Kennett High School Career and Educational Planning Guide

 

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List of courses available to KHS students for the 2017-2018 school year

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Kennett School District #39 Kennett High School Career and Educational Planning Guide STATEMENT OF ASSURANCE Kennett School District No. 39 makes no distinction on the grounds of race, sex, color, religion, handicap or national origin in providing to individuals any services, financial aid, or any other benefits. Any student having a grievance regarding discrimination under said Title IX or Section 504 that cannot be resolved by a discussion with the immediate supervisor should contact the following office: SECTION 504 and TITLE IX Office of the Assistant Superintendent 510 College Avenue — Kennett, MO 63857 Telephone: (573) 717-1100

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Contents — LANGUAGE ARTS (LA) — — FOREIGN LANGUAGE — — SOCIAL STUDIES — — MATHEMATICS — — SCIENCE — — FINE ARTS — — PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH — — PRACTICAL ARTS — A — BUSINESS EDUCATION B — FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE EDUCATION C — LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER — CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION — 3 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 9 10 11

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— LANGUAGE ARTS (LA) — The Language Arts program is designed to assist students to develop the skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, which will be of value in personal, social, and occupational endeavors. ► ​LA 9 ​[1 unit] ​— a required course for all freshmen, LA 9 stresses the application of skills and strategies necessary for the reading process, including vocabulary development and the skills of analyzing and evaluating fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction from a variety of authors and time periods. Students will also apply the writing process in composing text and learn to write effectively for various forms and types of writing. In addition, this class offers students instruction in the use of the library. Individual instruction is geared to meet student needs. ► L​ A 10 [​ 1 unit] ​— a required course for all sophomores. The focus of LA 10 is to develop reading and writing skills. Time is set aside for an in-depth study of at least one novel and one drama. Emphasis is placed on developing each student’s potential for composing their ideas into clear and systematic, as well as creative, oral, and written expression. World Literature is emphasized. ► L​ A 11 [​ 1 unit] ​— a required course for all juniors. Students enrolled in LA 11 are involved in a comprehensive study and review of grammar and mechanics. Essay writing, including the research essay, is emphasized. Students also explore a chronological study of American literature and a weekly study of the vocabulary which that literature entails. Students will also be involved in an intense study of two supplementary American novels. ► L​ A 12 [​ 1 unit] ​— ​a required course to fulfill the mandatory fourth year of Language Arts. This course is planned as a terminal course in high school English for those who expect to attend college. The focus of the course is to provide advanced training in communications. Students will engage in an intense study of fiction and nonfiction works. Students will also be involved in the study of two supplementary novels. Writing is emphasized by teaching accuracy in grammar, sentence structure, paragraphing, and the organization of essays. Students will write in response to the literature read. Research will be emphasized through the justification of critical analysis and the writing of a persuasive research paper. ► A​ dvanced Placement English Language and Composition-11th Grade [1 unit]​— an elective course for juniors. The Advanced Placement English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. College credit may be earned based upon the student’s score on the AP College Board Examination for this course. Prerequisite: LA10 and Teacher Recommendation. ► A​ dvanced Placement English Literature and Composition 12th Grade [1 unit] —​ an elective course for seniors. Advanced Placement in English Literature and Composition is designed to give advanced seniors the opportunity to study college level literature and language. By examining challenging literature and applying literary analysis skills and close reading skills, students will develop critical reading and writing skills. Students will analyze poetry, fiction, drama, novels, and nonfiction to determine the purpose and rhetorical strategies employed by the writers to convey meaning. Students will write extensively to demonstrate their comprehension of literature’s purpose and the strategies used to achieve its purpose. The major course objective is to enable every student to read and write for future college courses and for the AP English Literature Examination given in the Spring. College credit may be earned based upon the student’s score on the AP College Board Examination for this course. Prerequisite: LA11 and Teacher Recommendation. ► M​ ass Media II [​ 1 unit] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors. Sponsor approval is required. The course consists of instruction on the compilation and assembly of materials for the publication of the KHS paper, the “​Tatler.” The course is designed to teach students responsibility, leadership, and the ability to cooperate with others. ► M​ ass Media III ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors. Sponsor approval is required. The course consists of instruction on the compilation and assembly of materials for the publication of the KHS year- book, the “I​ ndian.” The course is designed to teach students responsibility, leadership, and the ability to cooperate with others.

