2015/16 ABM Annual Report

 

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2015/16 ABM Annual Report

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ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

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Our Profile ABM is the national mission agency of the Anglican Church of Australia working with overseas and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. We have a holistic view of God’s mission. We work with Anglican Church partners and others to see lives empowered and transformed spiritually, materially and socially. We help the Anglican Church and the wider community realise and respond to the invitation for all to be a part of God’s hope for the world. Our Purpose ABM believes in a world where all people enjoy God’s promise of love, hope and justice. We work to see this belief become a reality. Church in Myanmar. © Lina Magallanes/ABM, 2016.

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Our Vision ABM wants to see people everywhere experience the wholeness of life God offers in Jesus Christ, and supports our Partners as they participate in God’s mission. Five Marks of Mission ABM grounds all of its work in one or more of these Marks of Mission: • Witness to Christ’s saving, forgiving and reconciling love for all people • Build welcoming, transforming communities of faith • Stand in solidarity with the poor and needy • C hallenge violence, injustice and oppression, and work for peace and reconciliation • Protect, care for and renew life on our planet Front cover: Literacy Student in Vanuatu. © Kate Winney/ABM, 2016.

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Table of Contents Programs Director’s Message................ 7 Achievements of Anglicans in Development (AID) Program.............. 8 Reconciliation, Advocacy and Education Missioner's Report................ 10 Programs and Projects 2015/16............. 12 Report on ABM’s AID Program.............. 15 Marketing and Fundraising Report......... 29 ABM’s Partner Countries........................ 30 Church to Church Officer's Report......... 32 Financial Reports................................... 33 Consolidated Income Statement and Other Comprehensive Income........ 34 Consolidated Balance Sheet.................. 35 Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity.............................. 36 Consolidated Cash Movements for Designated Purposes........................ 37 Independent Auditor’s Report................ 38 Directors’ Declaration............................. 40 Plain Language Summary...................... 41 Board of Directors.................................. 42 Man in crops in Kenya. © Julianne Stewart/ABM, 2015. 4   I  ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16

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Foreword by the Executive Director It is with great pleasure that I present the Annual Report of the Anglican Board of Mission – Australia Ltd, for the Financial Year 2015/16. This past year has been marked by consolidation of our overseas programs and a further reshaping of our domestic programs and engagement with the Anglican Church here in Australia. Increasingly the missional perspective of the Church in Australia is shifting from one that sees mission as essentially happening in other places to one which recognises the local context for mission. ABM has sought to address this new reality through its four distinctive programs which give expression to the ‘Five Marks of Mission’ and in seeking to build creative partnerships with Dioceses of the Australian Church. It is, therefore, gratifying to be able to report that this past year has been once again marked by strong performance across all four of these programs. Despite the decline in funding for overseas aid by the Australian Government, ABM’s Anglicans in Development’s (AID) programs have continued to deliver impressive and sustainable outcomes in poverty alleviating programs across a range of partners. In particular I note the increasing commitment to Adult Literacy in PNG, as well as to the Positive Parenting Program in the Solomon Islands and to the Child Health Nutrition Program in Gaza. It has also been extremely pleasing to see new or expanding initiatives around addressing gender based violence and preparing communities to respond to disasters. 2015-16 did not see any diminution in the need for emergency relief assistance and ABM has continued to seek support for communities in Vanuatu, Nepal, PNG and Myanmar which have been severely affected by natural disasters. Once again, it has been extremely pleasing to see that this has been well supported by the Australian Church. AID continues to work on improving the effectiveness of the work across all its programs and on improving the benefits of collaboration, particularly through its engagement with the Communion wide Anglican Alliance and the (Australian) Churches Agencies Network. ABM’s Church to Church program has also enhanced its support for the work of partners in the Pacific, South East Asia and Africa. Included in the activities are a number which focus on the nurture and spiritual development of children and leadership training for both clergy and lay. These types of programs are often very difficult for ABM’s Partners to fund but vitally necessary for growing churches. The Good Friday Gift remains well supported and health related activities have been a significant focus of the recent grants from this annual collection. The Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) to which ABM has committed itself continues to inform and guide much of the work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This includes support for specific activities focused on the training of indigenous leaders and assisting the work of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Anglican Council. There is also encouragement and mentoring provided for dioceses and parishes as they seek to implement their own RAPs. ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16  I  5

