The Loom Fall 2016

 

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The Loom Fall 2016

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LoomT · H · E The Lilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute Creative Arts Journal by patients, families, caregivers, and staff. FALL 2016

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Halli Rosin . . . . . . . Front cover-2 Ariane Medero . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Halli Rosin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mary J. Gebre Yohannes . . . . . .7-8 Akiyah Brothers-Mohammed . . 9-10 Debbie Levenstein . . . . . . . . 11-12 Kyla Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Kenny and Sidd Foster . . . . . . . 1.4 Terri Hertz-Rosin . . . . . . . . . . 15 Halli Rosin . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Samavia Hussain . . . . . . . . . . 17 Rumasa Hussain . . . . . . . . . . 18 Minerva “Minnie” Santivanez . 19-20 Sarah Yazdian Rubin . . . . . . . . 21 Todd Rubin . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Steve Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Sarah Yazdian Rubin . . . . . . . 24 Ariane Medero . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Debbie Levenstein . . . . . . . . . 26 Carmen M. Dominguez Arias . . . 26 Chelsea Gooding-Desilva . . . . . 27 Charlie Kry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Rusama Hussain . . . . . . . . 29-30 Charlie Kry . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-32 Iris Vega . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Susie Cushner . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chloe Watson . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Mary J. Gebre Yohannes . . . . 35-36 Janiah Gutierrez . . . . . . . . 37-38 Terry Ebron . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Hannah Serrano . . . . . . . . . . 40 Debbie Levenstein . . . . . . . 41-42 Terri Hertz-Rosin . . . . . . . . 41-42 Halli Rosin . . . . . . . . . . . . 41-42 Eric Rosin . . . . . . . . . . . . 41-42 Halli Rosin . . . . . . . . . . . 43-44 Dominick Jimenez . . . . . . . . . 45 JD Elder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Angel Lebron . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Hailey Serrano . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Charlie Kry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 JD Elder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Markus Alvarado . . . . . . . . . . 50 Samavia Hussain . . . . . . . . . . 50 Jackie Mohan . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Anonymous . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Anonymous . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 JD Elder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Terri Hertz-Rosin . . . . . . . . . . 54 Susie Cushner . . . . . . . . . 55-56 Kyla Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Debbie Levenstein . . . . Back cover 1

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LoomT · H · E S TA F F Sarah Yazdian Rubin, LCAT, ATR-BC, CCLS Editor in Chief Diane Rode, LCAT, ATR-BC, CCLS Executive Editor Halli Rosin Guest Family Editor, Design and Production Maureen Leahy, RN, BSN, MHA, CHPN Contributing Editor Rabbi Edith Meyerson, DMin, BCC Contributing Editor R. Sean Morrison, MD Director, Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute 2

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Ariane Medero 3

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Introduction John Gardner wrote “Life is the art of drawing without an eraser.” I would add that death and grief is as well. Giving expression to our lives has always been through the marriage of our creativity and our cognition. As a young nurse, I had the opportunity to work at a camp for children who had experienced loss. I remember vividly one of the bereavement counselors speaking to a small boy about the death of his mommy. The little one was silent as he was asked how he felt, what he was thinking, what he needed. I watched the therapist gently put a crayon in his hand, and open a large blank paper in front of him. This small boy began to draw a picture of a house and a yard. The house was colored black with tiny windows, and the yard was filled with barren trees, and brown grass. It was at that moment that I truly understood the absolute power of art as a tool for communication in grief and loss and life and death. It informed my life as a nurse, and set a stage for me to grow in my compassion and understanding of the intimacy and poignancy of creativity. Out of the wellspring of our hearts we speak in ways that only sometimes use words… The World Health Organization has defined Palliative Care as an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Defined and wordy, we can miss the true meaning of what a palliative approach to care might look like. It is finally and spectacularly opening the door to patient directed care instead of disease directed care. And the unit of care is the patient and the family whatever the patient defines their family to be. As we explore the dimensions of what makes us complete, we recognize quickly that we are more than just the physical. We are social, and emotional, spiritual, intellectual… and to only look at the physical is to short change people. Art and its various forms are tools that allow us to reframe our experiences. It is a blessing. You will see among these pages some of the most poignant and meaningful examples of people. You will see grief, and loss, and death certainly. But above all that you will see life. You will see birth. You will see hope. Maureen Leahy Maureen Leahy, Associate Director of Nursing, Palliative Care 4

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Halli Rosin 5

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Letter from Guest Family Editor “The world is better because, for a brief space, they lived in it.” No other quote could describe my brother, Matthew Rosin, more accurately. Matthew was 19 when he passed away at Mount Sinai Hospital after a traumatic brain injury caused by a reckless bicycle rider. In those 5 painful months, my family and I were at his bedside every day hoping he would become conscious once again, but sadly, that never happened. I spent 3 weeks in the palliative care unit sleeping on fold-up chairs with my mom next to my brother. Using art therapy, I was able to work through a lot of my emotions and release some of what I was feeling. Creating dream catchers specifically had an impact. Creating them at his bedside allowed me to bond with him, and I would imagine that they were catching all of his bad dreams while he was “sleeping.” I feel that a piece of him is in each of those dream catchers. My time on the palliative care unit has changed my life in more ways than one. I was able to capture some of the darkest days of my life in tangible pieces and I was also able to witness the work of some of the most gentle and caring hospital staff. They managed to retain my brother’s humanity while caring for him and made us as comfortable as possible in the worst situation. Art is powerful—it can speak to people without words, and leave the observer feeling some of the artist’s feelings. In this publication, you will feel sadness, grief, and exhaustion felt by its contributors. But you will also be overwhelmed by the love, passion, and most importantly, life that fills these pages. Whether our loved ones are cured, healed, ill or gone, their lives are celebrated and preserved in these works of art. And perhaps, by getting a taste of each experience, we can understand why the world is a better place because they lived in it. H a lli R os in Halli Rosin, Guest Family Editor 6

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Mary J. Gebre Yohannes 7

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Akiyah Brothers-Mohammed 9

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Akiyah Brothers-Mohammed 10

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Debbie Levenstein 11

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Debbie Levenstein 12

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Kyla Foster 13

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Joy and Pain April 10, 2016 Thank You.. ..For allowing me to see you at birth and at death ..For nearly three decades of life, love, and laughter that will last ..For a Baby Girl that became a Woman beyond your years ..For being someone for whom I shed my tears ..For choosing me to be your Dad, for such a love that hurts, makes me sad and glad ..For letting me give you food and water, for allowing me to do what I ought to ..For a look, a smile, a frown, for a spirit that never stayed down ...For so many memories and lessons, each of them blessings ----- Dad   Kenny and Sidd Foster 14

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