Editing Level 2 (Sample)

 

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Introduces students to the rules of grammar and punctuation in a systematic and structured format.

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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm Editinga b no cde pqr sf gt uhLevi vjwkelxl 2my znaobpcqdresftguhviwj kxlymz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm Dr Lillian Fawcett CRACKING THE

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OTHER CRACKING THE ABC CODE RESOURCES Reading and Phonics Multisensory Reading Level 1 – designed to teach non-readers the basic sound-symbol relationship of the 26 letters of the alphabet. Multisensory Reading Level 2A – designed to teach beginning readers the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 2B – designed to teach early readers, who have some basic reading vocabulary, the 30 most common graphemes one at a time. Multisensory Reading Level 3A – comprehensive 25 unit program (commencing reading age of at least 6.06 to 7.00 years) designed as an introductory course for younger students to teach the common graphemes. Multisensory Reading Level 3B – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes (commencing reading age of at least 7.00 years) for students 8 years and older. Multisensory Reading Level 3C – 12 unit program covering the most common graphemes but using more challenging vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 7.06 to 8.00 years). Multisensory Reading Level 4 – 15 unit program covering the less common graphemes and incorporating difficult vocabulary (commencing reading age of at least 10.00 years). Suitable for adolescents and adults Spelling Multisensory Spelling Books 1 to 5 (300 most commonly used words graded according to level of difficulty). * Multisensory Spelling Books Levels A-T (Spelling Ages 5.00 – 15.06 years). Sound Hearing – designed to develop phonological awareness and auditory processing. Ender Bender – a card game requiring the application of spelling rules. SAMPLERules Rule – rule cards, nonsense word application and real word exercises. *It’s All Nonsense – a program that uses both nonsense and real words to teach students to spell by breaking words into syllables and phonemes and applying spelling rules. Editing Levels 1-4 - A series of graded books which require students to apply their phonological and spelling rule knowledge to correct errors in passages of varying difficulty. Writing Writing Creatively - A systematic program designed to develop students’ written expression skills. * Check website for availability and for more detailed information. © 2012, 2013 Dr Lillian Fawcett www.crackingtheabccode.com lfawcett@crackingtheabccode.com Cover Design: Hunt for Ideas (ideas@huntforideas.com) All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without written permission from the author. ISBN-13: 978-1478266440 ISBN-10: 1478266449

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CONTENTS PAGE Introduction & Instructions………………………………..…..……… 3 The Traitor (ay, a-e, ai = /ay/) …………...……………..……...….….. 4 Contractions.………………………………………..…………...……. 6 Shirley’s Birthday Wish List (er, ir, ur = /er/)…….…………....….…. 8 Capitals……………………………………………………...….…….. 10 Letter to Margaret (ar, a = /ar/)……….…………....…….……..…….. 12 Question Marks …..………………………………..….…………….... 14 News Today (oa, o-e, ow = /oa/) …………………...………….…..… 16 Full Stops …..……..……………………………….……........………. 18 Books in Brief (ea, ee, ie, e-e = /ee/) …..……………….....…………. 20 Plurals…………… …………………………………….………..…… 22 Joyce’s Check List (oy, or = /oy/) ……………..….…………………. 24 Possessive .…..…………………………………………....…….……. 26 Caught (or, aw, au = /or/)………….……………..………...……….... 28 Speech Marks ……………………………..……………….…….…... 30 Police Report (ow, ou = /ow/)……………………………….….……. 32 SAMPLECommas ………..………………………………………...….….……. 34 All Goods Retailer (u, o o= /oo/) …………………………….….…… 36 Nouns ………..………...……………………….…………….………. 38 Verbs ………………..……………………………………...………… 39 High School Rules (ie, i-e, i = /ie/)………………..…………….….… 40 Compound Words .……………………..…………………….…….… 42 Conjunctions ………………………………………………….……… 43 Jobs Available (y = /i/, /ie/, /ee/) ……..…...….….……………...……. 44 Negative ↔ Positive.………………………..………….……..…..….. 46 Double Negatives ……………………………………….….....……… 47 Dear Gemma (ge, gi, gy = /j/)……………………………...….……… 48 Articles……. ….…………………………..……………...…….…..… 50 Some/Any ………………………………………………...…….……. 51 Cyner State School Student Report (ce, cy, ci = /s/)………….….…… 52 Prefixes …. …………………………………..……………....…….… 54 Suffixes …………………………………..……………...……..…...... 55 Editing Level 2 p. 1

