Ciao Magazine 296

 

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Ciao Magazine Issue 296

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There’s life in the Inner West! Seafood: What’s cheap, sustainable and yummy FREE Issue 296 | November 25th 2016 WIN! FREE TIX: Mahana Who’s Afraid of Virgina Woolf? Spiegel’esque The wrong reasons to go poly Birdland in BAlmain Steve Clisby kicks it off at Balmain’s Weekend of Jazz HHttUiUiccRFRFkkrRRroeeoYmY11mt!t!e3e3BNBkN22kOoOo.vO.88cOvcK24o4Ko2399mN3mNO.O.WaaWu!u!

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Inner West whispers Local gossip, rumour, hearsay and unsubstantiated fact... Hot Dub Hot Mess – WestCONnecting – Local foodies doing us proud l It’s hard to know who went more over the top last Saturday, the cops or the teenyboppers at the Enmore’s Hot Dub Time Machine gig. The dance party gig was shut down an hour early after approximately 50 cops and riot police circled the venue and ordered the music to stop, citing safety issues for those outside. The Enmore was kept closed for the next 24 hours. Revellers reported ambos in the bathrooms helping a girl who had passed out and “fifty or so 16-year-olds smacked off their faces from messed up pills who were vomiting everywhere.” Most pointed out it was a minority of people causing any trouble at the all-ages event. As one fan said, “They were all music nerds like me,” which was probably true given the nature of HDTM’s shtick – playing tunes from the past half-century in strict chronological order. l A new round of protests have been sparked in reaction to the lastest updates on the Westconnex project. Residents of Annandale and Leichhardt have been holding small demos over the planned construction of mid-tunneling points of Dacey Road and the triangle of land between Parramatta Rd, Bridge Rd and Mallett St. l Inner West restaurants are on the menu this week with the Daily Telegraph’s Delicious naming Stanmore’s Sixpenny the best restaurant in NSW. Other local picking in the top 100 included The Tramshed’s Bodega 1904, Oscillate Wildly, Hartsyard, Continental Bar, Deli & Bistro, Bloodwood, Boathouse Blackwattle Bay, Pazaar Collective, One Penny Red and Ajo. In other food news, the Lantern Group has sold Five Dock Hotel for $28.75 million to former Wallaby Bill Young. l Followers of Kate McClymont would have noted the murder of crime boss Pasquale Barbaro – who had earlier survived an assassination attempt on Norton Street (Dec 2015) at the Italian Forum where he then lived. LOCAL history With the holiday season fast approaching what’s better than some fresh prawns for a Christmas barbie? Luckily, the world’s third largest seafood market, the Sydney Fish Market, is nearby. In 1945 the NSW government created a centralised, regulated market, which operated out of Haymarket. In 1966, the market moved to Blackwattle Bay but the selling still operated through an old-school auctioneer, with an assistant holding up the fish to a crowd who would then yell out their bids. In 1989, a computerised ‘reverse’ auction system was introduced. Currently, around 50 tonnes of seafood is traded every day at the market! Image credit: National Library of Australia. (Kim Beazley during the 1998 Federal election campaign) “John Howard is a one-term wonder!” GRAND OPENING Now offering Traditional Thai and Oil Message $55 per hour Colour from $50 - $120 Ombre $140 Seniors $45 Ladies’ Cut $30 Satire for the soul As progressives are grimly death marched to their Gotterdammerung, won’t someone please think of the children? Dear LL – Strangely enough, my five-year-old appears more interested in watching TV cartoons rather than serious discussions about American politics. Nonetheless, I’m wondering how to best help him process the information that he, his family and, indeed, everyone he’s ever cared for now live in a world in which anyone who is not a toothless, reactionary member of the white working class will be shipped off to a death camp forthwith. I gather that some of Newtown’s more forward-thinking primary schools are encouraging ‘twominute hates’ where first and second-graders can enjoy the catharsis of screaming, “Trump is a psychopathic, ethnonationalist tyrant; let’s devise a cunning plan to fly to Washington and assassinate him!” That seems like a reasonable jumping off point but shouldn’t we grownups being doing more to magnify any terror children are experiencing about their imminent destruction at the small but evil hands of the next Hitler. Raylene, Enmore LL replies: I’m a supporter of teachers, Raylene, especially the bolshie ones who are on strike four days out of every five, but it’s times like this I feel they’re letting the side down. Shouldn’t Australian educators have hurled their lesson plans on the ash heap of history come November 9 and committed themselves to doing nothing but screening Schindler’s List, reading excerpts from The Dairy of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and supervising excursions to the Shoah displays at the Sydney Jewish Museum? And what about some Kristallnacht role-playing where all the schoolkids who wear glasses are labelled members of the decadent cultural elite and beaten senseless by the rest of their (blackshirt-wearing) class? If Inner West parents and teachers don’t lift their game, the slim chance of their precious charges learning some strategies for emerging from the gathering Trumpocalypse alive will be lost forever! n Email your dilemma to info@ciaomagazine.com.au. Things we love: Men’s Cut $30 Seniors $25 Primary school $22 Unders fives $19 Christmas Choir in the Town Hall Kid Friendly Formerly Pixies Hair Salon Closed Wednesdays and Sundays 88 Norton St Leichhardt 2040 Ph: 8068 1888 Celebrate the festive season at Balmain Library with an evening of singing with the local choir Spring Street Singers. Wednesday 14 December 6:30pm - 8pm Free event – All welcome Bookings online or call 9367 9211 Balmain Library 370 Darling St, Balmain That’s some woolly thinking! This cute but not particularly functional bike was spotted in all it’s purled, yarn and knitted glory on Wilson Street, Newtown. Entirely covered in technicolour stitching, we are not sure if this bike actually goes anywhere – especially considering the two hefty locks keeping this piece of guerilla art in place. Wilson Street is known as Sydney’s ‘cyclists highway’ with generous bike lanes that drop you straight at Redfern Station’s transport hub. The street is also host to one of Sydney’s first contra-flow bike lanes, which is even buffeted in some parts to provide extra protection against traffic. This very still bicycle pays tribute to all the bicycles in transit on this important stretch of cycling infrastructure. C!ao’s voice In • Cooking with umamirich anchovies and sardines • Sustainable fishing practices • Montaigne’s ARIAs speech • Ashfield working on a refugee services app • Sherry • Photocopying your bum at the office party Out • The cricket ‘crisis’ • Pessimism • Great North Road and Ramsay St, lost in the trenches • The amazing but so expensive concerts coming up (PJ Harvey, Nick Cave, Adele) • Thanksgiving specials of US TV shows WE ARE C!AO ADVERTISING Sarah Shepherd sarah@ciaomagazine.com.au EDITORIAL Phoebe Moloney phoebe@ciaomagazine.com.au FOOD Melissa Leong info@ciaomagazine.com.au WINE Winsor Dobbin info@ciaomagazine.com.au ART DIRECTOR Paden Hunter paden@ciaomagazine.com.au REPORTER Maani Truu maani@ciaomagazine.com.au PUBLISHING Sonia Komaravalli sonia@ciaomagazine.com.au Contributors: Nigel Bowen, Lianna Taranto, Olivia Mackay, Russell Edwards, Maani Truu, Lucia Moon, Natassia Chrysanthos and Maria Zarro. Ciao loves you, and our photographers only supply photos for publication with consent. We try and make you look your best. No responsibility is accepted by Ciao Magazine for the accuracy of advertisements or information. We welcome unsolicited editorial and pictorial contributions. The opinions expressed in Ciao Magazine are those of contributors, indemnifying the publisher from inaccuracy or consequences arising from its reproduction. © All rights reserved. No material is to be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Ciao Magazine is a free publication. Distribution, advertising & editorial enquiries 460A Parramatta Road, Petersham 2049 info@ciaomagazine.com.au (02) 9518 3696. 0405 509 805 – Sonia Ciao is locally owned and produced. Please recycle Printed by Spot Press, Marrickville Jazz legend Steve Clisby at Balmain’s Weekend of Jazz venue, the Town Hall Hotel. Steve performs on Sunday at Gladstone Park. Image: Ben Cregan C!ao Magazine There’s life in the Inner West! 4

