Editing Level 4 (Sample)

 

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Introduces students to the rules of grammar and punctuation in a systematic and structured format.

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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm Editinga n b o cde pqr sf gt uhLevi vjwkelxl 4my znaobpcqdresftguhviwj kxlymz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm Dr Lillian Fawcett CRACKING THE

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OTHER CRACKING THE ABC CODE RESOURCES Reading and Phonics Multisensory Reading Level 1 – designed to teach non-readers the basic sound-symbol relationship of the 26 letters of the alphabet. Multisensory Reading Level 2A – designed to teach beginning readers the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 2B – designed to teach early readers, who have some basic reading vocabulary, the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 3A – comprehensive 25 unit program (commencing reading age of at least 6.06 to 7.00 years) designed as an introductory course for younger students to teach the common graphemes. Multisensory Reading Level 3B – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes (commencing reading age of at least 7.00 years) for students 8 years and older. Multisensory Reading Level 3C – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes but using more challenging vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 7.06 to 8.00 years). Multisensory Reading Level 4 – 15 unit program covering the less common graphemes and incorporating difficult vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 10.00 years). Suitable for adolescents and adults. Spelling Multisensory Spelling Books 1 to 5 (300 most commonly used words graded according to level of difficulty). * Multisensory Spelling Books Levels A-T (Spelling Ages 5.00 – 15.06 years). Sound Hearing – designed to develop phonological awareness and auditory processing. Ender Bender – a card game requiring the application of spelling rules. SAMPLERules Rule – rule cards, nonsense word application and real word exercises. *It’s All Nonsense – a program that uses both nonsense and real words to teach students to spell by breaking words into syllables and phonemes and applying spelling rules. Editing Levels 1-4 - A series of graded books which require students to apply their phonological and spelling rule knowledge to correct errors in passages of varying difficulty. Writing Writing Creatively - A systematic program designed to develop students’ written expression skills. * Check website for availability and for more detailed information. © 2011, 2013 Dr L.M. Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com lfawcett@crackingtheabccode.com Cover Design: Hunt for Ideas (ideas@huntforideas.com) All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without written permission from the author. ISBN-13: 978-1477530498 ISBN-10: 1477530495

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CONTENTS PAGE Introduction & Instructions……………………………….…………. 3 Trapped (ay, a-e, ai = /ay/) ………………………………..…………. 4 Speech Marks ……………………………………………..…………. 6 Letter to Arthur (ar, a = /ar/ ) ………………………………….……. 8 Questions…………………………………………………..…………. 10 New York Times (or, au, aw = /or/)…………………...…………..…. 12 There/Their/They’re………………………………..……………...…. 14 Day Trip to the Mountains (ow, ou = /ow/) ………………….……… 16 Exclamation Marks………………………………………..…………. 18 Letter to Peter (ea, ee, ie, e-e = /ee/ ) …..……………………………. 20 Me/ I…………...…………………..…………………………………. 22 Interview: Phillip Hough (ph, gh = /f/) …………….……………..…. 24 Collective Nouns…………………………………………..…………. 26 SAMPLEMatching verb with subject………………………………..…………. 27 Advertisement (er, ir, ur = /er/)…………………..………..…………. 28 Contractions………………………………..………………………... 30 For Sale (oa, ow, o-e = /oa/)…………………………………………. 32 Plurals……………………………………………………..…………. 34 Interview: Bruce Drew (ew, oo, ue, ui, u-e = /ue/)………………..…. 36 Commas - Phrases……………………………….………..…………. 38 Letter to Mrs Joyce (oy, oi = /oy/)…………………………………… 40 Full Stops………………………………..…………………………… 42 Sydney News (y = /i/, /ie/, /ee/ )…………..……….…………………. 44 Capital Letters………………………………..………………….……. 46 Email to Grandma (i-e, ie, i = /ie/)…………………...………..……… 48 Apostrophes for possession ………………………………..………… 50 Editing Level 4 p. 1

