Editing Level 3 (Sample)

 

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Introduces students to the rules of grammar and punctuation in a systematic and structured format.

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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm Editinga n b o cde pqr sf gt uhLevi vjwkelxl 3my znaobpcqdresftguhv wxyz ijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm Dr Lillian Fawcett CRACKING THE

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OTHER CRACKING THE ABC CODE RESOURCES Reading and Phonics Multisensory Reading Level 1 – designed to teach non-readers the basic sound-symbol relationship of the 26 letters of the alphabet. Multisensory Reading Level 2A – designed to teach beginning readers the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 2B – designed to teach early readers, who have some basic reading vocabulary, the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 3A – comprehensive 25 unit program (commencing reading age of at least 6.06 to 7.00 years) designed as an introductory course for younger students to teach the common graphemes. Multisensory Reading Level 3B – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes (commencing reading age of at least 7.00 years) for students 8 years and older. Multisensory Reading Level 3C – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes but using more challenging vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 7.06 to 8.00 years). Multisensory Reading Level 4 – 15 unit program covering the less common graphemes and incorporating difficult vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 10.00 years). Suitable for adolescents and adults. Spelling Multisensory Spelling Books 1 to 5 (300 most commonly used words graded according to level of difficulty). * Multisensory Spelling Books Levels A-T (Spelling Ages 5.00 – 15.06 years). Sound Hearing – designed to develop phonological awareness and auditory processing. Ender Bender – a card game requiring the application of spelling rules. SAMPLERules Rule – rule cards, nonsense word application and real word exercises. *It’s All Nonsense – a program that uses both nonsense and real words to teach students to spell by breaking words into syllables and phonemes and applying spelling rules. Editing Levels 1-4 - A series of graded books which require students to apply their phonological and spelling rule knowledge to correct errors in passages of varying difficulty. Writing Writing Creatively - A systematic program designed to develop students’ written expression skills. * Check website for availability and for more detailed information. © 2011, 2013 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com lfawcett@crackingtheabccode.com Cover Design: Hunt for Ideas (ideas@huntforideas.com) All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without written permission from the author. ISBN-13: 978-1482045635 ISBN-10: 148204563X

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CONTENTS PAGE Introduction & Instructions……………………………….….……… 3 Letter to Craig (ay, a-e, ai = /ay/) ………..……………..…….….….. 4 Capitals ……………………………………………..………….……. 6 Police Department Report (er, ir, ur = /er/ ).…………………..….…. 8 Full Stops…………………………………………………..……….. 10 Remarkable Calves (ar, a = /ar/)……….…………...……………….. 12 Speech Marks ……..………………………………..………..…….... 14 Garage Sale (oa, o-e, ow = /oa/) ………………….………...……..… 16 Plurals ……..……..……………………………………….....………. 18 Movie Review (ea, ee, ie, e-e = /ee/ ) …..………………...…………. 20 Question Marks...…………………..………………………..………. 22 Exclamation Marks ……………………………………………..…… 23 Things to See & Do in Toyland (oy, or = /oy/) …….………….……. 24 Commas ……..…………………………………………..…….……. 26 My Holidays (or, aw, au = /or/)…………………..………..……….... 28 SAMPLEContractions………………………………..…………………….…... 30 Shopping List (ow, ou = /ow/)………………………………….……. 32 Compound Nouns ………………………………………..…….……. 34 Homographs ………………………………………………….……… 35 Email to Grandma (u, oo= /oo/) ………………..……………….…… 36 Apostrophes – Possession ……………………….………..…………. 38 Sunday Times News Article (ie, i-e, i = /ie/)……………………….… 40 Verbs ….………………………………..………………………….… 42 Too Strange (y = /i/, /ie/, /ee/ )……….…..……….…………….……. 44 Adjectives….………………………………..…………………..……. 46 Halloween Party to do List (ew, ue, ui, i-e, oo = /ie/) ..………..…..… 48 Adverbs ……..…………………………………….………..…...…… 50 Exciting Science Report (ce, cy, ci = /s/)……………………..……… 52 Homophones …………………………………..……………...……… 54 Affect/Effect, Anything/Nothing, Its/It’s…..……………..………...... 55 Editing Level 3 p. 1