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Community Life ROAD TEST n Natassia Chrysanthos GONE FISHIN' Lucky for the Inner West, Parramatta River provides the opportunity for fishing without having to travel too far from home. Since prawn trawlers were removed from the river almost 10 years ago, local fish populations have flourished. The confluence of manmade and natural covers that exist in the Parramatta River – from the many marinas and wharves that line the river to the mangroves and rock walls which are scattered throughout – make it the perfect habitat for bream in particular. As a result, there are plenty of Inner West locations that are great for an evening fish so you can make the most of warm nights and late sunshine in summer. We've scouted some favourite local spots but, it bears noting, make sure you release your catch! Fish caught west of the Harbour Bridge still should not be eaten for health reasons. Abbotsford Wharf The stretch of water between Woolwhich and Cabarita is a prime area for bream with steady numbers year-round, and Abbotsford Wharf 's social environment and ease of parking make it a great access point. Wharves are particularly useful for lighting and shelter on rainier evenings, and Abbotsford tends to fill up fast once the ferries become more sporadic later at night. Waste and litter is often a problem though, and the wharf is now closed for Enjoy some fishy business fishing between 5am and 10am to allow for cleaning. Make sure that you dispose of rubbish and smelly bait, and be considerate of weary commuters also using the wharf. Iron Cove Bay / Birkenhead Point Ferry Wharf Iron Cove Bay is a thriving fishery owing to its waters' subtle changes in depth and its weed-fringed banks. The Iron Cove Bridge is worthy of particular attention because of how the bream tend to congregate around its pylons. This makes Birkenhead Point a good spot to fish from, as it's nestled right beneath the bridge. Look out for fishing signs indicating which areas are permitted fishing spots – security have been known to spray unsuspecting anglers in unapproved areas with fire hoses. Don't say you haven't been warned! RANT All I want for Christmas is a reprieve from the culture wars As 2016 begins to wind down, one thing that seems to be revving up is this country’s so-called culture wars. What could it possibly be this time? On the front lines this month, dampening our road to a cheery Christmas, is a guy called Bill Leak whose cartoons have provoked yet another round of the favourite pastime: belting out the same old tune over Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act. Now, “What are the culture wars?” you might ask. What is 18C? Who is Bill Leak, and why is he becoming a slightly-more-frequent-yet-still-largelyirrelevant topic for discussion on the occasional episode of The Drum I briefly watch while flicking through the afternoon telly? Well, 18C forms the crux of Australia’s anti-vilification laws, Bill Leak is a cartoonist at The Australian with a penchant for depicting same-sex marriage activists as Nazis, and the culture wars are the tendency of some in Australian media and political life to reduce debate about any issue into a tedious kind of ‘left versus right’ furore. It's jewfish'o'clock in Gladesville Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? This year we lost one of the great playwrights of the 20th century. What better way to honor his legacy than to bask in a performance of one his illustrious works? Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf by Edward Albee chronicles marital dysfunction like you have never seen it before; it’s confronting, amusing and shocking, and has been enthralling theatregoers since its debut in 1962. Presented by the independent, not-for-profit Theatron Group, the show will be held in the intimate Greek Theatre in Marrickville, ensuring the audience an up-close-and-personal encounter with George and Martha. Running from the November 25th to the December 17th, you have plenty of time to watch the couple’s all-night drinking session turn into a nightmare of revelations. n Ciao has three double passes to Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? to give away. To enter simply email info@ciaomagazine. com.au with your name, address, where you picked up your copy Ferry Street, Hunters Hill If you're feeling adventurous and are tempted to cross the Gladesville bridge, Ferry Street in Hunters Hill is a good option for a change of scenery. It's a quiet spot guarded by railing and usually the crowds are quite small. There's parking by the water, while the location makes for a lovely view of the Gladesville Bridge. Fishers have reported a variety of fish here including jewfish, tailors and even leatherjackets. n Thanks to Chris and Kevin at Fishing World and the Fishing Sydney Team for the tips! WIN TIFCRKEEETS Last week, a columnist at The Australian suggested that “mainstream Australians are horrified” by 18C and the highly improbable chance that a court may tell Bill Leak that he should apologise or pay a sum of money. It’d be putting it lightly to say that this is a bit of a stretch. If I asked my mum what she thought of Section 18C, she’d ask, “Section 18C of what?”. If I asked my friends what they thought of Bill Leak’s recent cartoons, I’d draw blank faces. I can think of a bunch of things that horrify “mainstream Australians” a whole lot more than the fact that a not-particularly-brilliant cartoonist (sorry, Bill) is coming under fire for a few drawings that were intentionally controversial. By no means am I suggesting that this issue isn’t important to anyone: you, reader, might be one of those who get their knickers in a twist over 18C and good on you for doing so. What I am unequivocally suggesting, however, is that portraying this debate as a matter of immense concern to all Australians is a downright farce. Maintaining this charade – that mainstream Australians give two damns about the culture wars when they have work to do and families to feed – is more destructive than it is productive, and merely distracts and detracts from important material issues. When there’s real inequality to be addressed and a community to unify, does this really need to be the priority in public debate? As we compose our Christmas card lists and the year winds down to a close, I wish that this combative and tired conversation would wind down with it. To those caught up in its bubble: if you must persist, please stop carrying on like everyone cares as much as you. of Ciao and what date you would want to see the show. For all other bookings visit www.trybooking.com. What’s on Community FREEevents listings are ciaomeAmatgtanail:ziiMnnfaeoa.c@noim.au n Compiled by Maani Truu. Email info@ciaomagazine.com.au Sun 27 Nov, 7pm Theatresports Cranston Cup Grand Final To anyone wondering what on earth Theatresports is, you are forgiven. We must admit we weren’t exactly sure up until recently. In short, theatresports is an exciting mix of improvisation and sketch comedy, played upside down and inside out. There are no limits. If this sounds like your thing, there’s no better time to get your first taste than at the Cranston Cup Grand Final, where the best of the bunch are unleashed on stage to battle it out for the title prize. Featuring finalists from all around the Inner West, come support local comics Tickets are $69.35/ $59.15 concession: www.improaustralia.com.au. Where: Enmore Theatre, 118 Enmore Rd, Enmore Wunderbar! 