Ciao Magazine 285

 

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Ciao Magazine Issue 285

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FREE There’s life in the Inner West! Issue 285 | June 24th 2016 Albo vs Jimbo: their final pitches WIN! FREE TIX: Scandiniavian Film Fest Australia Votes 2016 Is fine dining finished in Sydney? What are Inner Westies biggest turn-offs? Who’ll Clean up at the Business AWARDS? Time to celebrate our local entrepreneurs!

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Inner West whispers Local gossip, rumour, hearsay and unsubstantiated fact... Leichhardt Councillor in Bennelong – Painted over – Election imposter l WE ARE C!AO Satire for the soul Latte Leftie wonders when the Left will get over its juvenile hero-worshipping of the salt-of-the-earth working man Dear LL – What is it with hi-vis-vest-donning politicians and their long-running love affair with tradies? Surely anyone who’s ever renovated an Inner West terrace (and who among us hasn’t?) knows these despicable creatures are the most arrogant, avaricious, loudmouthed, swinish, tax-dodging and untrustworthy individuals imaginable. Actually, now I think about it, it makes perfect sense John Howard raised them up as culture heroes two decades ago. Nonetheless, I’m bemused a Left-Right war between real and fake tradies flared up during the election campaign. Surely there should now be bipartisan consensus around Australia joining the EU purely to flood the labour market with Croatian ‘chippies’, Polish pipelayers and Slovenian ‘sparkies’? And shouldn’t the ACCC have the power to jail for life any tradesman who fails to show up to provide a quote after a decent Australian has taken the afternoon off work to wait around for them? Andrew, Petersham LL replies: Hear, hear, Andrew! Nothing would smooth the transition from the mining boom and turbocharge ‘jobs and growth’ faster than slashing tradies’ wage from the current heart-surgeon level down the kind of remuneration enjoyed by that barista with a PhD in Cultural Studies who serves me my Peruvian goat’s milk macchiato every morning. Let’s see how concerned ‘Tony’s tradies’ are with the nasty Labor Party being mean to banks and people just trying to get ahead by negatively gearing their 15th investment property when they’re pulling down the pittance their forefathers were pathetically grateful to receive for mindless manual labour. In fact, it is just a pity there weren’t more current or erstwhile socialists running in seats other than Grayndler this election. At least under a dictatorship of the proletariat 21st century Australia’s answer to the Kulaks would be identified as the Joe the Plumber-style class enemies they truly are and quickly exiled to some hellish decommissioned refugee camp in the West Australian desert. n Email your dilemma to info@ciaomagazine.com.au. ADVERTISING Sarah Shepherd sarah@ciaomagazine.com.au Former Ciao cover girl and erstwhile Leichhardt Labor Councillor Lyndal Howison is entering the election race for John Howard’s ex-seat, Bennelong. Lyndal was a young single mother when she was on Leichhardt Council from 20082012, and agreed to be interviewed for our 2010 Mother’s Day edition. Having moved out of the Grayndler area, Lyndal is now contesting blueribbon Liberal territory (currently held by former tennis star John Alexander). But maybe she is hoping to pull off an election win a la Maxine McKew, who famously ousted Prime Minister John Howard from the seat in 2007. Perhaps one of Five Dock’s most underrated specialty stores has all but disappeared under the overlaying traffic and chaos of Lyons Road. Brinlay Paints, on the corner of Lyons Rd and Ingham Ave, closed abruptly a few weeks ago with the date ‘10/6/2016’ spraypainted all over the store’s boarded-up exterior. The store offered a wide range of decorating products to Five Dock’s aspirational (now thoroughly gentrified) DIY renovators. Positioned on a highly visible corner with plenty of residential parking, we can only imagine what will come in its place. Perhaps a café, restaurant or beige block of luxury apartments? l ADVERTISING Madi Day madi@ciaomagazine.com.au l Ciao has been exposed to an interesting election campaign tactic to undermine an opposing candidate’s campaign. A person who claimed to be the campaign manager for a local candidate presented himself as a suitor for our newspaper’s publicity but several phone calls and emails later we realised he was in fact an imposter. The real manager told us that this is a tactic used by both a candidate’s enemies – to damage the candidate’s reputation with timepoor journos, and a habit of fans – who are so enamoured with candidates they are happy to do some (fantasy) hack work on the side! FOOD Melissa Leong info@ciaomagazine.com.au WINE Winsor Dobbin info@ciaomagazine.com.au LOCAL history Grayndler, held by the ALP since its creation in 1949, has quite a history. It’s named after Edward Grayndler (1867-1943), a Labour politician, long-term member of the New South Wales Legislative Council and General Secretary of the Australian Workers’ Union. During WW1 he opposed conscription and censorship. Ironically, he lived most his life in Canterbury, just outside the current boundaries of the electorate bearing his name. Since then, Grayndler has only seen six different members, with Anthony Albanese holding the seat since 1996. Pictured above is a young Albo, only twelve months into his now 20-year-long stint, sitting with former member (Leaping) Leo McCleay who held the seat for the previous fourteen years. ART DIRECTOR Paden Hunter paden@ciaomagazine.com.au EDITORIAL Phoebe Moloney phoebe@ciaomagazine.com.au Albo before Grayndler aged him Things we love: PUBLISHING Sonia Komaravalli sonia@ciaomagazine.com.au Contributors: Nigel Bowen, Lianna Taranto, Olivia Mackay, Russell Edwards, Emma McConnell, Maani Truu and Hannah Craft. Ciao loves you, and our photographers only supply photos for publication with consent. We try and make you look your best. No responsibility is accepted by Ciao Magazine for the accuracy of advertisements or information. We welcome unsolicited editorial and pictorial contributions. The opinions expressed in Ciao Magazine are those of contributors, indemnifying the publisher from inaccuracy or consequences arising from its reproduction. © All rights reserved. No material is to be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Ciao Magazine is a free publication. Distribution, advertising & editorial enquiries 460A Parramatta Road, Petersham 2049 info@ciaomagazine.com.au (02) 9518 3696. 