Lower Beeding Parish Magazine - August 2016

 

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Lower Beeding Parish Magazine - August 2016

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LOWER BEEDING PARISH MAGAZINE 50p - To arrange an annual subscription (£6) ring 01403 891710 “A LOOK AT THE PAST” Vintage Local Photo Exhibition Wednesday 31st August – page 10 www.lowerbeeding.com www.facebook.com/LowerBeedingParish 0

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Lower Beeding Parish Worship Services This Month 7th 19th Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns August of 10.00am Family Eucharist the year Readings: Wisdom 18: 6-9, Hebrews 11: 1-2 & 8-19, Luke 12: 32-48. 14th Assumption 8.30am Eucharist at St. Johns August of the 10.00am Parish Eucharist BVM 3.30pm Evensong at St. Johns (BCP) Readings: Revelations 11:19 & 12: 1-6 & 10, Corinthians 15: 20-26, Luke 1: 39-56. 21st 21st Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns August of 10.00am Parish Eucharist the year Readings: Isiah 66: 18-21, Hebrews 12: 5-7 & 11-3, Luke 13: 22-30. 28th 22nd Sunday 8.30am Eucharist at St Johns August of 10.00am Parish Eucharist the year Readings: Ecclesiasticus 3: 7-20 & 28-29, Hebrews 2: 18-19 & 22-24, Luke 14: 1 & 7-14. BCP = Book of Common Prayer From the registers... (Baptisms, Funerals and Marriages) Funeral of Mrs Beatrice Turner, Thursday 7th July at Holy Trinity. Funeral of Mr John Barrett Hicks, Friday 15th July at Holy Trinity. May they rest in peace 1

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Contents Features Christmas Market! Summer Ball Report A LOOK AT THE PAST Hands of Friendship St Clare of Assisi Family Golf Day 6 7 10 34 38 42 Regulars Worship From Holy Trinity Views from St John’s Thursday Club LBA Engage Update LBHS Great Britons PCSO Report Holy Trinity School Gardener’s World Sussex Wildlife Trust Our Page (children) Puzzle Page Guides Report Readers’ Letters All in the Month of … Cricket Health Walks 1 5-6 8 12 13-14 16 18 19-21 22 23 24 26 28 29-30 31-32 33 37 39-40 44 Copy date for next magazine – Thursday 11th August Welcome to the August edition of the Lower Beeding Parish Magazine. The front cover features photographs from the exhibition being held by our neighbouring parish, Nuthurst. You can find out more details on page 10 about this excellent opportunity to remember and celebrate the local area with our neighbours! With The Vicarage being set back where it is, the one thing I do miss is having neighbours to chat to over the garden fence, however as my little boy likes to play out in the churchyard I regularly get to meet plenty of friendly local faces! On page 34 you can read about a new scheme set up by the Parish Council to help those that may not often see a friendly face, please do let them know of anyone you feel could benefit from this service. And don’t forget to smile and say ‘hello’ to your neighbours!  Have a fantastic August. Christina Betson Editor cmbetson@hotmail.co.uk The views and opinions within this publication are not necessarily those of the editor or the Lower Beeding Parochial Church Council. 2

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advertise your business now! Get exposure in the Lower Beeding area by advertising in this magazine and on our website - www.lowerbeeding.com E-Mail josh now to find out more - josh.hough@mas-group.co.uk or call 01444 645017. PHYSIOTHERAPY SPECIAL INTEREST IN SPORTS INJURIES AND SPINAL PAIN KATIE KNAPTON MCSP Member of the HPC CHARTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST BRIGHTON ROAD, LOWER BEEDING TEL: 07711 531132 www.katieknapton.co.uk PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE APPROVED Absolute Arboriculture Crabtree, Lower Beeding Tree surgery & Hedge cutting Stump grinding & Logs Call Max Ferretti ND, NCH Arb T: 01403 730504 M: 07759 482934 E: max@absolutearb.com W: www.absolutearb.com Paul C. Avery INTERIOR & EXTERIOR DECORATOR FOR A QUALITY ASSURED FINISH To all your decorating requirements THE GATEHOUSE . SANDYGATE LANE . LOWER BEEDING . RH13 6LR Telephone (01403) 891017