29 Nov – 10 Dec Montague Basement presents Shakespeare If one Shakespeare play is good, what’s better? Two! In all seriousness, we’ve been watching, reading and performing his works for over 400 years, so there must be something worth seeing in there. Luckily for us culturally lacking folk, Montague Basement has made it easy to catch up on your Shakespeare by presenting a double bill of two of the best: Macbeth and Taming of the Shrew. Directed and performed by local, young dynamic artists, you can bet this Shakespeare won’t be boring. Step outside, perhaps. n Stefanie Tumicelli To book visit montaguebasement.com/tickets. Where: PACT Centre for Emerging Artists, 107 Railway Pde, Erskineville 3-4 Dec Boomalli Textile Workshop How often do you have the chance to work with established artists in a gallery environment? Boomalli is providing just that for those with an interest in contemporary Aboriginal art, working in the mediums of pure silk and fleece. The workshop is spread over two days, with workshops limited to six people, assuring plenty of instructorship from gallery artists Annalisa Wilson and Swiss artist Margrit Rickenbach. Best of all, you leave having created your own piece of wearable art. And isn’t that the greatest art of all? The price is $250, including all materials, refreshments and lunch. Call 9560 2541 to secure your place. Where: Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Co-operative, 55-59 Flood St, Leichhardt A moment of fleece See page 8 for more what's on... 6

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n Local Gigs n Local Screens Wednesday 30th November The Temper Trap Trust the Enmore Theatre to bring the big acts, with ARIA Award winners and multiplatinum chart toppers The Temper Trap set to hit the stage TIFCRKEEETS mWoivniedopuabsslees this November. It’s good to see the much-loved Australian band back on home soil. Enmore Theatre, $74.85 Clever Trolls: They can fart glitter and poop cupcakes Subversive fun: Trolls In a land not far away, two tribes live side by side. The Bergens are the ugly ones with hideous teeth and warts (we won’t call them “the deplorables,” no matter how much we want to). They’re grumpy, spiteful and mean – always look on the dark side and without a doubt voted for Trump. The Trolls come from somewhere more enlightened, some place where medical marijuana has been freely available for a very long time. They’re always happy and sing, dance and party Temper, temper! all day long, only stopping for the scheduled group hugs Friday 2nd December Keyim Ba The Boss (Temeura Morrison): Once a warrior, now just a bully Dendy exclusive: Mahana The Founder every hour. So can these two live together? Silly question... Dang, those clever DreamWorks folks are tricky, disguising brainy political allegory as a fun, trippy DayGlo ride for tots. A collection of some of Australia’s best West African musicians, bringing influences from reggae, funk and rap to the stage. The eight-piece band delivers a modern twist to traditional culture, a combo that never fails to fill the dance floor. Camelot Lounge, $22.90 Friday 9th December Another Evening with Josh Pyke and Bob Evans Josh Pyke and Bob Evans are Australian movies regularly fail to register at the local box office, but there’s no such problem just across the Tasman. What do NZ filmmakers know that ours don’t? Lee Tamahori has it worked out. Mahana, his first film to be set in his native land since 1994’s Once Were Warriors, is the tale of a pair of warring Maori shearing clans in the 1960s. The Mahanas are ruled over by an autocratic bully (Temuera Morrison, also in Warriors). Teenage grandson Simeon (excellent newcomer Akuhata Keefe), spurred on by his feelings for a girl from the rival gang, rebels and the consequent fractures within the family lead to some explosive revelations about the past. It’s quite a potboiler, a nostalgic, ripe melodrama set against the stunning Ray Croc (Michael Keaton) was a likeable small time huckster who stumbled upon a great idea and And it is fun – with brilliantly tactile animation and colours so intense your eyeballs will hurt. Justin Timberlake did stole it. John Lee Hancock’s movie spins the yarn well, and takes its time to slam him for that. Not till the credits roll is the full extent of the Maccas the music and also stars as one of the Trolls, (as does Anna Kendrick); while the soundtrack contains just about every disco anthem and karaoke favourite you’ve ever belted your chief ’s douchebaggery revealed. Mostly you’ll be on lungs out to. As the long production credits roll (do stay his side, but then, disgusted. But really, his business – you’ll still be tapping your feet with an ear-to-ear grin) ethics were little different to that of other 'visionary' you'll notice most of the names are Indian. Yep, that’s where capitalists with much better reps (Steve Jobs and creative jobs are heading now. But Trump will bring Mark Zuckerberg, for example). That’s the way them back, won’t he... G from Dec 1. the system works in the US. Just look at who they elected president! M from Nov 24. CPIIACOK'Ss just two buddies who have been green backdrop of rural NZ (as one reviewer wryly playing music together for 10 noted, “It could double as a feature-length travel years and on stage the chemistry advertisement”). So, is that a problem? Go along shows. In celebration of their first and check out a gorgeous looking movie that tells a story show together exactly a decade audiences everywhere, not just locals, will respond to. ago the pair are hitting the road Then book your flight. M from Dec 8. and playing some tunes. n Thanks to eOne Entertianment we have 5 double The Factory Theatre, $44 passes to give away. Details below. American capitalism explained Billy, don't be a hero... Spiegel’esque Part cabaret, part song and dance and part circus makes for one interesting night. Overall, Spiegel’esque is a cabaret, but not like any you have seen before. Including comedy and slapstick, the show is both titillating and quirky, what a mix! Aside from the entertainment, can we please take a minute to discuss the venue? The show will be performed in a 97-year-old, fully transportable Spiegel Zelt, which when translated to English means Mirror Tent. Featuring all the original fittings, from mirror-lined walls to stained glass windows, the venue itself is a piece of history. The Spiegel Zelt will be erected in the Italian Forum Piazza (23 Norton St, Leichhardt) from November 23rd – January 15th, during which you can catch the Spiegel'esque show. Giving the Forum a much needed lease on life, catch the cabaret painting Leichhardt red! Top pick: Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk Ang Lee’s excellent new movie (technically and visually it’s awesome) covers just a day in the life of 19-year-old Billy (Joe Alwyn) and his “Bravo” squad while on a grotesque celebratory home tour in Texas, with flashbacks to a ferocious Iraqi street battle. He calls that “the worst day of my life”, and it labelled him a hero. We’re used to seeing servicemen only as PTSD victims, so the big surprise here is how much Lee celebrates warrior culture and the very real love (and these hard men call it that) the soldiers feel for each other. Vin Diesel plays a vaguely Buddhist captain who prepares Billy for combat by quoting from the Bhagavad Gita; Garrett Hedlund co-stars as his tough, mordantly cynical sergeant; while Kristen Stewart lights up every scene she’s in as his anti-war sister. You’d be wrong to apply any political labels to this small masterpiece. Yes the tone is