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Chat Room (ew, ue, ui, i-e, oo = /ie/) ………………..………..…..… 56 Exclamation Marks ……………………………….………..…...…… 58 Idioms ……………………………………………………………….. 59 Christopher’s Diary (ph, gh = /f/) ……………..…….………………. 60 Categorisation………………………..………………………......…... 62 Clarity …………………………………………………………..…… 63 It’s Your Decision (ti, si, ci = /sh/)…...………….…………………... 64 Synonyms …… ….………………………….……..………………… 66 Antonyms....…….………………………………….………….…..…. 67 Snap Shot (ou, a, o = /u/)………………..……….…………….…….. 68 Homographs …… ………………………..…….…………….……… 70 To/For, Who’s/Whose .……………..……………………………….. 71 Warehouse Sale (are, air, ear, ere = /air/) ….……..…………………. 72 Adjectives . ………………………………..…….…………...……… 74 Adverbs ……..…. …………………………………..………..……… 75 Life’s a Challenge (ch = /ch/, /sh/, /k/)……….………..……….……. 76 Male↔Female .……………………..……………………….………. 78 Adult↔Baby ………………………………………………………… 79 The Australian (i+vowel = /ee/, /ie/)………………….……………… 80 Present↔Past Tense ..………………………..…….………….…….. 82 SAMPLEPresent↔Future Tense ……………………………….……………… 83 Wonderful Wonderland (wo, wor, wa, war)..………….…….……… 84 Prepositions ………………...…………...…………….………...…… 86 Interview with a Pioneer (ear, eer, ere = /eer/) ….……….………….. 88 Word & Sentence Order .…..…………..……….……….………..…. 90 Paragraph Order ………………………………………….…….……. 91 Email to Mr Knight (Silent Letters) ….……..……………...….…….. 92 Acronyms & Initialisms ..……………………………………………. 94 Homophones ……………………………………………………...…. 95 Dreaming Instead (‘ea’ head) ……………………………….……..… 96 Pronouns …………………………………………………….……..… 98 Ideas for Christmas Presents (Tricky Words)….……..…….……....... 100 Comparatives ……………………..…………..….………………….. 102 Superlatives ……………………………………………...……..……. 103 Parts of Speech……………………………..…………………..…….. 104 Answers ………………………………..……………………..…....... 105 Editing Level 2 p. 2

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Introduction This editing workbook introduces students to the rules of grammar and punctuation in a systematic and structured format. It provides multiple exercises to maximise learning and to ensure retention of the information in long term memory. Understanding grammar enables students to understand the reason for the mistakes they are making and thereby helps them avoid making the same types of errors in the future. Information is presented in two ways: Firstly as an editing task and secondly in specific ‘drill’ type exercises. The editing tasks expose students to different types of genres. Each task introduces new punctuation and grammatical concepts. The following two pages provide further specific practice in those concepts for students who require extra drills. Similar to the other Cracking the ABC Code programs, once a concept is introduced it is then continually included throughout the remainder of the book, providing further opportunities for students to learn and reinforce this knowledge. Although the book can be used independently, it has been designed to reinforce the phonic knowledge taught in the Cracking the ABC Code Multisensory Reading Level 3A program and the exercises include the vocabulary introduced in this program. You may also find exercises in the Rules Rule book a useful supplement to this editing book. Instructions SAMPLEIt is recommended that students start at the beginning of the book because each exercise builds on the previous activities. Two approaches can be taken. If the concept being introduced is new to the student, or one that is a common error in the student’s work, it may be beneficial to begin with the drill exercise sheets. Once the student can competently complete these sheets, he or she can then attempt the editing exercise. Alternatively, the student can begin by completing the editing exercise and if there is a reason for concern, the drill exercises can then be completed. The number at the end of each line indicates the number of errors to be found on that line. At times, students will need to be encouraged to read the next line to find the error on the preceding line. This is particularly true for full stops, commas and verb tense. If the editing is being completed in a one-on-one teaching situation, it is recommended that as the student finds and corrects an error that the reason for the error is discussed. This information is provided on the accompanying page. In group situations, this information can be discussed as the work is being marked. For numerous homonyms and grammatical situations, it is often useful to substitute the word causing difficulty with one that the student knows is definitely correct. Examples of substitute words are provided throughout the book. For those students who have a poor understanding of the parts of speech, it may be useful to complete the final exercise sheet before starting the program. Editing Level 2 p. 3