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In fulfilling its mandate to educate the Church about mission ABM increasingly seeks opportunities to connect the global with the local, so that learning may be shared. Around Australia, Anglican Schools provide education for approximately 150,000 young people. ABM’s OneWorld WonTok conference has developed into a national, touring conference giving the opportunity for students to discover the importance of sustainable development and hear firsthand from some of ABM’s Partners. Another ABM initiative has been the establishment of the Transforming Service network to connect Australian schools involved in cross-cultural service learning. Mention should also be made of the innovative mission resources produced by the Education Program for Lent and National Reconciliation Week. In the area of Fundraising & Communication 2015/16 has seen the continued enhancement of ABM’s website. This has dramatically improved the ability to interact with supporters, donors, the Australian Church and Anglican Church Partners overseas. While still maintaining its print communication, ABM has also managed successfully to increase its online footprint through social media, monthly e-newsletter, media presence (both in the Anglican and secular press) and fundraising appeals. ABM is also very conscious that its current work is built upon the work and support of many who have gone before us. Accordingly, it is appropriate that, as part of the improved website, there is recognition of those who have made bequests to ABM, thereby helping to ensure that ABM’s role in making known the good news of Jesus Christ continues. I also note that a further recognition of ABM’s past missionaries, volunteers and supporters, in the form of the Coaldrake Award, was also announced during the year. Finally, acknowledgement must be made of the efforts and commitment of the Board and Staff to ensure that ABM has the vision and adaptability to respond to new opportunities in a constantly changing environment. At the same time, I would like to thank our Auxiliary, our Committees and Diocesan Representatives, our other volunteers, and of course our Partners for all the hard work which delivers the results. Needless to say, none of this would be possible without the support of our dioceses, parishes and individual donors, to whom we also extend our grateful thanks. We ask for your continuing prayers for God’s blessing of our work. Yours in Christ The Revd John Deane Executive Director 6   I  ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16

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Programs Director's Message During 2015-16 ABM’s Anglicans in Development (AID) Unit continued to work with its Church partners and communities to deliver development outcomes in 10 countries around the world through 10 Anglican Church partnerships and one ecumenical partnership. This has been in an environment of reduced government funding, and increased costs of delivering effective development and emergency assistance. As well as supporting ongoing development work, ABM (AID) continued to support partner responses to and rehabilitation of affected communities after a number of emergencies: Tropical Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu, the El Nino in Papua New Guinea and the Nepal earthquake. We also provided funds to the Church in the Province of Myanmar to respond to widespread flooding in August 2015, and continued to support the Middle East Council of Churches through the ACT Alliance response to refugees affected by the ongoing conflict in Syria. During the year evaluations were carried out of the ACT Alliance responses in both Vanuatu and Nepal, as well as the Anglican Church response to the conflict in South Sudan. It is very important to evaluate emergency responses so that both implementing organisations and those who fund them can assess how effective the responses were, and can learn lessons for future responses. This seems to have been a busy year for evaluations in the development work too. In Papua New Guinea, we evaluated the impacts after 2-3 years of the Australian Governmentfunded PNG Sexual Health Improvement Program and found that the program had produced some good and ongoing results. Currently Anglicare PNG treat 50-60 people for sexual health problems each day, and have 2000 people on their books, half of whom receive treatment for HIV and AIDs. We also evaluated the Gender program of Anglicare and the Anglican Church of PNG, and the HIV program, both of which have been conducted via the Church Partnership Program which has been fully funded to date by the Australian government. However, ABM has now begun to seek funding from our supporters for the important work of the church in Papua New Guinea, particularly in Adult Literacy and now, a new direction, Disaster Risk Reduction and training of churches and communities in disaster preparedness. Thanks to ABM’s generous supporters we have been able to increase our support of the Child Nutrition Program in Gaza operated from the Anglican Diocese of Jerusalem’s Ahli Arab Hospital and aimed at improving health outcomes for the many children who are born underweight. We have also been able to maintain support of the Positive Parenting Program in the Solomon Islands which addresses good practices in caring for children, and also looks at issues of family violence in an atmosphere of peer support. During 2015-16 our Zambian partner, Zambia Anglican Council Outreach Program, began a pilot of a second phase of their Gender and Governance Program, as we go through an evaluation of the first phase. I hope you will take some time to read the following pages to see specific results of ABM (AID)’s work in supporting our partners and their communities during 2015-16. Julianne Stewart Programs Director ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16  I  7