critical, but the best war movies defy easy categorisation. And this is n Two double passes up for grabs, just email us one of the very best. MA15+ from Nov 24. where you picked up your copy of Ciao! Tickets Give them the historically significant razzle dazzle from $49.90. To book visit www.ticketek.com.au. Sun 4 Dec Salisbury Hotel Launch Party If you haven’t been to the Salisbury Hotel recently, then there’s a good chance you won’t recognise it. To celebrate the completion of their renovations, the new owners are throwing a good old-fashioned party, complete with complimentary food, drinks and entertainment. The launch Make a RUCKUS! will also feature the official unveiling of ‘The Locals’ photo installation, commissioned by the hotel to pay tribute to community characters. See you there to celebrate Stanmore’s one and only hotel. Where: The Salisbury Hotel, 118 Percival Rd, Stanmore Mon 5 Dec, 3.45-5.45pm RUCKUS Open Workshop Our friends over at RUCKUS are opening their workshops up to the public, hoping to spread their message of inclusivity in the arts. Run by RUCKUS co-collaborator and facilitator Dean Walsh, along with members of the RUCKUS assemble, the workshop will guide participants through movement modulations and embodied states. It's open to those with and without a disability. Cost is $10 to support RUCKUS’s Outdoor cinema ongoing community work. To RSVP contact alison@ruckus.org.au. Where: St Stephen’s Church Hall, 189 Church St, Newtown 25 Nov - 21 Dec Ben & Jerry's Openair Cinema Going to the movies is an all time favourite for date night, friends night, or boring weekday night but why not make that tradition even better by moving it outdoors and plonking yourself on a sunlounge? Ben & Jerry’s are once again bringing their outdoor cinema experience to the Inner West, setting up on the lush lawns of Cadigal Greens at the University of Sydney. The line-up consists of a healthy mix of new-releases, blockbusters and some Christmas flicks. Before your movie chill out with live music and drinks from the bar, with dedicated Sunday sessions featuring free Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. You can’t beat that. To book your tickets visit: www.openaircinemas.com.au. WIN DOUBLE MOVIE PASSES To be in the running to win one of five double passes to Mahana just email info@ciaomagazine.com.au with your name and address telling us where you picked up your copy of At Dendy Newtown Dec 8 Ciao. Remember to include your postal address. n Reviews – Russell Edwards 8

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n Your say What most needs to be improved about Parramatta Road? "More public buses. Probably more light rail towards the Inner West." Gianmarco, Abbotsford "It should be widened, although I don't know how feasible that is. And maybe even have some underground areas leading in and out of Annandale and Camperdown." Jim, Haberfield "It needs a better flow of traffic." Dimitri, Kings Langley "I hate it. I always avoid it. The traffic is atrocious. Widen it. Put something over the top of it. They need to do something." Kelly, Rozelle "Obviously, traffic is the worst. And it's a bit of an eyesore too, so landscaping wouldn't go astray. But overdevelopment is a problem." Yvonne, Leichhardt "I really don't like Parramatta Road, I avoid it at all costs. I even put up with Kent Street on my way home from the city so I can avoid it. It needs extra lanes, but that's also not very good for the environment. Maybe they could plant more trees around the new lanes." Tania, Rodd Point "Public transport for sure, it's pretty appalling." Laura, Marrickville. n Sustainability SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD More than 1 billion people depend on fish as their primary source of protein. As a result, overfishing rates stand at an all time high; scientists from the Future of Marine Animal Populations (FMAP) program claim that up to 90 per cent of all large predatory fish such as cod, sharks, tuna and swordfish have been depleted. We Sydneysiders are coastal dwellers and seafood is an integral part of our diet, however, our oceans are not an endless resource. So what is sustainable seafood? It is seafood capable of being maintained at a steady level without exhausting natural resources or causing severe ecological damage. It’s difficult to know what to eat from our seas; in general it’s best to say no to overfished tuna and go for alternative choices from Australia. Within those choices it’s important to understand which sources are sustainably fished, allowing us to balance our diets with the need for a healthy ocean. Here is a brief list of readily available seafoods in Sydney that are classified as ‘SAY YES – SUSTAINABLE’. Australian squid Wild-caught, Australian squid such as the Gould’s squid, Hawkesbury river squid and southern Calamari are fast growing and quick to reproduce. They are abundant in number and are caught by jigging, a low impact, highly targeted method of fishing that has negligible by-catch and impact on threatened species. Stay away from imported squids. They are usually caught by trawling, a key threat to vulnerable marine wildlife, including dugongs and turtles. Australian salmon Australian salmon is a fast-growing species wildcaught in many commercial and recreational Is your seafood sufficiently green? fisheries around Australia. Fish stock levels are healthy. Australian salmon is a much more sustainable choice compared to Atlantic salmon. Atlantic salmon is a non-native species farmed in Tasmanian waters. Don't buy it. Fish caught in the wild are used to feed the carnivorous salmon, and currently fish used as feed outweigh the weight of salmon produced. Seals are also at risk of being entangled in sea cages. Australian Oysters Sydney rock, Native and Pacific Oysters are farmed in Australia. They have a low overall impact on our oceans. Australian Farmed Prawns Black Tiger, Kuruma and Banana Prawns are farmed in NSW and are a sustainable choice. In general, prawn farms are small operations with good management and regulation of wastewater discharge. However, prawns caught in the wild are usually trawled, and threatened species by-catch remains an issue in all fisheries. It’s best to decline wild prawns and go for Australian farmed. Imported prawns from Thailand, China, Vietnam and Malaysia are a big no-no as these countries have destroyed vast amounts of mangroves and coastal areas for poorly managed farms. n Head to www.sustainableseafood.org.au to find a complete guide and a downloadable app with tips on how to make sustainable seafood choices in Australia. Words by Lucia Moon n Local news Nominations Close for City of Canada Bay’s Citizen of the Year Nominations have closed for this year's City of Canada Bay’s Citizen of the Year with winners to be chosen in four categories. The categories, Citizen of the Year, Young Citizen of the Year, Sports Citizen of the Year and Arts and Culture Citizen of the Year are open to local residents or those affiliated with local groups or associations. Mayor Helen McCaffrey has praised the awards, underscoring their importance in recognising how volunteers give unpaid labour to their local communities. “Citizen of the Year awards are the perfect opportunity for us to reward those residents who work hard to support our local community,” she says. “Australia is a great country of volunteers and our City is brimming with talented individuals.” Previous winners have included Michael Hahn, who took Drummoyne Water Polo from a social second division club to a National League team, and Marie Piccin, a local business owner, community leader and MC. The awards are presented on Australia Day. Council to Launch Asylum Seeker App The Inner West Council has teamed up with the Asylum Seekers Centre to develop an ‘Arrival App’, which aims to assist in welcoming and supporting refugees and asylum seekers as they arrive in Australia. Plans