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— FOREIGN LANGUAGE — The foreign language program is designed to assist students in developing the skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, which will be of value in personal, social, and occupational endeavors. ► S​ panish I [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have not had previous Spanish courses. A strong background in Communication Arts is essential. This course emphasizes pronunciation and the development of conversational skills. Elementary grammar and extensive vocabulary are studied. A study of Hispanic culture is integrated into lessons. ► ​Spanish II [​ 1 unit] ​— an elective course for freshmen who have completed two years of Spanish at the middle school, or for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have satisfactorily completed Spanish I. The course explores a more comprehensive study of grammar and more complex paragraph structure. Additionally, advanced vocabulary is studied. A study of Hispanic culture is integrated into lessons. ► ​Spanish III [​ 1 unit] —​ an advanced elective course for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have satisfactorily completed Spanish I and II. Students review previously introduced grammar, learn advanced grammar, engage in conversation, explore Hispanic culture, perform dramatic works and study literature in the target language. ► S​ panish IV ​[1 unit] ​— an advanced elective course for juniors and seniors who have satisfactorily completed Spanish I, II, and III. Students review grammar, read short novels, engage in conversations, explore Hispanic culture, study literature, perform and create dramatic works. ► S​ panish V [​ 1 unit] —​ an advanced elective course for seniors who have satisfactorily completed Spanish I, II, III, and IV. Students read short novels, engage in conversations, explore Hispanic culture, study literature, perform/create dramatic works, and analyze the products, practices, and perspectives of the target language. — SOCIAL STUDIES — The term social studies collectively designates those courses which explore various human relationships. The social studies program seeks to describe and analyze cause and effect as well as identifying the various world cultures, and study the differences in people which are produced by geography, climate, and economic factors such as natural resources. Many supplementary teaching aides will be used in the social studies area such as maps, globes, charts, video, records, transparencies, guest speakers, and field trips. ► ​World History [​ 1 unit] ​— a required course for all freshmen. This course is a study of important civilization from prehistory to contemporary times. The objective of this course is to present the story of human history in the world from the time of man’s existence to the present. The interdependence of man and the interchange of cultures is stressed. The course is presented through concepts, broad general time sequences, and related factual information. The Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, European, Eastern, and African cultural institutions and their contributions to the development of civilizations are emphasized in the course of World History. ► A​ merican Government ​[1 unit] ​— a required course for all juniors. This course is designed to help students understand the roles of the local, state, and national governments, and the student’s responsibilities as a citizen of these institutions. In this course, the influence of school, family, and government is related to the individual in terms of his/her influence and interaction with these institutions. Students will learn to make observations and evaluations relating to government and draw conclusions as to the effect of government on the total population. ► A​ merican History ​[1 unit] —​ a required course for all sophomores. This course is designed for the study of the economic, political, and social history of the United States from Civil War to the present. The first semester explores the study of the growth of American Democracy and the expanding role of the United States in world affairs to World War I. The second semester deals with the study of American growth from World War I to the 21st Century. ► Advanced Placement U.S Government & Politics [​ 1 unit] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors. This course is an intensive study of the formal and informal structures of government and the processes of the American political system, with an emphasis on policy-making and implementation. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes in government and politics. This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students will be expected to gather and analyze information from outside