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Christmas Shopping List (ch = /ch/, /sh/, /k/)………………………… 52 Relative Pronouns………………………………..…………………… 54 Double Negatives …………………………………………..………... 55 Countrywomen (ou, o, a = /u/)……………………………………….. 56 Prepositions ………………………………..………………………… 58 Too Late (ce, ci, cy = /s/)……………………………………………. Its’/It’s …………..…………………..…………………………..…... Accept/Except, Prescribe/Proscribe………..………………………... 60 62 63 Positions Vacant (ge, gi, gy = /j/)…………………………………….. 64 We’re/Where/Wear ………………………………..………………… 66 We’re/Where/Were………………………………..……………..…... 67 Letter: Spark Electricity Company (ti, ci, si = /sh/)………………….. 68 Your/You’re………………………………..………………………… 70 Me/I . ………………………………..……………………………….. 71 Medical Students (i+vowel = /ee/, /ie/)………………………………. 72 Fewer/Less ………………………………..…………………………. 74 Comparatives & Superlatives………………………………..……….. 75 SAMPLETaken (u, oo = /oo/)…………….…………………………………….. 76 ed/t/d ………………………………..………………………………... 78 Malladare Fair (are, air, ear, ere = /air/)……………………………… 80 Commas – Lists ………………………………..…………………….. 82 Government Warning (wo, wor, wa, war)..………………………..… 84 Homophones ………………………………..……………………..… 86 News in Brief (ear, eer, ere = /eer/)…………………………………… 88 Verb Tense ………………………………..……………………….…. 90 Letter to Mary (Silent Letters and Tricky Words)……………………. 92 Relative Pronouns ………………………………..……………..……. 94 Homographs ………………………………..……………………….... 95 Parts of Speech……………………………..……………………….... 96 Answers ………………………………..……………………….... 97 Editing Level 4 p. 2

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Introduction This editing workbook introduces students to the rules of grammar and punctuation in a systematic and structured format. It provides multiple exercises to maximise learning and to ensure retention of the information in long term memory. Understanding grammar enables students to understand the reason for the mistakes they are making and thereby helps them avoid making the same types of errors in the future. Information is presented in two ways: Firstly as an editing task and secondly in specific ‘drill’ type exercises. The editing tasks expose students to different types of genres. Each task introduces new punctuation and grammatical concepts. The following two pages provide further specific practice in those concepts for those students who require extra drills. Similar to the other Cracking the ABC Code programs, once a concept is introduced it is then continually included throughout the remainder of the book, providing further opportunities for students to learn and reinforce this knowledge. Although the book can be used independently, it has been designed to reinforce the phonic knowledge taught in the Cracking the ABC Code Multisensory Reading Level 3C program and the exercises include the vocabulary introduced in this program. You may also find exercises in the Rules Rule book a useful supplement to the editing book. Instructions SAMPLEIt is recommended that students start at the beginning of the book because each exercise builds on the previous activities. Two approaches can be taken. If the concept being introduced is new to the student, or one that is a common error in the student’s work, it may be beneficial to begin with the drill exercise sheets. Once the student can competently complete these sheets, he or she can then attempt the editing exercise. Alternatively, the student can begin by completing the editing exercise and if there is a reason for concern, the drill exercises can then be completed. The number at the end of each line indicates the number of errors to be found on that line. At times, students will need to be encouraged to read the next line to find the error on the preceding line. This is particularly true for full stops, commas and verb tense. If the editing is being completed in a one-on-one teaching situation, it is recommended that as the student finds and corrects an error that the reason for the error be discussed. This information is provided on the accompanying page. In group situations, this information can be discussed as the work is being marked. For numerous homonyms and grammatical situations, it is often useful to substitute the word causing difficulty with one that the student knows is definitely correct. Examples of substitute words are provided throughout the book. For those students who have a poor understanding of the parts of speech, it may be useful to complete the final exercise sheet before starting the program. Editing Level 4 p. 3