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A selection of achievements by ABM’s Anglicans 3,450 people gained increased access to basic sanitation 1,686 people increased their access to financial services 11,982 people were provided with climate resilience training or awareness activities 136,754 people were provided with assistance in conflict and crisis situations following emergencies, mainly in Nepal, Myanmar, the Middle East, Vanuatu and West Africa. Built or upgraded at least 20 water points, providing 18,716 people with increased access to safe water Awareness raising and training on gender issues and women’s equal rights was provided to 1,540 people and 1,034 people were exposed to awareness campaigns on issues of violence against women. 8   I  ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16

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in Development Program 234 people were helped to obtain access to sustainable energy 3,073 poor farmers gained access to new agricultural technologies 89 partner staff were supported and attended training in management, leadership or strategic planning, whilst 141 staff were trained in cross-cutting issues such as protection, gender and disability 13,548 people were provided with increased access to basic health care 2,828 people were assisted to participate in education through quality alternative pathways, including adult and youth literacy, life skills and vocational training ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16  I  9

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Reconciliation, Advocacy and Education Missioner’s Report "Mission goes out from God. Mission is God's way of loving and saving the world..." (Lambeth Conference 1998) Reconciliation ABM recognises the prior ownership and habitation of the lands and waters we now regard as Australia by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have suffered gross injustices over the last 200 years, sometimes committed by the Anglican Church. We accept what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people tell us; that our national policies towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have created severe suffering that persists today. Increasingly we recognise that partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people requires attentive listening to the voices of First Australians and a willingness to prayerfully discover the mission of the Triune God within the dynamic of reconciliation. ABM is committed to serving and supporting the work of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Anglican Council (NATSIAC) and continues to raise project funds to provide secretariat support to the NATSIAC Chairperson. During the year we formally adopted the charter of the RECOGNISE campaign and encouraged churches to support constitutional change to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia’s constitution. Our work is guided by a Reconciliation Action Plan which makes clear that Reconciliation means much more than just raising funds for projects. Nevertheless, project funding provides an important avenue to assist vital and hopeful expressions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ministry within the Anglican Church, including: • Nungalinya College • Wontulp-Bi-Buya College • Gawura at St Andrew’s Cathedral School • Hope for Life (teenage pregnancy support pilot program) • The Bishop’s Award in the Diocese of the Northern Territory • Rev’d Gloria Shipp and NATSIAC; and • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Engagement Each year ABM produces resources for churches and schools to use during National Reconciliation Week. This year we were indebted to the Reverend Glenn Loughrey for his powerful reflections and paintings which remain available in the resources section of the ABM website. I particularly recognise the valuable contribution made by Reconciliation Coordinator, Malcolm MacCallum over the last 3 years. Mal left in early 2016 to take on new challenges and the role of Reconciliation Coordinator has been taken up by Celia Kemp. Advocacy Effective advocacy begins with deep listening. ABM’s policy concerns are informed by the voices of our partners, especially as they are expressed through the Anglican Alliance. Four 10   I  ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16

