EARCOS Triannual Journal - Spring Issue 2016

 

Embed or link this publication

Description

EARCOS Triannual Journal - Spring Issue 2016

Popular Pages


p. 1

The EARCOS Triannual JOURNAL A Link to Educational Excellence in East Asia SPRING 2016 Featured in this Issue EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2016 Theme: “Innovating Arts and Motion” EARCOS Special Report Aligning Professional Development for Collaboration: Results of EARCOS Survey

[close]

p. 2

The EARCOS JOURNAL The ET Journal is a triannual publication of the East Asia Regional Council of Schools(EARCOS), a nonprofit 501(C)3, incorporated in the state of Delaware, USA, with a regional office in Manila, Philippines. Membership in EARCOS is open to elementary and secondary schools in East Asia which offer an educational program using English as the primary language of instruction, and to other organizations, institutions, and individuals. Objectives and Purposes * To promote intercultural understanding and international friendship through the activities of member schools. * To broaden the dimensions of education of all schools involved. in the Council in the interest of a total program of education. * To advance the professional growth and welfare of individuals belonging to the educational staff of member schools. * To facilitate communication and cooperative action between and among all associated schools. * To cooperate with other organizations and individuals pursuing the same objectives as the Council. EARCOS BOARD OF TRUSTEES Margaret Alvarez, President (ISS International School) Tarek Razik, Treasurer (The International School of Beijing) Stephen Cathers, Secretary (Korea International School) Anna Marsden (International School Suva) Diane Lewthwaite (Fukuoka International School) Norman Hudson (International School Kuala Lumpur) David Toze, Past President (International School Manila) James McDonald (NIST International School) Stephen Dare (Hong Kong Academy) Andrew Davies (International School Bangkok) Office of Overseas Schools REO: EARCOS STAFF Executive Director: Richard Krajczar Assistant Director: Joe Petrone Consultant: Bill Oldread Vitz Baltero Ver Castro Robert Sonny Viray Editor: Joe Petrone Associate Editor: Edzel Drilo Elaine Repatacodo Edzel Drilo Rod Catubig Jr. Dr. Larry Hobdell Letter from the Executive Director Dear Colleagues: The end of the school year is near, and 2015-2016 is flying by. I hope everyone will have a smooth end of school. This is the time of year when so much is expected and workload is pushed to the limit. Breathe and try to stay relaxed during May madness! The Spring Heads’ Institute in Siem Reap, Cambodia, will have more than 40 school leaders in attendance, which is one of the largest retreats to date! We have steadily increased participation over years and hope that next year will be even better. Jefferson Cann is the retreat facilitator, and he aims to tap into and develop inner resources and self-confidence. We look forward to working with him to increase our personal effectiveness. The 2016 EARCOS Teachers’ Conference (ETC) had 830 registered delegates. Largest groups were the arts and physical education. The International School Manila proved to be a great venue for this year’s event. Our keynoters Michael Kuczala, Mark Jenkins, and Doug Goodkin were well received. We had a host of other excellent presenters including presentations from our own teachers. A total of 175 presentations! Please see the ETC conference write-up in this issue. Our EARCOS staff of Joe Petrone, Elaine,Vitz,Ver, Robert, and Edzel should be thanked for their tremendous efforts in organizing thousands of details. We hope you all have a great summer break (northern hemisphere) and enjoy time with family, friends, travel, and reflection. Our board and staff continue to work to make EARCOS a caring, supportive, and dynamic community of international schools. Please check out our website to see all our sponsored events and read about my travels throughout the EARCOS region. Please visit E-Connect, the EARCOS blog, initiated by our own Bill Oldread. Happy Holiday! Dick Krajczar Executive Director Check out our updated website at www.earcos.org and read our E-Connect blog at earcos-connect.tumblr.com East Asia Regional Council of Schools Brentville Subdivision, Barangay Mamplasan Biñan, Laguna, 4024, Philippines PHONE: 63-02-697-9170 FAX: 63-49-511-4694 WEBSITE: www.earcos.org L-R Rod Catubig, Edzel Drilo, Elaine Repatacodo, Dick Krajczar, Joe Petrone, Vitz Baltero, Robert Viray, and Ver Castro