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Trapped get out now with your hands in the air shouted the saylor, with his rifl pointng strayght at the stowawai’s heart. Kareflly and slowly, the stowawai krawled out from his hiding playce. (4) (4) (3) (3) I kan xplane the stowawae stuttered i am not (10) a traytor. I’m just a poor boy who wants to migrayt (2) to another kountry; a kountry where i kan (4) akkumulate some money. The saylor concentraited on the boy’s faice while he contemplayted his xplanation Kould the boy be trustd? without SAMPLEspeaking, the saelor pointd to a small cabn and (4) (2) (5) (3) indicayted that the boy should go inside. (1) weak from hunger and with his muscles kramping from being tucked into the small spaice, the stowawai stumbld towards the cabn. Once inside, the door was slammed shut and locked with a loud klick. the room was dark, but he kould just see the outline of the remaynder of some decaing food. (2) (1) (3) (3) (2) the saylor hurried awai to investigayte the stowawae’s story. Betraial was a constnt problm for piraytes, but a young, strong boy kould be put to good use! (4) (4) (2) Editing Level 4 p. 4

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Trapped 1 “2Get out now with your hands in the air3,4” shouted the 5sailor, with his 6rifle 7pointing 8straight at the 9stowaway’s heart. 10,11Carefully and slowly, the 12stowaway 13crawled out from his hiding 14place. 15 “I 16can 17expl18ain19, 20” the 21stowaway stuttered22. 23“24I am not a 25traitor. I’m just a poor boy who wants to 26migrate to another 27country; a 28country where 29I 30can 31accumulate some money. 32” The 33sailor 34concentrated on the boy’s 35face while he 36contemplated his 37explanation38. 39Could the boy be 40trusted? 41Without speaking, the 42sailor 43pointed to a small 44cabin and 45indicated that the boy should go inside. 46Weak from hunger and with his muscles 47cramping from being tucked into the small 48space, the 49stowaway 50stumbled towards the 51cabin. Once inside, the door was slammed shut and locked with a loud 52click. 53The room was dark, but he 54could just see the outline of the 55remainder of some 56decaying food. 57The 58sailor hurried 59away to 60investigate the 61stowaway’s story. 62Betrayal was a 63constant 64problem for 65pirates, but a young, strong boy 66could be put to good use! SAMPLE________________________________________________________________ 1, 15, 23 Use speech marks to indicate the beginning of spoken language. 2, 24, 41, 46, 53, 57 Use capital letters at the beginning of speech and the beginning of sentences. 3, 19 Place a comma at the end of spoken language and before speech marks. 4, 20, 32 Use speech marks to indicate the end of spoken language. 5, 8, 25, 26, 33, 36, 45, 55, 58, 60, 65 ‘ay’ is only used at the end of base words, not in the middle. 6, 7, 11, 14, 17, 37, 40, 43, 44, 50, 51, 63, 64 Every syllable needs at least one vowel. (Note: Although /ex/ is the ‘name’ of the letter ‘x’, the sound it represents is /cks/.) 9, 12, 21, 49, 56, 59, 61, 62 Only ‘ay’ is used at the end of base words. 10, 13, 16, 27, 28, 30, 31, 39, 47, 52, 54, 66 Use ‘c’ when the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’. 18, 42 ‘ai’ not ‘a-e’ 34, 35, 48 ‘a-e’ not ‘ai’ 22, 38 Use a full stop to indicate the end of a sentence. 24, 29 ‘I’ is always written as a capital. Editing Level 4 p. 5

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Sixty-six & ninety-nine: using speech marks Write what the king and the dog said inside the speech bubble. Then write their speech inside the inverted commas. ʻʻ ,ʼʼʼʼsaid the king. ʻʻ , ʼʼbarked the dog. SAMPLEPlace what is being said inside the speech bubble. 1. Come out with your hands up shouted the sailor. 2. I’m afraid whispered the stowaway. 3. Raymond raised his bayonet and yelled let the battle begin. 4. This estate has the best housing argued the salesman. 5. It’s a shame you are late said the coach because the game has already started. Editing Level 4 p. 6

