Ciao Magazine 280

 

Embed or link this publication

Description

Ciao magazine issue 280

Popular Pages


p. 1

FREE There’s life in the Inner West! Issue 280 | April 15th 2016 WIN! MOVIE TIX: Mia Madre A Month of Sundays #ReuseStyleIcon winners announced Business Awards nominations open Free dance lessons! The Vietnam vets you haven’t heard about They also served FLEMINGTON SESSION 2: 1.30PM – 3.3OPM FREE SHOWS • FREE PARKING @ PADDY’S MARKETS FRO M OR A NAY A LONG M M SA R.’S PL NG A ND TI J NICK SA M HOS ING M H R T I O F W PER Kids Karnival TM & © 2016 Marvel & Subs SUNDAY 22 MAY SESSION 1: 11.00AM – 1.0OPM © 2016 Viacom International Inc. © 2016 Spin Master PAW Productions Inc. © 2016 Viacom International. All Rights Reserved WWW.PADDYSMARKETS.COM.AU

[close]

p. 2



[close]

p. 3



[close]

p. 4

Inner West whispers Local gossip, rumour, hearsay and unsubstantiated fact... Byrne gets a sick burn - Back in ya cage - ASIO Agents of Addison Rd l Leichhardt WE ARE C!AO Satire for the soul ADVERTISING became the subject of an ABC radio segment on ‘Dead Zones’ in Sydney. Mayor Darcy Byrne did his best to defend the council’s actions on the issue of empty shopping strips, introducing free wi-fi and half-an-hour free parking but essentially pinned the issue to tax ‘loopholes’ that incentivise landlords to keep their shopfronts untenanted. A certain Parramatta Rd landlord from Vaucluse rang in to call bullshit on the council’s Revitalise program, which involves landlords renting out stores at reduced rates. Lots of callers complained about the parking meters; Byrne said the Council may consider turning them off past 6pm. A caller suggested Leichhardt catch up with Blacktown where the parking is entirely free and the nightlife bustling. protest taking place on Alfred St, St Peters against drilling works taking place for the new M5. WectCONnex activists and local residents had been blockading the drilling site since 6.30am to stop trucks entering. The Westconnex contractors constructed a fence around the protestors, a strange action that has become a feature of Westconnex protests. Then police arrived and forced protestors out of the way of Westconnex vehicles. Planning approval has not yet been granted for Stage 2 of Westconnex, nor Stage 3. l Jumping Righteous Rightie explains why everyone should just chill out about his family’s use of Cayman Island shell company. Dear RR – What have you made of the bleating that followed the revelation you and 800 of the Inner West’s other high-net-worth individuals have structured your financial affairs to (perfectly legally) minimise your tax? Maximilian, Annandale RR replies: You know who was big on tax and spend, Max? That national socialist Adolph Hitler! How much differently might the 20th century have turned out if the Fatherland’s plutocratic ubermensch had taken the Kerry Packer approach rather than happily handing their deutschmarks over to the Fuhrer to be wasted on autobahns and Messerschmitts. Am I equating anyone who objects to tax minimisation to a mono-testicled, flatulent, genocidal madman? Yes, yes I am. It’s galling enough I have to pay one cent in the dollar to subsidise the existence of oxygen thieves such as public school teachers, Greens politicians and ASIC troublemakers – I’ll be damned if I’m going to shell out two or three cents. As the treasurer keeps pointing out, this nation doesn’t have a revenue problem, it’s got a spending problem. If its hypochondriac, backward and obese citizenry would simply learn to walk where they needed to go instead of whingeing about congested roads; if they’d learn what they needed to know off the internet rather than expecting the state to prop up a money-pit education system; and if they’d show a bit of grit rather than taking advantage of socialised healthcare every time they got a sniffle, then perhaps even the little people might be able to stop handing over a third to a half of their incomes to the taxman. Do the carping hoi polloi want this nation’s noble wealth-creating class to move to Singapore en masse to escape the outrageous impositions of puffedup ATO officials? Keep up the class war rhetoric and my irreplaceable peers and I will soon be swearing allegiance to Lee Hsien Loong in Mandarin! n Email your dilemma to info@ciaomagazine.com.au. Sarah Shepherd sarah@ciaomagazine.com.au ADVERTISING Madi Day madi@ciaomagazine.com.au l Riot police were called in to disrupt a peaceful LOCAL history back 50 years, Marrickville Army Barracks on Addison Road was the site of the kind of hot protests that make the Westconnex fracas look tame. During the Vietnam War it was the conscription site of soldiers and therefore also a frequent protest venue for Save our Sons activists. Also present were ASIO agents who spied on picketing mothers. The ASIO files are now publicly accessible and with several hundred pages written on the NSW chapter of SOS alone, you wonder what local ASIO agents might be staking out today. FOOD Melissa Leong info@ciaomagazine.com.au WINE Winsor Dobbin info@ciaomagazine.com.au The Balmain War Memorial, located in Loyalty Square, is is the oldest World War I Memorial in Australia. It was unveiled on the 23rd of April 1916, while the War was still in full swing and before any Australian involvement on the Western Front. Previously, the square where it stands had been called Unity Square. The design was created by a local Balmain soldier, with funds for the memorial coming from local residents and businessmen, along with the local council, which allocated £200 to the project. By the time of its unveiling, it already recorded the names of 38 Balmain men who had lost their lives at Gallipoli. n Image courtesy of Leichhardt Library ART DIRECTOR Paden Hunter paden@ciaomagazine.com.au EDITORIAL Phoebe Moloney phoebe@ciaomagazine.com.au The memorial water fountain of Balmain Things we love: Kassia Aksenov kassia@ciaomagazine.com.au ASSISTANT PUBLISHER Contributors: Nigel Bowen, Lianna Taranto, Olivia Mackay, Russell Edwards, Emma McConnell, Maani Truu and Hannah Craft. Ciao loves you, and our photographers only supply photos for publication with consent. We try and make you look your best. No responsibility is accepted by Ciao Magazine for the accuracy of advertisements or information. We welcome unsolicited editorial and pictorial contributions. The opinions expressed in Ciao Magazine are those of contributors, indemnifying the publisher from inaccuracy or consequences arising from its reproduction. © All rights reserved. No material is to be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Ciao Magazine is a free publication. Distribution, advertising & editorial enquiries 460A Parramatta Road, Petersham 2049 info@ciaomagazine.com.au (02) 9518 3696. 0414 174 441 - Sarah 0405 509 805 – Sonia Ciao is locally owned and produced. Please recycle Printed by Spot Press, Marrickville Civilian nurses who served in the Vietnam War, Janelle Allan and Jan Bell, at Concord Hospital’s EM Lane Army Nursing Museum. Image: Ben Cregan Aussie, Aussie, Aussie! Have you seen this face popping up around Sydney streets? Street artist Peter Drew has stuck 250 paste ups of Monga Khan, a cameleer from India who lived in Australia during the 1900s, across Sydney this week. Monga Khan was one of thousands of people who applied for an exemption to the White Australia Policy. He succeeded because the government deemed his work as essential to the nation’s economy.  Drew crowdfunded the paste up campaign, asking, “Did Australia inherit its identity from the people who created the White Australia Policy…. or does ‘Aussie’ have more to do with the people who survived it?” C!ao’s voice In • The rise of the Newtown stoner cafe • Seat belts for puppies • Eating French food in Haberfield • Pinafores and platform boots •Tiny houses 4 Out • Driving through the narrow Valley of Death that is Henley Marine Drive due to Bay Run upgrades • Ciao’s shell company • Unsolicited haircuts on public transport C!ao Magazine There’s life in the Inner West!