0405 509 805 – Sonia Ciao is locally owned and produced. Please recycle Printed by Spot Press, Marrickville Strathfield business success story, Julie Wang, reps her business Big Clean. Big Clean is a major sponsor of this year’s Inner West Local Business Awards. Image: Ben Cregan Spotted at The Hub on King St Federal Election 2nd July 2016 Have you spied this bright orange van (also known as ‘Tubbsy’), driving around your suburb? Two best mates from Brisbane had the ingenious idea of putting dryers and washing machines in a van and offering laundry services to homeless people for free. Since late last year, Orange Sky’s van has been servicing the Sydney region. They have teamed up with Family and Community Services so while people’s clothes are being washed they can sit down and have a chat about other services that can provide support, shelter and food. n Go to: www.orangeskylaundry.com.au C!ao’s voice In • Pre-polling • Making a day out of voting – snag a sausage! Out • Candidates calling your landline with prerecorded messages • Candidates doorknocking while you are still in your pyjamas • Missing VIVID • Fake tradies • Britain For Reid 4 • Boozy book clubs • Crumbles • Avocados; they’re so good right now • Buying local • Porridge C!ao Magazine There’s life in the Inner West!

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n FEATURE The rumble in the progressive jungle The Inner West has fallen to the Greens on a State level. But can they win federally? Nigel Bowen meets the two left-wingers battling to represent Grayndler. VS. In the red corner is Albo, long-serving local member and the only Australian politician beloved enough to have a craft beer named after him. In the green corner is Jim Casey, head of the NSW branch of the firies union and a fresh face with the luxury of taking crowd-pleasing positions on hot-button issues such as WestConnex. What’s an inner-city elitist to do? Well, that’s up to you but you can find out more about the two men vying for Sydney’s progressive heartland below. the people who are genuinely concerned about the Liberals and I have some sympathy for them. Alternatively, it’s Labor apparatchiks. The argument is simply not true, having alternative voices in parliaments is important and it can achieve things. To take one example, [federal Greens senator] Janet Rice used Senate Estimates to unpack questions around the money going to WestConnex. That wouldn’t have happened if she wasn’t there. Labor and Liberal agree on the project and don’t want to scrutinise it. What do you make of the way the Murdoch press has attacked you? Having the Daily Telegraph announce you are a problem means that nine times out of ten you’re part of the solution. I feel sympathy for Anthony. When the withered, septuagenarian lips of Rupert Murdoch touch your cheeks, it’s a little bit like Michael Corleone giving you the kiss of death! After three decades of neo-liberalism is there a hunger for alternatives? People are disenchanted with the way the world is organised. A quarter of a century ago polls showed most people supported privatisation. Now, having lived through the neo-liberal era, most of them don’t. They see that business – with the two major parties in lockstep – is just trying to make a buck at their expense. I connect with voters when I say I’m for trade union rights, environmental sustainability, affordable housing and a compassionate approach to refugees. If people want to call that a socialist position I’m fine with that. Can you beat Albo? Yes but it’s not actually about Anthony or me. It’s about whether people want to vote ALP or Greens, which of those parties best reflect their values. Grayndler will go Green. Whether it’s me on July 2nd or another candidate at a future election, the Greens will win this seat. worry you’ve got my preference.’ Well, people can’t put a one next to the Greens and a two next to Labor and still see me elected. You’ve been more vocal than usual in attacking your Greens opponent this election. Is that because the Greens are now a serious threat? Whatever differences I had with [previous Greens candidate] Hall Greenland, he’d been on the Council, involved in Callan Park, had a record of activism around local issues. Prior to the campaign I’d never met Jim Casey at any local event. I didn’t know Jim Casey because I hadn’t hung around fringe left parties. Is it an odd position to be in as the leader of the Labor Left to be criticising your opponent for being a socialist? My criticism of Jim Casey is that he was a member of the International Socialist Organisation. That’s a Trotskyist party and not one that believes in parliamentary democracy. My concern with the NSW Greens, and it’s one shared by many Greens outside NSW, is that it contains people who’ve been part of fringe left parties and gone into the Greens. They have an ideological agenda that leads them to concentrate their criticisms on the Labor Party, never the conservatives. Nonetheless, aren’t your opponent’s positions on issues such as refugees and the WestConnex more in line with those of progressive Inner West voters than yours? Well, he can take a pure position on anything because there are no consequences. His party has one vote in the House of Representatives and are 75 short of a majority. It’s easy to come up with simplistic solutions and simple slogans, to tell people they what want to hear, but government is complex. Take Labor’s renewable energy target of 50 per cent by 2030. The Greens say it isn’t ambitious enough but the truth is there has to be a transition. You can’t have 100 per cent renewable energy tomorrow. You have to be honest with people. If you