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Sixty-six & ninety-nine: using speech marks Step 1: Underline the word that tells you that someone is talking (e.g., said, cried, shouted, whispered, yelled). Step 2: Put a square around the person that is doing the talking. Step 3: Put “ in front of the first word the person said. Step 4: Put a comma (,) after the last word the person said. Step 5: Put ” after the comma. 1. We must evacuate everyone immediately explained the administrator. 2. You must concentrate if you want to finish the remainder of your essay before lunch stated the teacher. 3. They must investigate the cause of the fire first complained the owner. 4. All plane flights to Albany will be delayed due to the approaching storm said the pilot. SAMPLERemember to use a capital letter after the “. 5. The distraught teenager cried I have dislocated my shoulder. 6. The castaway, with the straggly beard, whispered to the sailor please don’t betray me. 7. You’re late for baseball training stated Raymond. If the person is asking a question, put a question mark (?) instead of a comma. 8. Who is available to play baseball this season asked the coach. 9. Why didn’t you punctuate your work correctly demanded the experienced teacher. 10. The elderly waiter looked, turned his head and inquired can someone please straighten the glasses on this tray. Editing Level 4 p. 7

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22 Habour Layn (2) Darlington NSW 8066 21st Mach, 2034 (1) Dear Arthur, How are you daling. i hope your gharstly athritis is not causing you problms. Have finished your agument with Mak. i know that he really wishs to be your friend (5) (2) (5) I had mavellous time at canival i listened (5) to sevn xcellent sopranoes singing and bought (3) two new cadigans at a bagain price. I purchased surprise pacel and was rarther statled when i SAMPLEfound five toy submarine inside. (2) (5) (1) I’m particularly looking forward to seeing paliament (1) house have you been there. I believe that starff (4) are avaylable to take you on a tour for small chage. (3) I hope you have finished plarstering up the six hole in wall will you also finsh vanishing the wooden boxs before i return. (1) (6) (3) Regards Margaret Editing Level 4 p. 8

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22 1Harbour 2Lane Darlington NSW 8066 21st 3March, 2034 Dear Arthur, How are you 4darling5? 6I hope your 7ghastly 8arthritis is not causing you 9problems. Have 10you finished your 11argument with 12Mark13? 14I know that he really 15wishes to be your friend. I had 16a marvellous time at 17the 18carnival19. 20I listened to 21seven 22excellent 23sopranos singing and bought two new 24cardigans at a 25bargain price. I purchased 26a surprise 27parcel and was 28rather 29startled when 30I found five toy 31submarines inside. I’m particularly looking forward to seeing 32parliament house33. 34Have you been there35? I believe that 36staff are 37available to take you on a tour for 38a small 39charge. I hope you have finished 40plastering up the six 41holes in 42the wall43. 44Will you also 45finish 46varnishing the wooden 47boxes before 48I return49? Regards Margaret ______________________________________________________________________________ 1, 3, 4, 8, 11, 12, 18, 24, 25, 27, 29, 32, 39, 46 SAMPLE‘ar’not‘a’. 2, 37 ‘ay’ is only used at the end of base words, not in the middle. 5, 13, 35, 49 Place a question mark at the end of sentences asking a question. 6, 14, 20, 34, 44 Use capital letters at the beginning of sentences. 6, 14, 20, 30, 48 ‘I’ is always written as a capital. 7, 28, 36, 40 ‘a’ not ‘ar’. 9, 21, 22, 39, 45 Every syllable needs at least one vowel. (Note: Although /ex/ is the ‘name’ of the letter ‘x’, the sound it represents is /cks/.) 10 Every sentence needs a subject. 15, 23, 47 Add ‘es’ to words ending in ‘o’, ‘s’, ‘x’, ‘z’, ‘ch’ and ‘sh’ (sopranos in an exception). 16, 26, 38 ‘a’ is an ‘article’ that is used in front of a noun and indicates that the noun refers to any item. 17, 42 ‘the’ is an article that is used in front of a noun and indicates that the noun refers to a specific item. 19, 33, 43 Use a full stop to indicate the end of a sentence. 31, 41 Add ‘s’ to indicate ‘lots of’. Editing Level 4 p. 9

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Question or statement???? Put a ? at the end of those sentences which are asking a question. 1. Did you witness the disaster that occurred in the harbour last March. 2. The soprano opera singer had an argument with her campaign manager. 3. Was there a particular cardigan that you wanted to buy at the plaza. SAMPLE4. How many bargains did you get at the carnival. 5. There is no margin for error when you are investigating sabotage. 6. A bill was passed in parliament to provide extra funding for people with arthritis. 7. Are you able to varnish my nails with that marvellous nail polish. 8. Margaret was given a parcel to give to the sailors on the submarine. 9. Who dumped the old plaster into the dilapidated mine shaft. 10. Can you lend me some castor sugar for the cake I’m contemplating making. Editing Level 4 p. 10