[close]

p. 3

In this Issue 2 6 7 8 10 11 12 14 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 30 contents EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2016 Theme: “Innovating Arts and Motion” High School GIN2016 - “Turn on the enGIN. Make it Work!” Middle School GIN2016 - “EnGINeering Our Future” SENIA Conference - “United in Learning” Leadership Program - Supporting Tomorrow’s East Asia International School Leaders Press Release - Concordia Shanghai’s young entrepreneurs receive award for innovation EARCOS Special Report - Aligning Professional Development for Collaboration: Results of EARCOS Survey Service Learning - The Gift of Jave - A Scholar’s Journey to Success: Bernice Delos Reyes Curriculum Innovation - ISB Students’ Creative Projects for Innovation Day Community Relationship and Impact - Creating a Community Impact Statement: A Worthwhile Endeavor Community Service - Korea Kent Foreign School Volunteer Club - Global Issues Network Green & Sustainability - Sustainability and Systemic Change Social Emotional Learning at Middle School - Exclusiveness in Middle School - “Shake it Off“ College Admissions - Turning the Tide: How US University Admissions Can Make Better World Early Childhood - Let’em Play! Campus Development - A Step towards Growth - Cebu I.S. Campus Renovations - New Campus To Impact Learning, Says UNIS Hanoi Press Release - International Schools Moving Towards Inclusion Elementary School Gallery On the Road with Dr. K Front cover photo By Arnel Hatulla San Isidro Pahiyas Festival EARCOS and CIS are pleased to announce the 2nd INSTITUTE ON HIGHER EDUCATION ADMISSION AND GUIDANCE. Sept. 30 - October 1, 2016 Bangkok, Thailand, Shangri-La Hotel visit www.earcos.org EARCOS and CIS - Institute On Higher Education Admission and Guidance The EARCOS Action Research Grant In an ongoing effort to implement the EARCOS Strategic Plan, specifically Strategy E, to conduct, communicate, and archive relevant data and research to identify and enhance exceptional educational practices, grants will be made available to encourage our teachers, administrators, and professional staff to conduct action research to improve educational practices for the purpose of enhancing student learning. Action research is a reflective process, conducted in the school setting, to solve a real problem, or to improve and enhance the instructional process.This research may be undertaken by an individual, or by several people collaboratively. It is our belief that the results of such research will impact not only the researchers’ practices but also those of others with whom they share their findings.To that end, grantees will be expected to publish their findings, which will be made available to all EARCOS members on the website. Some researchers may elect to present their work at a subsequent ETC, ELC, or publish it in the EARCOS Journal. Please visit the EARCOS website for more information. www.earcos.org Contribute to the ET Journal If you have something going on at your school in any of the following categories that you would like to see highlighted in the Fall issue please send it along to us: Faces of EARCOS - Promotions, retirements, honors, etc. Service Learning Campus Development - New building plans, under construction, just completed projects. Curriculum - New and exciting curriculum adoptions. Green and Sustainable - Related to campus development or to curriculum efforts. Community Service Student Art - We showcase outstanding student art in each edition. Student Writing Press Releases Thank you for your help in allowing us to highlight the great things that are going on in EARCOS schools. Back cover: Approved EARCOS Weekend Workshops SY 2016-2017 Spring 2016 Spring 2016 Issue 1