put forward propositions that have no hope of being achieved you just create further cynicism in the community about the political system. Is taking a complex rather than simplistic approach to the WestConnex costing you votes? If the Greens were fair dinkum they would acknowledge WestConnex is a Coalition State Government project. The Greens have Upper House members as well as two local Lower House members in State Parliament and what have they done about it? What representations have they made on behalf of those people concerned about what they were being paid for their [compulsorily acquired] homes? I’ve made representations about saving Ashfield Park, campaigned for an audit of the way the project was funded, raised the issue more than 30 times in the Federal Parliament. So why should left-leaning voters support you on July 2nd? We’ve had an Abbott-Turnbull Government for three years. That’s had real consequences for people in the electorate. It will have consequences for local schools when the Gonski funding runs out. Consequences for Marrickville Legal Centre, for local arts organisations, for public transport. If you’re a progressive faced with the choice of having an opportunity to impact on decisions when they’re made by a government or wait for them to be made then protest about them afterwards, it’s beyond my comprehension that you’d choose the latter rather than the former. (NB: For reasons of space and clarity the candidates’ answers have been edited.) Jim Casey What’s your connection with the Inner West? “I’ve been running into burning buildings in the Inner West since 2001 but I accept a minority of the electorate would have met me in that capacity. I’ve lived in or near this area since 1988. My partner and I and our two children live in Stanmore.” Can you chronicle your much-publicised political trajectory from the International Socialist Organisation to the Greens? I don’t resile from the time I spent in those organisations and networks. I’d like to think I did some good activist work while involved in them. I still identify as a socialist. But there are limits to that approach. I found it wanting and moved on. My most serious political engagement has been leading a union for the last seven years. That led to a more broad-based understanding of social change. My Road to Damascus moment was the 2009 Black Saturday fires. It was the unprecedented fire behaviour that was happening not just in Victoria but also elsewhere in Australia and the world. I decided ecological sustainability had to be married with social justice. Why not join the ALP to further those goals? If I’d been getting into politics 30-40 years ago I likely would have ended up in the Labor Left. But the Labor Left is not what it used to be and on so many fundamental questions Labor is on the wrong side of history. Labor is still hellbent on opening new coalmines. It is OK with locking people up who’ve done nothing wrong to send a message to other people who’ve done nothing wrong. I’m a Green because I agree with the politics of the Greens, not the politics of the Labor Party. Voting Green might make voters feel virtuous but isn’t it a pointless gesture? Two types make that argument. One type is 6 Don’t want to vote for either the Coles or Iku Wholefoods of Australian politics? Here are some other possible options. Oscar Grenfell, Socialist Equality Party How can an electorate with so many property millionaires have so many socialists running? Pat Sheil, Australian Sex Party Libertarian or libertine? Pat’s your man. Ludo Disco Gamma Meow-Meow, Australian Science Party For those attracted to evidence-based policy (and wackily named candidates). David Van Gogh, Liberal May or may not sever his ear if his preference flow fails to be crucial. Noel McFarlane, Australian Cyclists Party For those worried the Inner West doesn’t cater sufficiently for middle-aged men who like to wear Lycra. Emma Hurst, Animal Justice Party Your animal companion might be denied the franchise but you can still use your human privilege to champion their canine/feline interests. Anthony Albanese What do you make of the Daily Telegraph going from photoshopping you as Sgt Schultz last election to launching a ‘Save our Albo’ campaign this time round? [Laughs] Well, it is what it is but it did draw attention to the fact that if people wanted me as their local member they had to vote for me. When I was out doorknocking, one person said to me, ‘You’re terrific, you should be PM, don’t

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Community Life R OA D T E ST n Emma McConnell Where’s The Sizzle? Democratic participation is so much better when there's food involved. Emma McConnell scopes out the tastiest polling booths from Sydney to Reid. profile: Time to stand together My name is Ken Canning and I am the lead NSW Senate candidate for the Socialist Alliance in the federal election. My traditional name is Burraga Gutya. My people are the Kunja clan of the Bidjara Nation of what is now called south-western Queensland. I was raised mainly on the coast of Queensland and in Brisbane, but I have lived in Sydney since the late 1970s and the local Koori community has taken me in. I am very proud that I have had a very long involvement in our First Nation people's struggle for basic human rights. Having said that, people from all walks of life will benefit from the fight for justice for our people. We cannot hold our heads up high as a nation or as global citizens unless we end the continued persecution of Indigenous peoples by the two big parties that monopolises all the parliaments. In Sydney, we have fought side by side with others for the rights of refugees, asylum seekers and the gay, lesbian and transgender communities seeking marriage equality. We have stood shoulder to shoulder with our Muslim sisters and brothers against the racist hate groups, such as Reclaim Australia and the United Patriots Front. In return, many of these people have walked by our side in our protests. The most powerful aspect of this interaction is the respect people are gaining for each other. Governments of both major