Taxi Talk April 2016

 

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Taxi Talk Magazine April 2016

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TAXI TALK APRIL 2016 ISSUE NO 574 VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY TAXI MAGAZINE ON THE RANKS SINCE 1966 PROUDLY PUBLISHED AND PRINTED IN MELBOURNE Print Post Approved number 100004912 VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY JURASSIC WORLD MELBOURNE MUSEUM At Jurassic World you will come face-to-face with a Pachyrhinosaurus; visit The Hammond Creation Lab; stare in wonder at a towering Brachiosaurus; get a rare up-close look at the most vicious dinosaur of them all, Tyrannosaurus rex; and learn all about top-secret projects currently in development.

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TALK TO US FOR Quick and Easy SOLUTIONS FOR Accident Cover Needs Call today for an obligation free quote PROVIDING COVER TO THE TAXI AND LIMOUSINE INDUSTRY SINCE 1998 VICTORIA TAXI CLUB 128 Errol Street, North Melbourne tel 9326 3808 | fax 9326 4808 | email vic.taxi@bigpond.com

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C 6 8 12 18 23 30 ontents Is the taxi industry dying? The Greed Virus has infected taxi operators. TAXI VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY MAGAZINE ON THE RANKS SINCE 1966 MAGAZINE EDITOR Toni F. Peters FOUNDER Stanley F. White PUBLISHER Trade Promotions Pty Ltd Journey towards zero ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES Mrs Toni Peters Trade Promotions Pty Ltd PO Box 2345, Mt Waverley VIC 3149 Phone: ....................................... 0400 137 866 Email: ............................. info@taxitalk.com.au Play your part to reduce lives lost on the road. Insurance Premiums Slashed Website: .......................... www.taxitalk.com.au Save more than $1100 as a result of insurers review. DISPLAY ADS World Taxi News All copy, editorial and artwork must be submitted by the 15th of the month prior to publication date. Advertisement sizes and costs can be downloaded at www.taxitalk.com.au. A look at what’s making the news around the globe. CLASSIFIED ADS Licence Statistics Monthly Victorian taxi & hire car licence comparison. $30 for 35 words, $60 for 70 words, etc. Email or Mail your classified advertisement by the 15th of the month prior to publication date, together with your payment. SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS Taxi Services Commission 1 year = $35 Updates on government issues effecting the industry. PAYMENT OPTIONS • • Via PAYPAL to info@taxitalk.com.au Direct Deposit to Trade Promotions Pty Ltd BSB 033065 A/c 312786 Mail Cheque to Trade Promotions Pty Ltd PO Box 2345, Mt Waverley VIC 3149 VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY proudly supporting these organisations since inception..... • Views expressed in any article in Taxi Talk magazine are those of the individual contributor and not necessarily those of the publisher. The publisher cannot accept any responsibility for any opinions, information, errors or omissions in this publication. To the extent permitted by law, the publisher will not be liable for any damages including special, exemplary, punitive or consequential damages (including but not limited to economic loss or loss of profit or revenue or loss of opportunity) or indirect loss or damage of any kind arising from the contract, tort or otherwise, even if advised of the possibility of such loss of profits or damage. Advertisements must comply with the relevant provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010. Responsibility for compliance with the Act rests with the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisement. Taxi Talk magazine has agreed to advertise taxi clubs because those clubs have stated that they and their products comply with all applicable laws and regulations relating to insurance for taxi operators. Taxi Talk magazine has not independently verified these taxi clubs’ compliance, and give no warranty and make no representation as to whether the taxi clubs are compliant. Operators should satisfy themselves as to a taxi club’s compliance with laws and regulations through their own enquiries. These advertisements do not constitute recommendations by Taxi Talk magazine that operators purchase insurance products from taxi clubs. Taxi Talk magazine does not accept any liability or responsibility for any loss or damage suffered or incurred by any operator because a taxi club or its product or service is non-compliant. TAXI MAGAZINE Taxi Talk magazine is wholly owned by Trade Promotions Pty Ltd. COPYRIGHT © Trade Promotions Pty Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. The “Taxi Talk – Voice of the taxi industry” heading and logos are trademarks of Stanley F. White. Copyright of articles and photographs of Taxi Talk magazine remain with the individual contributors and may not be reproduced without permission. Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry April 2016 |3

