Carmel Prospectus 2016-17

 

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Carmel Prospectus 2016-17

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CARMEL COLLEGE PROSPECTUS CONTENTS Mission Statement Aims and Objectives Statement of Partnership Uniform List Learning and Teaching Extra-curricular Activities Pastoral Care and Guidance Academic Achievements of Students in 2016 Admission Policy Further Information Page 4 5 6 7 8 12 16 17 22 26 3

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MISSION STATEMENT We shall endeavour to be a community which witnesses to the Gospel and the values contained therein. 'I came that you may have life in abundance.' John Ch10 v10 We shall endeavour to be a worshipping community and celebrate this in daily prayer and liturgy. Our community must be characterised by supportiveness, a welcoming approach and a caring ethos with justice given to all within it. We shall strive to provide opportunities and an environment in which all students develop according to their full potential. We must seek to ensure that all members of our community experience and find hope, joy and fulfilment and a sense of their own worth and that of others, by participating as fully as possible in College life. We shall strive to maintain fruitful links with parents, parishes, primary feeder schools and the local community, in recognition that the College is dependent on the interaction and support of many agencies, to achieve the aims embodied in this Mission Statement. We shall regularly evaluate our organisational and management structures, to ensure that they reflect the spirit of this Mission Statement, especially through the effectiveness of the College's communication systems. 'Where there is no vision, the people perish.' Proverbs Ch 29 v 18 4

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Carmel College has a strong reputation for excellence and providing a wide variety of opportunities within and beyond the classroom. We do this to develop the skills and experiences necessary for our students to become positive contributors to an all-round, outstanding community. Our strong performance academically and our positive reputation regionally are something that we are not complacent about but work hard to maintain. We seek to bring out the best in all our students Mike Shorten Principal Carmel College AIMS The aims of Carmel College are set out in the Mission Statement. They are intended to generate the distinctive Catholic ethos of a caring community, guided by Gospel values, to enable personal fulfilment and the development of those attributes, which help people to value and celebrate each other's uniqueness. Objectives To achieve these aims, all members of the College community have opportunities:  to receive the message of the Gospels, which instil a knowledge and understanding of the teachings of the Catholic church and encourage an appreciation of other religions and different ways of life;  to celebrate their own achievements and aspirations, as well as those of others;  for support and a level of care which is appropriate to their needs, through personal guidance, counselling and consultation;  to acquire knowledge and skills which improve their intellectual, social, physical, creative, aesthetic, cultural, moral and spiritual capabilities;  to make a full contribution to the community, which helps them to understand its interdependent nature;  which ensure continuity and coherence through all stages of their education and encourage a partnership among students, parents, teachers, parishes, employers and the wider community;  to have access to a forum in which they can express their views and ideas, relating to the organisation and long term planning of the College. 5

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STATEMENT OF PARTNERSHIP The Statement of Partnership forms an integral part of the contract between the College and parents/carers and is signed by all parties when a student begins College. The Statement of Partnership is as follows:Between the Governors and Staff of Carmel College and the Parent(s)/Carer(s) of ………………..………………. Carmel College offers your child an education based on the Catholic ethos of our College Mission Statement. We endeavour to provide an excellent standard of education with a positive learning environment, in a safe, caring and nurturing context. We have high expectations of every student in terms of their academic achievement, their behaviour in and out of College, their participation in extra-curricular activities and their respect for staff and other students. In partnership with the College, we ask that parents/carers support their child by attending Academic Mentoring Days each year, by providing an area for study in the home, by avoiding absences from College, by signing the homework diary weekly and by communicating with the College over any issue which may affect their child. In partnership we strive to fulfil the potential of every child. 6

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UNIFORM LIST Boys’ uniform: Blazer Trousers Shirt Tie Jumper Socks Shoes Navy with College badge Dark grey (not black) Plain light blue Blue striped with house colour Long sleeved, navy blue ‘V’ neck only Grey or black, not white All black with no other colours, markings or branding. Boys’ PE and Games Kit Reversible royal blue/white rugby shirt White indoor sports top Blue shorts Royal blue football socks with white trim Football boots No cycling shorts College tracksuit (optional) Girls’ uniform: Blazer Navy with College badge Skirt Dark grey pleated (all round) All skirts should be of the appropriate length i.e. no shorter than just above the knee. Trousers Grey Shirt/blouse Plain light blue, not fitted and with top fastening button. Tie Jumper Blue striped with house colour Long sleeved, navy blue ‘V’ neck only Tights Navy/black (winter) Shoes Black - not trainers, boots, stilettos, kitten heels or backless. Boots may be worn in bad weather in the winter months and only at the discretion of the Principal. Girls’ PE and Games Kit White polo top Royal blue skort Royal blue games shorts (no cycling shorts) Royal blue football socks with white trim Football boots College tracksuit (optional) All items of uniform should be purchased directly from Elizabeth’s Embroidery at www.elizabethsembroidery.com password:carmel Tel: 01642 674973 Art, Design and Technology - students must wear suitable protective clothing at all times. For Art and Ceramics an old shirt is most suitable. For Food Technology aprons must be provided. Students cannot be permitted to participate in practical work unless correctly attired. Mobile Phones, IPods and other expensive items - the College cannot accept responsibility for mobile phones or IPods. Students must also accept that these items should not be used during the College day. 7