parties have been picking on the vulnerable while they have refused to stand up to the rich and powerful. As a result, we have a more and more unequal society. First Nations peoples have been fighting against the greed and corruption of an imposed system of exploitation for 228 years and people from all backgrounds are realising that not only have we shown a tremendous will to survive but we have answers in our traditions of how to live in harmony with each other and how to love and care for our precious Mother Earth. The rest of the Socialist Alliance NSW Senate ticket are Susan Price, a national co-convener of the Socialist Alliance and former UNSW president of the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU); Sharlene Leroy-Dyer, a descendant of the Guringai, Gadigal, Wiradjuri and Dharug peoples of NSW and national councillor in the NTEU; and Howard Byrnes, a construction worker and Construction Forestry Energy Mining Union member. We ask for your support — and vote — in the federal election to help build a people's movement against racism, attacks on workers' rights and corporate greed. n Ken Canning Erskineville Public School One of the front-runners concerning polling day festivities, this school really prides itself on their selection of goodies for you to feast upon this Election Day – fingers crossed their pulled pork rolls are back on the menu! Bonus points are given due to its close proximity to the adjacent train station. Swanson Street, Erskineville Yeo Park Infants School Yeo Park Infants is hosting a Gala Day to coincide with the election, so be sure to bring your little ones along. There will be plenty of activities to cater for both big kids and small, including a jumping castle, face painting, entertainment and… a sausage sizzle, of course! Victoria Street, Ashfield Sausage sizzles have a 98 per cent approval rating Marrickville Primary School sausage sizzle will cater for all dietary needs, stocking both glutenfree and vegan alternatives as well as halloumi rolls for all of you on a strict cheese-only diet. Complemented with fresh greens from the school garden, you certainly can’t go wrong here! 116 Chapel Street, Marrickville Democracy is inclusive in that all citizens should be accounted for, which is why Marrickville Public School makes this list. Their Chalmers Road School For those on the outskirts of the Inner West, take note – a mini fete is planned alongside the polling booths at this venue. Be sure to turn up with an appetite as there will be both snags and sweets on offer and all proceeds will go back to fundraising for the school. 23 Chalmers Road, Strathfield Australia Street Infants School Offering a raffle, cake stalls and gourmet sausage sizzle this polling booth is the perfect way to kick off your Saturday. Get in early to avoid the queues and spend the rest of the day meandering down King Street and the local surrounds. 229 Australia Street, Newtown n Want to know if your local polling place is more than just ballot boxes this federal election? Check out www.electionsausagesizzle.com.au to see if they’ve registered a polling place party. Let you eat cake! Australia Votes 2016 The Harold Park Hotel in Glebe is once again hosting a night of comedy, with the team behind Australia Votes 2013, The Year of Abbott and The Book of Kevin, back with Australia Votes 2016, just in time for you know what! Australia Votes 2016 is an irreverent foray into all the absurdity of Australia's political landscape, with a few cameos from the US elections too! WIN FREE TICKETS Audiences can expect appearances from some of our most notable pollies, as hosts Timothy Hugh Govers and Sallie Don dissect all the most unedifying moments of the 44th Parliament of Australia. There will be four performances, with opening night taking place on Friday 24th June, and subsequent shows on Sunday 26th June, Friday 1st July and Friday 8th July. Like voting, attendance is compulsory! Tickets are $18 for adults, with concession prices available. show of Australia Votes 2016! To be in the running simply email info@ciaomagazine.com.au with your name, address and where you picked up your copy of Ciao. For further information and bookings visit www.gottazip.com. n Ciao has two double passes to giveaway for the Friday, July 1st What’s on n Compiled by Maani Truu. Email info@ciaomagazine.com.au Sat 18 June – Sun 24 July Mon 24 June, 6.30pm FREE Community are events listings email info@ m.au ciaomagazine.co Attn: Maani How We See Country Curated by esteemed Australian artist and community activist, Bronwyn Bancroft, you know from the get-go the 'How We See Country' exhibition by Bundjalung Indigenous artists is going to be good. Featuring a host of talented artists, including two solo shows by Kim Healey and Nicole Renee Phillips, it is the perfect opportunity to drop in and see some beautiful art in a beautiful setting. Where: Boomalli Aboriginal Art Gallery, 55-59 Flood St, Leichhardt 8 Author Talk at Concord Library Paratrooper, policeman, counterterrorism expert and… author? Come meet Chris Allen, the man who can do it all, when he discusses his novel Hunter. This book is the latest title in his series Intrepid, which focuses on the Intelligence, Recovery, Protection and Infiltration Division of Interpol. Something Chris sure knows a lot about. The event is free and light refreshments are provided. Bookings essential, visit www.canadabay.nsw.gov.au. Where: Concord Library, 60 Flavelle St, Concord Tues 28 June, 7pm poetry or live art? Did you answer "yes" to all of the above? Well this is the event for you, my friend. Featuring all manners of creative expression, there is something for everyone and anyone who has an interest in the arts. Hosted upstairs at the cosy Mr Falcon’s, grab a wine, sink into a lounge chair and be wowed by some of Sydney’s best performers. All of this for a measly five-dollar entry fee! Where: Mr Falcon’s, 92 Glebe Point Rd, Glebe Spoken word at Mr Falcon's Loose Leaf Literature at Mr Falcon's See Deborah Taylor Beiirrinba's art Do you like music, stories, comedy, Get on yer bike for art See page 10 for more what's on...