for the app include information about local places and services that may be of need to new arrivals, as well as tools aimed at fostering connections and participation in community life. While still in the development stage, local volunteers are being selected to work with the development team to research, evaluate and collate relevant content for the app. This initiative comes after the successful Inner West Refugee Week events, held earlier this this year. Council’s Push for Parramatta Road Light Rail Following the release of results from a joint study commissioned by Inner West Council and City of Canada Bay Council into public transport options for Parramatta Road; both councils have called for the implementation of public transport options in the area, with Inner West Council Administrator Richard Pearson stating that a Light Rail option “would be the ultimate long term choice.” The study, completed by an independent third-party, is in part responding to a stipulation in the original WestConnex approval that stated at least two lanes along Parramatta Road would be dedicated to public transport. The calls come as the State Government continues to release further details on the Parramatta Road Urban Transformation Strategy, which would see 27,000 new homes added to the corridor over 30 years. “The study makes clear that investment in public transport is a wellproven catalyst for urban transformation like the Parramatta Road Urban Transformation Strategy,” said Mr Pearson. “It is critical that this is done in tandem with the WestConnex works now rather than needing to retrofit these sections.” The proposed route backed by the study would see a light rail transport system running along Parramatta Road, connecting the CBD and Strathfield, with a loop stopping at Strathfield and Burwood railway stations. City of Canada Bay Mayor Helen McCaffrey accepted the need for growth, but added concerns about lack of planning. “We recognise that growth is important but we need to ensure that it is well designed to deliver for the community,” she said. “This opportunity provides a catalyst to reactivate Parramatta Road as a place for people.” Because there can never be enough light rail! Buckley takes a chance Locals Get Fit for Charity Local business owner and the man behind Fitness Factory Australia, Annandale, James Z.G. Buckley is on his mission to pave a healthier way for Inner West residents, while supporting the Starlight Foundation charity. His six week 'Your Best Body challenge' aims to help participants transform their bodies, change eating habits and create longer and healthier lives. The challenge is free to participate in, however, each person is asked to make a one-time donation of $47 directly to the Starlight Foundation. The free program includes six fitness sessions every Saturday, with the opportunity to win a prize pool of $5,000. “The work that Starlight Foundation does helps children and their families,” said James. “And like them, it is also what we’re trying to do here at the Fitness Factory, for people’s health. And with more awareness and more people talking about it, the more we can influence for improved change.” This is Fitness Factory’s seventh year running the challenge, with over $50,000 raised over these years through the community initiative. Steve Clisby - Jazz Legend STEVE CLISBY Steve Clisby is a legendary jazzman, the world over. Born in the US, he performed soul to Europe and wowed mainstream Australian audiences when he competed in The Voice. Bringing the wisdom of a lifelong musician to the limelight, Clisby is making sure jazz still flourishes in public view. Catch him at ‘Jazz in the Park’ at Gladstone Park, Balmain, on Sunday 4-6pm. Jazz acts will be performing at venues this weekend all over the peninsula when Balmain is turned into a temporary Birdland. What can we expect from your performance on Sunday at Gladstone Park? Well first of all, it will be Steve Clisby and Bill Risby playing. Bill will be on the piano. We’ll be playing quite a few songs from my most recent album Golden Ring, a mix of original songs and we also play unique arrangements of some other classic songs, whether it’s John Legend or Van Morrison we do it in our own way. Hopefully we can also get Dale Barlow up to play some saxophone, he’s been my friend since the first year I moved to Sydney. What was the first jazz tune you played? The tune that comes to mind is Horace Silver’s ‘Song For My Father’. I played it on the piano in my teens, when I was 17 or 18. I remember at that age I saw the first great jazz performers I ever saw, the Jazz Crusaders. When I was old enough to drive we would go to The Lighthouse on Formosa Beach (in LA) and Shelley’s Manne Hole. I saw Miles Davis, Tony Williams, everybody. What advice would you give to people hoping to be musicians? The business is changing now, but what you need to succeed is pretty much the same. Personally, I think you need to be true to yourself – and it can be difficult, and confusing. You have to be focused; you have to be a bit of a masochist because you have to accept rejection on a regular basis. Don’t worry too much about the outcome – jump, and the net will appear. If I had to distill it to one thing, I would say you have to be fearless. Not to say that I was not afraid, fear is part of life. But you have to do it anyway. What are your thoughts on Balmain? I think it’s one of the nicest suburbs I can’t afford to live in! It’s one of the nicest places in Sydney, it has the feel of a community. It’s Melbourne-like in a way, I think it’s a place for me. Do you have any future plans we should know about? I’m starting a master class workshop to introduce and develop new talent that is not yet being heard. There are a lot of incredible musicians here but I feel like there is a lack of a community between them, I want to develop that and help bring new talent to the public’s attention. 10

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n FEATURE Images of resilience Migrant support workers are bridging the divide between Sydney’s Inner and Outer West for the benefit of recent refugees... and residents who want to take part in their incredible stories. Courageous Journeys Manuiel, Mari and Anita moved from Syria n Words by Natassia Chrysanthos Inner and Outer West meet The story the tabloids don’t tell “With courage let us all combine.” These words, from the second verse of our national anthem, celebrate strength of character and a spirit of welcome. They were the chosen theme for this year’s Refugee Week and underpin the sentiments of the book Courageous Journeys, a joint effort of Liverpool Migrant Resource Centre (LMRC) and the Melkite Catholic Welfare Association. The book was launched at Glebe Town Hall on Wednesday November 16, when two buses of refugee families from Liverpool were greeted by a full room of Inner West locals eager to hear their stories. The idea for Courageous Journeys was conceived by LMRC employees Emma McCarthy and Meredith Stuebe. “Many of the families we work with have been through the unimaginable – long periods of separation and uncertainty, while remaining defiant and strong,” says Emma. “We wanted to create a space where families could reflect on their new home. In a media landscape that can sometimes vilify refugees, we wanted to look to the future and start a conversation centred on inclusion and acceptance.” The choice to host the book launch in Glebe, rather than South West Sydney where the families reside, was a deliberate one. “We wanted to hold it in a place like Glebe because there’s a big population in the Inner West who are really strong advocates for asylum seekers and refugee rights,” says Emma. “Yet working in a suburb like Liverpool, there seems to be a disconnect between the clients who need to feel that welcome and embrace, and the established Australian communities.” The book aims to be a catalyst