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LEARNING AND TEACHING Curriculum Structure and Organisation: The curriculum in College is the sum of all the students’ experience. This encompasses all of the activities which take place in College, including the formal programme of educational provision, the informal programme of extra-curricular activities and those aspects of organisation and interpersonal relationships, which contribute to the development of the College ethos. The formal aspects are delivered to the students via the College timetable. Timetable Design: There are 25 periods per week curriculum time in addition to one PSHEE and five 20-minute tutorials. Key Stage 3 Year RE En Ma Sc MFL MFL2 Gg Hi Te PE Ar Mu Co 7 24 3 3 2 0 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 8 23 3 3 2 2 1.5 1.5 2 2 1 1 1 9 23 3 3 2 2 1.5 1.5 2 2 1 1 1 On entry to Carmel, each student is assigned to a form tutor. Using information from our students’ primary schools, every effort is made to ensure that, as far as possible, the form groups are of similar, mixed ability. In Year 7, students are taught all subjects in mixed ability classes throughout the year, with the exception of mathematics, where half the year’s students are timetabled together to enable setting. Years 8 and 9 Mathematics, science and French are set according to ability and achievement across four forms. All other subjects are delivered to mixed ability classes. All Year 8 students who have displayed an aptitude for foreign languages in Year 7 are given the opportunity to study a second foreign language. Parents of students chosen to follow this route will be consulted. Students who do not start a second foreign language follow an extra course in literacy skills. At the end of Year 8, students choose two technology subjects from electronics, food technology, graphics, resistant materials and textiles. Mathematics, science, English, Spanish and RE are taught across four forms to enable setting according to ability. Technology, computing, PE, art, music, history and geography are taught to smaller classes. All subjects are moving towards completing KS3 in two years, enabling students to begin the GCSE course at the beginning of Year 9. This will allow students to make a more informed option choice, having already begun the GCSE course. Also this allows more time for the delivery of the KS4 syllabus. Throughout KS3, ICT is cross-curricular and, in addition, Years 7 to 9 have one hour of computing in curriculum time. Key Stage 4 Hours per subject: Year RE En Ma Sc PE Options 10 2.5 4 4 5.5 1 8 11 2.5 4 4 5.5 1 8 8

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All students follow GCSE programmes in RE, mathematics, English, science, a modern foreign language, a humanity subject (history or geography) and a choice from the option subjects including art, business, child development, French, Spanish, geography, history, music, PE, separate science and technology (electronics, resistant materials, graphics, food technology, textiles). Geography, history and modern foreign languages appear in the option blocks to allow students the opportunity to study more than one humanity or language. We offer a number of vocational opportunities including BTECs in creative media, music and sport, leading to qualifications that are equivalent to GCSE passes and a computing course leading to the equivalent of GCSE. Mathematics, English, science and RE groups are set according to ability. Efforts are made to provide groupings within options, on the basis of ability. ICT and Computing KS4 We believe that all students should have the opportunity to develop their understanding of the way that computers work and affect society. They should also be able to develop their ICT skills and capabilities so that they will be able to use computers effectively in their other studies and the workplace. In KS4 we offer a range of qualifications focusing on the knowledge, skills and understanding that will allow our students to progress into whichever aspect of Computer Science or ICT they choose in their future studies. There are cross-curricular opportunities, regardless of the subject area that is opted for and also extra-curricular opportunities within the department. There is the chance to use ICT facilities in the learning resource centre, both before and after school. Science KS4 Following the recent curriculum reforms, Year 10 students will now follow one of the following pathways in science: Triple Science, in which science must be taken as one of their options in addition to the “core”, leading to the award of separate GCSEs in biology, chemistry and physics. Combined Science, which is a new, two-year course, leading to the award of two GCSEs. Some students may also follow Entry Level Science (or equivalent) in parallel with the Combined Science qualification. Post-16 Carmel offers a wide variety of courses from the traditional to the modern, including A-levels and a number of vocational subjects. Many of our high performing students are also entered for A-Level General Studies. Sixth Form students are able to spend their private study time in the excellent facilities of our Library and Learning Resource Centre. In addition to unlocking the academic potential of all our students, we also aim to develop the whole person, by focusing on the talents of individuals and providing numerous experiences outside the classroom. Multiple copies of prospectuses are made available for students considering entrance to university and each year the vast majority of our students go on to study at a higher education establishment of their choice, with many at the country’s most prestigious institutions. 9