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n Local Gigs Friday 1st July n Local screens Wanda Queen of Hearts A woman not afraid to go after what she wants! Wanda finds her way through love, music and life on the road attempting to balance conflicting desires. Catch her debut vocal performance as she is joined by Matt Lamb and Ollie Brown. B.E.D Bar, Free Thursday 7th of July FREE TICKETS Win double movie passes Sounds like a plan Maggie’s Plan Klub Koori A not-to-be-missed hip-hop event as part of NAIDOC week, Klub Koori is back featuring a line-up of established and emerging Indigenous artists. Carriageworks, $10 Love is the Drug: Way too blonde – those beautiful Scandinavians are back Scandinavian Film Festival Klub Koori feat. Lady Lash Friday 8th July Stonefield We love rocking girl bands and we especially love them when they are homegrown and experienced in playing dingy Aussie pubs. About to drop their new album, As Above, So Below, Stonefield are giving fans a sneak peak of their new material. Newtown Social Club, $25 The poster for this year’s Volvo Scandinavian Film Festival suggests we’re in for more Nordic Noir, or maybe a dose of existential angst. Both are there (The Pusher Trilogy, Absolution, Parents) but there’s an impressive collection of lighter and often sardonically funny films too like Other Girls, about four Finnish high-school girlfriends misadventures as they near graduation, plus the bright Swedish romantic comedy Love is the Drug. The strongest film of the festival is its centrepiece, Land Of Mine – a gripping award-winning thriller about a group of young German POW soldiers in Denmark after World War II. And sure to be of interest here is Welcome to Norway – an acerbic and sharply witty take on the region’s refugee issues. An aspiring hotel owner decides to turn his half-built alpine hotel into a state-funded refugee asylum reception centre. Take note local councillors: Nothing works out as planned! ★ www.scandinavianfilmfestival.com July 5 – July 27 at Palace Cinemas. Everybody Wants Some!! Richard Linklater usually has strong and feisty female characters in his films – like Celine in the Before trilogy. But they’re absent here – instead there’s beer, bongs and boobs – the primary obsessions of the jocks of Linklater’s own college youth. It’s a rose-tinted nostalgic reverie for the '80s, and he amiably captures the blissed-out days of many young men before adulthood kicks in. The talented cast includes Ryan Guzman and Zoey Deutch, and, since this is the “spiritual sequel” to his 80s classic Dazed and Confused, Charlie as the “cat in the fridge.” MA15+ from June 23. Maggie’s Plan is as nutty as the person carrying it out. Greta Gerwig, doing her gawky Francis Ha thing charmingly, is a single woman whose biological clock is ticking away. An attempt at impregnating herself with the sperm of a Brooklyn “pickle entrepreneur”, who chivalrously offers to do it the normal way first, seemingly fails, but just then she successfully woos a married writer (Ethan Hawke) away from his dour academic wife (Julianne Moore – enjoying herself immensely). Three years into their affair, and now with a toddler in tow, she decides she’s had enough and plots to give him back. That’s the screwball premise of Rebecca Miller’s comedy, and it moves along nicely enough – if a little sedately. It mines all the elements of similar New York yukfests – brownstones, book stores, a jaunty jazz score, impossibly hyperverbal and self-obsessed people, but the laughs we’re constantly being primed for don’t come often enough… Maybe if Gerwig had teamed up with her real-life bf Noah Baumbach instead? At least he has form in this sub-Woody Allen turf. M from July 7. CIAO's PICKS n Thanks Palace Cinemas we have five double inseason passes to festival films. Details below. Cruising through Linklaterland Hot doc: Down into the WestConnex murk Inner West Local Business Awards The Road One of the most anticipated and important events for our local business community is right around the corner. On June 29th, hundreds of local business finalists will be waiting patiently to see if they will be walking away with one of the sought-after Inner West Business Awards. It’s not all about the trophies, however, the evening held at Burwood RSL is a great opportunity for local business owners, staff and sponsors to meet each other, network and celebrate the achievement of becoming a finalist. With great food and entertainment, the night seeks to not only award the hard work and dedication of our local businesses, but to celebrate the individuals who make the Inner West such a wonderful place to live. May the best of the Inner West take out the coveted awards on the night! (Almost) everyone is a winner! n For further information on the finalists check out the business profiles in this issue of Ciao. All sessions of Zanbo Zhang’s incredible account of a motorway project in Hunan, China were sold out at the SFF, and although also part of Palace’s current Hot Docs Fest, it won’t be screened locally. But it will turn up somewhere sometime, so take note – since for the WestConnex-affected Inner West, The Road makes for spectacularly relevant viewing. Not that we have government officials hiring gangsters to knife opponents here, or even openly handing out “red envelopes” – buying off difficult locals, safety inspectors and certifying local authorities. But sickeningly exposed is the depressing way state capitalism works everywhere. There’s lots of talk about corruption with the WestConnex too, but it’s largely paranoid nonsense. We’re getting our tolled motorway for the same reason Hunan did: even in open societies like ours, money is like water, it just flows downhill to the lowest spot it can. What a pity the Inner West has elected two local MPs, whose lack of ability and clout have put us right at the bottom. Saturdays throughout July Vintage Month at Rozelle Markets In celebration of their love of all things retro (a love shared by us here at Ciao), Rozelle Collectors Market will be hosting a Vintage Month throughout July. On top of the pre-loved