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Job Vacancies (ge, gi, gy = /j/)……………………………………… Abbreviations ….…………………………..……………………..… Proper Adjectives ………………………………………………...… 56 58 59 Shot (ph, gh= /f/) ……………………………………………………. 60 Paragraphs …………………………..………………………....…... 62 Asian Investigation (ti, si, ci = /sh/)………………………………... Abstract Nouns ….………………………………..………………… Conjunctions …….………………………………..………….…..…. 64 66 67 Letter to Cousin Angela (ou, a, o = /u/)……………………….…….. Subject/Predicate ..………………………..………………….……… Adverbial & Adjective Clauses ..…..……………………………….. 68 70 71 Come to the Fair (are, air, ear, ere = /air/) …………………………. 72 To/Two/Too ………………………………..………………...……… 74 Where/Were/We’re …………………………………………..……… 75 For Sale Notice (ch=/ch/, /sh/, /k/)……….…………………….……. 76 Antonyms …………………………..……………………….………. 78 Synonyms …………………………………………………………… 79 The Australian: News in Brief (i+vowel = /ee/, /ie/)………………… 80 Maintaining Tense …..………………………..……………….…….. 82 SAMPLECompound Verbs …………………………………………………… 83 Interview with Wally the Warlord (wo, wor, wa, war)..…….……… Personal & Object Pronouns …………...……………………...…… Possessive & Interrogative Pronouns ………………………..……… 84 86 87 Letter to Steve (ear, eer, ere = /eer/) …………….………………….. 88 Prepositions……………………………..……….………………..…. 90 Spooked (Silent Letters) ……………….……..……………….…….. 92 Clarity ………………………………………………………….……. 94 Mary’s Birthday Wish list (Tricky Words)………...…………….…. 96 Comparatives & Superlatives ……………………..…………..….…. 98 Few/Little, Much/Many ………………………………………..……. 99 Parts of Speech……………………………..…………………..…….. 100 Answers ………………………………..…………………………...... 101 Editing Level 3 p. 2

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Introduction This editing workbook introduces students to the rules of grammar and punctuation in a systematic and structured format. It provides multiple exercises to maximise learning and to ensure retention of the information in long term memory. Understanding grammar enables students to understand the reason for the mistakes they are making and thereby helps them avoid making the same types of errors in the future. Information is presented in two ways: Firstly as an editing task and secondly in specific ‘drill’ type exercises. The editing tasks expose students to different types of genres. Each task introduces new punctuation and grammatical concepts. The following two pages provide further specific practice in those concepts for students who require extra drills. Similar to the other Cracking the ABC Code programs, once a concept is introduced it is then continually included throughout the remainder of the book, providing further opportunities for students to learn and reinforce this knowledge. Although the book can be used independently, it has been designed to reinforce the phonic knowledge taught in the Cracking the ABC Code Multisensory Reading Level 3B program and the exercises include the vocabulary introduced in this program. You may also find exercises in the Rules Rule book a useful supplement to this editing book. Instructions SAMPLEIt is recommended that students start at the beginning of the book because each exercise builds on the previous activities. Two approaches can be taken. If the concept being introduced is new to the student, or one that is a common error in the student’s work, it may be beneficial to begin with the drill exercise sheets. Once the student can competently complete these sheets, he or she can then attempt the editing exercise. Alternatively, the student can begin by completing the editing exercise and if there is a reason for concern, the drill exercises can then be completed. The number at the end of each line indicates the number of errors to be found on that line. At times, students will need to be encouraged to read the next line to find the error on the preceding line. This is particularly true for full stops, commas and verb tense. If the editing is being completed in a one-on-one teaching situation, it is recommended that as the student finds and corrects an error that the reason for the error is discussed. This information is provided on the accompanying page. In group situations, this information can be discussed as the work is being marked. For numerous homonyms and grammatical situations, it is often useful to substitute the word causing difficulty with one that the student knows is definitely correct. Examples of substitute words are provided throughout the book. For those students who have a poor understanding of the parts of speech, it may be useful to complete the final exercise sheet before starting the program. Editing Level 3 p. 3