[close]

p. 5



[close]

p. 6

Community Life R OA D T E ST n Emma McConnell War for Leisure Some people used to believe that war makes a man, thankfully you can now make your own wars with miniature men. Emma McConnell ventures into peaceful military-inspired hobbies. RANT Lest we forget the Frontier Wars The colonial genocide and dispossession of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders is a historical fact that mainstream Australia would still rather ignore. For Indigenous Australians, Anzac Day is not an inclusive occasion. It is an occasion that reminds them that their history, their warriors and their rightful custodianship of this land continues to go unacknowledged for the sake of white nationalism. Anzac Day is a day to mourn all Australians lost in conflict. Those that were lost defending their families, their country and their land. So why doesn't that include Indigenous warriors? The Frontier Wars refers to the series of conflicts that occurred between Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders and early colonists. The violence took place over almost eighty years and hundreds of thousands of Indigenous and non-Indigenous lives were taken. Despite the common narrative, Indigenous Australians fought bravely and desperately for their lives and their land. The Frontier Wars and the stories of the warriors are fundamental to Aboriginal Australian history because, due to ongoing atrocities, their fight never stopped and is not even close to over. In 2013 The Australian War Memorial denied a request to acknowledge the Frontier Wars. Director of the Memorial, Brendan Nelson, rationalised this decision by stating that the memorial was commemorative only of Australians that had fought overseas or 'Australians that had fought for Australia'. Not only does this perspective reek of western imperialism and a local Us vs. Them mentally, it also erases Indigenous people and their history from the understanding of what it means to be Australian. Each year since 2012, a group of Indigenous Australians has marched respectfully behind the official Anzac Day parade in Canberra commemorating the Frontier Wars as well as those Indigenous Australians that fought in other wars. One of the founding members of the march and the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, Euahlayi leader Michael Anderson has described this tradition as less of a protest and more of call for recognition, sovereignty and peace. However, last year, the march was shut down by police. Police and protestors clashed physically after the police attempted to forcefully arrest Murrawarri man and veteran Fred Hooper and pulled a taser on another Indigenous man. The people involved in the march were told 'this day is not for you' and that they were marching illegally. Canberra police also threatened to seize NITV's camera, one officer claiming that filming the march from an Indigenous perspective was a 'misuse of Commonwealth property'. Denial and erasure of Indigenous experiences creates what Larissa Behrendt describes as a 'psychological terra nullius'. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are erased to the point of being forgotten so colonial notions of what it means to be 'Australian' can continue undisturbed. Australia is more than its white, military past. We live on land with one of the longest histories in the world but the culture and traditions of Anzac Day limit how and who we remember. The Aboriginal Test Embassy has launched a petition for The Australian War Memorial to erect a monument commemorating Indigenous lives lost in massacre and war. Go to: www.change.org/p/australian-war-memorial-acknowledgethe-indigenous-frontier-massacres-during-colonisation n Maddie Day Miniature Wargaming This social hobby is perfect for the patient yet competitive individual. Wargaming involves simulating a battle using miniature figurines from various historical periods. Winning requires skill and tactical gameplay. Games can be played one on one or with groups. This tradition dates back to the early 19th century and it still draws plenty of die-hard fans. The Cumberland Society is your go-to group in the Inner West. They meet every Sunday at the Annandale Community Centre. Alternatively, the staff at War & Peace games will be happy to assist with any enquiries you may have about this engrossing pursuit. n www.warandpeacegames.com.au When you play the game of thrones you win or you die! The Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) Model Replica This wonderful craft is great for both big kids and small, and for all skill levels too! With varying options available from buying readymade aircraft and ship models to building them from scratch you’re bound to find something that