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readings, daily lectures, as well as from the textbook. The willingness to prepare for and participate in class discussions and the ability to coherently express well- supported opinions in writing are also necessary for success in this course. This course is designed to prepare the students for the AP Government and Politics examination. College credit may be earned based upon the student’s score on the AP College Board examination for this course. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. ► Advanced Placement United States History ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors. This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students will be expected to gather and analyze information from outside readings, daily lectures, as well as from the textbook. The willingness to prepare for and participate in class discussions and the ability to coherently express well-supported opinions in writing are also necessary for success in this course. This course is designed to prepare the students for the AP U.S. History examination. College credit may be earned based upon the student’s score on the AP College Board Examination for this course. Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation. ► ​Sociology ​[½ unit] —​ an elective semester course for juniors and seniors. The course is designed to instruct students as to the importance of social relations in human behavior, to describe and interpret basic characteristics of social groups and to present a well-rounded and balanced view of social life. Special terminology is introduced, as well as factors influencing social relations (e.g. geography, biological and institutions) along with contrasts for our social worlds. Adjacent Semester: Psychology ► ​Psychology ​[½ unit] —​ an elective course for juniors and seniors. The course is the study of the working of the mind and is designed to develop curiosity about human behavior; to appreciate how scientific methods can be applied to human behavior; to stress that good adjustment to a happy and productive life depends upon the development of one’s talents, abilities, and upon the development of respect for the dignity and worth of individuals; to help students understand themselves, their own personal and social problems, and prepare more wisely for marriage and a vocation. Adjacent Semester: Sociology ► ​Street Law [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for juniors and seniors. Students will learn the goals and organization of the criminal justice system and will gain knowledge of the criminal law and procedural/constitutional law as related to the United States Constitution. The students will also focus on the classical, biological, psychological, and social explanations of crime. Students will learn about the systematic methods used by law enforcement to fight crime and to guard the civil liberties of citizens, and issues faced by law enforcement and the judiciary system. Students will examine the corrections system and issues within that system. ► ​Contemporary Issues ​[1 unit] —​ an elective course for all juniors and seniors. This course is designed to encourage interest in the topics of current history, often as it happens, and to build the skills necessary to research the topics and communicate the ideas and opinions of the student. The areas of study covered are current events, controversial issues, public speaking, writing, computer applications, and the use of media for research. — MATHEMATICS — The need to understand and use mathematics in everyday life and in the workplace has never been greater and will continue to increase. The underpinnings of everyday life are increasingly mathematical and technological. Just as the level of mathematics needed for intelligent citizenship has increased, so too has the level of mathematical thinking and problem solving needed in the workplace. Mathematical competence opens doors to productive futures, and those who understand and do mathematics will have significantly enhanced opportunities and options for shaping their futures. ► P​ re-Algebra [​ 1 unit] ​— This course is a one-year Pre-Algebra class that will prepare students to advance to higher mathematics classes. Course content includes development of number sense to include integers and rational numbers and the application of computation as estimation skills to rational numbers, problem solving strategies, measurement, geometry, consumer problems, algebraic concepts, statistics, and graphs. ► A​ lgebra I [​ 1 unit] ​— a required course for all students. This course is a one-year Algebra I class that will prepare students to advance to higher mathematics courses. This course is basic for all succeeding math courses. Algebra I is a study of mathematical functions, with emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Equation solving involving variables, operations with polynomials, factoring, graphing, and exercises involving geometry are all included in Algebra I.

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► G​ eometry [​ 1 unit] ​— a required course for all students who have indicated above average achievement in Algebra I. In some instances, Freshmen who have indicated above average achievement in Algebra I as an 8th grade student will be allowed to take this course. This course stresses both the basic structure of geometry and proficiency in developing formal proofs. Algebraic skills are reviewed and strengthened as algebraic methods are applied to solving problems in geometry. ► ​Algebra II ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course for all students who have successfully completed Algebra I and Geometry. This course is designed for college bound students or those who are interested in studying more math. This course will continue the study of algebraic concepts and the applications in problem solving. Prerequisite: Algebra I ► ​Trigonometry [​ ½ unit first semester] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Algebra II and Geometry. This course is a study of trigonometric functions with emphasis on applications, graphs, identities, equations, and solution of triangles. Adjacent Semester: Math Analysis ► ​Mathematical Analysis [​ ½ unit second semester] ​— an elective for juniors and seniors who have completed Algebra II and Geometry. This course is designed primarily for students who will enter college for further study in math, science, or engineering. It will utilize and stress to greater degree materials introduced and studied in the separate course of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and Trigonometry. Additionally, this course introduces the first steps of calculus. Adjacent Semester: Trigonometry ► A​ P Calculus AB [​ 1 unit] ​— an elective course for seniors. AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course. The course covers topics in these areas, including concepts of limits, derivatives and their applications, definite integrals and their applications. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are presented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst the representations. The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of the course. Students will use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, and to assist in interpreting results. AP Calculus AB is designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Exam. College credit may be earned based upon the student's score on the AP exam. — SCIENCE — Science is evident in all aspects of our lives. Our houses, clothing, jobs, and leisure time have been modified by the scientific discoveries and inventions of the past decades. People cannot consider themselves educated in today’s world unless they are capable of understanding and appreciating the concepts of modern science. The need for understanding and applying the scientific method to solve human problems is paramount. ► ​Physical Science ​[1 unit] ​— a required course for freshmen. This course will introduce students to the important principles of modern science. The student will learn how man has improved living conditions, health and mind through science. The course will incorporate experiments and demonstrations to aid the student in understanding how the scientist thinks and works. Students will learn to interpret facts and realize the need for suspending judgment until the facts can be ascertained. Topics studied in the course include the laws of motion simple machines, astronomy, energy, electricity, magnetism, atomic structure, matter, weather, and climate. Additionally, the course will present introductory concepts of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. ► ​Biology I ​[1 unit] ​— a required course for all sophomores. Biology is the study of living things. The study of biology includes many other branches of science including botany, zoology, bacteriology, genetics, physiology, anatomy, and chemistry, among many others. Students will investigate the changes in ecosystems and interactions of organisms with their environments, including ecosystems, populations, communities, diversity, adaptations, and feeding relationships. Students will demonstrate and apply knowledge of the characteristics and interactions of living organisms, including characteristics of plants and animals, structure and function of living systems, cellular reproductions, heredity, and change over time. ►A​ pplied Science ​[1 unit] ​— a​ n elective course for juniors and seniors. This course stresses the Environmental Science aspect of Earth Science, Ecology, Biology, and basic Chemistry in the context of our modern environment. Students will be challenged to make connections among the various scientific disciplines while developing their observational, analytical, and qualitative skills to better understand the physical world. Science skills such as data collection and analysis, using the Metric system, and making