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Learning Environments The attitudes and values of a College and its communication are sometimes described as the “hidden curriculum”. The demonstration of mutual respect, caring for each other, compassion, sensitivity and firm guidance are much more likely to create the conditions in which students experience the hope, joy and fulfilment and a sense of their own worth, aimed at in our Mission Statement. Conversely, negative attitudes by adults towards students have a depressive effect on development. The physical environments where children learn are also important. The general appearance of classrooms, laboratories, workshops, playing fields and sports areas are important parts of a pupil’s experience. If there is little attention paid to aesthetic awareness, the environment itself can become a negative part of the students’ curriculum and have a consequent effect on learning. Following our extensive building and renovation programme, all students at Carmel can now enjoy modern, state-of-the-art learning facilities. Teachers’ Style and Attitude The attitude and approach of the teacher will promote a positive and well-ordered environment, where expectations are high and where there is a climate in which students can arrive at an appreciation of notions of justice and fairness, by seeing them in the adults with whom they work. Of central importance is the teacher’s respect for the students and the creation of a classroom environment with good relationships and collaborative learning situations. Positive attitudes promote success which, in turn, lead to further success. Conversely, the highlighting of failure, both at individual and group level, is a destroyer of confidence, motivation and good relationships. Special Educational Needs (SEN) We are a fully inclusive College. We aim to create a mutually supportive environment in which all students can develop their full potential, without fear of failure. All students who have additional learning needs, including those who have an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHC), are a valued and integrated part of our community. Staff continuously seek opportunities to allow all students with additional learning needs to experience success, attempting to facilitate access to a broad and balanced curriculum, through informed and sensitive support programmes. Equal emphasis on inclusion is given in the College’s extracurricular activities. Liaison with feeder schools assists the forward planning of staff training, in order to proactively support students with learning difficulties / disabilities. Students who have an EHC are given priority when learning support staff are timetabled for provision of inclass support. Their progress is closely monitored by the College’s coordinator for SEN, assisted by eight learning support staff, the Emmaus Centre Co-ordinator and Pastoral Learning Managers. All students with SEN have a learner profile which is regularly reviewed. The progress of students who possess an EHC is reviewed annually with parents / carers in College; more often if this is deemed to be appropriate. Students have transitional reviews from the end of Year 9. We endeavour to support all our students according to their needs, always mindful of the need for increased independence. We aim to constantly improve the quality of our provision through regular monitoring, training and use of evaluative feedback. Support is as flexible to need as is possible. Further information is contained within the College’s SEN policy and SEN information leaflet, available in College or on our website. Students with Disabilities Students with disabilities will be admitted to the College in accordance with the College’s admission policy. We are committed to ensuring equality of education and opportunity for disabled students and all those receiving services from the College. We aim to develop a culture of inclusion and diversity, in which people feel free to disclose their disability and to participate fully in College life. 10

