Spyglass: Volume LIV | Issue I | October 2012

 

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Freshman football team "socks it" to leukemia

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pyglass pg 4 Foreign exchange students at JHS pg 6 New classes on campus pg Members of freshman football team “sock-it” 8-9 to leukemia pg 11 Joplin alum honored as “Young World Changer” Joplin High School Joplin, MO 11 & 12 Campus: 101 N. Range Line Rd, Bldg. D 9 & 10 Campus: 310 W. 8th Street Franklin Tech: 420 S. Grand Volume LIV Issue 1 October 2012

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DISCOVER M RE BUCKLE CHARLOTTE RUSSE HOT TOPIC RUE21 ULTA VICTORIA’S SECRET 3rd & Rangeline Road VisitNorthparkMall.com | 417.781.2121 420 S. Grand Providing outstanding career/technical educational programs that offer students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential for employment in increasingly complex work settings. Special thanks to all business patrons for making this publication possible!

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October 2012 Foreign exchange students from across the globe share 4their unique experience 5Return of boys swim team making big splash among JHS students 10JHS teacher tells of an artistic summer 11Joplin alum recognized for “changing the world” one young art student at a time JHS junior excels as cross country athlete Dancer and cheerleader 12recognized as All-American Staff member profiles 2012 election presidential candidates Link crew and science research classes make big 6impact at JHS 13First time voters at JHS, what the election means to them Documentary to feature JHS 7students powering through tough circumstances Freshman football team 8shows support for teammates with leukemia 14Point-counterpoint: Spyglass staff on graduating at semester Technical advice, what can be done to make macbooks run quicker VISIT US ONLINE AT www.jhs spyglass. com Spyglass is a student publication of Joplin High School in Joplin, Mo. All articles are student produced, and all opinions are those expressed by a member of the staff. Spyglass is produced twice per semester, and is delivered to all stu- dents, faculty, and staff of Joplin High School, as well as to local businesses supporting the Spy- glass. The Spyglass Online, www.jhsspyglass.com is updated weekly. Spyglass Staff Shelby Hass, Editor Kylie Davis, Asst. Editor Rylee Hartwell, Business Manager Jenna Herr Lexi Brown Thea Voutiritsas Miah Allison Zach Prickett Cassie Lloyd Michael Jensen Mrs. Mary W. Crane, Adviser Dear Reader, The past year has been a challenge for all of us at JHS. Students and staff alike have experienced numerous ups and downs. As editor of the Spyglass, I speak for the entire staff when I say our publication has not been excluded from the constantly changing dynamic that is 21st Century learning. Dating back to 1918, the Spyglass has been recording the history of Joplin High School in the format of a printed newspaper layout. Today, the Spyglass continues to record that history...in the form of a magazine and online publication. As our reader, you are a vital part of this publication. Your input is among great value to the entire staff. We encourage that any expression of opinions be directed to one of our staff members. Thank you for your continued readership and support! Shelby Hass, Editor Please direct all correspondence, letters to the editor, news ideas, and other material for the staff to either Mrs. Crane, any staff member or e-mail: shelbyhass@joplinschools.com pyglass

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Freshman football team to leukemia: By Shelby Hass Many are familiar with October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But throughout the month of September, the Joplin High freshman football team raised awareness of another form of cancer: leukemia, by sporting orange socks during each of their games. The team made the decision to wear the socks over a month ago, says Coach Tobin Schultz, in support of two teammates diagnosed with the specific form of cancer. Antwon Hines (diagnosed age 10), and Natal Bay (diagnosed age 5) are both currently in remission from leukemia, a form of cancer of the blood or bone marrow characterized by an abnormal increase of immature white blood cells. “I was really young. But I remember being scared because I could tell my parents were scared,” said Bay. “I’ve been in remission for nine years now.” Hines is currently undergoing treatment in the form of a chemotherapy pill, which he will be taking each day for the rest of his life. This form of treatment, accord- ing to Hines, is used to suppress the effects of leukemia, by helping the body grow new white blood cells. Bay underwent a different form of treatment, which was at the time, an experimental form of chemotherapy. “My parents had the choice to choose between what Antwon is doing now and the experimental treatment,” said Bay. “They couldn’t “Because the leukemia and chemotherapy had weakened my immune system, my lungs couldn’t handle it the same way they normally would. It affected my breathing at first, so we went back to the hospital and learned there was a fungus in my lungs. They ended up cutting from my ribs all the way “Being a teammate is so much more than playing for the same team. Football is a brotherhood.” -Netal Bay, bring themselves to choose, so they put it in a randomizer (computer program used to make random selections).” Bay lost all of his hair and suffered nausea as a result of the treatment, but after six months in the hospital, the cancer had seemingly disappeared and he was released. It wasn’t until several weeks after his release that Bay returned to the intensive care unit. “I had visited my uncle’s house while it was being built and I must have inhaled some of the sheetrock,” said Bay. to my back Freshman to remove the fungus.” Due to the surgery, Bay was hospitalized for an additional three months. Coincidentally, Hines and Bay both received treatment at Children’s Mercy in Kansas City. “It’s funny to think we both went to the same hospital to get treatment for the same disease, and now we play for the same football team,” said Bay. Purchasing a pair of orange socks for each of the players, the team Photo by Gabriella Torres