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useful conversions between measurements will be emphasized throughout the course. ► ​Biology II ​[1 unit] ​— ​an elective course for juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Biology I. Biology II is a lab/lecture class that focuses on a more detailed study of biological principles and fields. The four areas are Taxonomy, Entomology, Botany, Genetics, and Anatomy and Physiology. The student will discover and explore different forms of life, life processes, classification, and apply a scientific approach to problem solving and explorative study. ► ​AP Biology [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for juniors and seniors. This course is equivalent to a college freshman level biology course. AP Biology is designed to give students comprehensive, in-depth, and rigorous academic exposure to the foundational concepts of biological science, along with integration of the newest applications and innovations based on newly emerging research. Along with lecture and other activities, laboratory exercises will be used to introduce and reinforce many topics. Students will be responsible for composing laboratory reports as a part of the lab component of this course. AP Biology is designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Biology examination. College credit may be earned based upon the student’s score on the AP College Board examination for this course. Prerequisite: Biology I and Teacher Recommendation ► ​Chemistry ​I [1 unit] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors. Chemistry is a lecture/lab course designed to teach the basic principles of chemistry. Basic principles include: atomic structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relations, gas laws, the periodic table and its uses. Chemistry is basically a study of characteristics of elements, the changes that take place in chemical combination, the methods of causing these changes, and the mechanics whereby the reactions take place. ► ​Chemistry I​ I [1 unit] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors. Chemistry II is a lecture/lab course designed to present on a college l​ evel, concepts in chemistry concerning the nature of matter, its composition, stoichiomet​ry, ​solutions, concentrations of solutions, ionization, neutralization, titration, pH, POH, a brief introduction into organic chemistry, and other basic concepts and principles previously acquired in Chemistry I. This course builds on the first year of chemistry to enable the student to learn and apply ideas, concepts, and basic chemistry on a more advanced level. Selected new topics are included that will increase a student’s knowledge of scientific techniques. ▶A​ P Chemistry ​[1 unit] —​ an elective course for juniors and seniors. This course is equivalent to a general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. AP Chemistry is designed to give students a depth of understanding of chemistry fundamental and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. An emphasis on chemical calculations and mathematical formulation of principles is predominant throughout the course, as well as an abundance of laboratory exercises. AP Chemistry is designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Chemistry examination. College credit may be earned based upon the student’s score of the AP exam. Prerequisite: Chemistry I and completion of Algebra II. ▶P​ hysics [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for seniors that will be offered through a nontraditional setting using an online program. Physics is the science that explores matter and energy that do not involve change in composition. Physics studies mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. The study of nuclear energy is also explored. The study of physics also involves the study of laws governing the natural order and occurrence of things. This is a lab, lecture, and demonstration course. Prerequisites: Algebra, Chemistry, and Trigonometry — FINE ARTS — ► A​ rt I ​[1 unit] —​ an elective course for all students. The students in Art I will be exposed to the following: drawing, pencil, charcoal, color, tempera, pastels, printmaking, ceramics, mixed media, crafts, and art history. The course is designed to give the first year art student a broad experience with a variety of medium. Drawing is emphasized throughout the course of study. Students’ work will be displayed and entered in various competitions. ► ​Art II ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The students in Art II will work with basically the same materials as in Art I with the addition of oil pastel and pen and ink. Students are given individual study problems in different areas that require them to use knowledge gained from Art I. The course is designed for advanced study of art techniques and the development of appreciation, criticism, and analysis of art. Students’ work will be displayed and entered in various competitions. ► ​Art III ​[1 unit] —​ ​an elective course for juniors and seniors. Content in Art III will expand upon previous knowledge learned in Art II classes. The course will articulate the art curriculum as a bridge between general art classes and high school art classes. This course is designed for the serious art