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The Traytor (1) Kraig wasnt afrade. He did’nt hesitat. He raysed his baionet and ran strayght at the trator yelling, “Youve betraied us!” SAMPLE“You cant cill me,”exklaymed the (5) (3) (3) (5) traitor as he eskapd along the trale. (3) Craig gazd at the landskap. Then, without delai, ran to the left of the estayt and wated at the end of the tral. (3) (1) (2) (1) “Youv’e got me,” said Raymond in dismae. He slapped Kraig on the back and the two boys went home to get some lemonaid. (1) (2) (0) (1) Editing Level 2 p. 4

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The 1Traitor 2Craig 3wasn’t 4afraid. He 5didn’t 6hesitate. He 7raised his 8bayonet and ran 9straight at the 10traitor yelling, “11You’ve 12betrayed us!” “You 13,14can’t 15kill me,”16,17exclaimed the traitor as he 18,19escaped along the 20trail. Craig 21gazed at the 22,23landscape. Then, without 24delay, ran to the left of the 25estate and 26waited at the end of the 27trail. “28You’ve got me,” said Raymond in 29dismay. He slapped 30Craig on the back and the two boys went home to SAMPLEget some 31lemonade. _______________________________________________________________________________ 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31 Incorrect grapheme for /ay/ - ‘ay’ is used on the end of base words. 2, 13, 15, 16, 18, 22, 30 Use ‘c’ for /k/ when the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’; use ‘k’ when the next letter is ‘e’ or ‘i’. 3, 5, 11, 14, 28 An apostrophe is used to indicate the location of the missing letters in a contraction. Editing Level 2 p. 5

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contractions • Apostrophes are used to show the place of the missing letters when two words are shortened into one word. SAY the shortened form of the two words in the boxes on the left. CROSS OUT the letter(s) that are missing in the shortened form. WRITE the shortened form in the box on the right hand side. REMEMBER to place an apostrophe in the same place as the missing letter(s). HINT: Usually the first word stays the same. I will she is SAMPLEcan not we are they had Change these contractions into two words. didn't we've I’m Editing Level 2 p. 6

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contractions Place the apostrophes where they are needed. “Id like you to illustrate your essay about bayonets straight away,” explained Raymond. “But, Im painting a landscape. I dont have time for this,” complained Craig. He wasnt going to waste his crayons on an essay. SAMPLEGails going to investigate a complaint. Shed heard that mayonnaise was being sold at an inflated price. “Its important that this matter is solved,”exclaimed Gail. To his dismay, Shanes got a stain on his blazer. Its a paint stain, but he doesnt know how it happened. Ive asked him to investigate a way to get rid of the stain as his mums not available to help. Maybe next time hell be more careful! Editing Level 2 p. 7

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shirley’s birthday wish list (4) its my berthdai on thursday and i wan’t to have a cercus party on satirday. ill be the bos and eat hambergers. id like this stuf: (7) (6) (4)  New certains and firniture in my bedroom (2)  Perple pirse (2)  Mirmayd with cerly hair (3)  Holidae to germany (2)  Interesting bookk  Sterdy swing sett SAMPLE Berdbath for the garden (1) (2) (1)  Cercular matt (2)  A ‘dont disturb’ signn (4)  Balloon’s that do’nt birst (3)  A trayn sett that wil go in revirse (4)  a nerse’s kitt (2) Editing Level 2 p. 8

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1Shirley’s 2Birthday 3Wish 4List 5,6It’s my 7,8birthday on 9Thursday and 10I 11want to have a 12circus party on 13,14Saturday. 15,16I’ll be the 17boss and eat 18hamburgers. 19,20I’d like this 21stuff:  New 22curtains and 23furniture in my bedroom  24Purple 25purse  26,27Mermaid with 28curly hair  29Holiday to 30Germany  Interesting 31book  32Sturdy swing 33set  34Birdbath for the garden  35Circular 36mat  A ’37,38Don’t 39Disturb’ 40sign  41Balloons that 42don’t 43burst  A 44train 45set that 46will go in 47reverse SAMPLE 48A 49nurse’s 50kit ___________________________________________________________________________________________ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 13, 15, 19, 30, 37, 39, 48 Use a capital letter at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns and when using ‘I’ by itself. 6, 11, 16, 20, 38, 41, 42 An apostrophe is used to indicate the location of the missing letters in a contraction. 7, 12, 14, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 32, 34, 35, 43, 47, 49 Incorrect grapheme for /er/. 8, 27, 29, 44 Incorrect grapheme for /ay/. 17, 21, 31, 33, 36, 40, 45, 46, 50 Use ‘ss’, ‘zz’, ‘ff’ and ‘ll’ at the end of short words with short vowels. Editing Level 2 p. 9