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Players sport orange socks through month of September in support of teammates under remission Photo by Gabriella Torres Photo by Thea Voutiritsas decided as a whole to wear them in support of Hines and Bay. Junior varsity offensive lineman, Grant Shurley, believes the freshman team is an example to older generations of players as well as generations to come. “It’s really moving to see all the freshmen do that, not just one of them, but all,” said Shurley. “They went out and did that as a team which is really cool.” The team has started the year off 5-0, and Shurley believes if they stick with the way they are performing now, they hold a promising future for JHS football. Having first gaining clearance from a doctor before being allowed to play the contact sport, Hines and Bay both agree that such support from their team has meant a lot to them. “When I found out the team was going to be wearing the socks I got really excited for the season,” said Hines. “I can’t wait to see the way the rest of the season turns out.” Changing their outlook on the meaning of a team, the act of wearing the orange socks has created a special bond between the freshmen players. “Being a teammate is so much more than playing for the same team,” said Bay. “Football is a brotherhood.” Being told that he had a 20 percent chance to live, Bay feels there is a lesson to be learned from each of the players’ experiences with leuke- mia. “Stay strong, keep in it, don’t give up, always have hope,” he said. According to Hines, an experience such as what he and Bay have gone through transfers to the way they play football, and that rather than hin- dering his performance as an athlete, it has taught him not to fear the game. “I’ve learned that even though you can be scared and terrified, or you may not think you can get through something, you can still power through it,” said Hines. Both Hines and Bay plan to continue playing foot- ball through high school, each pursu- ing an athletic scholarship to play at the collegiate level. “It doesn’t matter where I end up,” said Bay. “I’m always going to remember this team and what they’ve taught me.” Freshmen football players, Antwon Hines (front) and Netal Bay (back), sport their Joplin Eagles polos on game day. The two players are both in remission from leukemia, a form of cancer characterized by an abnormal increase of immature white blood cells.

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JHS ART TEACHER, SETH WOLFSHORNDL, EARNS THE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME, SPENDING A THIRD OF HIS SUMMER IN GLACIER NATIONAL PARK AS AN ARTIST IN RESIDENCE. STORY BY THEA VOUTIRITSAS BACKGROUND IMAGE ILLUSTRATED BY SETH WOLFSHORNDL “ It’s a rare opportunity for an artist to go somewhere and relax for a month and just clients giving me feedback and suggesting changes,” he said. Though he has plenty create,” said Seth Wolfshorndl, of talent as an art teacher, his but that is exactly what he got to experience helped him with one do with his entire month of June. class, which was a new addition Known to his students to the classes offered at JHS: as Mr. Wolf, the twelve-year photography. Wolfshorndl says JHS art teacher snagged the the practice he got behind the rare opportunity to be an artist in camera and the photos he took residence at the Glacier National would both be helpful in teaching Park in Northwest Montana. Not this class. only was his stay at the park a The artist says this chance to grow as an artist, but experience was certainly a great he also got to reconnect with one, filled with many memories, many relatives. and a surprising one in particular. “I grew up in Montana, “I learned how to get so I had a bat out a lot of “I APPRECIATE THAT of a cabin! family members NATIONAL PARKS HAVE THIS The first time I saw living not PROGRAM – THAT THEY CARE it I was all even an by myself. hour from ENOUGH TO HAVE ARTISTS COME I thought the park. They IN. THEY ACTUALLY SUPPORT I heard something would ART AND HAVE ARTISTS COME hit the spend several IN. THEY HAVE ARTISTS COME window, but it was nights with IN EVERY YEAR AND CREATE a bat about me since there was a lot of ARTWORK.” -SETH WOLFSHORNDL four feet away from me,” he space in the cabin. JHS TEACHER explained. “We There was ARTIST IN RESIDENCE, GLACIER learned if someone with me, I NATIONAL PARK you turn the lights would say, off, they almost every night,” he said. thought they were outside and The artist certainly they would fly around looking didn’t let the full house conflict for food. My daughter and her with his creativity. In fact, it was cousins actually ended up nam- his mother who suggested that ing some of the bats. We had to he look into the residency pro- patch up the walls here and there gram after seeing a post about to keep them from getting in.” it on Glacier National Park’s Patched walls and pet bats Facebook page. aside, what Wolfshorndl gained “She sent me the link from this experience goes far and I checked it out. I wouldn’t deeper than his pen and paper. have even known about it if “I appreciate that it weren’t for her,” said Wolf- national parks have this program shorndl. – that they care enough to have After doing some artists come in. They actually research, he found the park was support art and have artists come looking for an artist to update the in. They have artists come in graphics in their Junior Ranger every year and create artwork.” book. He had plenty of experi- With his experience ence illustrating for a children’s teaching young artists combined series, so he sent in his portfolio. with his most recent opportunity, The park then decided he was Wolfshorndl gives a word of the right man for the job. advice for aspiring artists: Wolfshorndl claims his “Be creating all the stay at the park helped him grow time. Don’t think you have to as an artist in many ways. wait until you have a job to be “It allowed me to creative. You can do it all the improve my illustration skills and time. Keep your eyes open for gave me more experience work- opportunities like this, because ing with a team of clients. There there’s a lot of neat things that was a lot of collaboration with can come of it.”