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student and those who have the ability to work independently as required. Students should have earned a “B” or better in previous art classes. Students must be self-motivated and have good attendance. This is a two semester elective course of study. Art III is a prerequisite for Art IV classes. ► A​ rt IV [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for seniors. ► ​Clay/Ceramics ​[1unit] —​ a​ n elective course for all students. The students will learn and perfect hand-building techniques in clay, including pinch, slab, and coil methods. The course is designed to teach basic three-dimensional design principles. Drawing is also incorporated into projects. Students’ work may be displayed or entered into competitions. Clay 1 builds on design elements and principles learned in Art 1. ► F​ emale Chorus ​[1 unit] ​— an elective auditioned choir for all female students. The students will learn basic sight reading and vocal skills. The choir members participate in several performances and concerts annually. ► ​Male Chorus [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective auditioned choir for all male students. The students will learn basic sight reading and vocal skills. The choir members participate in several performances and concerts annually. ► V​ arsity Choir ​[1 unit] ​— an elective auditioned ensemble for juniors and seniors only. This choir requires advanced sight reading and vocal skills and performs advanced literature of various styles. The choir participates in several performances and concerts annually. ► ​Chamber Choir ​[1 unit] ​— an elective auditioned ensemble for the most advanced vocal students 9-12. Students must be enrolled in Male Chorus, Female Chorus or Varsity Choir. Students in Chamber Choir per- form advanced a cappella literature. These students are required to audition for district and state competitions and participate in the spring musical. Auditions for this group include solo singing and sight reading. Limited enrollment. ► G​ eneral Chorus ​[1 unit] —​ an elective class for grades 9-12. No audition or performance required. Focusing on vocal music fundamentals, history, styles and social interactions globally. ► G​ uitar [​ 1 unit] ​— an elective course for any student in grades 9-12. Guitar class is designed for the beginning guitar student. Students will learn and apply music fundamentals to the guitar. Included in those fundamentals are proper technique, reading notation, rhythmic skills, style. The result of this class will hopefully inspire the student to work independently, continue further study on guitar, and/or seek private instruction. This class will help set the stage for improvisation, composition, and student performance. This class will not perform public performances. ► I​ ntroduction to Percussions ​[1 unit​] — an elective course for all students. No previous experience is required. This course is designed to provide students with learning opportunities on percussion instruments in band. This multi-section course will cover percussion instruments from marching band, keyboard mallet instruments, and concert band percussion. Students will be able to understand how the instruments work, instrument care, as well as an understanding of basic music theory. The primary focus is on the development, continuation, and expansion of basic skills that are necessary for effective instrumental music performance. ▶F​ undamentals of Music Technology [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for all students. No experience in music is required. This course is designed to provide students with learning opportunities using technology to understand and create music for various situations. Students will be able to understand the anatomy of electronic music software and basic musical concepts. Students will also be able to apply their knowledge in real-world applications that range from creating ringtones to radio commercials. The primary focus is on the development, continuation, and expansion of basic skills that are necessary for effective electronic music creation. ► V​ arsity Band ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This course is designed to assist in the development of self-discipline, both mentally and socially. Some of the purposes of this organization and course are to engender school spirit, promote loyalty to school and the organization, perform at athletic contests, to represent the City of Kennett and Kennett High School at certain civic events, and to prepare students for more extensive musical education in college and to develop knowledge of and love for music. The senior band consists of a marching band, concert band, pep band, jazz band, and small ensembles. Members of the band participate in many performances and concerts annually. Students who wish to participate in Senior Band must audition with the director of bands before membership is granted. — PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH — ► P​ hysical Education (P.E.) [1 unit] —​ a required course for all students, unless a doctor