[close]

p. 4

EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2016 Over 700 delegates attended the first day of conference opening keynote of Mike Kuczala. Manila is a place filled with wonderful people and a city on the move. From the moment I got into the taxi and headed to the hotel it was clear that the people of Manila were inviting. Upon arrival at the International School of Manila campus, I found it beautiful and the staff again very inviting. It is rare to attend a conference where from the start an attendee gains a sense of community, learning and value. Opening the conference Christopher Bill dazzled the audience with his own brand of music. Speaking for myself (and for the very excited band teacher sitting next to me) this was a treat. His fashion and style of music set the stage for a conference that would ask attendees to go beyond a typical classroom. Christopher Bill spurred us to tap our toes and shake our bodies. It would be movement and learning that would follow as Mike Kuczala started us off with a rousing display of how even a library and tech guy like myself could better understand Math through movement. He went on to explain the means and manners which would ensure students brains would be engaged and actively learning. Further, he had an entire auditorium on their feet laughing and stimulating fresh thinking. It was off to the sessions then. There were tons of choices on the first day. The session spanned everything from counseling to create great peer programs from Scott Lassey to Brain Dance by Terry Goetz. The rooms were full. I attended a great session by Jefferson Lipsky that detailed the ‘nuts and bolts’ of film in schools. Keynote speaker Mike Kuczala. Keynote Title: The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning through Movement. 2 EARCOS Triannual Journal While I attended some amazing sessions on the first day it was the last session that really got me locked in on learning. There were Joba-Like sessions for every strand. In mine we discussed things that are happening everyday and how everyone is working these issues. It was great networking as well as listening to unique approaches. We ended that first day with a celebration in the middle of campus where we were able to network and share. Walking around the celebration, it was clear participants, rather than tired were electrified by the day’s sessions. Everyone was talking and mingling. All that stopped the conversation was an amazing cultural performance provided by The Bayanihan the National Folk Dance Company of the Philippines. It was the perfect cap to end the day.

[close]

p. 5

“Innovating Arts and Motion“ If the first day were any indicator, the second would be amazing. Dr. K. introduced Mark Jenkins, the keynote for day two, and he gave a talk that was truly inspiring. Mark spun the tail of his journey on assignment for National Geographic exploring what would be identified as the largest cave in the world. While the story of his journey was amazing in and of itself it was the images that truly inspired us to take chances, to extend our own learning and seek the latest information about quality teaching. In reflection, this presentation was an inspiration for teachers to struggle every day and stay the course while providing the best education for our students. Of special mention on day two was Alec Couros’ presentation on Digital Citizenship. He provided a positive outlook on a topic that engaged the full room of attendees. He provided information and suggestions to take back to school on Monday. There were more physical education sessions focused on making sure student needs were more than met and that of paramount importance was the student’s life long health. Added to the physical education sessions were the arts sessions. It was very exciting to sit with a group of dance instructors at lunch. They recapped sessions where they explained that they hadn’t spent a moment ‘sitting and getting’. They discussed the importance of movement on a daily basis. While the artistic study was critical, the movement was what trumped all. On this day most of us finished the day with smiles on our faces. The smiles masked what many spoke of and that was that we were already starting to feel ‘full’ of information. Most of us made our way to High Street, which is a short walk from ISM, to eat, mingle and enjoy the wonderful evening temperatures of Manila. On the final day Doug Goodkin opened for us. His talk was the culminating factor for our keynotes. On day one Mike spoke about linkages between the brain and learning, on day two Mark demonstrated life long learning and the importance of determination and finally Doug provided encouragement for all educators. Keynote speaker Mark Jenkins. Keynote title: Vietnam Underground: The Viet Cong, Spelunkers and the Biggest Cave on Earth It was the second day that it became evident that the contingent of physical education teachers was very large. Visiting a presentation by Lien Indigne and Dave Ducharme where there wasn’t a seat left available as the room was full of PE teachers. Their session focused on new standards and the necessity of more than simply ‘grading’ student performance, it was clear that developing a strong understand of health coupled with sparking life long exercise was the most important work these teachers carry out on a daily basis. Keynote speaker Doug Goodkin. Keynote title: The Humanitarian Mucian. It is a rare occasion that I attend a conference where I truly wished I could have gone to every session. It made me wonder what I had missed. However it was the closing ceremony where it was clear others felt the same way as their discussions were electric. A final few words about the conference... it is clear that the Dr. K and his team strive to put on a conference that teachers leave ‘fully charged’ to return to the classroom and that they are carrying a new set of tools to make them better. In most cases we left with new friends and ideas to enhance our teaching. Thanks Dr. K and team for a wonderful learning experience. By Christopher Bell, ETC Advisory Committee Member International School Bangkok Spring 2016 Issue 3