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full stop or question mark? . Find the end of each sentence. Put a full stop if it is a statement. Put a question mark if it is a question. 1. Did you see Craig at the carnival he had a marvellous time 2. Raymond startled the starving stowaway when he grasped his shirt what do you SAMPLEthink happened next 3. Who knows if a dislocated finger hurts will it hurt if you straighten it maybe you should ask a doctor 4. Are the staff at parliament paid well I would like a job there can you find out for me 5. There were bargains galore at the school gala day do you know what I liked best it was a ghastly blue cardigan Editing Level 4 p. 11

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New Yawk Times(1) Awckland (1) Orthorities are investigatng (2) the unlorful slorghter of (2) tautoises on a estayt near the (3) Orckland habour. the (3) dawghter of nearby (2) auchardist complayned that she kould hear a strange squorking noise koming from their every night SAMPLEduring awtumn. (2) (1) (2) (1) (1) Tortoise has lucky escape from torture. The remaynder of the estayt was explawed to look for more tortoises. sevn (2) (1) (2) tawtoises were found living (1) Starff from local police (2) in orful konditions in a old (3) staytion cortiously approached (2) daumitory. the shells of some (2) the estayt. they were (2) tautoises had been displaed (2) horrified to see the tautoises (1) on shelves in the dawmitory (1) being tawtured, cilled and (2) as aunaments. (1) then thrown into a cauldron. Police immediately arrestd (1) police are being kounselled (2) the kriminals responsible and (1) about there orful awdeal. (3) there going to be charged. it (2) the authau of this aticle (3) is hoped that their going to (1) applords the orthorities for (2) be sent to jail for a long time. they’re prompt action. (1) Editing Level 4 p. 12

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New 1York Times 2Auckland 3Authorities are 4investigating the 5unlawful 6slaughter of 7tortoises on 8an 9estate near the 10Auckland 11harbour. 12The 13daughter of 14a nearby 15orchardist 16complained that Tortoise has lucky escape from torture. she 17could hear a strange 18squawking noise 19coming from 20there every night during 21autumn. The 36remainder of the 37estate was 38explored to look for more tortoises. 39, 40Seven 41tortoises were found living 22Staff from 23the local police 24station 25cautiously approached the 26estate. 27They were horrified to see the 28tortoises being 29tortured, 30killed and in 42awful 43conditions in 44an old 45dormitory. The shells of some 46tortoises had been 47displayed on shelves in the 48dormitory as 49ornaments. then thrown into a cauldron. Police immediately 31arrested 50Police are being 51counselled the 32criminals responsible and 33they’re about 52their 53awful 54ordeal. going to be charged. 34It 55The 56author of this 57article is hoped that 35they’re going to 58applauds the 59authorities for be sent to jail for a long time. 60their prompt action. _____________________________________________________________________________ 1, 10, 29, 38, 41, 54 SAMPLE‘or’not‘aw’. 2, 13, 21 ‘au’ not ‘aw’. 3, 6, 25, 58, 59 ‘au’ nor ‘or. 4, 31, 40 Every syllable needs at least one vowel. 5, 18, 42, 53 ‘aw’ not ‘or’. 7, 15, 28, 48, 56 ‘or’ not ‘au’. 8, 44, 49 Use ‘an’ not ‘a’ when the noun begins with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u). 9, 16, 24, 26, 36, 37 ‘ay’ is only used at the end of base words. 11, 57 ‘ar’ not ‘a’. 12, 27, 34, 39, 50, 55 Sentences begin with a capital letter. 14 ‘a’ is an ‘article’ that is used in front of a noun and indicates that the noun refers to any item. 17, 19, 30, 32, 43, 51 Use ‘c’ for the /k/ sound at the beginning of words if the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’, otherwise use ‘k’. 20, 33, 35, 52, 60 their = ownership, there=place, they’re = they are. 22 ‘a’ not ‘ar’. 23 ‘the’ is an article that is used in front of a noun and indicates that the noun refers to a specific item. Editing Level 4 p. 13

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