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areas are particularly important to ABM: Reconciliation, Climate Change and the Environment, Sustainable Development and Gender-based Violence. ABM is a member of the Campaign for Australian Aid and a supporting organisation of Micah Australia. Together with other non-government organisations, we are dismayed by the deep cuts to Australia’s overseas aid budget that have led to our lowest level of investment in overseas development assistance since records began in the 1970’s. ABM believes that Australia should aspire to a level of aid investment equivalent to 70 cents out of every $100 of Gross National Income. A target that has been reached by other countries such as the United Kingdom. In Feburary 2016, ABM worked together with the Anglican Alliance and the Anglican Church of Australia Public Affairs Commission to host the Ash Wednesday Climate Justice Forum. Presenters from South Africa, the Solomon Islands and the Torres Strait addressed delegates from all over the Australian church to raise awareness of the seriousness and impacts of global climate change. ABM will continue to play an organising role in helping the Australian church to consider and respond to issues which affect our partners. Education Participation in the mission of the Triune God is a response to an invitation to inhabit the world differently. We are people animated by God’s work of loving and saving the world. ABM undertakes education activities that open up engagement with the 5 Marks of Mission. We also undertake distinct Development Education activities which introduce the new Global Goals for Sustainable Development. Early in 2016 ABM helped to organise the national Life in Abundance: Mission and Evangelism Conference. Keynote addresses and selected workshops from the conference are available to view on ABM’s YouTube Channel, along with other videos from around Australia and the world. ABM also worked in coalition to develop the inaugural Transforming Service Conference which was held in April 2016. Transforming Service is a focal point for educators in church schools to promote discussion of service learning activities, including cross cultural immersion learning experiences. More information is available at www.transformingservice.com. The OneWorld WonTok Conference was again a high-point in our engagement with schools. 548 secondary students from 46 different schools attended the interactive one-day conference as it made its way around Australia in May. I pay particular tribute to Celia Kemp who wrote ABM’s excellent ‘Into the Desert’ Lenten study which is available as a free mobile app on any smartphone. The study has been downloaded thousands of times and attracted heartfelt appreciation from all over the world for its deep, punchy style and erudite use of poetry, literature and theology. All with a distinctly Australian flavour. ABM continues to recommend study of the new World Council of Churches statement on Mission and Evangelism: Together Towards Life. We also welcomed a major new report published by the Anglican Communion entitled Intentional Discipleship and Disciple-Making - An Anglican Guide for Christian Life and Formation. Brad Chapman Reconciliation, Advocacy and Education Missioner ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16  I  11

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Programs and Projects 2015/16 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Projects Bishop’s Award Program, Northern Territory Diocese Hope for Life (teenage pregnancy support pilot program) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Engagement Gawura at St Andrew’s Cathedral School, Sydney Ministry of Rev Gloria Shipp and NATSIAC, Bathurst Diocese Wontulp-Bi-Buya College, North Queensland Diocese Nungalinya College, Northern Territory Diocese Church to Church Programs Australia Encounter Program Cyprus and the Gulf Famagusta Student Chaplaincy Egypt EpiscoCare Health Program Making Disciples Ethiopia "Walking Together": Clergy Training and Area Assembly in Gambella and Vocations Conference Jerusalem Strengthening the Christian Presence in the Holy Land Kenya Catechesis of the Good Shepherd Children's Program Youth and Sunday School Empowerment into Worship Myanmar Producing Textbooks for Discipleship Training Courses Income Generation and Transportation for Bible School Organizational Development for Anglican Study and Reseach Centre Catechist Refresher Training Church Music School Papua New Guinea Revise ACPNG Eucharist Liturgy Provincial Mission and Ministry Program Philippines National Evangelism and Christian Education Program Zambia St John's Seminary - Theological Training and Support New New New New New New New New New New New New New 12   I  ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16