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23 railwai Parade Krab bay WA 6701 2nd mae, 6034 (2) (2) (2) Dear craig, (1) how are you? i’m having an amaizing time at krab (5) bae. i’m afrayd that it taiks a long time to get here. (5) however, the road is straghte and in good kondition. (3) to my dismae, we were detayned by a storm. i (4) estimaited thate the haylstones were the size of golf (3) balls. It was very paneful when one hit you. (1) although it is kold, I have done many things. i really (3) enjoyed walking on an old trale to see a rock shaiped (2) SAMPLElike a sante. ate the end of the trayl, a kind wayter (5) gauv me a cane of lemonaide. (3) take kare. (2) your friend raymond (1) (1) Editing Level 3 p. 4

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23 1,2Ralway Parade 3Crab 4Bay WA 6701 2nd 5,6May, 6034 Dear 7Craig, 8How are you? 9I’m having an10amazing time at 11,12Crab 13,14Bay. 15I’m 16afraid that it 17takes a long time to get here. 18However, the road is 19straight and in good 20condition. 21To my 22dismay, we were 23detained by a storm. 24I 25estimated 26that the 27hailstones were the size of golf balls. It was very 28painful when one hit you. 29Although it is 30cold, I have done many things. 31I really enjoyed walking on an old 32trail to see a rock 33shaped like a 34saint. 35,36At the end of the 37trail, a kind 38waiter 39gave me a 40can of 41lemonade. 42Take 43care. 44Your friend SAMPLE45Raymond ___________________________________________________________________________________________ 1, 6, 10, 14, 16, 17, 19, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 32, 33, 34, 37, 38, 39, 41 Incorrect grapheme for /ay/ - ‘ay’ is used on the end of base words. 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 29, 31, 35, 42, 44, 45 Use a capital letter at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns and when using ‘I’ by itself. 3, 12, 20, 30, 43 Use ‘c’ for /k/ when the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’; use ‘k’ when the next letter is ‘e’ or ‘i’. 26, 36, 40 The ‘e’ changes the preceding vowel from a short to a long sound. Editing Level 3 p. 5

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Capitals: proper nouns • Nouns are words that are the names of things that can be seen, touched, smelled or thought about. • A proper noun is a word that is used to name particular people, places or things. Proper nouns always begin with a capital letter. Remember that ‘I’ (when you are talking about yourself) is always written as a capital. Write in the capital letter for the words that are proper nouns. uncle amaze friday cape york rose lake malaysia SAMPLEbombay david player murray river aunty fay planter waiter beach road may mary mount fuji sister trail sprain jane donald duck asia forest eagle hailstone bay saint mary lemonade away new south wales albany mrs lacey brain france snake Editing Level 3 p. 6

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Capital letters • Capitals are used at the beginning of sentences and for the titles of books, plays, stories and songs. In titles use a capital for the first letter of ALL the words except for small words such as ‘a’, ‘an’, ‘and’, ‘of’, ‘to’, ‘at’, ‘by’, ‘with’ and ‘in’. Write in the capital letters as required. 1. it’s amazing that craig had the courage to complain to the waiter at the blue bay restaurant. 2. the band at all saints college was praised for the way they played the tune “when the saints go marching”. 3. my favourite television show is “where’s raymond?”. it is very funny SAMPLEand i can’t stop laughing. 4. “having a sprained ankle is very painful,” exclaimed miss mayfair sympathetically. 5. mr bayer from russia read the story “the three little pigs” to the children. 6. “i don’t tolerate bad behaviour,” dr spencer told the visitors at the denmark historical museum. Editing Level 3 p. 7