[close]

p. 6

Announcements/Remarks by Colin Aitken(ISM), Skylie Bevear(HKIS), and Keith Allerton(JIS). Delegates preparing for the first general session. 14th EARCOS Teachers’ Conference 2016 Terry Goetz workshop on BrainDance: Collaborative Variations. Sam Cook and Colin Aitken watching the performance of ISM Jazz Band. Grace Hudkins workshop on Elementary Drama Integration. 4 EARCOS Triannual Journal Carolyn Temertzoglou workshop on Developing Confident, Competent Movers.This active session explores how to develop confident competent movers in a wide variety of activities

[close]

p. 7

Ted and Carolyn Temertzoglou. workshop on Making Connections Between Physical Literacy and Physical Fitness. Ringo Dingrando and Matt Chadwick workshop on The Tools of Robolution. Theme: Innovating Arts and Motion Peter Boonshaft workshop on Teaching Music with Promise: 25 MORE Things You Can Do Tomorrow To Improve Your Ensemble. Cameron McHale workshop on Action Research and Adventure Based Learning. 5KM Charity Fun Run for Operation Smile. >> More photos available at the ETC website http://earcos.org/etc2016/ Teachers’ band rocking the night at the Open Mic closing party held at ISM middle school courtyard. Spring 2016 Issue 5

[close]

p. 8

Conference G lobal warming, poverty, infectious disease, terrorism and illegal drugs are some of the serious issues that need global cooperation to be solved. In his 2002 book “High Noon: Twenty Global Problems, Twenty Years to Solve Them”, Jean Francois Rischard highlighted these issues and the urgency for immediate action; this later became the inspiration to form the Global Issues Network (GIN). Empowering schools to become the network’s foundation, GIN has grown rapidly from a small grassroots beginning in Luxembourg to more than 500 schools across Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, as well as South and Central America at present. With the mission to encourage youths to collaborate in creating project-based sustainable solutions for global issues, this network of school communities organizes the annual GIN Conference at the regional level. This year, Bali Island School (BIS) hosted a conference that gathered students and teachers from the East Asia Regional Council of Schools. Taking place in Sanur last week, this two-day event, entitled “Turn on the enGIN. Make it work.”, brought together youth participants from East Asia for an exciting weekend of learning and action. Alongside their peers, the students learned “YOUTHS TAKE ACTION TO ADDRESS GLOBAL ISSUES” WORDS DESY NURHAYATI PHOTOS ARIMBAWANDUD ESTMOVIE HS GIN CONFERENCE 2016 2016 GIN CONFERENCE and created action projects that addressed 20 global issues, as well as learning from notable speakers. Among these speakers was Silverius Oscar Unggul, who created a business model that empowers and provides economic incentives for forest dwelling communities to get involved in conservation e orts by helping them manage their own sustainable eco-labeled timber business. Founder of Migrant Care, Anis Hidayah, a human rights warrior walking a lonely path, also shared her thoughts on the issues of international labor and migration. Balinese artist Made Bayak was also one of the speakers at the event, inspiring the students with his projects, for which he utilized plastic trash and turned it into mesmerizing pieces of art. There were also some foreign speakers, including Micah White, a lifelong social activist with a twenty-year record of innovative approaches to creating social change. He took the participants through his theories of mass movement that are destined to inspire and catalyze the next generation of global action. Participating students also joined workshop sessions focused on issues varying from education, global warming and pollution, to biotechnology, trade and international labor, which were subdivided into sharing our humanity, sharing our planet and sharing our rule book. “These issues encompass the values we live by on a daily basis in Indonesia and the rest of the world,” commented Sarah de Ruyter, GIN student leader. “The event inspired each and every one of us to take our projects to a higher level. It certainly takes innovation, action and collaboration to solve those problems and make both local and global impacts.” Overall, the conference presented the participants with more challenges and fresh perspectives that will hopefully spark new ideas and plans to help address and solve growing issues in this ever-changing world. 6 March 17, 2016 6 EARCOS Triannual Journal