for this embrace, uniting simple storytelling with images to share the families’ settlement experiences in Sydney. It compiles portraits of 14 refugee families taken by Inner West photographer Saskia Wilson, alongside a series of simple statements about the subjects’ proudest achievements and hopes for the future. One of the families featured is the Kaakahjian family: Mari and Manuiel, along with their daughter Anita, moved to Sydney from Aleppo, Syria in July last year. Settling in South West Sydney, where two of their other daughters were already living, has provided the opportunity for the family’s first reunion in years. According to Mari, the family is happier than they have been before. Nonetheless, settling in a new country later in life has presented its own set of challenges. “I wish that I came here when I was younger,” Mari says. “It would be more easy. I could learn the language faster, I could work – I love work.” As it stands, Mari is a carer for her daughter Anita, who has a disability. “When it comes to Anita, she’s the winner here,” Manuiel says of his eldest daughter. “She’s more comfortable, and the centre she goes to twice a week has made her really happy. All that we have here wasn’t available to us in Syria.” The opportunities that are available for Anita in Australia have alleviated many of Mari’s concerns for the future. When she speaks, the relief from uncertainty that Australia represents overwhelms her. “For a long time I was thinking about my daughter,” she says. “When I pass away, what’s going to happen to her? I didn’t know what was going to happen to her. But I have come here to Australia, and I feel like I put her in safe hands. I feel like she is secure.” The family is due to receive support from the National Disability Insurance Scheme and Anita visits the Young Adult Disabled Association twice a week. This has meant Mari is finding the time to take care of herself for the first time in years. She attends LMRC’s Refugee Women’s Social Group on Tuesday mornings; a social and conversational English class that helps newly arrived women build connections and develop new skills in Australia. “I feel so excited,” Mari says. “I keep waiting the whole week for Tuesday to come. It feels like coming home to family.” But while the friendship and sense of community has been wonderful for Mari, the most important experience has been learning. “Education is number one,” she says. “I come here and I’m learning about Australian culture and how people live in Australia.” Lena, the group’s coordinator, says that Mari has come to the group every week since its inception and regularly arrives half an hour early. Courageous Journeys has similarly provided an opportunity for the family to immerse itself in new aspects of Australian culture and community. “Anita is so excited about it,” Mari says. “She’s been waiting for the book launch for so long and asks me every day. She feels so special.” Anita’s excitement was contagious on Wednesday night. Anna, a local from Concord who attended the launch, shares Anita’s enthusiasm. “It was really lovely seeing the families’ excitement and their smiles,” she says. “It brings the issue closer to home and makes it feel very real. I also think it’s fantastic to learn about the amazing things all these different organisations are doing to help. We hear a lot of negativity around refugees, so it’s really nice to see how people in Australia are doing really good things.” The book’s organisers, Emma and Meredith, are residents of the Inner West, and are drawing on their community connections to foster links between the two communities. “We want to be that bridge between the support in the Inner West and the clients who actually need to feel that in South West Sydney,” says Emma. “Even if it just means that there’s somebody there to say: ‘Hi, thanks for sharing your story, it was nice to meet you,’ that’s a really positive interaction that our clients might not have had otherwise.” After Courageous Journeys, LMRC hopes to continue to develop these connections in a supported environment. “Our clients come to Australia and they’ve obviously been through quite long and traumatic journeys,” Emma says. “Trust is something that can be difficult for them to establish with strangers and with the Australian community. As an organisation that has worked with these communities for a really long time, they know us and they trust us, so we’re trying to partner with a lot more organisations that are based in the Inner West.” LMRC has also collaborated with the Welcome Dinner Project, based in Newtown, to facilitate welcome dinners for newly arrived migrants with established Australians. “It can be in people’s homes and as simple as asking: ‘Hey, do you want to come around for dinner and me and my family meet you and your family?’” Emma says. “It’s just coming together in a positive environment over food.” Fostering an atmosphere of positivity and inclusion is key to LMRC’s work. “The refugee communities here are only continuing to grow,” Emma says. “To borrow a sentence from our CEO’s piece in the book – ‘We hope this book generates a positive conversation around welcoming refugees into our community, and acknowledges the strength and courage they bring with them that in turn, strengthens us. Let us be that narrative and make the message of welcome and celebration louder than any other.’” www.ciaomagazine.com.au 11

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n with Olivia Mackay, www.scoffandquaff. in the kitchen wordpress.com White anchovy crostini Anchovies, orange and dates are most commonly found together in salads, often with baby spinach, fennel or endive. Here, I’ve cut out the middlemen and served them as crostini toppings for a flavoursome canape. The crunchy toast provides a textural contrast and soaks up and holds the delicious juices. These are incredibly simple to make and ideal for throwing together for unexpected guests. If you want to create a vegetarian version, a robust blue cheese such as stilton would hold its own in place of the anchovies. Makes 12-16 Method Ingredients • 1 loaf ciabatta (or other wide/flat bread) 3 blood oranges 2 small purple shallots, thinly sliced 120g marinated white anchovy fillets Don’t hold the anchovies! 8-10 medjool dates, pitted 4 tbsp red wine vinegar or sherry vinegar 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil Salt and pepper fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped 1. Combine the shallots, vinegar and oil in a bowl. 2. Zest the oranges then finely slice the zest, being careful to avoid all the pith. 3. Separate and remove the individual orange segments using a sharp knife. 4. Add the zest and segments to the bowl with the shallots, season to taste, stir well and set aside to marinate. 5. Thinly slice the sourdough loaf and toast or grill on both sides until lightly golden. 6. Cut a slit in the dates and use a teaspoon to scoop out the sticky inside flesh. Spread onto the toasted sourdough slices. 7. Layer each slice with a few segments of orange, then top with one or two anchovy fillets. 8. Spoon over some of the shallots and juices from the orange marinade. 