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perth police department (3) Police Report DAYT: TIME: PLAICE: 1st octobir, 2034 10.20 am 2 murmaid close pirth (3) (4) (2) on thersday, on the ferst day of octobur 2034 at (6) 10.20 am, police received an phone kall from burt (3) lane he claymed that his gerlfriend, shirley smith, (7) had been merdered. (1) the police went to the property at 2 mirmaid close (4) SAMPLEand found a kurly haired gerl lying on a derty kouch (5) close by was a empty pirple perse. (4) bert lane was very disterbed by the girl’s murdur and (5) went birserk when police suggested that he was (3) responsible however, the neighbour remembured (2) hearing the cherping of the berglar alarm and a (3) expurt found evidence that linked the mirder to an (3) pirson other than burt. (2) The investigaytion is still ongoing. (1) Editing Level 3 p. 8

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1Perth 2Police 3Department Police Report 4DATE: TIME: 7PLACE: 1st 5,6October, 2034 10.20 am 2 8,9Mermaid 10Close 11,12Perth 13On 14,15Thursday on the 16first day of 17,18October 2034 at 10.20 am, police received 19a phone 20call from 21Burt 22Lane23. 24He 25claimed that his 26girlfriend, 27Shirley 28Smith, had been 29murdered. 30The police went to the property at 2 31,32Mermaid 33Close and found a 34curly haired 35girl lying on a 36dirty 37couch38. 39Close by was 40an empty 41purple42 purse. 43,44Burt 45Lane was very 46disturbed by the girl’s 47murder and went 48berserk when police suggested that he was responsible49. 50However, the neighbour 51remembered hearing the 52chirping of the 53burglar alarm and 54an 55expert found evidence that linked the 56murder to 57a SAMPLE58person other than 59Burt. The 60investigation is still ongoing. Officer Mervin Brown ___________________________________________________________________________________________ 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 18, 21, 22, 24, 27, 28, 30, 31, 33, 39, 43, 45, 50, 59 Use a capital letter at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns and when using ‘I’ by itself. 4, 7, 25, 60 Incorrect grapheme for /ay/. 6, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, 26, 29, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 44, 46, 47, 48, 51, 52, 53, 55, 56, 58 Incorrect grapheme for /er/. 19, 40, 54, 57 Use ‘an’ not ‘a’ in front of adjectives and nouns that begin with a vowel sound. 20, 34, 37 Use ‘c’ for /k/ when the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’; use ‘k’ when the next letter is ‘e’ or ‘i’. 23, 38, 49 Use a full stop to indicate the end of a sentence. Editing Level 3 p. 9

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Full stops • Full stops are used to show the end of a statement. Each new statement must begin with a capital letter. Place a full stop at the end of each statement. Add in any commas that are required. 1. Joyce got food poisoning from eating oysters now she avoids oysters 3. The turquoise 2. Lloyd the Boy Scout was in a turmoil he didn’t know whether to hoist the flag or salute the royal family 4. SAMPLEShe was very buoy was bobbing in the waves the convoy of ships avoided hitting it 5. disappointed The loyal receiving an workers decided invoice was to boycott the unexpected the meeting they embroidery was not up to standard 6. Moisture had seeped into the didn’t agree with the appointment of the new manager building therefore 7. The tortoise was hoisted onto the man’s shoulder and returned to its cage its escape was annoying luckily it had been found in the foyer it was necessary to employ a maintenance man the repairs took one day 8. Flamboyantly the film star waved at the crowd her shirt embroidered with flowers was loved by everyone soon she was gone Editing Level 3 p. 10