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EDITOR’S DESK TAXI VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY MAGAZINE ON THE RANKS SINCE 1966 All around the world we are seeing the introduction of electric vehicles being used for taxis. Delhi, Gurgaon, Bengaluru are just a few of the cities in India that have adopted electric taxis and it appears that India is globally leading the way in making this industry environmentally friendly. In Dundee, Scotland they have 30 Nissan Leaf vehicles which have already travelled over 1.6 million kms in their first year. They are adding 40 wheelchair accessible electric taxis to the fleet this year. The goal is for Dundee to become the world’s first all electric-taxi city. Last month Taxi Lineup launched in Sydney and Melbourne, with an initial 90 drivers. What a novel idea! Using taxis as couriers! They can use the transit lanes, deliver 24/7 and cabbies around Australia are looking for some extra income. The general public think of taxis delivering passengers (and their assistance animals) from point A to point B. Taxis don’t readily come to the fore of consumer’s mind when wishing to get their parcel delivered. Former Nestlé executive and entrepreneur Anthony Lechner has developed the Taxi Lineup app. A system for the consumer to book a delivery from their smartphone, computer or tablet with just a few clicks. They offer same day, 3-hour and 1-hour deliveries. They have a tracking app similar to Dominoes pizza, whereby it provides live updates of the parcel’s progress at any given time. Taxi Lineup plans to go nationwide by the end of 2016. It seems that many things have fallen down in NSW since Uber has been allowed to legally compete with the taxis and hire cars. Combined Communications Network (CCN owned by Cabcharge) has apparently reduced their taxi driver training from four months to two hours and Silver Top and Legion have reduced their trainings to two days. It is no longer mandatory for NSW cabbies to wear uniforms and there are many taxi drivers who have chosen not to wear uniform and have taken to wearing jeans, t-shirts, tracksuits and runners. Hmmm. It was thought that the NSW taxi industry would lift its game when Uber was accepted into the fold - but it seems that it has gone the other way. Proudly published in Melbourne 64 | September 2015 | April 2016 Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry

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This month we see an all time low in the taxi licence plate prices - $166,667 to be precise. It is a far cry from the $521,600 in January 2011. It’s a 68% drop in value in the past 5 years. The last time the plates were valued this low was in 1995! We can hope that this is where it stops - but it is on the cards that this is not the final low price to be seen. Over in Boston it has been decided that the very best way to protect taxi passengers is to fingerprint taxi drivers. The driver fingerprint program is considered the gold standard for screenings because they can identify applicants who use an alias or lie about their criminal records. Drivers will be required to pay a one-time fee of $50, $30 of which will go to the state and $20 will go to a city fund. By the way, Los Angeles and San Francisco have been fingerprinting their drivers for many years already. Last year there were 25 Uber drivers identified in Los Angeles and San Francisco who had convictions for murder, assaults, driving under the influence and other offenses. It is highly probable that all ride-sharing drivers must get their fingerprints on file too. Toni Peters Editor, Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry TT Australia’s premier taxi magazine is now proudly independent taxitalk • Taxi Talk magazine • Taxi news Took its first faltering steps in May 1966 and for the first time in 60 years provided a forum for a common cause in the taxi and hire car industry. A progressive approach to sharing the industry’s news to Victorian taxi owners, operators and drivers. 11 issues a year! (Feb - Dec) on the ranks since 1966 magazine TAXI TALK APRIL 2016 ISSUE NO 574 VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY TAXI VOICE OF THE TAXI INDUSTRY MAGAZINE ON THE RANKS SINCE 1966 PROUDLY PUBLISHED AND PRINTED IN MELBOURNE Print Post Approved number 100004912 • Monthly editions JURASSIC WORLD MELBOURNE MUSEUM At Jurassic World you will come face-to-face with a Pachyrhinosaurus; visit The Hammond Creation Lab; stare in wonder at a towering Brachiosaurus; get a rare up-close look at the most vicious dinosaur of them all, Tyrannosaurus rex; and learn all about top-secret projects currently in development. • www.taxitalk.com.au Updated monthly with the current magazine edition. Phone 0400 137 866 | Email info@taxitalk.com.au | Website www.taxitalk.com.au Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry April 2016 |5

