of communicating in a range of ways. Current state - 2016  63% of boys at or above National Standards in Writing.  Lead Teacher attendance at Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy.  79% of students at or above National Standards in Mathematics.  Engaging with Education Council to outline evidence against criteria.  Professional development programme for all staff linked to school / team goals. Strategies for 2017  70% of boys at or above National Standards in Writing.  In school whole staff Science professional development delivered by the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy.  80% of students at or above National Standards in Mathematics.  Development of a teacher rubric based on school expectations and Education Council criteria.  Senior leadership team taking a more active role in mentoring / coaching of teams. Strategies for 2018 75% of boys at or above National Standards in Writing.  Two STEM learning topics to be delivered during the year.  82% of students at or above National Standards in Mathematics.  Shift all staff at least one sublevel of teacher rubric.  Development of a mentoring / coaching programme with a peer partner based on teacher performance rubric. Strategies for 2019 80% of boys at or above National Standards in Writing.  STEM learning integrated to all learning activities.  85% of students at or above National Standards in Mathematics.  All staff working at “above” level when assessed against the teacher rubric.  Staff leading professional development for others. Creative: Create opportunities for people to think and act creatively.  Senior group competition at Auckland Lego Robo Cup competition.  Robotics included as part of senior options.  Review Deep Learning topic structure.  Investigation and development of Discovery Time and Genius Hour projects.  Leadership and Involvement in Franklin Robo Cup competition.  Use of Audrino kits to create simple robotic actions.  Senior students running in school junior robot workshop and competition using Spheros and Lego Mindstorms.  A range of students competing at Auckland Lego Robo Cup competition.  Implement revised Deep Learning topic structure focusing on authentic performance tasks.  Increased ‘hands on’ practical learning within classrooms.  Discovery Time and Genius Hour projects occurring in all classrooms.  Student impact projects developed and implemented to make an impact within the wider community.

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Become- Whakanui “We become capable and creative participants in a changing world.” Learning Skills for Life! Key Programmes Capable: Develop people who are capable of communicating in a range of ways. Creative: Create opportunities for people to think and act creatively. Targeted Actions  Science Professional Development delivered to all teaching staff by the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy.  Term 2 Science focus with all classes experiencing hands on Science experiences.  Management units assigned to extra responsibilities.  Clear expectations of coaching and mentoring others to build capacity stated within these responsibilities.  Development of a teacher capability rubric based on Practicing Teacher Criteria.  Teacher’s self-assessment against rubric.  Areas for development highlighted from self and peer assessment.  Purchase of two Evo3 Lego Mindstorms robots.  Lunchtime Robotics team set up in Term 1.  Purchase of Arduino discovery kits as part of senior options programme.  Learning shared with a wider audience.  See Saw used to share learning with parents and wider whanau.  Review and implementation of topic units with a focus on authentic and experiential learning activities. Who Simon, All teachers Classroom teachers Simon Completed by Before year start and end of term 1 holidays End of Term 2 End of 2016 Measures of Success All teaching staff graduating from Science Academy programme. Increased teacher confidence in the teaching of Science. All classes experiencing hands on science experiences during Term 2 Management units assigned to priority areas for school developments. Increased capacity of all staff in the areas of priority. Senior Leadership, Teachers End of Term 1 End of Term 2 End of Term 2 Teachers able to identify strengths and weaknesses of their teaching and have a personalised plan in place to improve these areas. Sean Dean Term 1 Lunchtime robotic group set up and working towards competing at robotic competition. Team Leaders Sean Dean – See Saw Team Leaders End of Term 1 End of Term 1 Sharing My Learning evening used to strengthen school – home partnerships. Hands on learning activities planned and delivered within team topic programme. Outcome Overall Measure of Success: 2016 results to student question.. “I am a capable and creative learner” Percentages Number of students Scale 0% 0 1 Not at all 1.9% 1 2 13% 38.9% 46.3% 7 21 25 34 5 All the time