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excuses the student because of a serious illness. Physical Education endeavors to promote the physical, emotional, mental, and social well-being of the individual through supervised structured and free play activities. ► H​ ealth [​ embedded in P.E. and Weightlifting] ​— a required course for all students. Students will study anatomy to better understand the basic structure of the body, physiology to better understand the functions and processes of the body, organic, and functional diseases, and the methods toward treatment and prevention of such diseases. ► W​ eight lifting ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course designed for increasing performance and decreasing injury in students involved in school sponsored sports. This course will stress physical development of a person through the use of weight training, aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, flexibility, agility, speed, power, balance, and plyometric. The students will be exposed to numerous fitness components through various testing of power, strength, and agility. The students will also learn safety issues and how to use proper techniques on each lift. The students will be graded on improvement, participation, attitude, and effort. — PRACTICAL ARTS — A —​ ​BUSINESS EDUCATION The business and office education department will prepare students for initial employment in business offices, provide college preparatory training for students who major in business at the postsecondary level, and contribute to the understanding of attitudes and non-vocational skills needed by all persons to be effective in maintaining their personal business affairs. ► I​ ntroduction to Business [​ 1 unit] ​— an elective course designed for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This course explores business and economic affairs which affect our well-being. A major purpose of the course is to strengthen economic citizenship through the study of business. Skills are taught include banking and check writing procedures, savings and investments, consumer buying, types of insurance, consumer credit, income tax, and personal record keeping. An additional Personal Finance credit [½ unit] may be earned upon successful completion of this course. Embedded credit will be graded on a Pass/Fail, a G.P.A. calculation excluded. ►​Computer Applications I/Document Processing [1​ unit] an elective course for all students to develop basic keyboarding skills needed to key alphabetic, numeric, and special symbol characters, as well as teaching the skills to use a 10-key numeric keypad. Students also receive the instruction in basic word processing features, including creating, saving, deleting, printing documents, and formatting professional looking documents such as memos, letters, reports, manuscripts, and tables. ► ​Computer Applications II ​[1 unit] —​ an elective course for all students who have successfully completed Computer Applications I/Document Processing. This course is designed to develop and use advanced applications using programs for word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database management. ► B​ usiness Communications ​[½ unit] —​ an elective course for sophomores, juniors and seniors. This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to continue the development of the basics of grammar, spelling, vocabulary and writing skills and how to apply these basic principles of communication in writing clear and effective business documents. Adjacent Semester: Personal Finance ► P​ ersonal Finance [​ ½ unit] ​— a required course for sophomores, juniors and seniors. This course is designed to equip high school students with the knowledge and skills necessary to manage their personal finances effectively. Students learn “real life” math skills and personal record keeping skills which can be utilized throughout their own lives upon successful completion of this course. Adjacent Semester: Business Communications ► ​Accounting I ​[1 unit] ​— an elective course for all students who want to understand financial records so that improved economic decisions can be made. Students learn the accounting cycle used by businesses that sell services or merchandise. Students are introduced to automated data processing and to the handling of transactions related to the subsystems of accounting. An accounting simulation set is used. The course is designed to meet the needs of the high school student in maintaining their own personal business records as well as meeting the minimum requirements for most bookkeeping jobs. ► A​ ccounting II ​[1 unit] —​ an elective course for those students who have completed Accounting I. This second year course is vocational and career oriented for the student planning to go to college and major in accounting, marketing, management, or some other aspect of business administration. Prerequisite: Accounting I

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B ​— F​ AMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE EDUCATION This program of instruction was designed to help students improve personal and family living through the development and use of human and material resources. The nature and content of instruction will be derived from the need and concern of the individuals and families served, taking into consideration maturity and experience of the students. The curriculum will focus on fundamental values and concepts of the various aspects of homemaking and consumer education. The skills of homemaking, consumer buying, and prospects for a vocation or avocation will be taught. An attempt will be made to develop attitudes, understanding, and appreciation for the family institution and community activities which affect homes and families. ► ​Child Development [​ ½ unit] ​— an elective course for all students. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the awesome responsibilities and lifestyle changes that will occur with the decision to become a parent. Units of study include: responsibilities of parenthood, financial considerations, the reproductive process, birth defects, pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum experiences. Students will also learn about the child’s growth and development during the newborn, infancy, and toddler stages. Teaching methods include use of the text, audio-visual materials, research projects, professional guest speakers, and child observations. Adjacent Semester: Family Living and Parenthood ► F​ amily Living and Parenthood ​[½ unit] —​ an elective course for all students. This course is designed to help the student understand their roles within the family and society. Units of study include: family structure, relationships with parents and friends, dating issues, sexuality, love, mate selection, preparation for marriage, and family crisis. Teaching methods may include use of text, class discussions, audio-visual materials, supplemental reading, class projects, and professional guest speakers. Adjacent Semester: Child Development ► ​Fashion Apparel and Textiles [​ ½ unit] ​— an elective course for all students. This course is an introductory class into the world of fashion and production. The student will learn color schemes, materials, and experience construction of samples and simple projects. The student will also learn the importance of consumer relations in the textile industry and the business procedures. Teaching methods include use of the text, class discussion, teacher and student demonstration, audio-visual materials, displays, and student projects. Adjacent Semester: Nutrition and Wellness ► N​ utrition and Wellness [​ ½ unit] —​ an elective course for all students. This course is a beginning course designed to enhance students’ knowledge of the importance of nutrition. This semester course allows students to build fundamental skills to read food labels. They will discover the importance of the food pyramid and the nutrients our bodies need. Students will learn how healthy eating and exercise can give us a longer, healthier life. Units of study include: food pyramid, basic nutrition, label reading, diet fads, and exercise to stay healthy. Teaching strategies may include lecture, discussions, activities, presentations, class projects, and labs. Adjacent Semester: Fashion Apparel and Textiles ► H​ ousing and Design ​[½ unit] ​— an elective course for all students. This course explores the various dimensions of selecting, planning, decorating, and furnishing the places where we live. Hands-on creative projects will showcase the students’ own artistic expression. Elements and principles of design and color will be studied as they apply to interiors and housing. Students will evaluate and draw floor plans and then create rooms to illustrate the furnishings and fabrics for project situations. Students will learn how to create floor plans and designs using computer programs. Teaching techniques may include lecture, discussions, audio-visual materials, professional guest speakers, field trips, technology, and student presentations. Adjacent Semester: Resource Management ► ​FACS Resource Management ​[½ unit] ​— an elective course for all students. This course, which prepares students to be confident consumers, fulfills the personal finance graduation requirement. An additional Personal Finance credit (1/2 unit) may be earned upon successful completion of this course. Embedded credit will be graded on a Pass/Fail, a G.P.A. scale calculation excluding. The students will achieve an understanding of resource management in a constantly changing society. Educated teen consumers will function more effectively by understanding their purchasing power, protecting their well-being as well as their assets, making career choices, avoiding spending traps, and defending their consumer rights. The students will gain confidence in making choices for their financial future and handling difficult money decisions. The teaching resources used for this course are the use of the text, study guides, newspaper articles, class discussions, audio-visual materials, supplemental readings, various related projects, and professional guest speakers. Adjacent Semester: Housing and Design