suits you. If you’re new to this (as I was) consider ducking down to RC Hobbies in Lidcome and have a chat to the friendly staff. They specialise in remotecontrolled replicas, which add a touch of kinetic excitement to playing Admiral (or Air Marshal). You can choose from accurate scale models that will cut a swathe through the land, air or sea. n RC Hobbies, 9 Parramatta Rd Lidcome If you want to really immerse yourself into a historical battles, why not consider joining a SCA group? These hobbyists focus upon recreating pre-17th Century medieval period costumes and activities and meet on a regular basis. The Barony of Rowany is a welcoming Inner West SCA community, with weekly activities which include Medieval combat practice, singing or calligraphy and large-scale events such as the Rowany Festival which takes place over the Easter long weekend. Dressing up is definitely encouraged! The Barony meet weekly at the Addison Road Community Centre, check out their ‘Events’ page on their website for further details. n rowany.lochac.sca.org Video Games rchobbies.com.au While some may not consider video games a traditional hobby, the popularity of warfare video games, and online gaming in particular, deserves a mention. With numerous titles, genres and game-play options to choose from there are endless ways to immerse yourself within either semi-accurate or considerably inaccurate battles from history. Online gaming has seen a surge in combat games, particularly those that involve modern warfare or medieval fantasy gameplay. The ability to play online gives this hobby a sense of connectivity and community that it lacked in the past, as does the plethora of social media channels dedicated to connecting gamers. n Get all your friends together and have a group game at an internet War! What is it good for? (Relieving boredom, apparently) cafe (yes, they still exist) like TERA webstation in Strathfield. ANZAC Day Dawn Service Leichhardt Council's annual Anzac Day dawn service will take place this year at Loyalty Square in Balmain from 6-7am. Commemorating the brave Australians and New Zealanders who have served in wartime, the dawn service is always an intensely reflective and moving ceremony. The ceremony centres around Australia's oldest war memorial, a drinking fountain that features the words ‘Peace, Honour, Empire, Liberty’. Close to 5000 men and women from the suburbs of Annandale, Balmain, Birchgrove, Leichhardt, Lilyfield and Rozelle enlisted their services for World War One. Around 4,500 enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force – the AIF – with a further 500 in the Royal Australian Air Force and Navy, and serving as Nurses and Medical Staff. Please join in the service to commemorate the locals who gave so much in war. n Where: Loyalty Square, Darling St, Balmain What’s on n Compiled by Hannah Craft. Email info@ciaomagazine.com.au Fri 15th and Tues 26th Apr, 1pm FREE Community are en ev ts listings email info@ m.au ciaomagazine.co Attn: Hannah along to enjoy a tasty bite, peruse some stalls and find out how you can help save our waterways. Where: Leichhardt Town Hall, corner of Marion and Norton Streets Monday April 25th Authors at Ashfield Authors at Ashfield has been running free literary events since 2002. On Friday 15th Jeannine Baker will discuss and sign copies of her new book Australian Women War Reporters: Boer War to Vietnam, which looks at the hidden story of Australian women war reporters and their fight for equality. On Tuesday 26th Walter Mason will be in conversation with Antonia Pesenti and Hilary Benn about their new picture books Numerical Street and Alphabetical Sydney. Where: Level 6 Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 260 Liverpool Rd, Ashfield. Tues 19th Apr, 6pm-8pm Climate Conversations, an annual environmental forum organised by Leichhardt Council. The topic in 2016 is the detrimental impact of plastic on waterways and marine life. This event is free and open to the public, so come Canada Bay Anzac services The City of Canada Bay will be hosting a number of services commemorating the landing at Galipolli on Anzac Day and in the lead up to April 25th. Drummoyne RSL, Concord RSL and Breakfast Point will all be holding dawn services. A commemoration service will be taking place in Five Dock Park on Sunday April 17th at 11am. Climate Conversations with Tim Silverwood Baker's a delightful historian 6 Tim Silverwood of Take 3 will be taking the stage at this year's Take your rubbish with you For more information about exact location and times please visit the Canada Bay Council website: www.canadabay.nsw.gov.au/anzacday-services-2016.html Canada Bay will be hosting many Anzac events See page 8 for more what's on...

[close]

p. 7



[close]