[close]

p. 9

MS GIN CONFERENCE 2016 EnGINeering Our Future: Middle School Global Issues Network Conference at Shanghai Community International School - Hongqiao Campus Seven months of planning was realized when more than two-hundred fifty Middle School students and their advisors from twentythree international schools across Asia arrived at the SCIS Hongqiao Campus ready to “enGINeer” their future. This diverse group of change makers gathered for the 2016 Middle School Global Issues Network (GIN) Conference. GIN is an international network of students whose mission is to empower young people to collaborate locally, regionally and globally to create sustainable solutions for global issues. The network is mostly based on Jean-Francois Rischard’s, novel High Noon: Twenty Global Problems, Twenty Years to Solve Them. Our conference theme was “EnGINineering Our Future”.The aim of our student led and organized event was to provide a platform for like-minded middle schoolers to connect, to exchange knowledge and to learn tools for meaningful action through, peer workshops, hands-on sessions, social networking events and other fun activities. Locally based inspirational keynote speakers challenged both students and teachers to go beyond the obvious, to be innovative, and to work together to understand and develop sustainable solutions for global issues both during and after the conference. ticipated in different workshops, all students experienced the same design process which can be applied to all current and future projects. As a part of the conference’s zero waste theme, Green Accommodation was offered to reduce transportation emissions. Students and chaperones stayed at school, immersing themselves in the experience and making new friends. Also, activities such as: Swap Shop, Tee4Tee, Sustainability Fair, teacher workshops and social networking events for both students and teachers, were offered. Throughout the weekend, stories about our passion for global issues and ideas for collaborative post-conference actions were shared. Organizing this event was a tremendous undertaking. The experience infused our entire community with a collaborative spirit and challenged us to “walk the talk”. We were humbled by the commitment of everyone who made this event possible. Having more than three hundred students, teachers and volunteers together, connected by our belief in sustainable solutions for global issues, was one of the greatest moments. We understood that we can work together, do projects together, get help from each other, and most importantly, teach each other how to engineer our future together even if we were not in the same physical location. The weekend ended with everyone buzzing from the excitement of the conference and looking forward to putting their learning into practice in their communities. By Lisa Chui, MYP Art Teacher/GIN Facilitator; Richard Forbes, MYP Humanities Teacher/GIN Facilitator; Hilda Meijer, MS student, GIN organizer; and Tina Santilli, MS Principal Prior to the conference, GIN teams engaged in global issues projects at their own schools. During the conference, each GIN team led a “Peer to Peer” workshop as experts sharing solutions to the issues their projects addressed. Students not only learned about different projects but also had opportunities to reflect on what they learned and ways they could apply their learning in the future projects. One of the highlights of the weekend was our five-hour hands-on “EnGINeering” workshops. During these practical sessions, participants designed and constructed up-cycled fashion, aquaponics gardens, large scale bamboo play equipment, small scale energy efficient homes, and “viral” water awareness campaigns. While students par- Spring 2016 Issue 7