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From Holy Trinity Celebrating 150 years of Reader Ministry Following on from the article in the June magazine, I am have been asked to write on what Reader Ministry involves. Although ‘Reader’ Ministry as such has been known since the reign of Elisabeth 1, modern Reader Ministry dates from 1866, when the office was revived and the Bishop of Bristol and Gloucester admitted the first ‘modern’ Reader on 10 May 1866. Readers’ official title is ‘Lay Reader’ but because this may cause confusion as to the ministry of a ‘Reader’, some dioceses have adopted the title of Licensed Lay Minster – Reader, often abbreviated to ‘LLM (Reader)’. So - What is a Reader? 1 The Role of a Reader Readers are lay men and women, from a wide diversity of occupations and backgrounds, who recognise a call to serve God and his world through the Church of England. They work in a variety of roles and situations across the Church, being authorised by the Church of England and licenced by the Diocesan Bishop to preach and teach, to conduct or assist in conducting worship, and to assist in the pastoral, evangelistic and liturgical work of the Church in the parish or area where they are licensed. As well as their formal roles Readers have many informal ways of ministering by their presence, witness and listening at their places of work, at home, among the neighbours and in their local communities. They are informed lay people living out their faith in their different walks of life. 2 The Duties of a Reader Readers may:  Preach  Lead worship, except those services and parts of services specifically excluded by the Canons. (The Law of the church of England)  Read the Old or New Testament readings, Epistle or Gospel at any service  Lead intercessions  Receive and present the offerings of the people  Distribute the consecrated bread and wine to the people  Take Communion to the sick and housebound  Publish banns of marriage in the absence of a priest  Undertake pastoral and educational work  Assist any minister as the bishop may direct  With permission from the incumbent of the parish, Readers may accept occasional or regular invitations to take part in services of another C of E parish within the diocese or in a church of another denomination  With permission from the Bishop, Readers may:  Officiate at Communion by Extension services  Officiate at Funeral services (with the good will of the persons responsible) 5

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So to sum up Readers or LLMs are lay people who have been selected, trained and licensed by the Bishop of a diocese to preach, teach and lead worship in a pastoral context. There are more than 10,000 active Readers in the Church of England. Most are licensed to a parish but some are chaplains in prisons, hospitals, hospices or schools, a few are in charge of parishes. Readers give their services to the Church so do not receive payment. Readers are supported by a Warden of Readers and a Secretary in each diocese, (and in Chichester diocese by an Archdeaconry Warden and Archdeaconry Secretary) and by the Central Readers Council based at Church House, Westminster. Most importantly (Lay) Readers (or LLM’s) work collaboratively with the incumbent and the Church wardens in support of each other. Blessings, Geoff And so it begins…. Christmas Market November 26th 2016 As the Summer holidays begin, we are thinking ahead to the Christmas Market 2016. While you are on your holidays please look at for that unusual gift or item that would be good for the Tombola, Children’s Toys, The Old Curiosity Stall and others. Please begin to make a collection that could fill our stalls. If you are making jams and chutneys this year put a few jars away for the Preserves stall. We look forward to seeing you all at the Christmas Market 2016. Stall holders please put 10TH OCTOBER, 7.30PM, CHURCH ROOM in your diaries for our first stall holders’ meeting. In the meantime have wonderful holidays wherever you are going. Lesley Hendy (01403 256752) and Jan McKinnell (01403 891481) Christmas Market Organisers 6

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Summer Ball on Saturday 6th July Many thanks to everyone who joined us at South Lodge for our Summer Ball in memory of Jackie Barrow. We had a wonderful evening with a champagne reception, an excellent dinner and very spirited dancing to the Flaming Mojos. Jackie's son, The Revd Alex Barrow, paid a moving tribute to his mother. He also praised the work of hospices, in particular St Catherine’s, and all those who care for others with such compassion. There was a lively auction, hosted by Russell Knapton with great enthusiasm and wit. All proceeds from the event will be shared between St Catherine’s Hospice and our two churches. Many thanks to all. Another date for your diary is the 10th September when we will be having our annual sponsored walk which will follow the route of the Horsham Riverside Walk. Look out for more details in next month’s magazine. Joan Hackett, Church Fundraising Team. 7