collectables, clothing, antiques and art-works the market is already famous for, each Saturday in July will see a vintage-themed event take over the stage. First up is the Rozelle Roadshow, to be held on July 2nd, inviting visitors to have their gems valued by antiques expert Ken Buxton! Or perhaps the Vinyl Record Spin on July 9th is more up your ally? For the full program of events check out rozellecollectorsmarket.com.au. Where: Rozelle Collectors Market, Rozelle Public School, 663 Darling Street, Rozelle Mon 4 – Sun 10 July Inner West comic stylings Sat 9 July, 12pm-6pm Argentine Festival 2016 Comic Con-Versation Bric is back! 10 Starting in 2014 as a one-evening comic convention at Ashfield Library, Comic Con-Versation has quickly grown to span a whole week and include 14 libraries throughout Sydney. For those with an interest in comics, the festival includes many free events including both practical and informative sessions. And don’t worry about getting there; events are held all across the Inner West at Ashfield, Concord, Leichhardt and Marrickville libraries. For the full program or more information visit www.facebook.com/ comicconversation2016, alternatively contact the libraries directly for booking information. Where: Libraries across the Inner West and Sydney Bring the whole family down to celebrate Argentina’s Independence Day at Concord Bowlo, with plenty of activities to keep both parents and children happy. There will be delicious food, catered by Parrilla Argenchino Catering, live bands and a tango show. The kids can run amok with a jumping castle and face painting. If you need more convincing, there are rumours of a ten-metre-long BBQ. Where: Concord Bowling Club, 1 Clermont Avenue, Concord WIN DOUBLE MOVIE PASSES To be in the running to win one of five name and address telling us where you double in-season passes to the Volvo picked up your copy of Ciao. Scandinavian Film Festival just email info@ciaomagazine.com.au with your n Reviews – Russell Edwards www.scandiavianfilmfestival.com

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n POLITICS MEET THE CANDIDATES a very cohesive council, which enabled it to do a lot of important things to make Canada Bay an exciting place to work, live and play in. Is your commitment to environment reflected in Labor’s policy? We do have strong commitment, given that we are focused on pushing forward to provide opportunities for industries for the future focusing on clean energy. We shouldn’t be paying polluters, as the current Government is doing. We should be focusing on new industries with a direction of reducing our carbon footprint; our policies are directed to achieve that. Australia has got the great advantage of solar and wind. We hope with our policies we can reach our targets earlier as well as a neutral carbon footprint. What issues are most concerning for people in your electorate? Even when I was talking to commuters at Concord West station this morning, which is very close to Concord Hospital, it was evident that Concord Hospital is a real important factor for this election. Residents are worried about Medicare, they’re worried about the freeze on the rebates, and the impact on bulk billing. The fact that the State Government’s Budget came out on Monday with no money for Concord Hospital, people are concerned about resourcing and maintaining the quality of service there. In Reid there has been a 9 per cent increase in student enrolments, which is the second highest in the state. So there is a lot more pressure on our schools and teachers. They need the two extra years of Gonski, which for our area means $24 million to go into bringing everyone up to the same level and ensuring there are great opportunities for students no matter their background or school. In the end that means we can bring innovation into schools and give students a better education, better jobs and that means a stronger economy in the future. is now working with Larissa at Meshea Lifestyle, 42 Short St Leichhardt, 11am - 4pm Wednesdays and 1.30-4pm Sundays. New and old clients are welcome and workshops will be coming soon. n Call Sylvia on 0427 640 835 or Larissa on seat like Sydney has 60 per cent renters, that’s the largest amount of renters of any seat in the country. And it’s also one of the least affordable cities in the world to live in. That’s not because housing prices are so high but because rents are so high. It affects quality of life and is driving the gap between rich and poor. We want to end negative gearing and the capital gains tax. Our policy would save $7 billion a year, and we would propose to reinvest that money into homeless services and public housing. We also have a detailed renters rights package, which is around capping rental price increases so we don’t see the doubling of rent that we have seen in the last ten years. Australia has some of the weakest laws protecting tenants of any country and we need to fix that urgently. What do you think will be the key Greens policy in this election? The conversation we’ve had most often with people who are thinking of changing their votes are around refugees and asylum seekers. People are confused and upset why the two major parties won’t talk about other options except for detention. We have a proposal of taking in 50,000 refugees, which is still modest compared to other countries. There are more refugees seeking asylum in the world than there was after WW2, more than any time in history. The Greens think it’s important to fulfill our international obligations and welcome people here. Tell me about the domestic violence policy you recently launched… One of the most important things it includes is an increase in affordable housing, as well as funding crisis refuges, which have seen a lot of cuts at the state and federal level. It also includes a stronger program of community education around respecting women. I am so excited about this package because it sees the whole picture, rather than just fund the crisis point. xxxxx xxxxxx xxxxx n xxxxx xxxxx Angelo Tsirekas Labor Candidate for Reid What did you achieve while you were mayor of