[close]

p. 10

Bersatu, ‘United in Learning’ SENIA 2016 at ISKL! This article was written by Kathryn Balsamo, SENIA Board Member in collaboration with Rami Madani, ISKL Director of Teaching and Learning. At the heart of SENIA’s mission is that of advocacy. The SENIA board was honored to award Tobin Zolkowski with the Student Award. As the only deaf student at Jakarta Intercultural School, Tobin’s perseverance and determination have allowed him to find avenues to make a difference. From addressing the student body on ways to communicate with the deaf to volunteering as an interpreter in the local community, Tobin’s advocacy has had an impact. The SENIA Advocate award winner, Dato’ Dr. Amir Singh spoke of Malaysia’s journey towards inclusion. As many international schools are on similar journeys, his words of encouragement and wisdom resonated with the crowd. SENIA 2016 gave back. Personal touches made SENIA a memorable event. This included allocating free tickets for local Malaysian school teachers, donating to specific charities in lieu of conference trinkets, supporting local organizations that employ young adults with disabilities, and providing opportunities for students with disabilities to showcase their talents. Transformational, inspirational, and motivational were a few of the words used on the feedback surveys to describe the Special Education Network in Asia (SENIA) conference held at The International School of Kuala Lumpur in February, 2016. The conference, now in its 13th year, attracts classroom educators, related service providers, administrators and parents from schools and organizations in and around Asia. This year’s attendance of 450 delegates sends a clear message – SENIA has become the “go-to” conference to network and learn about best practices to support the learning differences of all students. The SENIA pre conference started with the opportunity for educators to spend a full day immersed in learning around one of the conference strands – executive functioning, and social emotional well being. The ISKL planning team, under the direction of Rami Madani, Director of Teaching and Learning and Amy Diefendorf, elementary school counselor, recruited renowned and published speakers. Dr. Peg Dawson, author of Executive Skills in Children and Adolescents, and Smart but Scattered provided attendees with a clear definition of executive skills and valuable strategies to use in a variety of settings. Julia Cook, a highly entertaining speaker and author of over 50 picture books about social-emotional skills, helped attendees understand how to use books to address social skill deficits Dr. Stephen Shore took attendees inside the life of a person with autism. Sharing his journey from a young boy, told he could not attend school, to a college professor at Adelphi University in New York, Dr. Shore stressed the importance of reaching all students. The SENIA conference kicked off with welcome messages from ISKL’s Head of School, Dr. Norma Hudson and long time SENIA supporter, EARCOS Director Dr. Dick Krajczer. Both encouraged the delegates to continue learning best practices that support all the children arriving at our schools doors. All weekend ISKL’s Melawati campus was abuzz with conversations, both professional and personal as educators reconnected or met for the first time and discussed their takeaways from the various dynamic and informative workshops. These conversations and the ability to network with like-minded professionals is one reason so many delegates look forward to SENIA each year! Bersatu! The participants at SENIA 2016 came together, showing their commitment to learning and engaged in rich conversations, both of which will have a direct impact on the children under their care. ISKL Planning Team SENIA Board Members (L) Karli Koning, Catherine Deen, Ericson Perez, Lori Boll, Kathryn Balsamo, Frederick Wagner, Tanya Farrol (Not in photo) 8 EARCOS Triannual Journal

[close]

p. 11

Accredited. College-Prep. Online. Rigorous, college-prep courses and respected, accepted diploma. highschool.nebraska.edu/EARCOS The University of Nebraska is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

[close]

