Wagon Mound Bean Day 2016 Program

 

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Wagon Mound Bean Day 2016 Program

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Wagon Mound * 106th Bean Day Celebration September 2-5, 2016 Official Program Schedule of Events Day - Time Friday night Bean Cleaning & Street Dance – Firehouse Friday 6 pm Veterans Memorial Service – Vets Park on Hwy 120 Saturday 9 am Car Show – Railroad Avenue Saturday 11:30 Rodeo Events Schedule – Saturday Saturday 2 p.m. Breakfast at the Firehouse Sunday 8 a.m. Horseshoe Tourney – Downtown Court (main street) Sunday 10 a.m. Music in the Park – Sunday Sunday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Mud Bogg - End of South Catron Avenue Sunday 11:00 a.m. Rodeo Events Schedule – Sunday Sunday 2 p.m. Dance – Sunday, Wagon Mound School old gym Sunday 9 p.m. Parade – Railroad Ave (main street) Monday 9:30 a.m. Street Events for Kids (on Main Street) Monday 10:30 a.m. Barbeque – prepare, serve, and eat the Beans and Meat Monday 12 noon - 1 p.m. Music in the Park – Monday Monday 12 noon – 2 p.m. Bingo – Santa Clara Parish Hall Monday 2 p.m. Rodeo Events Schedule – Monday Monday 2 p.m. Commemorative T-shirt & Cap Concession Fri – Mon Page 9 23 12 18 15 15 11 18 9 20 21 26-27 15 25 18 Features and Articles Welcome to the 106th Wagon Mound Bean Day Celebration and Mission Statement Grand Marshals – Mary & Don Schutz Pony Express Smoke Signals Wagon Mound Art Fest Custom Made Trophy Buckle Donors and Hay Donors Wagon Mound Stories Painting Wagon Mound Rocks Supporting Donors Honor Roll Bean Day Association Members Volunteers – Thanks Remembrance List of Advertisers Thank you, Wiseman Rodeo! Page 3 5 6-7 8 14 17 22, 24, 33, 47 28 28 29 29 30-31 49-50 48 & Back Inside Cover 1

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Pony ExpressWAGON MOUND • NEW MEXICO SUBMITTED BY: TOM HERERRA Wanted: young, skinny, wiry fellows, not over 18. Must be expert riders, willing to risk death daily. Orphans preferred. Wages $25 a week…” When this notice appeared in various western newspapers in 1860, half a million Americans lived west of the Rocky Mountains. Two thousand miles of mountains, plains and deserts, broken only by Indian trails separated them from the rest of the United States. To link all territories (New Mexico, Nevada, Colorado) and California to the Missouri frontier, an adventurous businessman created the Pony Express. It all started, in a sense, in 1839 when Swiss adventurer John Sutter arrived in northern California, then under Mexican rule. Sutter managed to attain large tracts of land and eventually built Fort Sutter, where by 1848 the fort contained about a quarter of the handful of Americans then living in California. In February of 1848 one of Sutter men discovered gold on the property, a secret that Sutter wanted so desperately to keep. Not so fast! One of the Indians who had worked at a nearby camp got word of the discovery, found some nuggets himself and spread the word, “Oro, oro, oro!” News spread all over San Francisco and the gold rush was on. Gradually, the word spread back east. In reading about the gold rush, we get the impression the discovery of gold in February 1848, immediately led to a mad stampede from easterners. This was not so. It was not until the following September that people began to perk their ears. Why the delay? Consider the conditions under which news was carried. To bring word of the discovery of gold across the Rockies and deserts to Salt Lake City took many weeks. Months passed before the news reached Missouri. There was a dire need to communicate in a more practical manner. Businessmen needed to get orders in and out, the government needed to know the status of many enterprises, families need to know of each other. The mail needed to arrive. Two mails routes were gradually established; one was very long, but not hampered by too much snowfall in wintertime. Known as the Ox-Bow (or Butterfield) Route, it swung south 6

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from St. Louis to Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. At Yuma, it forked into two routes leading to Los Angeles and then north to San Francisco. The Pony Express also followed stretches of the Santa Fe Trail, mainly the routes near garrisons such as Fort Dodge, Fort Lyon, Bent’s Fort and nearby Fort Union. Though the Pony Express lasted for only eighteen months (186061), it occupies a glorious place in American history. It was more than a business; it was a romantic adventure which thrilled people of its own day and those of later times. The transcontinental telegraph had effectively replaced and completed the work of the Pony Express in connecting the southwestern territories and California to the rest of the Union. Telegraph Despite its financial failures and the competition from stage coach lines, the Pony Express did succeed in delivering mail from Missouri to Santa Fe to California in ten days. Yet its days were certainly numbered for everyone knew sooner or later the telegraph lines would extend all the way to the west coast. It took only eight months for telegraph lines to be put up all the way across the continent. In 1857, Hiram Sibley president of Western Union, suggested it was time to extend lines all the way to California. When he called a meeting to propose transcontinental telegraph communication, his colleagues and potential investors merely laughed at the impractical and visionary ideas. The expense they pointed out. What about the hostile Indians? The tremendous maintenance costs especially in winter. Sibley went ahead without them and went to Washington and engaged Congress in the project. The legislators were very interested due to the impending arrival of the Civil War had brought home to them the urgent need for better communication. Sibley formed two construction companies and they started construction of two separate line-- one from western Nevada heading east to Salt Lake City, the other from Omaha heading west to Salt Lake City (connecting lines south into Santa Fe and El Paso were constructed months later). Both companies were able to make steady progress by dividing the work in small groups. One group using 26 wagons drawn by oxen, distributing poles, wires, and all other necessary materials along the trail. Another group laid out the line and drove stakes to indicate the location of the poles. Others dug the holes followed by the men who set up the poles. The last group strung the wires between the poles. At first the Indians were hostile, at least bewildered by this strange construction. However, it was explained to them the new device was a gift from the Great Spirit to make it possible to carry a man’s voice hundreds of miles. The Indians remained skeptical, but came around when Sibley asked Chief Washakie of the Shoshones to send a message to another chief in far-off Wyoming, arranging for a meeting at midpoint at a given time. When both chiefs showed up at the rendezvous place, they were finally convinced. Messages, the 19th century version of e-mail, were now instantaneous. The Morse Code of dots and dashes were now serving the entire United States, not only the eastern seaboard, but all the way to bustling California and all points in between. Certainly no evidence exists of the original telegraph poles or lines. Yet, poles and lines made their way into the 20th century as telegraph lines were replaced by evolving technology and the modern telephone systems became the new, faster, clearer way to communicate. Santa Clara, now Wagon Mound, has seen and experienced all the methods of communication brought on by the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. From smoke signals, mail wagon trains, stagecoaches, the Pony Express, telegraph, and advances beyond, Wagon Mound has seen, read and heard it all!! 7

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2016 BEAN DAY EVENTS 11

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TAMBA RECORDS 12

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SUNNYSIDE HARDWARE “We’ve Got What you Need” . .Paint Plumbing Tools and Much, Much More 507 3rd St Springer, NM 575-483-2750 13

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