p. 8

n Local Gigs Thursday 21st April n Local screens 30/70 Straight out of Melbourne, 30/70 will give you the best in modern minimal eclectic soul. In their live performance they get people grooving and moving. Supported by The Baldwins and Triceratops. The Sly Fox, free FREE TICKETS Win double movie passes An estate agent a bit off his game A Month Of Sundays Don't label them! Saturday 23rd April Johm Turturro has all the right moves Julian Temple Join Julian Temple for an afternoon performance of blues and roots in Marrickville in celebration of Temple’s fifth album release Ceiling In The Sky. Supported by Jesse Morris this is an all ages gig to bring the whole family along to. The Gasoline Pony, free Thursday 28th April Mayfair Kytes Touring the country in honour of their debut album launch, Mayfair Kytes deftly layer harmonies and strings with dissonant guitars. Having worked with big-name producers on this album the live performance is sure to reflect all the work that has been poured into creating the record. The Vanguard, $13.80 Nanni Moretti, the acclaimed Palme d’Or winning Italian director, again sensitively maps out the heartbreak involved in personal tragedy, but this time with some welcome light touches and cracking good jokes. Mia Madre stars Margherita Buy as a film director whose ambitious movie about workers' rights is going badly. Her biggest problem is an imported hot-shot American actor (hilariously played by John Turturro) so full of himself he can barely remember his lines. Her personal life is going to hell too, with breakups and various family dramas, the worst being her mother’s (Guilia Lazzarini) terminal illness. Moretti himself plays her caring brother and their family scenes, dealing with all the regrets and challenges of middle-aged life, are rich in pathos. Ultimately it’s a joyful film, though mixed with a prevailing sense of sadness. Widely regarded as a brilliant return to form for Moretti, this is easily his best since The Son’s Room. M from May 5. Mia Madre Mother’s Day There are some movies you won’t want to see with your mum (Fifty Shades of Gray– she’s seen it already, trust me). Then there’s this from Garry Marshall’s (Valentine’s Day). “Bringing together Jennifer Aniston, Kate Hudson, Julia Roberts and Jason Sudeikis, this heart-warming film follows the very different relationships between mothers and their children,” the synopsis says. And includes “the special relationship of a remarkable six-year-old growing up with two mums". Two? Oh, right... All bases covered then. Make it a date for May 8th. (Unpreviewed). CTC from April 28. After two strikingly original crime dramas (Noise, Felony), Mathew Saville turns his hand to gentle comedy in this good-hearted feature about an Adelaide real estate agent. Suffering a severe case of the mid-life blues, Frank (Anthony LaPaglia) is so bored with hosting open houses that he's barely able to sell a thing. As well as being recently divorced, he’s at odds with his teenage son, and deals with everything with snarky droll wit. The dry exchanges between him and his boss (satirist John Clarke) set the tone at first, but everything changes after he receives a call from an elderly widower, Sarah (Julia Blake), who mistakes him for her own son. The two strike up an unusual friendship and, quite unexpectedly, Frank finds a way out of his selfimposed funk. It’s a bittersweet and satisfyingly charming tale dealing with life’s big and small-ticket issues, which generously gives everyone a chance at salvation – of sorts. As the tagline claims, everyone deserves a second chance… Even real estate agents, apparently! PG from April 28. n Thanks to Madman Entertianment we have 5 double inseason passes to give away. Details below. CIAO's PICKS n Thanks to Palace Films we have 10 double preview passes to give away valid on the weekend of Apr 29 - May 1. Details below. Two mums are better than one Happy 140: Money makes the world go wrong TIME TO LOCK IT IN Bail Byrne out! PCYC Balmain is running their annual fundraising event on Friday 29th April. ‘Time 4 Kids’ is an exciting way to fundraise where local community leaders spend time in a makeshift cell and have to raise ‘bail’ to be released. Joining the club this year to help with the fundraising are Mayor Darcy Byrne and founding Director of Cobden & Hayson, Danny Cobden. The event is always a lot of fun with the ‘prisoners’ wearing a black and white striped outfit and posing for mugshots. The premise behind it is that they’re “doing time to stop youth crime” with the money going towards club activities and Police programs. Make a donation online at https://time4kids2016.everydayhero. com/au/balmain. Alternatively, come down to Loyalty Square on Darling Street, Balmain on Friday 29th April to make your donation in person. n To get involved call manager Demetra on 0417 423 335 to express your interest and for further details. Spanish Film Festival hits Running until May 1, there’s still plenty of time to find festival screenings of most of 2016’s program of comedies, dramas, thrillers and docos from Spain and Latin America. Two that caught Ciao’s eye were: n Happy 140 is a darkly gripping black comedy about a woman (Maribel Verdú) happily celebrating her 40th birthday with family and friends. All’s going well, until she announces some fantastic news – she’s won 140 million euros. The air thickens, the plots and recriminations start… culminating in the ultimate moral crisis for all. n Truman. Director Cesc Gay is the man we can blame for the deeply subversive A Gun In Each Hand, which so brilliantly skewered the male ego in 2012. He’s more gentle here with a tale about an actor with terminal cancer, but just as funny and incisive. Variety called it “wistful and well-observed.” n At Palace Cinemas Apr 12 – May 1. Bookings and info: www.spanishfilmfestival.com.au Tues 26th Apr, 6:30pm-8pm Mum’s Night Out with Madeline West Mums in the Inner West are invited to a special evening discussion with actor and writer Madeline West. She will discuss her new book Six Under Eight, which examines the hectic juggle of life, career and kids, in the cozy and intimate setting of the 3 Weeds living room. Cost $20pp, including a glass of wine or bubbly and some nibbles. To book call 9818 2788 or email functions@3weeds.com.au. Where: 3 Weeds, 197 Evans St, Rozelle Sat 30th Apr, 2pm-4pm Community Picnic in the Park Get neighbourly with Madeline West 8 The City of Canada Bay invites local residents to a picnic marking the the opening of the Lewis Berger Park in Rhodes. Mayor Angelo Tsirekas will open the new park with an official ceremony at 4pm followed by a service unveiling the relocation of the Berger Honour Shrine. Preceding these ceremonies is a community picnic commencing at 2pm. A gold coin donation sausage sizzle will be supporting Legacy Australia. Entertainment will include performances by local schools, face A sight & sound to behold opera, classical music, and kid's events. Hear contemporary voices fill the cavernous architectural jewel that is the Leichhardt Town Hall. Site and Sound is an initiative from Leichhardt Council that aims to animate and enliven the Leichhardt Town Hall, a building that has been in community use for 128 consecutive years. Check out performances such as theatrical marvel The Bee and the Tree, Contrite Spirit and the majestic Cellists from TMO. For more go to lmc.nsw.gov.au. painting and ballon twisting. There will also be some delicious treats! Where: Lewis Berger Park, Rider Blvd, Rhodes Until 28th May WIN Double MOVIE PASSES To be in the running to win double preview passes to Mia Madre for the weekend April 29 - May 1 or double in-season passes to A Month Of Sundays, email info@ciaomagazine. com.au with your name and address Only at the movies April 28 SiTE & SOUND The 2016 Site and Sound Arts program invites you to enjoy an explosive, innovative season of new theatre, telling us where you picked up your copy of Ciao. n Reviews – Russell Edwards