p. 12

Leadership Program >> Supporting Tomorrow’s East Asia International School Leaders: Context-Based Training and the Development of Support Networks practice can find themselves uncertain and tentative as they move into positions of leadership—especially in cases where they do not have a mentor to guide them. Despite participation in effective training programs and authentic internship opportunities the newly anointed administrators in our program spoke of missing their teacher colleagues with whom they had formed close relationships. We quickly recognized the need to structure our weeklong seminars to create learning communities and support networks that would endure between seminars and after students’ graduation from the program. We began by structuring seminars around group and teamwork, and later added coaching and role-playing components. As candidates developed work products, e.g., model teacher evaluations, we provided opportunities for collegial feedback to inform their work. They co-developed documents and materials such as communication and crisis plans, protocols for dealing with challenging interpersonal confrontations, and other work products they could apply in their professional setting. As networks began to form organically, we were delighted to find that students sought out each other at social events, and scheduled evening meals so they could continue their conversations. As months and years have passed, we have noted that colleagues follow each other’s career paths, often connecting at EARCOS conferences or at other professional venues. They continued to seek assistance and advice from each other regarding personnel issues, policy and procedure development, and other needs. Students Prepare A Group Report We arrived in Bangkok in the spring of 2012 to teach our first group of principal candidates. We were pleased to join the International Leadership Program co-sponsored by the University of San Francisco and Washington State University. As retired school superintendents from the United States, we knew that educational leadership is increasingly challenging and complex. We quickly learned that this is especially true in East Asia, where many administrators work in relative isolation from each other. While school leaders in the United States struggle to increase learning for all students, administrators in East Asian schools face the same challenge but must also contend with the additional challenge of working in “for profit” educational organizations. Structured Group Work Results in Enduring Professional Networks We knew from experience that the transition from teacher to a formal leadership role is challenging. Teachers who have acquired a sense of efficacy and competence borne from years of successful 10 EARCOS Triannual Journal Students prepare team reports.

[close]

p. 13

Context-Based Instruction Results in Increased Levels of Learning and Coaching As we worked with these creative, courageous leaders we found that they loved learning about each other’s schools and work settings. They enthusiastically participated in activities where they were called upon to compare and contrast policies, procedures, and protocols at their respective schools. They welcomed a venue for brainstorming solutions to scenarios and applying assigned readings and materials to the realities of their own and each other’s professional settings. Although we came to class with carefully crafted hypothetical scenarios designed to engage students in applying learning to a “real” context, at student request we repeatedly replaced our scenarios with their scenarios. Students made comments such as “I’d like to have the class work on my situation and give me suggestions.” We took our students’ lead and moved them from the hypothetical to the real. Rather than course content imported by professors from the United States who have limited knowledge of the politics and realities of living and working in East Asia, the use of student-centered scenarios tailored our program to the needs of the future leaders of East Asia international schools. As a result, students reported high levels of practical learning and a readiness to apply their new skills in their work settings. Conclusion EARCOS provides a rich, professional development opportunity for prospective educational leaders in East Asia international schools. USF and WSU have successfully partnered with EARCOS to provide an International Leadership Program that is unique in its approach and its outcomes. By embedding context-based in- struction and structured group work, candidates report developing knowledge and skills crafted for their leadership work in East Asian schools, and perhaps more importantly the development of a professional network that will provide ongoing support and assistance for their work. By Glenys Hill, Ed.D, Washington State University and Roger Rada, Ph.D., University of San Francisco Student coach each other on teacher evaluations. Press Release >> Concordia Shanghai’s young entrepreneurs receive award for innovation Yunnan and as a way to earn funds to continue the authentic work they have started. The Social Entrepreneurship class is an applied learning course that motivates students through education and first hand business experience to become social entrepreneurs and agents of change. Students source coffee beans directly from farmers in Yunnan, China, roast them on campus, and sell the roasted coffee to the community to guarantee that the process is socially and environmentally sustainable, while at the same time advocating for conscientious consumer habits and connecting consumers to their supply chain. Students in Concordia Shanghai’s Social Entrepreneurship class were recently awarded the ACAMIS Koerschen Award for Innovation in Schools. Students applied for the award in hopes of sharing with the international community the impact their social enterprise, Third Culture Coffee Roasters, has had on the lives of farmers in rural The students will apply the money from the award towards a new coffee roaster to help scale their business and further benefit the farmers in Yunnan. Spring 2016 Issue 11