9.Finish with some parsley and ground black pepper. Market UPDATE n Fruit: Everything sweet and sunset hued has come into bloom for the summer season. Mangoes, nectarines, peaches, apricot, rockmelon and papaw are all delicious at the moment. Berries are ideally priced with strawberries fetching $2-5 a punnet and blueberries $3-$4 a punnet. Raspberries and blackberries are also superb. n Veggies: Hearty vegetables are in peak season at the moment, with kumara, beetroot, eggplant and kale offering to be the perfect ‘hero’ ingredient in a meat-less dinner. Light and crisp celery, lebanese cucumbers and sugar snap pears are ideal in salads tossed with mint. Trump-coloured taters! AT HOME WITH JASON RAY Dulwich Hill local Jason Ray has been teaching people to cook and enjoy seafood for almost a decade at Sydney Seafood School. What is your favourite fish to cook? I like to cook freshwater trout because it’s such a versatile fish, you can bake, grill, steam, wrap it in newspaper and throw it over some coals, preserve it through smoking and so much more! It has a higher fat content which makes it really flavoursome, nutritious, and difficult to overcook. It looks spectacular served whole and is a good size for one to two people. What is a useful tip or littleknown fact that you find really helps people preparing seafood? People seem to really struggle to know how to cook fish properly. If you cook it with the skin on over a medium high heat and leave a lid on it the steam will cook the flesh side without drying it out. Insert a skewer through it to see how much cooking is left to go, based on how much the raw flesh resists the skewer. What are some overlooked seafood alternatives that are cheaper or more sustainable? Leatherjacket’s a classic tasty and affordable fish, thought it’s becoming more expensive as more people clue onto it! If you’re looking for affordable seafood you can’t go past mussels, they’re also delicious and very sustainable since they’re filter feeders and lower on the food chain than your classic top order predator fish such as tuna and salmon. How do you prepare sardines so they actually taste nice? Haha. I like sardines as they are, I think the pungency that people associate with them tends to happen when they’re not as fresh as they should be. At Sydney Seafood School we cook sardines in seasoned flour in olive oil over a high heat and serve them with a punchy salsa verde with loads of garlic and they’re delicious! What should you look for in a fish shop? Looking at how the seafood is stored, check that it’s not sitting in a pool of water, make sure the flesh looks firm (the muscle tissue should not be coming apart) and the fish has full, bright eyes. Use your instincts, use your eyes, use your sense of smell! Who first taught you to cook? I’ve always loved cooking. I learnt a few things from my grandmother but a lot of the recipes I used in childhood were plucked from simple recipe books from the library. The first thing I ever made was pizza, I used to use pre-made bases each week, then I started playing around with making fresh dough and the fun really began. What is the strangest thing that has ever happened in one of your cooking classes? In a class where we teach people how to prepare squid, a fisherman was affronted to hear we got rid of the eyes. In the hands-on section of the class he went around to all of the groups and collected all of the squid eyes to take home with him! He might be wearing fur but he digs leatherjackets Smoked Trout, caper and new Potato Salad Ingredients • 800 g new potatoes, scrubbed • 2 tbsp crème fraîche •1 lemon , zest and juice • 1 red onion, peeled and very finely sliced • 1 small bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked and roughly chopped • 100g jar capers, drained • 1 punnet watercress • 300g lightly smoked trout Method 1. Place your potatoes in a pan of cold water, bring to the boil and simmer until cooked. Drain and allow to cool. 2. In a bowl, mix the crème fraîche with the lemon zest and juice. Add the potatoes, onion, parsley and capers, then snip your cress into the bowl. Season with salt and pepper and mix well. 3. Divide between four serving bowls and flake the smoked trout over the top. Serves 4 12 Wine with Winsor n www.wdwineoftheweek.blogspot.com Nero soars The Family 2015 Nero d’Avola Looking for a spicy, savoury red quaffer that offers terrific value for money? Look no further than this new release from Trentham Estate, made from the increasingly popular Nero d’Avola grape, which originates from Sicily. This has sweet plum and restrained pepper notes, along with mellow tannins. Medium-bodied, long and soft, it is extremely quaffable and would be a perfect partner for pizzas, pasta dishes and grilled red meats. $15. Something different Chandon S Sparkling Aficionados may be appalled by this new release from Domaine Chandon in the Yarra Valley, who have twisted the rule book to produce a sparkling wine blended with orange bitters to create a fun take on the Champagne cocktail. This release is designed to be served over ice and winemaker Dan Buckle is on a winner with a zingy, zesty and tangy wine. An excellent aperitif for the holiday season and sure to be a hit in cocktail bars. $29. Distinguished red Wynn’s Coonawarra Estate 2015 Cabernet Shiraz Merlot Sue Hodder and her winemaking team at Wynn’s Coonawarra Estate make some of Australia’s most celebrated reds and the entry level Wynn’s wines offer excellent drinking at bargain basement prices. This is a beautifully constructed blend of three red grapes that thrive in Coonawarra and the red and black fruit intensity here is matched by black olive and forest floor notes. Very soft, balanced, plush and hugely impressive given that it can often be found on special for well under the RRP of $25. MELISSA Leong Ocean Phoenix It is a proud fact that as Inner Western Sydney locals, we hold in our possession one of the world’s great fish markets. Each year, over 3 million people visit Sydney Fish Market in Pyrmont, from locals doing their weekly shop, to tourists from all over the world who jostle for fish and chips and selfies with pelicans. It’s a vibrant sight, and one that we should take advantage of, while we still have it. A couple of weeks ago, it was officially announced that the iconic fish Mecca that is Sydney Fish Market would be closing down to make way for a new $250 million iteration down the road in Blackwattle Bay. Set to open in 2020, this new and glittering addition to the Sydney landscape is an exciting prospect, but I have to admit that there’s a small part of me who will miss the terrible parking situation, slip-sliding around Claudio’s while trying to decide what to cook for dinner and in general, the faded and crumbling façade that has become such a familiar and much loved part of the Sydney landscape in the Inner West. Over the years, I’ve attended cooking classes at Sydney Seafood School, partaken in more than one hungover yum cha session at Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant, smashed smoked brisket at Vic’s Meats and bought more than my body weight in cheese and charcuterie from Blackwattle Deli. In this regard, Sydney Fish Market is so much more than just seafood, though it’s also an obvious celebration of all things harvested from beneath the waves. If you haven’t been for a while, might I suggest taking yourself down there in the next little while to reacquaint yourself with this old phoenix, before she rises anew. Sydney Fish Markets