[close]

p. 9



[close]

p. 10

n Your say n Sustainability n Local news Do you think Norton Street has become more lively over the past six months? Yeah, kind of. I have only lived here for a year, so I don't really know. But it seems like a few more shops have happened up and it's a bit busier. Daigan, Redfern Yes, for the young people. I have two daughters and they have started coming here to go out for dinner. But it's changed over the years. Susan, Russell Lea From my observations it hasn't got more lively, there are still lots of shop vacancies. I would love to see some more small bars and I am always up for another bookstore. I think the pop-up stores are a great idea, but I think maybe the parking prices are deterring people from coming here. Debbie, Leichhardt I used to come here all the time but it's just not the same atmosphere anymore. I am very disappointed with The Forum, that really went down hill. Rosetta, Kingsgrove Yes, it's feeling more lively and active with a few more shops open. It's got a bit more of a vibe happening. Alex, Leichhardt Norton Street is just as sh*t as always! Anon, Leichhardt Personal waste reduction As Inner Westies, we are some of the largest waste contributors in the world. It is estimated that a family produces enough waste to fill a three bedroom house – gross! While waiting for better waste management and recycling processes to be implemented by governments Kassia Aksenov finds products you can invest in to reduce your own waste. Nominations Open for Inner West Local Business Awards Nominations are now open for the upcoming Inner West Local Business Awards . The Inner West Local Business Awards seeks to acknowledge the vital role played by local businesses in our community. Businesses with a large number of nominations for their category will then be chosen as a finalist, with the winners announced at a presentation evening on the 29th of June. n To nominate a local business visit www.thebusinessawards.com or fill out the nomination coupon in this issue of Ciao. Nominations for the 2016 Awards will close on Wednesday, 11th May. Get an enviro-friendly caffeine hit Keepcup We Inner Westies love our coffee... we're also so damn busy, always on the go, meaning that we opt for takeaway cups. In Australia, over one billion disposable coffee cups end up in landfill each year. Even the paper cups are not as recyclable and eco friendly as we are led to believe and are lined with a plastic layer inside. The solution: a Keepcup! Yes, Keepcups are still made of plastic, however they are lightweight, unbreakable, dishwasher safe, have a life cycle of up to three years and are recyclable afterwards. n To purchase one visit About Life, 605 Darling street, Rozelle. ....and Sustainability Awards The Sustainability Awards, which are in their tenth year, are open to businesses, community groups and individuals who are deemed to have achieved economic, social or environmental progress in the local area. The winners of the categories will be announced at the Sustainability Awards presentation dinner on the 23rd of May at Rhodes Phoenix restaurant, with tickets on sale now. For further information regarding the Sustainability Awards please email awards@canadabay.nsw.gov.au. avoiding contact with heat and cleaned well. n To purchase visit biome.com.au/676-foodwrap-covers Reusable nappies Reusable produce bags By now everyone is well aware of reusable shopping bags as an alternative to plastic bags, though plastic bags still somehow creep their way into our shopping baskets. Reusable produce bags can hold up to 2kg of produce, are machine washable and extremely lightweight – perfect for supermarket scales. n Visit biome.com.au/95-shopping-bags to view products in this range. Young families produce more waste than any other type of household. This can largely be attributed to nappies with two billion going to Australian landfill each year. Luckily there are easy to use reusable nappies on the market that have improved greatly since our grandparents' day. Real Nappies consist of a machine washable cover and cotton insert with an optional flushable insert. These can be a little bulky on bub but they don't leak and have huge savings of over $1000 per year compared with disposable nappies. n To find out more visit real-nappies.com.au/ Menstrual cups Food wraps Cling film and aluminium foil are other products we find ourselves reaching for when prepping food in the kitchen. Reusable food wraps made from natural materials such as bees wax and hemp can be used instead. These products will last over a year if used properly, A woman uses around 12,000 pads and tampons in her lifetime, contributing 120kg of waste to landfill. Experts say that menstrual cups can take three to four cycles for a woman to get used to, can be a little messy upon insertion and extraction though these small cups will last up to 10 years, can be left in for 12 hours and you only need one! n To see what is on offer visit itcouldbebetter. com.au/buy-products/ Words by Kassia Aksenov Free dance lessons! Fostering a Love of Dance For over six years, Momentum Dance Studio has been offering full-scholarships to children living in foster care with a keen interest in dance and is currently seeking Inner West candidates for the opportunity. The scholarship includes full financial support to study dance at the school until the recipient turns 18. Directors Belinda Fenech and Natasha Swan believe that despite some children having to face more challenges than others, with support much can be overcome. “As mums and owners of a dance school we saw an opportunity to be able to support children that lived in foster care by providing a long term and stable opportunity to learn to dance with us,” said Natasha. With four different locations across Sydney, including a local Rozelle location, the scholarship is valid for all studios. n For further information on the scholarship, please visit www.momentumdancestudios.com.au. Local School First with Reconciliation Action Plan On Wednesday April 6th, St Brendan’s Catholic Primary launched their schoolbased Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), making them the first school in the Inner West to do so. RAP refers to a framework for organisations to implement reconciliation in their community, focusing on a plan documenting the steps the organisation commits to take in order to contribute to increased reconciliation in Australia. St Brendan’s plan, which was developed in consultation with Leichhardt Council, aims to make Aboriginal reconciliation and integration a part of everyday life within the school. According to Principal of St Brendan’s, Ms Louise Maguire, the RAP is largely thanks to the work of committed parents and staff. “They, along with the Council’s Officer, have done some magnificent work to bring this plan to life,” she says. The launch was celebrated with a ceremony at the school, featuring a number of Inner West Aboriginal student performers, including a traditional dance troupe from Glebe’s St Scholastica’s College, a didgeridoo player from Ashfield’s De La Salle College and artists from Marrickville’s Casimir Catholic College. In addition the students were lucky to watch Uncle Max Eulo, one of Australia’s most well known Aboriginal Elders, perform a traditional smoking ceremony (pictured). Mayor of Leichhard Cr Darcy Byrne, who was present at the launch, commended St Brendan’s for taking a lead in reconciliation. “Council has focused on celebrating the diversity of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and working together to take reconciliation into the 21st Century,” he said. “Our schools are the perfect way to do that.” n For further information about RAP go to: www.reconciliation.org.au St Brendan's leads the way "Stay Safe, even around Newtown" The recent bashing of Isaac Keatinge, as he was walking from Redfern to Newtown, has highlighted that the Inner West may not be as accepting as believed. Keatinge believes he was assaulted for wearing a dress. “I was confronted by some straight men who didn’t appreciate the gorgeous gown or make up I was wearing,” he says. Keatinge, along with NSW Police, recommends that people walking around at night, do so with a group of people and stick to major roads that are well lit. Heart Ya Mum? We do. To celebrate Mother’s Day at Ciao we are running a SELFIE COMPETITION. Take a snap with your mum (or mums!) and tell us why she’s the best! Upload it to Instagram with hashtag #heartyamum and tag us @ciaomagazinesydney Prizes and more info in our next issue. Stay tuned! 10 Summer Special! Balayage $100 Colour from $50 - $80 Ombre $110 Seniors $40 Ladies’ Cut $30 Men’s Cut $30 Seniors $25 Primary school $22 Unders fives $19 We Love Kids and Parents! Formerly Pixies Hair Salon N. James Hair Salon Closed Wednesdays and Sundays 88 Norton St Leichhardt 2040 Ph: 8068 1888