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From Goal to Strategies: For School Organisation & Structure Objective Current state - 2016 Strategies for 2017 Strategies for 2018 Strategies for 2018 Buildings:  Refurbishment of Rms 15 & 16  Senior playground fall zone replacement  Maintenance as per 10YP  Admin / Staffroom upgrade  Rimu / Karaka toilet block upgrade.  Events Centre wall covering repairs.  Maintenance as per 10YP  Floor covering replacement Kowhai  Kowhai toilet block upgrade.  Modernisation of Rooms 11 & 12.  Maintenance as per 10YP  Floor covering replacement Karaka  Maintenance as per 10YP Grounds: Equipment: Safety:  Junior Playground extension  Construction of new Enviro Gardens  Senior Playground fall zone upgrade.  Junior deck replacement.  Sandpit upgrade.  Shade sail in pool area.  Junior playground shade sail  Shelter belt tree replacement.  Front Fence replacement  New laptop trolley (Rm 5)  Replacement data projectors (Rm 15, Rm 13)  Kowhai ipads  Classroom tables (Karaka)  Replacement of junior ipads  VoiP phone system.  Replacement of computers attached to activboards.  Server replacement.  Laptop trolley replacement.  Monthly inspections.  Regular reports to the BOT monitoring safety hazards.  Monthly inspections  Regular reports to the BOT monitoring safety hazards.  Monthly inspections  Regular reports to the BOT monitoring safety hazards.  Monthly inspections  Regular reports to the BOT monitoring safety hazards. Teaching Resources:  Purchase equipment as budgeted in the annual budget.  Purchase equipment as budgeted in the annual budget.  Purchase equipment as budgeted in the annual budget.  Purchase equipment as budgeted in the annual budget.

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Believe Whakapono Believe - Whakapono “We believe that we can all be powerful learners” Waiau Pa learners are ‘Powerful Learners’. To be a powerful learner students will;  Make Connections between their past experiences and knowledge and be able to transfer this to new learning.  Ask Questions to clarify understanding and to think creatively about solving problems.  Take Risks with their learning to move out of their comfort zone.  Reflect on what has worked and how we can do it better.  Persevere, keep trying in all situations. These five features make up a shared language which is incorporated into all aspects of school life. Believe – Whakapono in a Maori Perspective AKO NGATAHITANGA At Waiau Pa ako means that we are all learners and teachers. At Waiau Pa ngātahitanga means that we learn together and collaborate to improve

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Belong- Whakamana BelongWhakamana “We belong and contribute to making a positive difference.” This programme is based around our four core values which are; Respect Inclusion Caring Honesty Some features of this structure are;  Peer Mediation- Students are trained in the Cool Schools mediation process. During break times Peer Mediators are actively involved in the mediation of minor playground disputes.  Student Leadership- Senior students are given responsibilities and leadership opportunities throughout the school. They are encouraged to be part of making a positive difference for others.  House Structure- The school is divided into four houses named after four families from the Waiau Pa area, Cole, Clark, Millen and Matheson. Houses compete against each other in sporting events as well a house point system.  PTA- We have an active PTA who create a positive link between home and school. The PTA is actively involved in fundraising for the school as well as being a source of consultation with the community. Belong- Whakamana in a Maori Perspective WHANAUNGATANGA At Waiau Pa whanaungatanga means strong connections with each other and our whenua. MANAAKI At Waiau Pa manaaki means to support, take care of others and the environment and show our RICH values.