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Community Development and Humanitarian Programs Africa Humanitarian Assistance - Ebola Crisis (Liberia and Sierra Leone) Support for Regional Hubs (CAPA) Burundi Humanitarian Assistance - Burundi Conflict China Community-based HIV Prevention Healthcare Promotion Families with Children Ethiopia Community Library Project Global Anglican Alliance Secretariat Support Kenya Integrated Livelihood Improvement Myanmar (Burma) Economic Empowerment Education Food Security Humanitarian assistance - Myanmar flood Institutional Strengthening Water and Sanitation Nepal Humanitarian Response - Earthquake Northern Iraq Humanitarian Response - Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) Palestinian Al Ahli Arab Hospital Territories Humanitarian Response - Gaza Conflict Papua New ACPNG Capacity Building Guinea Literacy, School Education, HIV and Gender Program Philippines Community Capacity Building Disaster Risk Reduction Economic Empowerment Humanitarian Assistance - Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) St Paul’s School, Northern Luzon New New New New New ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16  I  13

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Programs and Projects 2015/16 (cont’d) Solomon Islands South Sudan Syria Thailand Vanuatu Zambia Disaster Risk Reduction Humanitarian Assistance - Guadalcanal Flash Flood Institutional Strengthening Positive Parenting Health Commission Support Humanitarian Assistance - Conflict Emergency Humanitarian Assistance - Ongoing Conflict Emergency Mai Tai Clinic Disaster Risk Reduction Humanitarian Response - Cyclone Pam Language, Literacy and Numeracy Water and Sanitation Program Gender and Governance Program Kids at opening of Adult Literacy in PNG © Meagan Schwarz/ABM, 2015. 14   I  ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16

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Report on ABM (AID) Programs during 2015–16 ABM (AID) is an arm of ABM that addresses poverty internationally. It supports whole communities, regardless of faith or religious affiliation. ABM (AID)’s community development programs are implemented through Anglican or Ecumenical partners in PNG, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Myanmar, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Zambia, Kenya and China. In some other parts of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific we also support emergency response programs. These programs involve a range of sectors, which are agreed upon through consultation between ABM, partners and the communities in which we work. Below is a summary of the main achievements of our programs for 2015/16, listed under seven sectors. The data is mainly sourced from ABM(AID)’s Annual Project Effectiveness Reviews, which are themselves sourced from partners’ reports, monitoring reports by ABM(AID) staff, independent evaluations and direct communication with partners. Water and Sanitation In FY 2015/2016, four ABM partners provided water and sanitation facilities in rural communities, enabling an estimated total of 18,716 people to gain improved access to water. In Kenya, our partner ADS-E constructed three sand dams serving 4,962 people. ADSE’s work in 2015/16 and previous years had a flow-on effect: one of the community-based organisations that it founded was invited to participate in county budgeting and planning meetings, where they persuaded the county government to budget for additional sand dams and one earth dam across two large villages. In addition, ADS-E constructed a 10,000 litre water tank in each of four schools (total enrolment 2,271 students) and trained four volunteers in Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) to disseminate positive hygiene and sanitation messages. Another country where ABM funded a significant water and sanitation program was in Vanuatu, working through the Anglican Church of Melanesia (ACOM). In FY 2015/16, ACOM Vanuatu built or repaired water supply facilities in seven communities (four of these were rebuilt as part of our Cyclone Pam response: in Motalava, Port Patteson, Losalava and Mere Lava). These facilities consisted of two gravity-fed water systems repaired and five water tanks installed. In addition, ACOM Vanuatu built 31 VIP toilets and conducted hygiene awareness to encourage the use and maintenance of these toilets. To promote sustainability, 12 trainers took part in a Training of Trainers course in installing and repairing water supply facilities and VIP toilets and conducting hygiene promotion. Then they ran training courses for another 60 community volunteers, including small teams of youth. Finally, ACOM worked with the Rural Health Ministry to compile a WASH (Water Sanitation and Hygiene) information kit. This will be distributed to volunteers during 2016-17. In Myanmar, ABM supported its partner CPM to implement water and sanitation projects in seven villages across three dioceses (Yangon, Mandalay and Sittwe). A total of 228 families (approximately 1,398 people) gained easier access to water from gravity-fed systems and tube wells, and 40 latrines were constructed in two villages. Other water supply facilities were built or renovated through CPM’s flood response program, explained in the disaster response section below. ABM ANNUAL REPORT 2015–16  I  15

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