[close]

p. 11

n FEATURE Triage in VUng Tàu When two young nurses from Concord Hospital left Sydney to treat civilians injured in the Vietnam War their world view was radically changed, writes Phoebe Moloney. In November 1967, Jan Bell stepped into the busiest airport in the world. “I was walking down the stairway of the plane, a Pan Am flight. I looked down – I had a mini skirt on – I was dressed as if I was going to a party. As I walked down I realized I was in a vast military airport, everyone was wearing khaki and had guns. People were tearing around in jeeps with machine guns on the back. “ “I thought, ‘My god, this is a war.’” Bell had landed in Tân Sơn Nhứt airport, the site of America’s largest military base in Vietnam, located in the city then known as Saigon. Twelve months later, another nurse from Sydney, Janelle Allan, also landed in Tân Sơn Nhứt. By then half of it was missing. “Oh, that was the international terminal,” pointed out the pilot as she arrived. “It was rocketed last week.” Jan Bell and Janelle Allan (then respectively aged 27 and 23) were Civilian Nurses, part of the Australian Surgical Team Vietnam (CN-ASTV) dispatched by the Department of External Affairs’ medical aid program. They were sent to Vũng Tàu, a coastal city in Vietnam’s southeast, as part of a small team which was treating Vietnamese civilians. “It was fascinating year and a terrifying year,” says Bell. “A life-changing experience.” “My father had the horrors when he found out I was going,” says Allan. “He said, ‘You don’t know what it’s like being in a war-torn country.’” Both Allan and Bell’s fathers were ex-servicemen. Their daughters trained together in a hospital with a legacy of heroic women. Constructed as a military hospital in World War Two, Concord Hospital was home to Ellen Savage, the only nurse to survive a Japanese torpedo attack on the hospital ship The Centaur in 1943. For 36 hours Savage floated in the ocean, delivering food, water and first-aid to other survivors holding onto the ship’s debris. It was Savage’s generation of army nurses who trained Allan and Bell. “They were wonderful women, but we were scared stiff of them. We were prepared better than many (for Vietnam) because they gave us a lot of leeway in decision making ,” Bell says. “We went to Vietnam for the adventure,” Allan says. “But also for the feeling that we could do something in a country where there was no one else to do it.” “All of the Vietnamese people working with us had gone back home to celebrate Tet and we were going to Saigon. There wasn’t a soul on the road. ‘Gee, that’s funny,’ I thought. We had heard that Tet was a busy time where families dressed in their best clothing and visited one and other. “We arrived at the airport and the American soldiers had their weapons cocked and were in their flack jackets, ‘No Ma’am,’ they said. ‘You’re not going anywhere, Saigon’s been rocketed.” The five remaining nurses and doctors went back to the hospital to find hundreds of people waiting who had been seriously injured in a series of synchronised attacks that became known as the Tet Offensive. “I was outside looking after all these people, assessing them and ordering them for surgery. Triaging, although that word hadn’t come into use yet,” Bell recalls. “There was one poor girl I thought would never make it to surgery, she had a chest injury, was bleeding from the pelvis and was unconscious with a head injury. Her parents had been killed when her house fell in. She had gathered all her younger siblings and brought them to the hospital and collapsed,” Bell says. The girl regained consciousness when she was reunited with her younger brothers. “After she recovered her and her family always visited us and wrote us lovely letters.” In the weeks following Tet bodies were brought to the hospital and laid on its lawn. Relatives came to identify the dead. “It looked like a battleground,” says Bell. Returning to Australia neither Bell nor Allan were debriefed on their service, or offered professional support. The Civilian Nurses have never been granted repatriation benefits despite many contracting Agent Orange-related diseases, and PTSD. “I returned to Sydney and went straight back to the operating theatre and felt very strange,” says Bell. “Vietnam had changed my whole outlook on life, my nursing, my feelings towards people.” “My political views completely changed,” says Allan. “I had believed the Domino Theory of Communism. It was what we were taught, it was what our fathers’ said, therefore it must be true.” “But I realised that Vietnam had been at war so long, for 300 years, they wanted peace at any price. Family were fighting family, there were brothers on either side, families had been torn apart.” The nurses questioned the heavy loss of Vietnamese, Australian and American lives. “We also wondered what happened to our interpreters and the people who worked with us, because they would have been treated as conspirators,” says Bell. The nurses found it hard to share their experiences at home amid the groundswell of anti-Vietnam sentiment. “No one was interested in talking about it,” Bell says. They did, however, gain recognition from their former teachers. “We were invited by the World War Two nurses to march with them on Anzac Day when we received our medals. We knew many of those [WWII] nurses.” Allan eventually decided to organise a marching contingent dedicated to the Australian Surgical Team. Memebers have now been marching together for over 10 years. Both Bell and Allan eventually returned to work at their ‘home’ hospital of Concord, and Jan Bell still volunteers at the hospital three days a week in the nursing museum. They also returned to Vietnam. “They don’t talk about the Vietnam War over there; they talk about the American War,” says Bell. “The big difference was to actually see the people united and to see peace, peace for the very first time.” “we went to vietnam for the adventure” In Vũng Tàu the nurses treated civilians who had been injured as a direct result of the war as well as those who had been left to suffer ongoing illnesses without doctors, as the majority of the South Vietnam’s doctors had been enlisted into the Republic’s army. Bell and Allan worked from a Vietnamese hospital, whilst living in dilapidated colonialera villas. With no sure-fire access to food, medical equipment or supplies the surgical team had to rely on the generosity of the American and Australian service personnel as well as the local interpreters. “We had tremendous interaction with the soldiers. We also had entry to the American Army Hospital to use the X-ray machine, after ours broke five minutes after arrival,” said Bell. The team was confronted with illnesses they had never treated in Australia, such as leprosy and tetanus. “Medically speaking it was like going back a few hundreds of years,” Allan says. “We didn’t have enough nurses to look after the patients,” says Bell. “So the relatives would look after them and change their IV bottles and do the dressings.” In late January 1968, the traditional Vietnamese New Year celebration of Tet marked a devastating turn in Bell’s year of service. n For more info visit the EM Lane Nurses Open Mon - Thurs 10am - 4pm. Museum. Entry, via Gate 2 Hospital Road, Concord Repatriation Hospital, Concord. www.ciaomagazine.com.au 11