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C —​ ​LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER The Library Media Center provides students with skills to utilize​ t​ echnology for the purposes of research. ► L​ ibrary Science I [​ 1 unit] —​ an elective course for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The course is designed to enable students to learn library procedures and to utilize reference resources. Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation. ► T​ ech Team [​ 1 Unit]​—Technology Integration and Technical Support is a course to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to technically analyze hardware and software problems as well as develop leadership and communication skills. A blended learning environment will offer students self-paced online units of study while offering first level technical support to include troubleshooting software, hardware and web related issues, performing basic repairs of broken devices, and creating digital media such as blogs, screencasts, and videos regarding problems and solutions in educational technology integration. Open to students​ i​ n grades 10, 11 and 12. Students must submit an application. Teacher recommendation required. ▶J​obs for America's Graduates (JAG) [​ 1 unit]​—this course is designed to help motivate students to stay in school. It focuses on helping students pursue postsecondary education and learn how to research quality entry-level jobs that may lead to career advancement opportunities. ► C​ redit Recovery​—a course for any students in need of recovering previous failed courses in order to stay on track for graduation. — CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION — Career and Technology Educations provides instruction for the development of basic manipulative skills, safety, technical knowledge, and related occupational information for preparing students for employment in vocational industrial pursuits. The basic principle of Career and Technology education is “learning by doing.” The needs of the individual worker are the foundations upon which all instructional activity is based. Second year students (seniors) who meet attendance and GPA requirements may choose to intern out at a place of business within the area of study during the second semester of their senior year. The intern student would be getting paid job experience while earning high school credits. This offer is for seniors in Auto Collision Repair, Auto Technology, Computer Repair, Graphic Communications, Welding, and Office Technology II. ► ​Auto Technology I ​[3 units - meets 3 hours daily] ​— an elective course for juniors who have good mechanical aptitudes. This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals, theory, and manipulative skills required to become an automobile technician. A portion of the day is spent in the classroom with the remainder spent working on vehicles in the shop area. ► ​Auto Technology II ​[3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for seniors who have satisfactorily completed Auto Technology I. This is an advanced course continuing the study described in Auto Technology I. Prerequisite: Auto Technology I ► A​ uto Collision Repair I [​ 3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for junior students who have good mechanical aptitude. This course is designed to teach the student to remove minor dents, restore original contours, prepare panels for painting, and mix and spray paints. Some welding experience is taught as well as general safety practices and procedures. ► ​Auto Collision Repair II [​ 3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective for senior students who have satisfactorily completed Auto Collision Repair I. Students are taught the removal and replacement of major panels such as fenders, doors, and trunk lids. Advanced work in all phases of auto collision repair is taught. A well-qualified student should be able to be employed upon successful completion of this course. Prerequisite: Auto Collision Repair I ► G​ raphic Communications I [​ 3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for any junior who is interested in learning the skills for basic press operation and printing. Students will gain hands-on experience while learning photography, screen printing, and vinyl sign making. Students will also learn how to operate design programs such as Photoshop, Indesign, and Corel. Art skills are beneficial but not required to be in the Graphics program. ► G​ raphic Communications II [​ 3 units - meets 3 hours daily] — an elective for seniors who have satisfactorily completed Graphic Communications I. Concepts that were learned during Graphic Communication I are reinforced and expanded upon while students gain more hands-on experience in the areas of printing, photography, screen printing, and vinyl sign making.

