Learning Words: Games

 

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Games for learning how to fluently and automatically read high frequency words.

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L E A WOR D S N I N G G MS

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OTHER CRACKING THE ABC CODE RESOURCES Reading and Phonics Learn to Read Series – 20 reading books designed to teach non-readers to read. Multisensory Reading Level 1 – Designed to teach non-readers the basic sound-symbol relationship of the 26 letters of the alphabet. Multisensory Reading Level 2A – Designed to teach beginning readers the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 2B – Designed to teach early readers, who have some basic reading vocabulary, the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 3A – A comprehensive 25 unit program (commencing reading age of at least 6.06 to 7.00 years) designed as an introductory course for younger students to teach the common graphemes. Multisensory Reading Level 3B – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes (commencing reading age of at least 7.00 years). Multisensory Reading Level 3C – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes but using more challenging vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 8.00 years). Multisensory Reading Level 4 – 15 unit program covering the less common graphemes and incorporating difficult vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 10.00 years). Suitable for adolescents and adults. Reading for Comprehension – A series of 10 books focusing specifically on developing comprehension skills. Spelling Multisensory Spelling Books 1 to 5 (300 most commonly used words graded according to level of difficulty). Multisensory Spelling Books Levels A-T (spelling ages 5.00 to 15.06 years). Sound Hearing – Designed to develop phonological awareness and auditory processing. Rules Rule – Rule cards, nonsense word application and real word exercises. Rules Rule Levels 1 to 4 – A series of graded books which systematically introduce 40 rules. 10 new rules are introduced in each book and previously introduced rules are revised and covered at a higher level of complexity. Editing Levels 1-4 – A series of graded books which require students to apply their phonological and spelling rule knowledge to correct errors in passages of varying difficulty. Writing Writing Creatively & Persuasively - Systematic writing programs designed to develop students’ written expression skills. * Check website for availability and further resources. © 2017 Dr L.M. Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com lfawcett@crackingtheabccode.com

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The reading process has two components. When you first come across a new word, you need to be able to decode the word, which requires a good knowledge of phonics (i.e., know the letters or combinations of letters that represent different sounds). Once the word has been decoded then you need to remember that word (i.e., put it into your long-term memory) so that when you come across the word again you don’t need to go through the decoding process. Being able to read words fluently and automatically is an important part of the reading process. Once students have a large number of words that can be fluently and automatically read every time they are encountered, they can then focus their mental energy on comprehending the text. Many students need to practise reading a word multiple times before it is stored in their long-term memory. For these students, games are an effective strategy for helping in this process. Each word to be learned should be printed on a piece of card approximately 6cm x 13cm. Make two cards for each word. Only work on learning 10 words at any one time. Once a word is well-known and can be read fluently on several different occasions, remove that word and replace it with the next word to learn. You will find that some words are easily learned while others may take several weeks to remember – that is absolutely fine! Ideas for Introducing the Words 1. Wrap words to be unwrapped like presents. 2. Post words in an envelope. 3. Hide a new word in the room each day for the child to find. 4. Make a special word stand (or it could be a toy) to display the new word on. 5. Make a special word box in which to keep the cards. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Shuffle the cards and give yourself and your child 5 cards each. • Place the remaining 10 cards facing down in the middle of the table. • Each player checks their cards for matching pairs. • Take it in turns to ask: “Have you got ……?” • If the other player has the card this is passed to the asking player. • If the player does not have the card, the player replies, “Go fish!” and the asking player picks up a card from the pile. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Place 9 cards on the table. • Each player has 5 counters of the same colour. • Take it in turns to place a counter on a card. • The child should read the word each time irrespective of who places on the counter. • The first person to have three counters in a row is the winner. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Place all cards upside down. • Take it in turns to turn over two cards. • The child must read every word that is turned over. • If the cards match, these are removed and the player has another turn. • If the cards do not match, leave the cards turned right- side up. • The game finishes when all cards are matched. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Place all the cards on a table with the wordV showing. • The child makes a jumping frog land on a card (or close to a card). • The child reads the card. If the word is read correctly, it is removed from the table. • If the word is read incorrectly, help the child to decode and leave it on the table. • Instead of a ‘jumping frog’ the child can just toss a counter or a coin onto the cards. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Hide the cards around the room making them reasonably easy to find. • The child hunts for the words. • You can say ‘hotter’ if the child is getting close to the card and ‘colder’ if the child is moving away from the card. • Each time a card is found the child reads the word. • If read correctly, the child keeps the card. • If read incorrectly or if the child can’t remember the word, help the child decode the word and rehide. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Use the cards to make sentences. • You might need to add in some extra cards with words such as ‘the’, ‘heªRU ‘she’ . • Make sure you have a mix of verbs and nouns to ensure sentences can be made. • Help your child read the sentence. • Try changing just one word in the sentence. Read the sentence again 'oes it still make sense? If not, can you find a different word so that the sentence does make sense? • The sentence only needs to make sense from a grammatical perspective. • Can you make a different sentence using the same words but just changing the order of the words" © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Place the cards across the floor to act as stepping stones. • The child has to ‘cross the river’ stepping on each card and correctly reading the word. • If the child reads the words wrongly, the child is ‘eaten’ by the crocodile (the parent). • Help the child decode the word and then try again to cross the river without being eaten. • Pick up words that are read correctly, so that there are less and less stepping stones to use to cross the river. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Shuffle the cards and then deal them all out equally so both players have the same number of cards. • Take it in turns to place a card in the middle of the table. • As a card is placed the child must say the word. • If the card placed on top matches the card on the table the players slap a hand over the pile and call, “Snap!” • The player with the hand WRXFKLQJ the WRSRIWKHcardV SLFNVXSDOOWhe cards. • The player with all the cards wins the game. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Put the cards on the floor to make a ‘ladder’. • The child reads the words to ‘climb’ the ladder. • If a mistake is made, help the child decode the word and put it at the top of the ladder. • If the word is read correctly, the child is given the card to hold. • Continue until the child is holding all the cards. • A variation of this is to put the cards end-to-end to make a ‘road’. • The child ‘drives’ a toy car along the ‘road’ reading each word. • As above, if the word is read correctly it is taken off the ‘road’. If read incorrectly, it goes to the end of the road. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Place the cards on the table. • The child moves a toy figure from one card to the next while saying the rhyme: Skippety, plippety, plop, No-one knows where I will stop. • On ‘stop’ the child reads the word. • If correct, the card is pick up.. • If incorrect, help the child decode the word, but leave it on the table. • Continue until all cards have been picked up © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Draw a hangman frame. • Put all the words in a bag. • The child pulls out a word. • If it is read correctly, the child keeps the word. • If the word is read incorrectly, one body part is added to the hangman frame. • Help the child decode the word and put it back in the bag. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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• Separate the cards into two piles so that there is one of each card in each pile. • Share the words from one pile between the players. • Put the other pile of cards in a bag. • The child pulls out a word from the bag and reads it. • Whoever has that word placeV the card upside down on the matching card. • The first person to have all cards covered calls ‘Bingo’ and wins the game. © 2010, 2017 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com

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