Canada Bay Council? The best thing I was able to achieve was to bring the community together and in partnership work towards creating a better community. We were able to create a very environmentally focused and sustainable council, and that was recognised nationally and internationally with the sustainable policies we introduced for buildings, business and community. We were also active in looking for ways to improve our wonderful built environment. That includes new growth areas in Rhodes, where we were able to create open space and build a bridge that got people out of their cars and to connect with the railway line. We had n PROMOTION Sylvie Ellsmore The Greens candidate for Sydney What were your achievements as councillor on Marrickville Council? I think the proudest achievements I had were around affordable housing and increasing bike paths. We were able to establish an Affordable Housing Committee, of which I was the co-chair. The council committed to building its own affordable housing and had a target to grow affordable housing owned by council and we also managed to secure several million dollars worth of new affordable housing to be built. What are the most pertinent issues for your electorate right now? Housing affordability is the most important issue because it impacts so many people. A Grayndler’s fate hanging in the stars On July 2nd candidates in the Grayndler area, Labor’s Anthony Albanese and the Greens’ Jim Casey will be head-to-head in competition to run the Grayndler area. However, I feel that as Anthony Albanese has been in the electoral forefront for a considerable amount of time, Casey will probably be pipped to the post and Albanese will regain his seat in the electorate. The Greens’ man, Jim Casey, has some exceptionally good ideas and many voters will find him and his concepts most appealing. He will lose by a small margin I feel. Good luck to both candidates. “Celebrated clairvoyant and psychic to the stars, Sylvia St. Clair, opened the first psychic and healing centre in Australia in 1972, Soul Potential Psychic and Healing Centre on Darling Street, Rozelle. She 9518 3281. Woman’s Day - Fuji Television Japan - New Idea Sylvia St Claire Australia’s most recognised PSYCHIC Reader for the stars Sylvia has read for celebrities like Princess Diana Now in the INNER WEST Over 46 years experience Sylvia can be found at Meshea Lifestyle Sundays from 11am & Wednesdays from 1.30pm VOTE 1 SYLVIE ELLSMORE Sylvie is a Native Title lawyer and former local councillor, with deep roots in the community and a strong track record of getting things done. ▲ Compassion for people seeking asylum. ▲ 100% renewable energy by 2050. ▲ Stop WestConnex, invest in public transport. STANDING UP FOR WHAT MATTERS WWW.GREENSFORSYDNEY.ORG Authorised by Chris Kerle for the Greens NSW. 1/275 Broadway Glebe NSW 2037. 42 Short St Leichhardt Ph: 9518 3281 M: 0427 640 835 12

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in the kitchen Date, orange and cinnamon slice Method  with Olivia Mackay, n www.scoffandquaff. wordpress.com I like something a little sweet but not too unhealthy. Most recipes seem to fall into one of two camps: those which consist of butter, white flour and caster sugar, and those with ingredients like coconut flour and rice malt syrup. Here, I have adapted a traditional date slice biscuit recipe to be somewhere in between. It’s crumbly, buttery and sweet but the oats and almond meal will fill you up for longer than most biscuity treats. 1. Preheat oven to 180C or 160C fan-forced. 2. Grease and line a baking tin approx. 25cm x 25cm. 3. Zest and then juice the oranges. Pour the juice into a cup measure, then add just enough water to fill to one cup. 4. Put dates and OJ in a saucepan. Simmer for 10 minutes. 5. Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. 6. Add the flour, bicarb, oats, almond meal, cinnamon and orange zest and mix well. 7. Tip half the oat mixture into the lined pan and press down evenly to form the biscuit base. 8. Spread the cooled date mixture over the top. 9. Crumble remaining oat mixture on the top so that the dates are completely covered and press down gently with your fingertips. 10. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until golden brown. 11. Allow to cool before cutting into squares. 12. Serve with a hot cup of tea as an afternoon treat; alternatively, serve warm with custard or ice cream as a dessert. Makes 16 Wine with Winsor n www.wdwineoftheweek.blogspot.com Taylors 2014 80 Acres Cabernet Shiraz Merlot 80 Acres is a budget label from Taylors, a family-owned winery in the Clare Valley of South Australia that offers great value. This wine is a blend of three different grape varieties from various regions of South Australia and the end result is a classic Australian red with plenty of fruity oomph (think blackcurrants and raspberry flavours, restrained oak and plenty of length). Versatile with food, too. Maybe pizza, pasta or a barbecue. $16. Easy drinking Something new Clonakilla 2016 Viognier Nouveau Here is something fun and exciting from the recent vintage. Made from the white French grape viognier, this is designed to be enjoyed when young and fresh. Very little is done to the fruit in the winery. It is fermented in stainless steel and bottled early for maximum fruit impact. This is deliciously vibrant and eminently slurpable with apricot and tropical fruit flavours to the fore. It would pair brilliantly with a chilli chicken dish. $25. A filling treat for a wintery day Ingredients • 2 cups dried pitted dates, roughly chopped • Zest and juice of two large oranges • ¾ cup butter, chopped • ½ cup brown sugar • 1 cup wholemeal flour • 1 ½ cups rolled oats • ½ cup almond meal • ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda • ½ tsp ground cinnamon Pinot panache Coldstream Hills 2015 Pinot Noir Coldstream Hills is one of the leading producers in the Yarra Valley and was founded by wine critic James Halliday. Pinot noir is a very difficult grape to grow and prices for the variety tend to be quite high but this is certainly worth a splurge with its bright red and black