Antonacci Lapiccirella - Collezionando I

 

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Acknowledgements: We would like to thank Gloria Gallucci and Caterina Caputo for writing most of the catalogue entries and Ferdinando Mazzocca for his fine study on the Antonio Canova drawing. Also thanks are due for their help and advice, Guido Briganti, Maria Cecilia Fabbri, Federica Giacomini, Francesca Lapiccirella Brass, Cesare Lampronti, Francesco Leone, Mario e Ruggero Longari, Marco Longari, Gianfranco Luzzetti, Fabrizio Magani, Francoise-Anne Maillet-Contoz, Domenico Piva, Cristiana Romalli, Maria Novella e Mattia Romano, Gregory Rubinstein, Matteo Salamon and Julien Stock. Dimensions are given in millimetres, with height before width.

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COLLEZIONANDO I Master Drawings Presented by Damiano Lapiccirella Francesca Antonacci PARIS Salon du Dessin 28th March - 2th April 2012 Damiano Lapiccirella Francesca Antonacci Fine Art Borgo Ognissanti, 56r Firenze Via Margutta, 54 Roma

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COLLEZIONANDO I Master Drawings Paris, Salon du Dessin 28th March 2th April 2012 Damiano Lapiccirella Francesca Antonacci Fine Art Firenze Borgo Ognissanti, 56r Tel. +39.055.284902 damiano@lapiccirella.eu www.lapiccirella.eu Roma Via Margutta, 54 Tel. +39.06.45433036 info@francescaantonacci.com www.francescaantonacci.com © Damiano Lapiccirella Francesca Antonacci Fine Art All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without the explicit written consent of the copyright owners. Catalogue entries by: Gloria Gallucci ( GG ) Caterina Caputo ( CC ) Ferdinando Mazzocca ( FM ) Maria Cecilia Fabbri ( MCF ) Fabrizio Magani ( FMag ) Printed in Italy by: Viol’ Art Firenze Translation: Francesca Lapiccirella Brass, Firenze

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COLLEZIONANDO I Master Drawings

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Ippolito Andreasi Mantova 1548 - 1608 1. A she-goat suckling two baby satyrs Pen and brown ink and wash. Inscribed in brown ink by a later hand: Giulio Romano. Laid down and inscribed in brown ink: Polido and S. R. n. 49 150 x 246 mm Provenance: The letters and the number inscribed on the backing, as well as the type of mount fixing shows that this drawing possibly comes from the collection of Niccolo’ Sagredo (1606-1676) Venice, and Zaccaria Sagredo (1653/1729)1. Among the painters of Mantova of the second half of the sixteenth century Andreasi appears to be one of the most well known. We don’t know much about his life. His date of birth seems to exclude a direct contact to Giulio Romano but Giulio’s influence is still very strong. Between 1567 and 1568 he was commissioned by the antiquarian Jacopo Strada to make drawings after Giulio’s work, many of which survive today. Around 1580 he worked in the Corte Vecchia in Palazzo Ducale, Mantova as well as the Castle of Goito. In 1592 he was invited to make a project for the façade of the Duomo of Milano and in 1599 he still appeared among the architects paid for its construction. He was also famous for his designs for stage sets. In 1608 at the age of sixty he was murdered by his wife and her lover. There are a large number of drawings by Andreasi and Bertani after Giulio Romano’s works, but like the present example Andreasi’s style has his own personality in the way he uses his pen and his drawn facial types. In the present drawing he has copied the center left group in the foreground of the fresco on the west wall in the Marriage Feast of Cupid and Psyche, datable after 1528, in the Palazzo del Te, Mantova. We therfore have two possible dates for this drawing the first from letters from the antiquarian, Jacopo Strada, who commissioned Ippolito in 1567-68 to make drawings after the Palazzo del Te frescoes. The other possibility is recorded in a letter written by Andreasi in 1587 from the Palazzo Te where he writes that he has drawn a satyr to be painted in the Camera dei Frutti in Goito. A copy of this drawing was on the New York art market in 1971. ( GG )