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The achievement of disabled students is monitored and we will continue to use this data to further raise standards and ensure inclusive teaching. We will continue to make reasonable adjustments to ensure that the College environment is as accessible as possible. Whenever a change is proposed to the College’s environment, facilities or services, we will undertake a Disability Impact Assessment to identify if it can be done in such a way that it will have a positive impact on disabled people; to eliminate or reduce any negative impact on disabled people as a result of the change and to promote areas of existing good practice in disability equality. Our Accessibility Plan is available as part of our SEN policy. At Carmel, we believe that diversity is a strength, which should be respected and celebrated by all those who learn, teach and visit here. Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance (CEIAG) The programme for CEIAG is led by the Vice-Principal for Pastoral Care and is coordinated by the Pastoral Learning Managers for each year group. The formal careers’ programme forms part of the PSHEE curriculum, which is delivered by a team of academic mentors. Guidance on Further/Higher Education, apprenticeships and career choices forms an integral part of this programme. Representatives from outside agencies, universities and local companies are involved in both the planning and the delivery of CEIAG sessions. The College employs a part-time Careers Coordinator who offers guidance, action planning and careers interviews. Students also have access to online careers resource u-explore which can be accessed both at College and at home. At key points in the academic year, a number of information sessions for parents and students are arranged to keep everyone informed of the opportunities available to students when making choices which will affect their next steps. A Careers’ Section for use by students is located within the Library and Learning Resource Centre. Students can access careers’ resources via the National Careers’ website (https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/) and a software package used in College called U-Explore. Citizenship Citizenship is an integral part of the National Curriculum and is delivered throughout Key Stages 3, 4 and 5. The aim of citizenship is to encourage students to acquire knowledge and skills to become informed, active and responsible members of the College and local community. Students are given opportunities to address real life issues and are shown that they can make a difference. The emphasis of citizenship and associated programmes such as PSHE and Global Learning is to involve all students and encourage participation, by developing communication and decision-making skills. Citizenship is delivered both within subjects and as part of our PSHEE programme. Sporting Provision All students at Carmel participate in PE lessons which are 2 x 60 minute sessions for Years 7-9; Years 10 and 11 have 1 x 60 minute session. PE is a compulsory core National Curriculum subject for all students. In KS3, the activities include hockey, netball, football, rugby, basketball, gymnastics, tennis, badminton, athletics, cricket, rounders, health related fitness and orienteering. In KS4, more emphasis is put on badminton, hockey, football, cricket, athletics and trampolining. GCSE PE is offered at KS4 and AS/A2 Sports Studies at post-16. For students who prefer a vocational course, BTEC Sport is offered at KS4 and at post-16. 11

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EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES Music Department The Music Department at Carmel is a vibrant department, providing active opportunities for students of all musical abilities. Our department provides a thriving extra-curricular programme on a daily basis and we offer a high quality musical experience in the following ensembles:  Orchestra  Senior Choir  Junior Choir  Liturgy Group  Big Band  Show Band The high level of student participation creates vibrant and inclusive opportunities to perform. Our singers and instrumentalists perform at venues such as The Sage, Gateshead and events in the local and wider community, as well as contributing to College community events, including the summer production, Christmas liturgy and concert, St Cecilia’s Concert and End of Year Mass. Carmel music department has recently moved into brand new accommodation. This includes two large teaching rooms, a recording studio and music technology suite and practice rooms equipped with drum kits, guitars and bass guitars, keyboards, microphones and amps. We remain committed to providing high-quality musical opportunities and experiences for all our students. PE Department An extensive extra-curriculum is offered to students in many sports and activities including athletics, badminton, basketball, cricket, cross-country, fitness, football, gymnastics, hockey, netball, rounders, rugby, skiing and swimming. Carmel are the Darlington and Catholic Partnership champions in athletics, cross country and swimming, as well as football, hockey, netball and rugby Town League and Cup winners in many age groups. The College competes in various sports at district, county, national and international level. These successes are celebrated annually at the Sports’ Presentation Evening, with an elite sports’ performer presenting the awards. There are inter-house matches throughout the year in most of these activities. Visits are arranged to international netball, rugby, football and athletics meetings. There is a popular ski club and each year a skiing trip abroad is organised, which is very well supported. Teams enter local, area, regional, county and national competitions and many students are selected for their area and county teams, particularly in hockey, netball, athletics, football and rugby. All activities offered in College are organised by suitably qualified staff. Sports’ Leaders, GCSE/BTEC and A’ Level students are encouraged to assist the Department. The PE Department aims to promote sports for all students, whilst also pursuing the path of excellence in all activities. 12