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Joplin alum honored as young world changer Story and photos by Lexi Brown are chosen specifically for young people who want to make a difference. Starting Art Feeds at receives, the closer they are to having the funding to reach all 16 schools. They recently were program, suggested the students interested be part of Art Feeds during school. Bourne loved the Art Feeds is a non-profit organization that targets the 19 and having people tell her all along that she was just too young to start a non-profit, she said it was an encouragement to have nominated in the Chase Grant. The Chase Grant will donate $5,000,000 among 196 eligible charities who receive the most idea, being such a huge advocate for young people creating change. Bourne talked to every link crew classes about how healing of young children that the support of something so big. votes, accepted the nominations, being young is an advantage to have undergone trauma through Will Norton, an active partici- and fulfill eligibility requirements. creating change. creative healing, with painting, pant in the program encouraged Art Feeds was up against photography, dance and much Bourne to apply for the grant 7,000 other causes and more. This year Art Feeds was consistently. She was still skepti- received $20,000 for being recognized on the VH1 Do Some- cal about applying. With a short one of the next 50 runners- “Applying for the up. With the 2012-2013 school year, Art Feeds has also made their way into Joplin award helped me High Schools cadet teaching program, so that students can be interns for two hours cope.” -Meg Bourne Founder of Art Feeds during the day. “We love our interns! They bring so much energy and they are wonderful with the kids. They also bring new ideas for Art Feeds,” said Bourne. “All 10 interns help thing Awards for being “young period of time before the applica- a ton with the workload at world changers.” tion deadline, Bourne was going the office.” Since 1966, DoSomething.org through what she described as Tobin Shultz, coordina- has honored the nations best a messy email inbox, when she tor for the cadet teaching young world-changers that are 25 came across a tweet from Will years and younger. Entrants to encouraging her to apply, as if the competition are strictly judged it was in real time. on how they have truly and pas- So, ultimately it was for Will, sionately impacted their commu- for whom she wanted to do nity, according to Do Something. her best. Bourne considers Five finalists were selected this this her way of dealing with the year for the awards, given their tornado personally. particular projects, a $10,000 “Applying for the award grant and making their work helped me cope,” said Bourne. eligible for the grand prize of The process from being an $100,000. applicant to a finalist was a The finalists were; Katia seemingly endless advance. Gomez, creator of Educate2Evn- Bourne completed 15 different sion whice provide second- interviews; eventually she ary education to the youth in was called back with follow Honduras; Manyang Rang Kher up questions, and some “red founder of Humanity Helping flags” that they said needed to Sudan, designed to improve lives be cleared. of Sudanese refugees and battle Nervous that there would the problems of an entire popula- be bad news, Bourne asked tion; Danny Mendoza, creator of everyone to leave the Art Together We Rise, a youth led or- Feeds office. She proceeded ganization dedicated to programs to Skype with affiliates of Do that bring a sense of normalcy Something. Bourne received and stability in foster care, but news that she had been also allows foster care children selected as a finalist for the Do to make their own choices in Something Awards. life; Seth Maxwell creator of The According to Bourne, Thirst Project which raises aware- $10,000 is the average ness to bring solutions to the amount of money it takes to global water crisis; Meg Bourne for her work in creating Art Feeds. The winner of the $100,000 grant ended up being Educate2Envision’s founder Katie provide weekly lessons for an entire school each year. Art Feeds can provide continual healing through art. Art Feeds isn’t just in one Above,top: Senior Audrey Cox lends a hand at the Art Feeds Kaboom Build. Cox is one of the Art Feeds Cadet Teaching Interns, which is a group of hand-selected JHS volunteers who donate their time to the organization. Gomez. To be chosen as a finalist was a huge deal for said Bourne, because the Do Something Awards school; they’re in 10 schools, with a goal of 16 schools--every elementary school in Joplin. The more grants Art Feeds Above, bottom: Art Feeds Founder, Meg Bourne (far right), presents her cause to members of the Joplin Community. The nonprofit organization has earned rocognization by the Do Something Awards for its efforts to reach children through creative healing.