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Italo - Flemish School circa 1580 2. Diana and Acteon Pen and brown ink and wash on blue paper, heightened with white. Made up from two pieces of paper. 270 x 455 mm Numbered on the verso in black chalk: K 238; A0146; 25 A very popular subject the sheet, with its distinctive facial types has defied attribution. Suggestions, but none convincing, have been to: Hans Speckaert, Joseph Heintz, and other artists working at the time of Rudolph II. When the goddess Diana was hot and weary from the hunt, she went to a woodland cave to bathe in the clear waters of a pool fed by a spring. Entering the arched grotto, she handed her javelin, quiver and bow to one of her nymphs and her cloack to another. A third nymph bound her long hair into a knot while others drew water in large jars from the spring and poured it over her. At that very moment Acteon, who had been hunting on a mountain nearby, was making his way through the unfamiliar woods with hunting dogs and came to the cave where Diana was bathing. The nymphs shrieked at his sight of a man and rushed to shelter their naked and blushing mistress. Surrounded by her nymphs, Diana turned aside and looked back over her shoulder. Then bending as though she wished her arrows were at hand, she scoped up some water, which was at hand, and sprinkled it in Acteon’s face, challenging him to tell others, if he could, how he had seen her without her clothes. Suddenly antlers started growing where the water touched Acteon’s brow and he was changed into a stag. Even his own hunting dogs did not recognize him and, thinking he was a wild animal, chased him and tore him to pieces1. A very popular subject this sheet with its distinctive facial types has defied attribution. Suggestions, but none convincing, are to: Hans Speckaert, Joseph Heintz, and other artists working at the time of Rudolph II. ( GG )

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Giovanni Bilivert Florence 1585 - 1644 3. Study for Saint Agnese Red and black pencil on blue paper 130 x 102 mm Provenance: Florence, private collection Literature: P. Contini, Apocrifi bilivertiani, e altro, «Paragone», 7, 1986, pp. 53-69. This study is the only preparatory drawing known so far for the Santa Angnese painting, (fig. 1) signed and dated by Bilivert, 1629, part of the Luzzetti Collection in Florence. The way the pencil is used to represent the figure, and its fainted hand towards the chest, evoke the 1629 oil painting. In Roberto Contini publication of the canvas (1986, pp. 53-54, fig. 1) the Saint is entirely depicted and seated on a high-backed chair, along with the traditional lamb crouched on the lower left side. However, there are few light variations compared to the drawing, such as the hairstyle and the head’s inclination degree of the Saint’s prayerful face. Furthermore, the original format of this drawing was probably bigger and containing others partial drafts of the same figure - as Bilivert used to do. In this work, the artist used a typical technique of his: or rather the contrast among colours, in this specific case he is alternating the sanguine to the bold black. This is as characteristic as his vivid and vibrating way of sketching, which is almost shaded, an effect given by the light pressure of the technical medium. The sensitive series of chiaroscuro gradations is given by concise and irregular short lines at the edges of both neck and cheeks, and also by those wide curls that are falling onto her shoulders. The white ivory of the skin, typical of Furini’s manner, gives great softness to the drawing. Regarding Furini, Bilivert has been « a prepared interpreter » who postponed the forcedly pathetic and sentimental face expression, with half-closed lips and turgid gaze raised to the sky, that is considered to be a traced physiognomy of « an encoded repertoire of types » (Contini, 1985, p. 27). The 1629 date affixed to the Santa Agnese painting places this oeuvre, and the associated drawing, into Bilivert’s most flourishing period of commissions. However, due to measures disparity with the painting of analogous subject mentioned ab antique in Rosso’s Florentine house, the date under consideration is not clearly identifiable (cfr. Contini, 1985, p. 160). To this year also date back Pecchioli’s Assumption of Virgin Mary in Pisa - to be noted the physiognomic Fig. 1 Giovanni Bilivert, Santa Agnese, Florence, Gianfranco Luzzetti collection similarity between our Saint and Saint Catherine kneeled on the left - as well as the Crucifixion in the Dome of Pisa. To the following year, belongs instead Cleopatra, today held at Montecitorio, whose preparatory draft is preserved at