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News and Views from St. John’s, Coolhurst Personal reflections on a concert at St John's In the evening of Sunday 26th June St John’s once again played host to the Shipley Arts Festival. Some fiftyfive people filled a space that, in the opinion of many, is in size and acoustic properties ideal for the performance of chamber music. The occasion was a concert by the Bernadi Music Group who Mark and Tina Scrase-Dickins have brought here several times in the past few years. At the outset I should say that, although I enjoy listening to classical music, I am no musician and can only report my own personal reactions and the views of others more qualified. The Shipley Arts Festival is recognised as an important national music event and Andrew Bernardi, a resident of Shipley, is its Artistic Director. Its concerts are opportunities for audiences to enjoy performances by some of the finest instrumentalists and Andrew himself is regarded as one of the country’s leading violinists. He plays a 1696 Stradivarius and, I read, uses a bow formerly owned by Lord Yehudi Menhuin. The first half of this year’s concert began with a lively and cheerful Mozart flute quintet and ended with a movement from one of Bochereni’s one hundred or so quintets. In between these pieces we had the world premieres of two works by the local composers George Grinling and Julian Marczak. George’s piece was entitled “A Dialogue” and struck me as very atmospheric. For me its mood was enhanced by the setting. I was sitting on the South side of the church and the sight of the chancel with its white flowers and shafts of sunlight seemed at one with the music. The other piece, entitled “Peace and Solace”, was written by Julian as a Christmas gift to a friend who at that time was seriously ill. What a wonderful present! The second half of the concert was devoted to a Schubert quintet. This was complex music, which was not familiar to me, and I would have to hear it several times before I could really start to appreciate it. The format and content of these concerts vary from one year to another. Last year Andrew performed with the Stradivarius Trio, comprising himself, the cellist Jonathan Few and the pianist Maria Marchant. That concert focussed on virtuoso pieces. Andrew played part of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons with tremendous verve and dynamism and Maria’s piece was incredible for the way her hands flew beautifully and effortless between one end of the keyboard to the other. For his part Jonathan played a piece by John Ireland, whom I believe also lived in Shipley. I do not find Ireland’s music easy listening and Jonathan described the piece as almost breaking the bounds of tonality. Nevertheless it was an extraordinary virtuoso performance. That concert coincided with Tina’s birthday and I suspect that not too many people can claim to have Happy Birthday played to them on a Stradivarius. By way of contrast to chamber music, some years ago the programme was a performance of Mozart’s opera Cosi Fan Tutti. Perhaps in a rather unusual setting for an opera that is considered by some to be a product of the Enlightenment. If you read the libretto of the final aria for five voices you might agree with them. Incidentally, I read somewhere that Beethoven considered the opera to be scandalous. I must confess that it is one of my favourites! Concerts like this obviously provide an opportunity to socialise and this year the interval was enhanced by the provision of delicious cakes and tea by the local caterers Alimento Event Catering. Also we must not forget that these concerts generate a contribution to parish funds. I look forward to next year. Bryan Deal 8

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Arthur   Lodge Veterinary Surgery •Consultations by appointment •24 hour inhouse emergency service •Loyalty card for discounted veterinary treatment •Nurse Clinics 17 Brighton Road, Horsham, RH13 5BE Tel: 01403 252964 www.arthurlodgevets.co.uk  

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An opportunity to see an exceptional collection of 300 images of the local area in times long gone Featuring pictures of - *Copsale *Cowfold *Crabtree *Hammer Ponds *Handcross *Lower Beeding *Mannings Heath *Maplehurst *Monks Gate *Nuthurst *Sedgwick Mannings Heath Village Hall Two showings, at 2.30pm and 7.30pm Wednesday 31st August 2016 Everyone welcome, refreshments available Entrance £3, Society members £1 Don’t miss seeing pictures of places in days gone by, some of which have changed beyond recognition, and some of which are no more... Parish of Nuthurst Local History Society 10

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Mark and his staff welcome you to THE PLOUGH Lower Beeding A traditional, family friendly country pub, serving fine ales and beers. Lunchtime snacks from 12–2pm. Full evening menu available from 6–9pm. Sunday roast from 12 – 3 pm. Don’t forget Fryday is fish and chip day. Ring 01403 891277 to order – you’d batter hurry. Open all day Friday Saturday and Sunday. Darts Pool Bar See you soon Billiards ROY WICKING GARDENING SERVICES * Lawn & hedge cutting * Garden clearance * General maintenance * Fully insured TEL: 01403 891710 MOB: 075 2209 5930 MAIL: ROY.WICKING@GOOGLEMAIL.COM KEEPERS BOARDING KENNELS & GROOMING PARLOUR Leechpond Hill, Lower Beeding, RH13 6NR 5-star Accommodation with outside Astro Turf exercise ground Day Boarders Welcome Contact the owners Lisa & Sue. 01403 891 300      

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Our last meeting Mr Peter Benner gave an enlightening talk about The Coaching era, especially along the roads around here. Mail post coaches and stagecoaches that served the area. Many of the Hotels had facilities for the horses to be changed over, including The Kings Head in Horsham and The George in Crawley. Mr Benner has collected a lot of memorabilia which was fascinating to look at. There is a change to our August meeting to be held on Thursday 11th August at 2.30, instead of a lunch we will have tea at Caroline Reid’s home in Shermanbury. Parking is restricted, so please would members ring Carly, so we can fill up cars - telephone 01403 891542. Look forward to seeing as many as possible. Carly Charman mobile 07581191185. 12