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Full stops Put a cross if the group of words is not a complete statement. Put a full stop if it is a complete statement. 1. The young employees exploiting the tortoise 3. The boisterous young boy enjoyed the voyage 5. The oysters were kept moist to avoid being spoilt 2. The royal prince with the annoying grin 4. Hoisting the sail and avoiding the buoy SAMPLEPut in full stops, commas and capital letters so that this poem makes sense. A Silly Story I watched a horse making cakes I watched a lady eating snakes I watched an eagle flying kites I watched some boys dressed in tights I watched a dancer made of steel I watched a crane having a meal I watched a teacher chasing cats I watched some dogs wearing hats I watched the police flying away I watched a bird making hay I watched a farmer hung out to dry I watched some washing having a cry I watched a baby making frocks I watched a dressmaker in a box I watched an ant catching a mouse I watched a cat building a house I watched two men who saw these things And will confirm that I’m not lying. Editing Level 3 p. 11

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remakable carlves (4) i hat my kalves eating that gabage snaled the famer magaret just ignored him and carlmly kontinued feeding the hungry carlves th strange mixture of sadines, parsta and barnanas cmbined with marmarlade. (8) (5) (3) (3) (2) just look at how well everything grows in my (2) gaden margaet stayted quietly, showing the (6) farmir her barsket of tmartoes and rarspberries. yes, i know you are an remakable gadener, but SAMPLEmy karlves are not plants agued the famer. (5) (6) (6) i understnd daling pirred Magaret do you remembur the carlf that won ferst prize last year? (11) (4) yes rplied the famer gruffly. (6) it won furst prize bcause it ate my mixture rarther than grarss smerked margaret. (4) (6) Editing Level 3 p. 12

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1,2Remarkable 3,4Calves 5,6 “I 7hate my 8calves eating that 9garbage10,11” 12snarled the 13farmer14. 15,16Margaret just ignored him and 17calmly 18continued feeding the hungry 19calves 20the strange mixture of 21sardines, 22pasta and 23bananas 24combined with 25marmalade. 26,27“Just look at how well everything grows in my 28garden29,30” 31,32Margaret 33stated quietly, showing the 34farmer her 35basket of 36,37tomatoes and 38raspberries. 39,40“Yes, 41I know you are 42a 43remarkable 44gardener, but my 45,46calves are not plants47,48” 49argued the 50farmer. 51,52“I 53understand 54darling55,56” 57purred 58Margaret59. 60,61“Do you 62remember the 63calf that won 64first prize last year?” 65,66“Yes67,68” 69replied the 70farmer gruffly. 71,72“It won 73first prize 74because it ate my mixture 75rather than 76grass77,78” 79smirked 80Margaret. ___________________________________________________________________________________________ 1, 3, 8, 9, 12, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23, 25, 28, 32, 35, 37, 38, 43, 44, 46, 49, 50, 54, 58, 63, 70, 75, 76 Incorrect grapheme for /ar/. 2, 4, 5, 16, 27, 31, 40, 41, 52, 61, 66, 72, 80 Use a capital letter for titles, at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns and when using ‘I’ by itself. 6, 11, 26, 30, 39, 48, 51, 56, 60, 65, 68, 71, 78 SAMPLEUse speech marks to indicate the beginning and end of spoken language. 7, 33, 34, 57, 62, 64, 73, 79 Incorrect grapheme for /ay/, /er/. 10, 29, 47, 55, 67, 77 Use a comma to indicate the end of speech and phrases. It usually goes after the word that occurs before the subject and after conjunctions used at the beginning of sentences (e.g., however, therefore, although, consequently, etc). 14, 59 Use a full stop to indicate the end of a sentence. 18, 45 Use ‘c’ for /k/ when the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’; use ‘k’ when the next letter is ‘e’ or ‘i’. 20, 24, 36, 53, 69, 74 Every syllable contains at least one vowel. 42 Use ‘the’ in front of a noun when referring to a specific item, otherwise use ‘a’ or ‘an’ (before vowel sounds). Editing Level 3 p. 13

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