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n HABERFIELD FESTA Haberfield Heart Celebrating the small suburb with a big heart The biggest event on Haberfield’s social calender, the yearly community Festa, is back for another celebration, featuring speciality cuisine, entertainment and over 90 stalls on Sunday, December 4th. While you are there strolling through the colourful Dalhousie and Ramsay streets, why not give the crowds a break and pop into one of the local businesses along the strip and see what gems Haberfied has to offer all year-round... Viatour Travel Family run businesses are becoming rarer, as every where you look a chain seems to be popping up. Look beyond your Flight Centres, however, and you will family travel agents still exist. That’s exactly what we did when we sat down with Cathy of Viatour Travel to learn about the companies Italian heritage... The year was 1972 and a young ex-carabiniere called Antonio Bamonte set up a travel agency and called it Viatour. Soon the thousands of Italians who’d been living in Sydney acquired a level of wealth sufficient to travel back to the home country and they flocked to Viatour. In those days Alitalia was flying to Rome and the DC-10 with the big ‘A’ on the tail were swallowing Italian after Italian at Kingsford Smith. Of course, Viatour was also selling Qantas, Singapore Airlines, Thai International, KLM and Lufthansa. Then Air India opened a route to Rome from Sydney via Bombay and Viatour became the number one agency on that route. Fast forward to today. Alitalia has not been flying to Australia for years, but Viatour’s logo, featuring a “V” very similar to the “A” on the tails of Alitalia planes is still there. The first generation Italian immigrants have shrunk dramatically and now the community is made up mostly of the children and grandchildren of Viatour clients of yesteryear. They still have affection for the agency that ferried their fathers to the home country but have learned to use the Internet for their bookings, especially on the domestic front. However, an agency can still provide astonishingly good fares on international routes. www.viatour.com.au 125 Ramsay Rd, Haberfield Ph: 9799 3222 More than just another pharmacy. We deliver more than expected in a regular community pharmacy. Suzi Reichert MBA BPharm Compounding Pharmacist What is compounding? Pharmaceutical compounding is science creating customised medication, for unique needs, where standard drugs don’t exist or can’t be used. 1/191 Ramsay St, Haberfield | Phone: 9798 8499 | open 7 days 14

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Cutting edge design Haberfield Eyecare Haberfield Eyecare is the first choice when it comes to optical services for the suburb’s locals. A beautiful store with helpful and relaxed staff, and a trending designer range of frames, it’s no wonder Haberfield Eyecare is a preferred optometrist and eyecare specialist even for Sydneysiders who live outside of Haberfield. We speak to Alex about what sets Haberfield Eyecare apart. Sunglasses to suit your style What services do you offer? All optical services from eye examinations to prescribing glasses and contact lenses. We supply leading edge fashion eyewear, funky designs, sports eyewear, custom made eyewear for individual purposes, over 1000 frames and sunglasses to choose from. What does good customer service mean to you? Good customer service means a friendly, knowledgeable, and helpful style of approach to all my customers. Always being available to offer advice where needed. How is Haberfield Eyecare different from other eyecare services? Haberfield Eyecare is different because we are independent and therefore not bound by the parameters and restrictions of larger chain stores. We have eyewear of quality and design not available in many larger companies. The experience we believe our customers will have is one of enjoyment and fun whilst being able to purchase eyewear that suits their personality and lifestyle. What’s the best thing about working in Haberfield? The best thing about working in Haberfield is the beautiful people who live here and getting to meet and befriend them, and, hopefully help their eyecare needs in any way we can. The atmosphere of Haberfield is very much like a village. Super friendly, super awesome place to work. The best pizza, cakes, and coffee around this joint too! You’ll never go hungry! What can we expect from Haberfield Eyecare in the future? The future of Haberfield Eyecare is exciting. We are constantly updating our stock with new and interesting eyewear and sunglasses. www.haberfieldeyecare.com.au 131A Ramsay St, Haberfield Ph: 9799 9904 for all kinds of feet Walk This Way Podiatry CLINIC Joseph Sassine gives the facts on feet! What is your role at the clinic? As Principal Podiatrist I provide high quality foot care services to our patients as well overlooking the daily running of the business.
How do your support your patients?
We listen to our patients needs and provide the appropriate services to keep our them pain free and active everyday.

 What’s the best thing about your job?
Unlike a dentist, I get to talk to my patients while I am treating them!
What sets you apart from other services in the area?
 We have a great history of providing a very personalised service that patients keep coming back for. Our business has grown rapidly because of the high number of word of mouth referrals we have received and we have used this foundation to build a practice that serves the needs of our local community.
 What’s the best feedback you have ever received?
 During the year I resolved a patient’s heel pain in three months which he had previously treated unsuccessfully for three years. He was able to get back into exercise, lose 15kgs along the way and no longer needed his Diabetes medication. He told me that he was able to turn his life around now that his feet were no longer stopping him from doing what he loves!
 Anything else you would like to add? Make sure you come and visit us at Haberfield Festa Sunday December 4 2016. Our stall will be outside of our practice on 92 Ramsay St. Come have a look at the specials on our foot care products and new range of footwear available now. Our practice is open Monday to Saturday and we can be contacted on 02 9797 0179 for all enquiries. www.wtwpodiatry.com.au 92 Ramsay St, Haberfield Ph: 9797 0179 Your Choice Pharmacy With helpful, knowledgeable staff, a great location and expert pharmacists, Your Choice Pharmacy, is the Haberfield go-to for all your health needs. Owner Suzi Reichert explains why compounding chemists are better for you. What are the benefits of pharmaceutical compounding? Compounding focuses on providing? Preparations customised to fit unique needs for people and pets where standard drugs fail to do so. Compounding may be required because of allergies, or where the exact dosage or delivery form dose not currently exist. Pharmaceutical compounding can also change medications from tablet to cream, tablet to pleasant tasting liquid. Your Choice Pharmacy’s compounding pharmacist Suzi Reichert is highly trained and well researched to understand and provide for the needs of people and pets. Shop 1, 191 Ramsay Street, Haberfield Ph: 97988499 Compounding for unique needs Tours 2017 LICNO2TA000469 Greek Island cruise and Grand Tour of Italy 8 days on the Jewel of the Sea from Civitavecchia to Santorini, Mikonos, Athens and more, then 15 day Grand Tour: San Marino, Lake Garda, Junedeparts 17 the Dolomites, Venice, Florence, Siena, Amalfi, Ischia, Pompeii, Rome. Flights, the cruise, accommodation in 3 or 4 star superior hotels, many meals and more - all included. Ask us for a brochure! $6899 Maydeparts 11 Ask us about our FOOD TOURS! Paths of Faith PARMA! May 7 Seven days in the heart of traditional Northern Italian cuisine with restaurateur Carmel Ruggieri & Luca Ciano, former Barilla 20 days visiting Fatima on the Australia Executive Chef. 100th anniversary of the first apparition of the Virgin Mary to three little Portuguese shepherds. Then Lourdes, Assisi, San Giovanni Rotondo. Also July 2 Italy Unexplored 8 days with Vincenzo exploring the rich Abruzzo San Sebastian, Biarritz, Monte traditions with an Carlo, Nice, Genoa, Florence, Aussie local! Amalfi, Pompeii and finally Rome. including return flights $5949 tour only $3749 Included: accommodation in 3/4 star superior hotels, breakfasts & dinners, entry fees and more. Ask us for a brochure! viatour@viatour.com.au 02 9799 3222 1300 732 825ABN 60 001 105 193 At HABERFIELD EYECARE you will find the latest and hottest quality fashion eyewear We stock a great selection of frames and sunglasses to suit your lifestyle and personality! AT HABERFIELD EYECARE We CAN HELP YOU WITH: • Eye examinations • Bulk billing for eye tests • Contact lenses • Sunglasses • Prescription sunglasses • Adjustments and repairs on site 131 Ramsay St Haberfield | Ph: 9799 9904 | alex@haberfieldeyecare.com.au www.ciaomagazine.com.au 15

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