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Lexi Brown JHS seniors voting for the first time by Zachery Prickett As the 2012 presidential elections draw near, the race is heating up. In Joplin, there will be many new eligible voters. In the United States, 16.8 million “youth” will be eligible to vote for the first time, according to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE). These “youth” are determined by CIRCLE to be citizens ages 18 to 29. Many of the newly turned adults are excited about their abilities to vote. “I like the idea that I get to have somewhat of a say in how my country will run in the future,” said JHS senior, Johnny Presley. Presley turned 18 years old July 4, 2012, and plans to vote in the upcoming election. “It’s part of your duty as an American to participate in the democratic process,” said Presley. He claims that, even though every day there seems to be some new gaffe to draw attention away from the candidates, he considers himself up to date on the issues. One of the biggest issues he’s concerned about is ObamaCare. Local and state officials have been making their rounds in Joplin, and Missouri Governor Jay unqualified leaders. Nixon is not an exception. Nixon “I’m voting for Mitt Romney, [be- stopped by the 11-12 campus in cause] in my opinion, he’s just the late August to speak to a group better of the two worst choices,” of senior students. Nixon sees a said Presley. shift in how young voters make Hankins and Hank Millard, decisions. another JHS senior, agree that “In the past, young voters have the national debt is one of the voted closely like their parents,” most significant issues in this said Nixon. “In the past three or year’s election. The current debt four years, this has been different, is approximately a whopping $16 because of the arrival of the infor- trillion. mation age. We have had the sys- “National debt is troubling,” said tem controlled by older folks, and Millard. “We need to get some “Vote as soon as kind of plan in place to reduce it. you can, get It’s unrealistic to think we can get informed, and vote every time.” it out of the way immediately, but we need to at least get some steps in place to reduce it, -Governor Jay Nixon not expand it.” Regardless of the feelings about who “should” win, now young people are becoming there are split feelings about who more informed on the issues. will win. Having the vote reflect younger “I would guess that President folks’ issues is important.” Obama will win, mainly because Despite preferences, there are I think the Republicans are too some who would rather not vote. divided on Romney,” said Millard. “I don’t feel I should be voting if I Millard declined revealing whom don’t agree with he would vote for, but encourages Students pay attention to Governor Jay Nixon as anyone’s side,” everyone to vote for whoever they he speaks. Nixon stopped by Joplin High School said Tyler Han- support. 11-12 campus earlier in the year to speak to the kins, JHS senior. “I have a feeling that Mitt Rom- students about their education. “I just don’t ney will win,” said Presley. “I feel see the point like a lot of the people who got in voting. I stay excited to vote Obama in, once he independent, was in, realized they didn’t make yeah, but none the best decision. I also think that of the indepen- with all these voter ID laws to dent nominees restrict voter attendance, you’re are very good going to find fewer votes [overall] either. I just and more votes for Romney. I don’t see how don’t think it’s right, but I think either is really that’s what you will find.” fit to be a good This year’s election appears president.” to be a close one. As the United There are States nears the election on others who November 6, things will likely heat share Hankins’ up. perspective “Vote as soon as you can, get – that neither informed, and vote every time,” candidate is said Nixon. “I hope that more kids good enough do.” for the position, and to vote is to choose the better of two For more information about the candidates that are running, visit www.votesmart.org. Candidates that voters will be selecting: President: Barack Obama (D) Mitt Romney (R) Rocky Anderson (I) Virgil Goode, Jr. (ACP) Gary Johnson (L) Jill Stein (G) Senator: Claire McCaskill (D) Todd Akin (R) Johnathan Dine (L) District 7 Representative: Billy Long (R) Kevin Craig (L) Jim Evans (D) Missouri Governor: Jay Nixon (D) Jim Higgins (L) Dave Spence (R) Lieutenant Governor: Peter Kindle (R) Matthew Copple (L) Cynthia Davis (C) Susan Montee (D) Missouri District 128 Representative: Charlie Davis (R) Missouri District 129 Representative: Bill White (R) Missouri District 32 Senator: Ronald Richard (R) Missouri Attorney General: Chris Koster (D) Dave Browning (L) Edward Martin (R) Missouri Secretary of State: Justin Harter (C) Jason Kander (D) Shane Schoeller (R) Cisse Spragins (L) Key: (R) - Republican (D) - Democrat (L) - Libertarian (C) - Constitution (G) - Green Party (ACP) - American Constitution Party