[close]

p. 14

EARCOS Special Report >> Aligning Professional Development for Collaboration: Results of EARCOS Survey 4. Standards based assessment and reporting . . . 5. Developing student problem solving skills using real problems . . . 6. Maths professional learning community. 7. Coherent vertical articulation. 8. Structured word inquiry. 9. Play-based learning. 10. Regular curriculum review process. 11. Increasing teacher capacity to implement innovation across the school. 12. Project-based learning. 13. ELL training for all teachers . . . 14. Project Voice spoken word poets . . . 15. Curriculum alignment . . . 16. Intern program. 17. Next Generation Science Standards. 18. Implementing Daily 5 Programmme . . . 19. Changed to new curriculum mapping system and rewrote all curriculum . . . 20. Piloting Google Classrooms . . . 21. Focus Groups for whole school strategic planning . . . 22. Development of Bespoke Middle Leadership training . . . 23. Introduction of Professional Development learning afternoons . . . 24. DRA Reading Assessment and Running Records . . . 25. Focusing on feedback to improve student learning. 26. Using assessments to guide instruction. 27. Implementation of Writers’ Workshop. 28. Data-driven instruction and differentiation . . . 29. Reading and Writing Project workshops – Columbia Teachers College. As we noted in the most recent, Winter 2016 ET it is most important for EARCOS to understand the needs of our member schools. Twenty-nine of our members accepted our invitation to share particularly successful professional development initiatives in their schools and relevant processes that enhanced successful implementation. We extend our grateful appreciation to them for their responses and herein provide a short summary of what we learned. Some will remember the Special Feature articles published in Winter 2016 ET, “EARCOS: Leading through Learning from its Members” and “Professional Development: Content, Context, and Process”. At that time, it was noted that successful initiatives leading to increased student learning results are characterized by mature school contexts, deliberate and planned professional development processes, ample resource capacity, and rich collaborative structures. Examples of these contexts and processes include, mature professional learning communities, planned time for peer observations/feedback, provisions for data dialogues to analyze student work/achievement, empowered action research groups, designated instructional coaches, and induction and orientation mentors. When such critical process elements are present and adequate resources are available, a chosen initiative has an elevated likelihood of success. Armed with this understanding, we extended an invitation via a short survey to members regarding initiatives in their schools in which they are currently engaged, planning to launch or successfully implementing. Through the survey, we now have an increased knowledge of regional professional development pursuits that could allow us to serve as a collaboration clearinghouse. Also, the results help us understand the degree to which contexts and processes are in place to support particularly successful professional development initiatives identified by EARCOS members schools. The survey identified the following successful initiatives. (In most cases, the initiatives were abbreviated.) 1. Creating observation and reflective discussion opportunities for teacher growth . . . 2. Expanding and developing mathematical curricular thinking . . . 3. Enhancements and refinements to teacher appraisal system . . . 12 EARCOS Triannual Journal As you can see, there were only a few common initiatives among the respondents. But, what was shared among those responding were the availability of “mature professional learning communities”, which was reported to exist in 75% of survey responses. Over half and nearly half, respectively, of school members completing the survey reported that they had “provisions for data dialogues to analyze student work and achievement records” (59%) “planned time for peer observation and follow-on non-evaluative feedback” (48%), and “employed instructional coaches” (48%). The remaining processes were reported to be less available, nonetheless noteworthy. “Empowered action research groups” were reported to be present at a 28% level and “induction and orientation mentors” also present at 28% in member schools completing the survey. The return rate for our survey represented nearly 20% of our membership and helps us better understand the variety of successful initiative in which our member schools participate. Most importantly, it might provide opportunities for member schools to collaborate. Please let us know, if you see initiatives in which you are currently engaged or planning to launch and wish to be connected with those survey respondents, who have current/recent experience and a willingness to share. We will do our best to connect you. Thanks again to those completing the survey. By Dr. Joe Petrone Assistant Director, EARCOS

[close]

p. 15

Learn in greater detail Our in-depth, clearly structured education programmes prepare students for life, helping them develop an informed curiosity and a lasting passion for learning. Cambridge programmes follow four stages, each leading seamlessly from primary to secondary and pre-university years. Learn more at: www.cie.org.uk Image: detail of the epidermis of a jellyfish.

[close]

Comments

no comments yet