fruit notes, savoury impact and nicely integrated French oak. A tad lighter than many Australian reds but deftly balanced and a very good choice to match with a roast duck from Chinatown. $35. www.gourmetontheroad.blogspot.com. Market Update n Fruit: You’ll find mandarins are juicy and firm-skinned right now at $2-$5 a kilo. Strawberries are luscious at $3-$5 a punnet. Bananas, passionfruit and rock melons will also make a tasty and thrifty treat! tried oven-baked fennel now is the time, with bulbs at $1.50-$2.50 each. Cabbage, carrots and cauliflower are perfect right now. Thanks to Sydney Markets. See www.sydneymarkets.com.au for more. n Veggies: Kumara is a great buy this week at $2-$4 a kilo. If you haven’t AT HOME WITH Emma Hurst Ashfield psychologist, Emma Hurst is the Animal Justice Party’s Grayndler candidate. How did you first develop your passion for animal rights? When I was six years old my parents rescued two cats from the Cat Protection Society on Enmore Road. Seeing how much personality each cat had and recognising that they had needs and wants made me wonder about other species. We have been taught in society that certain animals have the ability to suffer and need our protection – dogs, cats, horses – while others are less able to suffer, or have less intelligence – cows, pigs, chickens. A pig has the same intelligence as a six-year-old child, so the way society has grouped these animals makes no sense. I’m not unique in recognising this as a child though. Having worked with children, I can see that many children see all animals as intelligent and capable of pain. Is this passion reflected in your diet? I went vegetarian when I realised I couldn’t kill and eat my cat. That was almost 20 years ago. Once I heard about the cruelty in the egg and dairy industry I went vegan overnight. Reading about the male calves being taken away and slaughtered at just one-day-old in the dairy industry and the male chicks macerated at birth in the egg industry was enough to turn me away. I’ve been living a vegan lifestyle for 16 years now. 14 MELISSA Leong Sydney has cast its vote Sydney’s culinary scene has turned away from old favourites, Melissa Leong asks who will be contesting for our bellies (and our bank notes) next? I have a confession to make. A couple of years ago, I fell off the electoral role while moving suburbs. Election time rolled around and I felt a bit cheated when I went to the polls and couldn’t cast my vote. It’s important stuff, voting, don’t you know. It determines who gets to shape our nation and speak on our behalf. Like it or lump it, politicians are also largely responsible for how the rest of the world sees us, be that good, bad or downright embarrassing. It’s no different when it comes to food. We vote with our stomachs and, more tangibly, our wallets. To the chopping block go venues that are either no good…or perhaps just no longer relevant. The past year has seen a lot of discussion in the food industry about the way we choose to dine and how that’s changing. Super fine dining restaurants such as Rockpool and Marque have recently called it quits, while more casual, shared plate offerings seem to be thriving. Clearly Sydney’s finest dining restaurants have brilliant food but maybe they are loosing relevance? There is no doubt that the places we choose to eat out at changes the culinary landscape in a far more profound way than we realise. Finely-wrought ephemeral art on a plate, five-hour dinners and highly designed dining rooms create drama and ooze class. Personally, I do love a good knees-up in the presence of white tablecloths and polished silver, but I’m a bit tired of it all. It’s like going to see a film: anything that goes much longer than 2 hours and I start to wonder if I couldn’t be doing something better with my time. So it would seem the Australian dining public has voted, with their sleeves rolled up and their top button undone. While it is sad to see these iconic beauties singing their swan songs, necessity does make way for ingenuity and evolution. I look forward to tasting what these brilliant culinary minds come up with at their next ventures, now that the game has changed yet again. Animal justice hero! What do you like cooking at home? I am lucky to have a partner that loves to cook (and who used to own a few restaurants). Now that it is winter I am loving my soups- my favourite being potato and leek soup with either some brown rice, quinoa, or freshly made sourdough bread. My partner also makes traditional Greek soups with tomato and lentils. My cat Jess always wants to lick the bowl. Considering he is a carnivore, we must be making some pretty delicious plant-based soups! What is the policy you are most passionate about? The policy to end live animal export. The AJP opposes the commercial export, whether by sea or air, of live animals. The ALP have just agreed to work with the AJP to increase plant-based food production. Investment in plant-based foods is about jobs and growth in a nonlethal industry. Our belief is that in the future, investment in the live animal trade industry will cease in favour of investment in a diverse, organic, plant-based agriculture industry. Is there a treat that you try to avoid but find tempting? Gelato Blue vegan ice cream in Newtown! Even though it is winter I struggle to walk past that place without getting a scoop of cookies and cream. I have a massive sweet tooth. If it’s not ice cream, I’m usually trying to stop myself munching on some liquorice. n For more information about Emma’s campaign go to: www.animaljusticeparty.org Potato and Leek Soup Ingredients: 1 Tsp coconut oil 4 potatoes 2 leeks 1 onion 2 sticks celery 4 cups vegetable stock Method Add coconut oil to base of a large saucepan. Cut and heat onion, celery and leeks. Stir until the pieces become soft. Skin potatoes and cut into four pieces. Add potatoes to the pot with the vegetable stock. Cook until potato is soft all the way through. Put all ingredients into a blender and blend until completely smooth. Add salt or pepper to taste.

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