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IS THE TAXI INDUSTRY DYING? The taxi industry might not be dying yet, but it is certainly very sick and in need of lifesupport. Is it dying of cancer, a virus, bacteria infection or simply of old age and neglect? Old age and neglect certainly weakened the immune system of the taxi industry and allowed it to be invaded by cancer, viruses and bacteria. I would like to have a look at one of the nasty viruses and the cancer in detail. The Greed Virus has many forms and is the most dangerous and destructive virus that attacked the industry for many a year. It hides in many places and does its destructive work unobserved until it is very difficult to cure the patient. The Greed Virus comes in the form of:1. Government regulation and legislation. 2. Abuse of market power by suppliers to the industry. 3. Self-interest in the industry. Government regulation and legislation has existed in the taxi industry around the whole world for many decades. of 600 Peak Service licences that created a yearly income of around $3.6 million for Treasury. This was followed in 2010 with another issue of over 500 licences and finally in 2014 with around 600 additional licences. The total yearly income to the government is, at this moment, more than $25 million per annum. The government has forgotten that it exists in order to serve the public and not act in its own pecuniary interest. The government has forgotten that it should uphold existing laws and not change or ignore them for selfinterest or big business in Australia or overseas. The government is probably at the moment ignorant of the fact that in Melbourne the taxi industry is not represented by the Network Service Providers (NSPs), or the many suppliers of apps, nor the Victorian Taxi Association (VTA) which is primarily representing the interests of the NSPs. There are many different suppliers to the taxi industry of which the radio network suppliers and the taxi meter manufacturers are the most important. The radio networks and the VTA used to be owned and operated by the taxi industry, until the change of the century. The NSPs provide a platform that brings the taxi customer and the taxi together. They get paid by the taxi operator and should therefore act Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry The primary purpose for government regulation and legislation existence is the protection of the public. This led to regulation and legislation that set standards with respect to maximum fares, vehicle standards, safety devices, standards for drivers and service to the public. Unfortunately governments in Victoria got infected by the Greed Virus in 2002. It started with the issue and charging 6 | April 2016

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primarily in the interest of the taxi operator. This arrangement worked fairly well until they got infected by the Greed Virus. Slowly but surely the relationship of servant and master changed. The NSPs became the masters and taxi operators became the servants. The NSPs consider that the taxi user is their customer; even so the only income received from the taxi user is on behalf of the taxi operator. The NSPs receive a fixed monthly fee from the taxi operator for dispatching work to the taxi. It is at this point that the Greed Virus attacks. It costs money to employ staff who answer the calls of taxi users and every $ saved is adding directly to the bottom line profit. A customer who is kept waiting on the phone for 20 minutes will certainly not be happy with the service. The customer is not happy and the taxi operator is not happy, but do the NSPs care? Certainly not! They have nothing to fear, because the government, who accredits the NSPs, has given up on enforcing service standards for the NSPs. Not only the government profited from the issue of more licences but so did the NSPs. They collected millions of dollars in extra fees from operators after only investing a small amount of money in hardware, without dispatching more work to the taxis. So why would they put more than a token objection to the government proposal? Uber seems to have a never ending money supply and friends in high and very high places. We all know that Uber disregards and disrespects our laws, and has tax havens in order to avoid paying taxes in Australia. Yet politicians in Canberra change existing laws to accommodate lawbreakers. Is money so strong that we bow to big American companies instead of protecting thousands of small businesses, their employees and their working conditions? For our patient to survive the taxi industry, government and the Network Service Providers have to work together and acknowledge that they exist not for themselves, but in order to provide the safest and best possible service to the public, at the cheapest possible price. The taxi industry itself is not without blame. The Greed Virus infected taxi operators and they sold their Radio Networks and their future for a few dollars. The licence holders played landlords and wanted even more money for the lease of a licence, which led to the excesses around 2009/10. Operators got infected and paid excessive amounts for licences in order to gain more market share. Drivers were not immune to the virus either, as they forgot to service the customer and instead picked and chose what work to do. As if the above is not enough to make the taxi industry very sick, we have to fight a cancer that threatens to kill all the participants in the industry. This cancer is called Uber. The other way that the Greed Virus acted was in how the NSPs and the VTA reacted to the oversupply of taxi licences. Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry This is certainly not possible when the industry is not allowed to operate in the most efficient way and when the prospective taxi user has not got access to all taxis in Melbourne at all times. Hans Altoff Taxi Owner/ Operator TT April 2016 |7