[close]

p. 12

in the kitchen Cheese, Rosemary & Poppy Seed Biscuits  with Olivia Mackay, n www.scoffandquaff. wordpress.com Rosemary has a special significance for Australians. We know it as a symbol of remembrance – its use has even been shown to boost memory – and it also grows wild on the Gallipoli Peninsula. These savoury biscuits showcase rosemary’s woody, pinelike fragrance in a buttery cheese shortbread, with an edging of nutty poppy seeds. It’s a winning combination and makes an intriguing change from the traditional, sweet Anzac biscuits. You can use whatever hard cheese you have on hand - parmesan, cheddar, or a little of both works well – just make sure it’s got a good strong flavour. Wine with Winsor n www.wdwineoftheweek.blogspot.com Elodie 2014 Le Tongs Rosé There is a sense of style about this French rosé, which the producer describes as “the very essence of leisurely, summer drinking”. It is a humble regional blend of syrah and cinsault from the Var region of the south of France, with a label that features a pair of rubber thongs, Les Tongs. It is made at a very good local producer, the Domaine de Cantarelle, outside Aix-en-Provence in the heartland of fine rosés. Available in Australia from boutique French wine importer DiscoverVin. $25. Lively Rosé Method 1. Process the flour, butter, egg yolk and water and pulse to combine, scraping down the sides of the bowl when necessary. 2. Add the cheese and rosemary and blitz briefly to combine. 3. Turn out the mixture onto a lightly floured benchtop and bring the dough together with your hands. 4. Form into a smooth log about 4-5cm in diameter. 5. Roll the log in the poppy seeds to coat and gently push into the surface. Another sort of Anzac biscuit Refreshing white El Desperado 2015 Pinot Grigio Tom Keelan, winemaker for The Pawn Wine Co. label, has an impressive reputation for delivering value for money; and he’s right on the bullseye again with this fresh pinot grigio made from fruit grown in the cool Adelaide Hills. It is a true grigio, crisp and clean in the northern Italian style with brisk citrus and stone fruit flavours and some refreshing acidity on the palate. Watch the label turn from a flower to a skull if you let the bottle get too warm. $20. Ingredients • 1 cup (around 150g) plain flour • 80g cold, salted butter, cubed • 1 egg yolk • 2 tbsp cold water • 2/3 cup (around 70g) grated hard cheese • leaves from 1 large sprig of fresh rosemary, finely chopped • 2 tbsp poppy seeds 6. Cover in cling wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour. 7. Preheat the oven to 180°C (or 170°C if fan-forced). 8. Line two flat baking trays with greaseproof paper. 9. Slice the log into circles around half a centimeter thick and place onto the trays. 10. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until pale golden. Bargain red Yalumba Y Series 2014 Tempranillo You won’t find many ranges that offer such good value for money across all the wines as Yalumba’s Y Series. This is a very good take on the classic Spanish grape tempranillo: a bright fruit-driven red with savoury hints that make it extremely food-friendly. Match this with anything from grilled veal and lamb dishes to a simple backyard barbecue. It’s fun and affordable. $13. n www.gourmetontheroad.blogspot.com MARKET UPDATE n Fruit: All new season apples and pears have started. Delicious, Granny Smith, Pink Lady and Gala all range from $3-7 per kilo. Pear varieties are also widely available, including Ross, and are selling at the same price. Smith, Pink Lady and Gala all range from $3-7 per kilo. Pear varieties are also widely available, including Ross, and are selling at the same price. Thanks to Tony Trim from Trim’s Fresh n Veggies: All new season apples and pears have started. Delicious, Granny How do you like these apples? AT HOME WITH ADRIAN MCKINTY Crime writer Adrian McKinty shares his love of Guinness, Irish stew and whiskey with his novels’ protagonist, Detective Inspector Sean Duffy, a Catholic cop cracking cases during the Troubles. You are originally from Northern Ireland, studied in England, and you then moved to New York and finally immigrated to Melbourne. What foods do you associate with these different times in your life?’ In Ireland I grew up on Irish stews and Ulster fries. An Irish stew is potatoes, lamb, carrots and onions stewed in a big pot with Worcester sauce, salt and pepper for about three hours. An Ulster fry is a breakfast food and not advised for anyone who wants to live past forty: fried bacon, sausage, egg, potato bread, soda bread and black pudding. (My mum used to fry it in lard, which while delicious is heart attack food) In New York my food palate greatly expanded. The nearest restaurant to me on 122nd street and Amsterdam was an Ethiopian cafe and I used to eat there two or three times a week. My wife is Russian Jewish so we went to many of the cities famous Jewish delis often and got bagel, lox and cream cheese or pastrami sandwiches... Your Sean Duffy series must require a tonne of research into the 1980s in Northern Ireland, are there any surprising facts that people don’t know about from this time? How much of your novels 12 MELISSA Leong Anzac Biccie I love a good Anzac biscuit. In fact, I scarcely know anyone who doesn’t. Sure, opinions might be divided into camps of honey vs golden syrup and crunchy vs chewy, but that wholesome, golden, oaty, coconuty goodness is something all Australians and Kiwis are fond of, not in the least because it represents a healthy sense of nostalgia and patriotism…of the nonCronulla-riot kind. (For the record, I happen to think that the best combination is crunchy on the outside, chewy in the centre and made with golden syrup, but you’re welcome to disagree). are based on your own memories? Yeah, a lot of research. About four months of research on every book. But also my memories too. Particularly my own memories of the food and drink and music of the time. I suppose the most surprising thing was just how insanely violent it was back then. I’d forgotten or mentally blocked out the fact that a bomb was going off pretty much every week and there were riots and shootings somewhere in Belfast every single day of the 1980s! Your protagonist Sean Duffy has a penchant for “the dark stuff ”. Do you share his love of Guinness? I like a good pint of Guinness and a really good single malt from the island of Islay. As Duffy says in one of my books of a 12-year- old Islay single malt: ““Twelve-year-old Islay. Good stuff if you liked peat, smoke, earth, rain, despair, and the Atlantic Ocean, and who doesn’t like that?”  What do you enjoy eating at home with your family? I make a pretty good vegetarian lentil potato curry. I also make the girls [McKinty has two daughters] porridge pretty much every morning in the winter. How do you feel about potatoes? Love potatoes. I was amazed a few years ago when I was in Peru and discovered that Peruvians eat over 100 varieties of potatoes. I knew about six varieties so Peru is a potato lover’s paradise.  If you had to write crime set in contemporary Australia, who do you Adrian’s secret food diary think your protagonist would be? I live pretty close to St Kilda, a really diverse and interesting neighbourhood in Melbourne with many great food options. I’ve always liked the idea of having a PI who is also a baker because he has to get up at 3am in the morning and sees the neighbourhood in a way that no one else does.  Rain Dogs, at Ashfield Town Hall on May 19th, 6.30-7.30pm as a guest of Sydney Writers Festival. Book at ashfieldlibrary.eventbrite.com.au n McKinty will be speaking about his latest novel, Biscuit mythology goes that these golden oldies were named Anzac biscuits because they were made by those at home (with love) to be sent to loved ones at war. A likelier story, though they do travel well, is that they were made and sold on the home front to raise money for the war effort in biscuit drives, church and school fetes and of course CWA gatherings, hence, the ANZAC reference in the name. I drove out to central NSW to a town called Cudal last year to meet and interview CWA baking champion and Masterchef challenge setter, Merle Parrish. We talked about her opinions on being part of the CWA and what the classic biccie meant to her. Like anything the CWA choose to include in their repertoire, the recipe is simple enough, but often it’s a technique honed on hundreds of batches that make them magic. Aside from the fierce competition that breeds perfection, Merle also noted in her personal experience that the social network of the CWA and the love in the baking is something that connects so many women across distance not only to each other for support and solidarity, but to their loved ones fighting on the frontline abroad. Whether it’s part of your personal history or not, living in Australia or New Zealand bonds us in a special Antipodean way. So if you’ve the time to set aside a quiet moment for a cup of tea and an Anzac biscuit in the lead up to the 25th of April, while you are dunking and sipping, give a quiet nod to those who have and continue to serve in order for us to have that quiet moment in the first place. Really good porridge Ingredients • porridge • oats • full cream milk • cream • brown sugar • salt • water.  Method Put a mug of porridge into a bowl, followed by a mug of full cream milk and a mug of water. Turn on a medium heat and bring to the boil, reduce to the lowest possible heat, add a big pinch of salt and stir continuously until porridge is thick (for at least seven minutes or so). Serve in bowls. Add brown sugar or honey or molasses to taste. Pour on a tablespoon of double cream. 

[close]

p. 13



[close]

p. 14



[close]

p. 15



[close]

Comments

no comments yet