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Modern Foreign Languages The modern language department offers French and Spanish throughout Key Stages 3, 4 and 5. Students are also offered Mandarin taster sessions and voluntary after-school lessons. The ethos of the department is to encourage and combine an enjoyment of learning, an interest in the wider world and an enthusiasm for communicating in a foreign language. We seek to make our students aware that languages lead to excellent opportunities in the world of work, better international and global understanding, greater leisure opportunities and cultural awareness and appreciation. Our students have a variety of opportunities to practise their languages abroad and form links with partners in foreign schools. A gentle introduction to life abroad is offered in KS3. Year 7 students have the chance to spend a week at Le Château d’Ebblinghem in northern France, Year 8 students have the opportunity to spend a week in a residential centre in Ibi near Alicante in Spain and Year 9 students are encouraged to participate in a Spanish exchange with our partner school “Nuestra Señora De Los Desamparados”, also in Ibi. We have recently established a new link with a secondary school in Valencia, which will offer students the opportunity to communicate regularly with partners and take part in Year 9 in an exchange programme. Library and Learning Resource Centre Carmel Library and Learning Resource Centre is an integral part of curriculum support, providing information and resources for staff and students. The LRC is open from 8.00am until 5.00pm (4.00pm Friday) and provides computer/internet access, printing, scanning and photocopying facilities, together with Library resources for use throughout the College day. There is a wide range of books and curriculum based websites to support students with Key Stage studies, as well as a selection of fiction titles to inspire readers’ imaginations! iPads are available for students to access e-books and educational apps. The College Library catalogue can be accessed via the Carmel website or by downloading the free iMLS app onto tablets or other devices. Homework Club is held from Monday to Thursday, after College, to enable students to access information and use resources, with support from library staff. Sixth Form students can access the LRC in their directed study periods, where there is a dedicated area for quiet study, together with a further study room for group work. A careers’ library is available with a comprehensive range of university prospectuses, current publications and Higher Education Resources. There is an extensive collection of resources to support trainee teachers to become outstanding professional practitioners, developing their understanding of educational theory and subject pedagogy. Academic writing is an integral part of the PGCE and, as such, the Learning Resource Centre is equipped with the relevant reading materials. Extended family members of Carmel students are able to access the ‘Primary Library’ during Homework Club hours (term-time only). This collection contains books and resources for preschool and primary children. 13

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Art Department KS3 students have the opportunity to use the art rooms most lunchtimes to use materials and ICT provision. Lunchtime clubs in photography and textiles are available for KS3 students and these are facilitated by Sixth Form students and supervised by teachers. In Year 7 we have a lunchtime club for SEN students and in Year 9 students have the opportunity to complete banners for the End of Year Mass. All GCSE students can join an after school extension and support class every Wednesday evening, to improve their coursework. In year 8 there is a visit to the Captain Cook Museum and MIMA in Middlesbrough and in year 10 a photography field trip to Redcar. Sixth Form students are encouraged and directed towards visiting galleries related to their individual studies and we take Year 11 and 12 on a study visit to Paris or London and to degree shows at Northumbria University. English Department KS3 students are encouraged to join the Creative Writing and Drama Clubs which run during lunchtimes. Working closely with the Catholic Partnership, students can take part in activities including the Spelling Bee and Shakespeare Smash. All KS4 students have the opportunity to become involved in extra-curricular Drama activities by attending workshops after school. Other activities include theatre visits, public speaking and poetry competitions. In the autumn term, we organise trips to Newcastle Theatre Royal for the Royal Shakespeare Company season and A-level Media students attend the Catholic Partnership Media Oscars’ Evening at Hardwick Hall. A Level English Language students attend carefully selected study days which prepare them for examinations (Sheffield Hallam in Year 12 and Newcastle University in Year 13). A Level English Literature students also attend university day schools (Sheffield Hallam and Sunderland University in Year 12) which enable them to experience university life, taking advantage of the expert knowledge top academics who are specialists in their field have. The English Department takes every opportunity to study the programmes of the local theatres for relevant productions; regular theatre trips are planned throughout the year to enhance the study of the set texts. There are also productions every year involving the whole College. Technology Students are encouraged to extend their skills in electronics, textiles, resistant materials, graphics and food technology, both at lunchtime and at the end of the College day. We are extending our students’ skills in textiles by offering a course in pattern cutting after College. This will develop skills in garment manufacture and will help to prepare students for relevant courses in Further Education. 14

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Mathematics Students in the maths department take part in the UKMT Maths Challenges in Years 8, 10 and 12, as well as taking part in the junior and senior team challenges. Year 7 take part in an inter-form maths activity and have the opportunity to attend a Games Club at lunchtime. Students from the Year 6 feeder primary schools take part in a maths afternoon. Years 4 and 5 are invited in to take part in maths trails and bridge-building workshops. Year 11 and 12 students attend Maths Inspiration talks to broaden their mathematical knowledge. Other Activities A number of other activities are organised including:  Skiing holidays  The chance to take part in the HCPT Pilgrimage to Lourdes, to assist with physically, mentally, socially and emotionally challenged children  Religious retreats  University visits  Theatre trips  Fieldwork trips  Museum visits  Student conferences and competitions “Carmel students leave College with much more than just outstanding exam results.” 15

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