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opinion Point-Counterpoint: Spyglass staff on graduating at semester Why are you graduating at semester? Lexi Brown Graduating early isn’t for everyone. Having to choose between missing half of my senior year and going to college was a really tough choice, but I know I’m making the right one for myself. High school has never been my favorite thing in the world, so leaving honestly won’t be that hard. I feel like I’ve squeezed every drop of opportunity out of Joplin High School and I’m so ready to go on to bigger things. I feel so privileged to have been a student at Joplin, however. My friends and my instructors have always been so encouraging, pushing me to do things that will make me better at what I want to do, and as a person. One of my main reasons for graduating in December is for the head start. All of the good photographers I know never even went to college because they were out in the world, busy getting the best training – experience. But, college has always been a really important thing to me and I believe that to be successful in life I must get some sort of degree. With the head start I will get, I can have time to be educated and get the experience I want to be a great photographer. Secondly, I think we all know how we can get toward third and fourth quarter. Sweat pants, T-shirts, lax on homework. But, this time in our lives is important and I like to do things I know will keep me motivated. Last year, after I went and simply had a college tour, it seemed like my perspective changed. I was excited for the next step in my life. If graduating early is what I have to do to keep me looking straight toward what I really want to do in life, then so be it. And honestly, I can still go to games, prom and other high school events, I just won’t be in school for seven hours a day. Instead, I will be in class for maybe four or five hours a day with a little more homework. To me, that’s very worth it. By Jeremiah Johnson Why are you not graduating at semester? Shelby Hass Graduating early seems to be trendy at Joplin High School, and for some students, I understand the appeal. As a freshman, it had been discussed between my parents and I that I consider early graduation, even a whole year early as opposed to just a semester. However, upon further thought I decided early graduation was not for me. Although by the end of this semester I will have all of the credits I need to graduate, there are several things I could not leave behind. By the end of my sophomore year, I knew that I would be assistant editor of the Spyglass, and probably the next year I would step up as editor-in-chief of the publication. Not only had I accepted this as a responsibility, but also a privilege that I could not turn down. With the rest of the staff in mind, I decided I could not leave them to fend for themselves a semester early. I also did not want to pass up other opportunities only present- ed to seniors, such as Tomorrows Leaders Today (TLT), and being a teacher’s assistant. Both of which were things I had looked forward to since I was a freshman. I do understand the appeal of early graduation for some students that already have all their credits, and feel as though they have drawn every opportunity out of high school that they possibly can. Even for students who already know where they will attend their first semester of college or have a set plan, it makes sense. I, however, am still waiting for each of these puzzle pieces to fall in place. Not only will the last semester of my senior year hold a distinct place for finalizing my college plans, but also to build lasting memories of my senior year. When I walk across that stage at graduation, I will be certain that I have squeezed every ounce of opportunity from Joplin High School, and made the memories to go along with it. GEEKFREAKS TECH TALK --with Michael Jensen How do I keep my computer from freezing up and getting that annoying, spinning beachball of death? There are several things you can do to prevent your Mac computer from freezing up. Restarting your computer every night and letting it charge up after dying down, will greatly reduce the chance of your computer freezing, or having loading errors. If your computer continues to freeze up, take it to the technology office located on the second floor on the west side of the school at the 9/10 campus, and inside the cafeteria to the right of the library at the 11/12 campus. Helpful tip--For maximum battery life, it’s recommended to let your battery die down to about 9%, then recharge it fully about once a week. Why does my computer run so slow? Your computer could have several things that could slow it down. If you have too many applications running on your computer, it will slow it down. Always be sure to close an application after you’re done using it. Another possible cause is your computer’s memory. If you have a lot of files on your computer, that could slow it down. You can invest in a portable flash drive to allow more room for storing files that won’t bog your computer down.

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