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JOURNEY TOWARDS ZERO Get behind Towards Zero and play your part to reduce the number of lives lost to road trauma. Last year, the total number of lives lost to road trauma was 252, an increase of four people on the year before. This year 70 lives have already been lost, 13 more than the same time last year. If this rate continues, Victoria will be looking at one of the worst road tolls in recent years. 2016 has already seen vulnerable motorcyclists become over-represented in this year’s fatalities. Alarmingly, 21 motorcyclists have lost their lives in road crashes since 1 January, compared to 30 for all of 2015. The report shows that the number of people dying on our roads has increased two years in a row. Last year, 252 people lost their life to road trauma – four more than 2014 and nine more than the lowest road toll in 2013. Drivers in regional Victoria continue to be over-represented with more than 50 percent of fatalities happening on country roads. Young drivers aged 18-20 are also at an increased risk of dying on the road. Compared to 2014, ten more young drivers lost their lives last year along with seven more young passengers aged 16-17. All but one of the young passengers died in vehicles driven by drivers aged 17-22. “Already this year far too many people have been killed on our roads. These numbers represent real people who will be missed by their families, friends and colleagues,” said Minister for Roads and Road Safety Luke Donnellan. Reducing the number of deaths and serious injury from road trauma is a key priority. The Government is investing heavily in road safety initiatives including: • $146 million for the Young Driver Safety Package; continued page 10 8 | April 2016 Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry

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ALEX TAXIS & BROKER P/L TAXI VHA MT $BUY > Taxi leases available MT SELL VHA $$$ 119 Errol St Nth Melb Call Jimmy 0412 717 616 TAXI COVER VANs - SEDANs ATB FOR ALL YOUR TAXI COVER > > > > > > > > > Fastest recovery for loss of income Prompt repairs carried out well equipped workshop in tottenham Alex tAxis mobile eftpos Quick repairs to put you back on the road ASAP Genuine parts used Get rewarded for no claims and not at fault claims SMALLER > /BRIGHTER FASTER Third party property public liability > cover 30 Million 24hr Help Hotline 0425 837 766 TAXI RESPRAYS FROM $1090 (incGST) Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry April 2016 119 Errol St Nth Melb Call Chantel 9348 9507 | 15

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JOURNEY TOWARDS ZERO ...continued • • • $2.4 million for phase 2 of the Motorcycle GLS $100 million for the Safer Cyclists and Pedestrian Fund, and $1 billion over ten years for the Safe System Road Infrastructure Program. The 2015 Victorian Road Trauma Report will inform the Government and its road safety partners as well as the broader community on areas that need the greatest focus to achieve our target of fewer than 200 deaths by 2020. Everyone has a role to play to reduce road trauma, and Victorians are being urged to have conversations with their families, their loved ones and their colleagues about how they can help to keep themselves safe on the roads. “We are all responsible for keeping each other safe on the roads and we urge people to share the road responsibly. A single life lost is one too many,” said Mr Donnellan. TT There is still more work to be done on the journey Towards Zero. Road fatalities by user and metro vs country Metro Melbourne: the three year average (2012 to 2014). Table 1 shows the number of fatalities by road user group within region of Victoria and year. Drivers comprise the largest single group of fatalities (around 38% of fatalities in Metro Melbourne and 57% of fatalities in Country Victoria). The table below shows the number of fatalities road user group within region of Victoria and year. Driverswith comprise • In 2015 there were 5 more driver by fatalities compared with 2014, and 4 more compared the largest single group of fatalities (around 38% of fatalities in Metro Melbourne and 57% of fatalities in Country Victoria). Metro • Melbourne: There are two to three times as many pedestrian fatalities in Metro Melbourne compared with Country Pedestrian fatalities in 2015 were 8 and fewer in Metro Melbourne compared • In 2015 there Victoria. were 5 more driver fatalities compared with 2014, 4 more compared with the three year average (2012 to 2014). with 2014, and 7 fewer than the three year average. • There are two to three times as manyin pedestrian fatalities in Metro Melbourne compared Country Victoria. • Whilst there were reductions motorcycle fatalities in Country Victoria, this with improvement has Pedestrian fatalities were 8 fewer in Metro Melbourne compared with 2014, and 7 fewer than the three year not been seenin in2015 Metro Melbourne. average. Country Victoria: • Whilst there were reductions in motorcycle fatalities in Country Victoria, this improvement has not been seen in Metro Melbourne. Country • Victoria: Passenger fatalities were 4 more than in 2014, and 7 more than the three year average. • • Driver fatalities werefatalities 3 more than in 2014, but 9 fewer thanand the three year average. Motorcyclist were 2 less than in 2014 7 fewer than the three year average. • Passenger fatalities were 4 more than in 2014, and 7 more than the three year average. Table 1: Fatalities by road user type and Metro Melb versus Country Vic • Motorcyclist fatalities were 2 less2012 than to in 2014 for 2015, 2014 and 3 year average 2014 and 7 fewer than the three year average. • Driver fatalities were 3 more than in 2014, but 9 fewer than the three year average. Road User Metro Melb Driver Passenger Pedestrian Motorcyclist* Cyclist Total Heavy Vehicle Involved 44 25 22 19 6 116 16 2015 Country Vic 78 32 11 11 4 136 25 All Vic 122 57 33 30 10 252 41 Metro Melb 39 22 30 17 4 112 27 2014 Country Vic 75 28 14 13 6 136 29 All Vic 114 50 44 30 10 248 56 Metro Melb 40 22 29 19 4 114 18 2012 to 2014 (3 Year Avg) Country Vic 87 25 10 18 4 144 25 All Vic 127 47 38 37 8 258 43 * including pillion passengers (<1%) 10 | April 2016 Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry

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Road Users Drivers and passengers In 2015, 122 drivers and 57 passengers died on Victoria’s roads. • Driver fatalities were 8 more than in 2014, but 5 lower than the 3 year average. Drivers passengers • Youngand driver (18 to 20 year olds) fatalities were 10 more than in 2014, and 6 more than the In 2015, 122 drivers and 57 passengers died on Victoria’s roads. • • • • • Road Users • 3 year average. Older driver (75 years and older) fatalities were one fewer than in 2014, and 7 fewer than Driver fatalities 8 more than in 2014, but 5 lower than the 3 year average. the 3 yearwere average. •Young Passenger fatalities were 7 more than 2014, and 10 more yearaverage. average. driver (18 to 20 year olds) fatalities were 10 in more than in 2014, and 6 than more the thanthree the 3 year •Older Young passenger fatalities (16 to 17 year olds) were 7 more than in 2014, and 9 more than driver (75 years and older) fatalities were one fewer than in 2014, and 7 fewer than the 3 year average. the 3 year average. Passenger fatalities were 7 more than in 2014, and 10 more than the three year average. • Vehicle occupant fatalities not wearing a seatbelt were 8 more than in 2014, and 4 less Young passenger fatalities (16 to 17 year olds) were 7 more than in 2014, and 9 more than the 3 year average. than the three year average. • Vehicle occupant fatalities not wearing a seatbelt were 8 more than in 2014, and 4 less than the three year average. Table 2: Drivers and Passengers Change (2015 versus 2014) 8 (7%) All drivers Group 2015 2014 Avg. 20122014 127 122 18 9 12 57 11 26 114 8 16 13 50 4 18 10 -7 -1 7 7 8 (125%) Young drivers (18 to 20 years) (-44%) Young drivers (21 to 25 years) (-8%) (14%) Older drivers (75 years or older) All passengers 12 14 19 47 2 30 (175%) Young passengers (16 to 17) (44%) Drivers and passengers not wearing a seatbelt Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry April 2016 | 11

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INSURANCE PREMIUMS SLASHED Taxi drivers in Canberra could save more than $1100 on premiums as a result of a review by insurers triggered by the arrival of Uber last year. In contrast, Uber drivers’ premiums would rise by up to several hundred dollars from April 1, a shift the taxi industry welcomed as a step towards a level playing field. Chairman of the Canberra Taxi Industry Association and Aerial shareholder John McKeough has welcomed the premium relief. The savings on Compulsory ThirdParty (CTP) insurance premiums for taxis varied among the four providers in the ACT market, with NRMA’s price down just $264 but GIO’s price dropping 13 per cent or $1160. Hire car operators were the biggest winners with premiums cut in half by three of the four brands, delivering savings of up to $1284. Canberra Taxi Industry Association chairman John McKeough said the changes were most welcome for taxi operators, who were still assessing their position for possible compensation claims against the government following its taxi industry reform last year. “It helps a little bit, anything extra the rideshare drivers have to pay will make them think twice about doing work that has been a pretty unsure return,” he said. The cheapest annual CTP premium for rideshare vehicles from April 1 was $621.70 offered by NRMA, only $56.50 more than its premium for an ordinary passenger vehicle. The cheapest hire car premium was GIO’s $1099.80 offer, and the cheapest taxi premium, also from GIO, was $7,698.60. Uber reported 350 drivers had signed up and 20,000 trips had been logged in the first month after Chief Minister Andrew Barr gave the ridesharing model the green light from October 30. 12 | April 2016 Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry

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The three brands offering the greatest savings for taxis and hire cars, and the highest rise in a shift from the ordinary car class to the new rideshare class – GIO, AAMI and APIA – are all owned by Suncorp Insurance. Uber driver Gary Woodbridge said income had exceeded his expectations and he would not be surprised if some taxi drivers began to rent an Uber-eligible car to start driving themselves. “I was looking to make about $15,000 a year gross, and I’m now ending up at about $2500 per month gross, for about 30 hours per week,” he said. The time spent on the road and extent of the commercial activity, as well as the frequency and average cost of motor accident claims, were key reasons between the price differences among the different premium classes. Licensed insurers are required to charge premiums that will fully fund their present and future liabilities under the CTP legislation. Mr McKeough said many taxis had introduced a system last month which allowed drivers to call passengers back directly without needing to know the passengers’ number. Matthew Raggatt TT HYBRID IS THE FUTURE Visit Melbourne City Toyota Lower your operating costs with Hybrid Call us TODAY! FINANCE AVAILABLE AT CAMPAIGN RATES* Melbourne City Toyota 621 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000 www.melbcitytoyota.com.au (03) 9282 8888 *T.A.P. Pics for illustration purpose only. E&OE. LMCT 10618 Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry April 2016 | 13

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LET’S LEARN FROM UBER Governments should be looking for new business models, not fighting to keep hold of old revenue sources. The solution to Uber in Newark, New Jersey — and one that’s starting to be explored elsewhere, also — is to create a wave of new regulations for Uber drivers, too, including licensing fees, background checks, drug tests and more, in order to handicap them onto the same playing field as the cabs. The Uber model isn’t perfect — all it takes is a Google search to demonstrate how dangerous it can be to step into one of its cars — but it solves many problems with the taxi model, including overcrowded roads, seas of cabs in under-used stands and a bureaucracy created to keep pulling dollars out of this industry. There’s a reason Uber is hailed as a model of the new economy — it’s more efficient, more competitive on costs and is able to provide the kind of immediacy demanded by today’s consumer. Cities should be encouraging a disruptive model such as Uber, not binding it with regulation and fees — especially when such a move looks like a desperate cash grab in a revenue-starved state that set up faulty red light cameras to turn intersections into ATMs. The city council admitted as such in an NJ.com story in which a councilwoman complained that the city “doesn’t make any money, not a dime” from services like Uber. What would be a lot more encouraging for Newark, and cities like it, would be to slacken the regulatory noose on cabs, to see if they have what it takes to compete with Uber if the dollars were even. For now, it seems, cities are more inclined to stick with their cash grab over what’s been a clear preference for their residents and visitors. That’s hardly the sort of precedent we want governments to be setting for businesses. njbiz.com TT 14 | April 2016 Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry

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WHO OWNS YOUR INCOME DATA? Your Taximeter Your Income Data Their Taximeter WHOSE INCOME DATA? RE-INSTALL YOUR Schmidt G4 Taximeter AT NO COST! If your taxi has been fitted with a Cabcharge Fareway Plus terminal and you are concerned about who has ownership of your confidential income data, we will re-install your G4 Taximeter into your taxi at NO COST TO YOU* It is your absolute right to keep and use your G4 Taximeter in your taxi. YOUR INCOME DATA IS YOUR BUSINESS BOOK NOW. CALL (03) 9546 6990 *Offer available for a limited time only. Bookings essential. Schmidt Electronic Laboratories Pty Ltd Trusted by thousands of taxi operators & drivers for more than 35 years Taxi Talk - Voice of the Taxi Industry Address 153 Osborne Avenue, Clayton South, VIC 3169 | ABN 20 005 631 710 Phone (03) 9546 6990 or 1300 132 422 | Email info@schmidt.com.au | Website www.schmidt.com.au April 2016 |7

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