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Capitals: proper nouns • Nouns are words that are the names of things that can be seen, touched, smelled or thought about. • A proper noun is a word that is used to name particular people, places or things. Proper nouns always begin with a capital letter. Remember that ‘I’ (when you are talking about yourself) is always written as a capital. Write in the capital letter for the words that are proper nouns. thirty german burglar expert energy uncle burt SAMPLEcircus murder herself mermaid serpentine river birthday mercy thursday saturday way nurse purse perth sister birdbath shirley sturt forest tern bay interest murder alburny third sturdy water away curl western states miss saint bernard red river sister bertha birney Editing Level 2 p. 10

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Capital letters • Capitals are used at the beginning of sentences and for the titles of books, plays, stories and songs. In titles use a capital for the first letter of ALL the words except for small words such as ‘a’, ‘an’, ‘and’, ‘of’, ‘to’, ‘at’, ‘by’, ‘with’ and ‘in’. Write in the capital letters as required. 1. the mermaid had purple hair and a curly tail. 2. on saturday thirty children sang “happy birthday”. 3. “don’t disturb me,” i wrote on the SAMPLEcover of my book. 4. this thursday, miss berk will go to germany. 5. when will i have my birthday? 6. shirley went along mercy lane to get to burt’s bird circus. Editing Level 2 p. 11

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2 park road margaret River africa 68229 12th Mach, 2023 (2) (1) (1) (1) dear margaret, (2) how are you. do you Like your craft clarss. (6) Were having a mavellous Time in bali. we lov going to the makets and arsking for bagains. i hav a new cadigan, a flarsk And a glass mable for barney (5) (3) (6) (2) Every arfternoon, We go to the depatment store (3) to buy a barnana, tomarto, Marmalayd and (4) pasta. would you rarther kook or hav someone kook for you. SAMPLEtomorrow, well go to the harbour. we wil (4) (2) (4) visit the karnival and then tayk a tripp along the (3) koast to See a remakable carpentir carv (5) sardines from plarster. Hav you seen him. (3) my Partner and i hav had one narsty argument. (5) i did’nt wan’t himm to eat the galic because (4) it givs you a bad smel. do you like garlic. (4) would you like to hav a Barbeque when we retern. (3) (2) Lov martha (2) Editing Level 2 p. 12

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2 1Park 2Road 3Margaret River 4Africa 68229 12th 5March, 2023 6Dear 7Margaret, 8How are you9? 10Do you 11like your craft 12class13? 14We’re having a 15marvellous 16time in 17Bali. 18We 19love going to the 20markets and 21asking for 22bargains. 23I 24have a new 25cardigan, a 26flask 27and a glass 28marble for 29Barney Every 30afternoon, 31we go to the 32department store to buy a 33banana, 34tomato, 35,36marmalade and pasta. 37Would you 38rather 39cook or 40have someone 41cook for you42? 43Tomorrow, 44we’ll go to the harbour. 45We 46will visit the 47carnival and then 48take a 49trip along the 50coast to 51see a 52remarkable 53carpenter 54carve sardines from 55plaster. 56Have you seen him57? 58My 59partner and 60I 61have had one 62nasty argument. SAMPLE63I 64didn’t 65want 66him to eat the garlic because it 67gives you a bad 68smell. 69Do you like garlic70? 71Would you like to 72have a 73barbeque when we 74return75? 76Love 77Martha _____________________________________________________________________ 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10., 11, 16, 17, 18, 23, 27, 29, 31, 35, 37, 43, 45, 51, 58, 59, 60, 63, 69, 71, 73, 77 Use a capital letter for titles, at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns, and when using ‘I’ by itself. 5, 12, 15, 20, 21, 22, 25, 26, 28, 30, 32, 33, 34, 38, 52, 55, 62 Incorrect grapheme for /ar/. 9, 13, 42, 57, 70, 75 Use ‘?’ at the end of questions. 14, 44, 64, 65 An apostrophe is used to indicate the location of the missing letters in a contraction. 19, 24, 40, 54, 56, 61, 67, 72, 76 No English word ends in a ‘v’. 36, 48, 53, 74 Incorrect grapheme for /ay/, /er/. 39, 41, 47, 50 Use ‘c’ for /k/ when the next letter is ‘a’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ or ‘r’; use ‘k’ when the next letter is ‘e’ or ‘i’. 46, 49, 66, 68 Use ‘ss’, ‘zz’, ‘ff’ and ‘ll’ at the end of short words with short vowels. Editing Level 2 p. 13

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