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Lower Beeding Association News Charity No. 267433 Lower Beeding Fete 2016 – Report The 41st Lower Beeding Fete took place on Saturday 18 June, with the headline news that £3,652 was raised for the Lower Beeding Association. This is slightly lower than previous years, which may in part be due to the less than ideal weather in the days and hours leading up to the event; however, during the actual event the rain held off and indeed there were even extended bouts of sunshine for the first hour or so. Before all that though, there was the small matter of preparing the venue, with the majority of the work kicking off around 8 a.m.; LBA President Derek Fry and trustee Mary Davies led from the front, ably assisted by numerous helpers, and managed to get everything in place in good time for the start of the show – even the improvised netting for the coconut shy! Kim Dennis was once again the Master of Ceremonies, whilst our very own Chairman, Roy Wicking, officially opened proceedings with a concise speech. Mannings Heath band One for the Road provided a very enjoyable set of music before the kids, ably corralled by Mandy Wicking, took centre stage, with a delightful display of country dancing, followed by a series of races and culminating in a dance around the Maypole. To complete the Wicking hat-trick, the duties of MC had by now been taken over by the enthusiastic Nathan Wicking, who will surely come to regret volunteering at such a young age, as he enters the first of his 50 year contract. The climax of the arena events was of course the Grand Raffle. With some top prizes on offer, Ian Shaw claimed the first prize of £150. Around the ground, the popular laser clay shooting returned to test the mettle of prospective sharp shooters, as did the welly throwing hosted by the Crabtree Cavaliers, for those harbouring ambitions of a career in launching protective footwear into fields. Claiming victory in the Boys competition was Sebastian Ogg, with Angel the champion in the Girls. Tammy Massingale reclaimed the title in the Ladies with a new record of 27m, whilst Adam Wicking eventually emerged as the Mens champion. The ‘Beat the Goalie’ competition, hosted by Lower Beeding & Handcross Juniors FC, was ever popular, as was a new ‘Beat the Coach’ game being run by the team at Comptons Tennis Club. It should also be noted that the car parking was again efficiently managed by the Knaptons, with no reports of rogue parking incidents this year. Once again the Fete hosted a fun dog show, run by Wendy Mitchell and her team. Although entrants were slightly down on earlier years, a good time was had by all. Best in Show was Scilla, a Standard Poodle, who also won the best Veteran award and is owned by Mrs Wendy Ratcliffe from Storrington. The best puppy in Show was a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel owned by Mrs Helen Stevens from West Chiltington. 13

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Returning to the takings, this is slightly lower than in previous years, in the main owing to much lower income for the Grand Raffle, which contributed £730 compared to an average of £1,314 over the previous five years. All other areas performed strongly, with the barbecue setting a new record of £347.50 (previous best £296.80 in 2013), with Bill and Pam Jays and others putting in a real shift to get through over twice as many burgers and sausages as last year! The Good As New stall more than doubled its previous years takings and set a new record of £255 (£186, 2011), due in part to Caroline’s ruthless sales techniques. The tombolas both did exceptionally well: the general tombola run by the Loveridges collected £140, and the bottle tombola, as ever under the watchful eye of Tom and Marion Tyler, taking in an impressive £658, both of which were ‘stall records’. There were also excellent ‘performances’ from the bar, under the stewardship of Malcolm ‘Eddie’ Edwards; the Horticultural Society’s verdant plant stall; the creams teas, provided once again by Ruth Edwards; and the cake stall, which had been organised at very late notice by Jan McKinnell, so the £80 generated was all the more impressive. There were a few disappointments, such as a lack of entrants for the children’s cake competition, an abandonment of the inter-pub tug o’war due to insufficient numbers, and not being able to find a volunteer to run the hoopla and roll-a-penny. However, given the patchy weather leading up to the event, it can overall be considered a success, albeit with many lessons to be learned for next year when it will return bigger and better than ever. There are simply too many people to list who gave of their time to help with the Fete, either in the preparation of the grounds; running of the stalls; delivering the leaflets or donating the various prizes, without which it would simply not be possible to run the Fete. Thank you all. If any readers would like to get involved with next year’s Fete, or have ideas that could improve the experience or increase the takings, then do please get in touch: petelrobinson@hotmail.com A bit about wood: Beecwood fires are bright and clear If the logs are kept a year Chestnut’s only good they say If for long ‘tis laid away But Ash new or Ash old Is fit for a queen with crown on gold Birch and Fir logs burn too fast Blaze up bright and do not last It is by the Irish said Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread Elm wood burns like churchyard mold Jean Black E’en thee very flames are cold But Ash green or Ash brown Is fit for a queen with a golden crown Poplar gives a bitter smoke Fills your eyes and makes you choke Apple wood will scent your room With incense like perfume Oaken logs, if dry and old Keep away the winters cold But Ash wet or Ash dry A King shall warm his slippers by 14

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