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Additionally, the development of personal and social traits which are essential for success in the Graphics job market are employed. Prerequisite: Graphic Communications I ► ​Computer Repair I ​[3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for juniors who possess a good mechanical aptitude and sufficient basic math skills. Students will be introduced to the basics of electricity, electronics, and Cisco IT Essentials I: (PC Software and Hardware) and IT Essentials II: (Network Operating Systems) in preparation for the A+ certification exam. ► C​ omputer Repair II ​[3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for seniors who have satisfactorily completed Industrial Electronics I. The second year student will be introduced to the CISCO Networking Academy CCNA program. The Cisco CCNA Discovery curriculum provides foundational networking knowledge, practical experience, opportunities for career exploration, and soft-skills development to help students prepare for entry-level careers in IT and networking. The curriculum offers a hands-on approach to learning and uses interactive tools and easy-to-follow labs to help students learn the general theory needed to build networks. Prerequisite: Computer Repair I ► ​Health Occupations [​ 3 units per year - 1 year program] ​— an elective course designed for high school seniors only. Health Occupations provides insight into many job opportunities within the health field. Students have classroom instruction in many medical areas including Anatomy & Physiology, CPR certification, First Aid certification, and medical terminology. Clinical experiences are provided in areas such as lab technician, nurse assistant, medical records, pharmacy aide, physical therapist aide, radiology aide, dental aide, and veterinary assistant. Students are given the option to complete requirements to be certified as a nursing assistant, which requires 100 clinical hours in a long-term care facility and successfully passing a state instructed test. Independent study requests are reviewed individually and require an excellent overall record (GPA, attendance, attitude, and teacher recommendation). Unlike the trade/industry classes, these internships cover the entire school year. Additional expenses for this class may include uniform, watch, and any applicable license fees. ► ​Law Enforcement I [​ 3 units - meets 3 hours daily]—​ an elective course for junior students who have an interest in Law Enforcement. Students will study a broad range of criminal justice issues including understanding and interpreting the U.S. Constitution, law enforcement, and corrections and courts. Practical skills of law enforcement such as handcuffing, proper communication, and document preparation will also be taught. Students will experience lectures from active police officers, coroners, law enforcement administration officials, attorneys, and correction officers. Students will become proficient in the skills necessary for entry-level employment in law enforcement and criminal justice. ► L​ aw Enforcement II ​[3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ An elective course for seniors who have satisfactorily completed Law Enforcement I. This is an advanced course continuing the study described in Law Enforcement I. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement I ► W​ elding Technology I​ [3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for juniors and seniors interested in welding related careers. Will cover safety, oxyfuel set up, oxyfuel cutting and welding in all positions, Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) in flat and horizontal position, Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) in flat and horizontal position, Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW) in flat and horizontal position and Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC) in all position. ► ​Welding Technology ​II [3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for seniors interested in welding related careers. Will cover safety, SMAW, GMAW, in vertical and overhead positions, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in flat and horizontal position, Track torch beveling, Carbon Arc Gouging, Groove Welds, and students will pass a series of AWS certified welding tests. Prerequisite: Welding I ► ​Marketing Cooperative [​ 3 units - meets 3 hours daily] —​ an elective course for seniors, cooperative education is a job internship that allows a student to put into practice the principles and competencies learned in the classroom and/or related to the career goal. The student’s on-the-job progress is supervised by the employer and the coordinator/facilitator (school supervisor). The student will have the privilege and responsibility to leave the school campus to commute to a training site. The student should remember that you represent yourself, the school and the Marketing Department. ► S​ ports and Entertainment Marketing [​ ½ unit - semester] —​ an elective course for juniors and seniors, an instructional program that focuses on marketing and management functions and tasks that can be applied in amateur or professional sports or sporting events, entertainment or entertainment events, selling or renting of supplies and equipment (other than vehicles) used for recreational or sporting purposes, products and services related to hobbies or cultural events, or businesses primarily engaged in satisfying the desire to make productive or enjoyable use of leisure time. Adjacent Semester: Travel and Tourism

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► T​ ravel and Tourism ​[½ unit - semester] ​— an elective course for juniors and seniors, a program that prepares individuals to manage travel related enterprises and related convention and/or tour services. Includes instruction in travel agency management tour arranging and planning, convention and event planning, travel industry operations and procedures, tourism marketing and promotion strategies, travel counseling, travel industry law, international and domestic operations, and travel and tourism policy. Adjacent Semester: Sports and Entertainment Marketing

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