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Actual size the Uffizi (n. 9636 F). This work has several stylistic connections with the drawing under present consideration, for instance the red and black chalk used to draw it (for this draft and the drawings above cited cfr. Contini, 1985, pp. 34-38, 93-98, schede 27-32). (MCF)

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Marco Ricci Belluno 1676 - Venice 1730 4. A mountainous landscape with village Pen, brown ink and wash 200 x 285 mm Numbered on the verso in black chalk : A075 Provenance: Almost certainly from Marco Ricci’s folio volume, the property of Dr. Benno Geiger which were dispersed in lots at Sotheby’s on 8 Dec. 1920 lots. 259-72; Italico Brass, Venice; Venice private collection; Florence private collection. Exhibited: Bassano del Grappa, Palazzo Sturm, Marco Ricci, 1 Sept. – 30 Nov. 1963, p.136 plate 107; Groningen, Pictura, 18 c. Eeuwse Venetiaanse Tekeningen, 24 Mei - 4 Juli, 1964, no. 77 p. 39, and the same exhibition and catalogue, Rotterdam, Museum Boymans - van Beuningen, 29 Juli – 13 September, 1964. Literature: G.M. Pilo, Otto nuove acqueforte ed alter aggiunte grafiche a Marco Ricci, in Arte Veneta, XV, 1961, p. 172 . Clearly influenced by Titian, this charming landscape is drawn on different levels with two peasants resting in the left foreground. The village in the background is typical of the area of Cadore, where both Ricci and Titian were from. It is almost certain that it comes from the album that consisted of eighty-eight leaves that was inscribed MARCI RICCI BELLUNENSIS PICTORIS EXIMII SCHEDAE. Other studies from the same source were bought at the time of the 1920 sale by The British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum Oxford1. Painter and etcher. He was the nephew and pupil of Sebastiano Ricci, with whom he collaborated in the painting of landscape in Florence in 1706-07 and numerous occasions thereafter. He probably went to Rome and also to Milan, where an encounter with Magnasco was of particular importance. From 1708 to 1710 he worked in England as a scenographer together with Pellegrini, and again from 1712 to 1716 with Sebastiano Ricci. On his return trip to Venice, passing through Flanders and Low Countries, he visited Paris. Marco Ricci renewed Venetian landscapes painting just as Sebastiano Ricci had renewed history painting. Essential to Marco’s art was the example of Titian, with whom he had in common the direct visual experience of the landscape of the region of Cadore. Also important was the influence of the works of Salvator Rosa, Dughet, and Pieter Mulier (Tempesta), and Luca Carlevaris’ Venetian-Roman topographical views and paintings of ruins. In his romantic landscapes Marco Ricci was the precursor of Piranesi. Ricci began to etch in 1723, but more numerous are the etchings made by others after his designs. Giuseppe Zais was his pupil and direct follower, and Zuccarelli, Canaletto, and Guardi all felt his influence. The grater part of his drawings, about three hundred, are at Windsor. Like the Windsor collection of Sebastiano’s drawings they came from Joseph Smith, the English Consul in Venice. ( GG )

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Sante Piatti Venezia 1687 - 1747 c. 5. Standing figure of a disciple Pen and brown ink and wash 235 x 121 mm Numbered lower right in black ink: A. i 8; numbered on the verso in black ink: AO113 Drawn on the back of a fragment of a letter This fast and lively drawing could be a study for a disciple watching either The Assumption of the Virgin or The Transfiguration. In The Assumption the apostles assist the Virgin into heaven and as the New Testament says“ Suddenly a light from heaven shone round them; they fell to earth, and the holy body was taken up into heaven by angels”1. In The Transfiguration Jesus took Peter, John and James to the mountain to pray. There before their eyes Christ was transfigured. Little is known about this artist, a pupil of Giuseppe Diamantini who worked almost exclusively in Venice. There are a number of alterpieces by him that show the influence of Sebastiano Ricci. There are a number of drawings attributed to him by “The Reliable VEnetian Hand”see Alessandro Bettagno, Disegni di una collezione veneziana del Settecento, Venice, Fondazione Giorgio Cini, 1966, under number 78. ( GG )

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