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REFLECTING THE CULTURAL DIVERSITY AT WAIAU PA SCHOOL We will embrace all cultures. The school curriculum will encourage students to understand and respect the different cultures which make up New Zealand society. It will ensure that the experiences, cultural traditions, histories, and languages of all New Zealanders are recognised and valued. Our plans and policies will be implemented in ways that are sensitive to the cultural backgrounds and values of individual children and their families. We will cater for cultural diversity by:  Being aware of and empathetic toward the range of different cultures and groups within the school .  Ensuring school programmes take into account the cultural differences of the school community. REFLECTING THE WAIAU PA MAORI COMMUNITY We recognise and value the unique position of Maori in New Zealand society. The views and needs of our Maori community, including tikanga Maori and te reo Maori, will be considered through continued consultation. The school curriculum will acknowledge the importance to all New Zealanders of both Maori and Pakeha traditions, histories and values. Waiau Pa School will take all reasonable steps to incorporate tikanga Maori and Maori culture into the school curriculum, which could include:  A school wide programme of Te Reo for all students  EOTC programmes which include cultural activities Instruction in Te Reo Maori for full time students whose parents request it. If a whanau requests a higher level of tikanga and/or te reo that is presently being offered, the Board of Trustees, Staff and family will discuss the following options, depending on appropriateness, cost effectiveness and feasibility:  Further extend existing programmes  Provide a Te Reo programme in the school for all students  Consider what support the local iwi can provide within the school’s programmes and organisational structures to address expectations  Explore other schools which may offer programmes closer to their expectations. Waiau Pa School will discover the views and concerns of the school’s Maori community by:  Developing, maintaining and supporting a Whanau group in the school.  By ensuring formal meetings are held to discuss concerns, areas for improvements, celebrating success and ways forward  Ensuring that school management take responsibility for the fostering of positive relations with the Whanau.

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Kaupapa for Learning at Waiau Pa Believe- Whakapono Belong- Whakamana Whakapono at Waiau Pa looks like…. Whakamana at Waiau Pa looks like…. AKO At Waiau Pa ako means that we are all learners and teachers. WHANAUNGATANGA At Waiau Pa whanaungatanga means strong connections with each other and our whenua. Ako is shown in...  Buddy classes  Te Reo buddy classes  Sharing My Learning Evenings  Classroom experts  Star of the day / Class leaders  Powerful Learner traits  Teaching as Inquiry - Plenary sessions with children  Wikipage reflections/Blogs  Student agency - what is learning? How do I learn best? Who helps me with my learning? Whanaungatanga is shown in...  Enviro Schools programme  Maori legend - Papatuanuku and Ranginui  Classroom practice  Strong, respectful relationships with learners, their whānau, hapū, iwi and everyone in between.  Te Reo buddy classes  Sharing My Learning, Parent Interviews  Know your students backgrounds  Involving parents and whanau with learning  Cooperative learning structures  Community feedback  School Camps – team work NGATAHITANGA At Waiau Pa ngātahitanga means that we learn together and collaborate to improve. MANAAKI At Waiau Pa manaaki means to support, take care of others and the environment and show our RICH values. Ngātahitanga is shown in...  Treaty at beginning of the year  Whole class rewards  RICH Celebration  Person to person bonding  Greetings / Mihi in morning ritual  Whole school term focus  Sharing Manaaki is shown in...  Peer mediation  Buddy classes  Houses  Monitors—Road Patrol, Office Duty etc  Inclusion sports Become- Whakanui Whakanui at Waiau Pa looks like…. WHAKAPAPA At Waiau Pa whakapapa means having a strong sense of identity and knowing who they are. Whakapapa is shown in …  Enviro Schools programme  ‘Identity’ Deep Learning topic  Involving parents/community in school events (Calf Club, Friends of Waiau Pa meetings)  ANZAC celebrations and memorial on school grounds  Grandparents Day - sharing our learning with our extended family  Calf Club - rural community and tradition at Waiau Pa  Trees for Survival WHAKAMANAWA At Waiau Pa whakamanawa means being confident and in control of themselves and their learning. Whakamanawa is shown in …  Sharing goals and next steps for learning.  Leadership and duty roles around the school.  Goal setting and co-constructing steps with students to achieve their goals so that students are confident in their way forward.  Celebrating and sharing stories and successes.  Achievers badges and points.

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