The Developmental Psychology of Psychopathology

 

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Psychopathology as the outcome of problems in early childhood development.

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The Developmental Psychology of Psychopathology 2nd EDITION Sam Vaknin, Ph.D. Lidija Rangelovska Editing and Design: Lidija Rangelovska A Narcissus Publications Imprint, Skopje 2006 Not for Sale! Non-commercial edition. 1

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© 2002-6 Copyright Lidija Rangelovska. All rights reserved. This book, or any part thereof, may not be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from: Lidija Rangelovska – write to: palma@unet.com.mk or to vaknin@link.com.mk Find additional articles about personality disorders here - click on the links: http://www.narcissistic-abuse.com/faqpd.html http://www.narcissistic-abuse.com/faq82.html http://opensite.org/Health/Conditions_and_Diseases/Psychiatric_Disorders/Personality/ http://personalitydisorders.suite101.com/ Philosophical Musings and Essays http://samvak.tripod.com/culture.html Malignant Self Love – Narcissism Revisited http://samvak.tripod.com/ Created by: LIDIJA RANGELOVSKA REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA 2

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CONTENTS A. Notes on Developmental Psychology Brain and Personality Psychosexual Stages of Development Gender and Personality Disorders The Genetic Roots of Personality Disorders Defense Mechanisms B. Topics in Developmental Psychology The Narcissistic Parent The Narcissist’s Mother Born Alien Parenting – The Irrational Vocation The Development of Narcissists and Schizoids Serial Killers Sex, or Gender The Natural roots of Sexuality The Incest Taboo The Roots of Pedophilia Homosexual and Transsexual Narcissists The Insanity of the Defense The Author 3

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Notes on Developmental Psychology 4

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Brain and Personality First published here: "Personality Disorders (Suite101)" By: Dr. Sam Vaknin Phineas Gage was a 25 years old construction foreman who lived in Vermont in the 1860s. While working on a railroad bed, he packed powdered explosives into a hole in the ground, using tamping iron. The powder heated and blew in his face. The tamping iron rebounded and pierced the top of his skull, ravaging the frontal lobes. In 1868, Harlow, his doctor, reported the changes to his personality following the accident: He became "fitful, irreverent, indulging at times in the grossest profanity (which was not previously his customs), manifesting but little deference to his fellows, impatient of restraint or advice when it conflicts with his desires, at times pertinaciously obstinate yet capricious and vacillating, devising many plans for future operation which are no sooner arranged than they are abandoned in turn for others appearing more feasible ... His mind was radically changed, so that his friends and acquaintances said he was no longer Gage." In other words, his brain injury turned him into a psychopathic narcissist. Similarly startling transformation have been recorded among soldiers with penetrating head injuries suffered in World War I. Orbitomedial wounds made people "pseudopsychopathic": grandiose, euphoric, disinhibited, 5

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and puerile. When the dorsolateral convexities were damaged, those affected became lethargic and apathetic ("pseudodepressed"). As Geschwind noted, many had both syndromes. The DSM is clear: the brain-injured may acquire traits and behaviors typical of certain personality disorders but head trauma never results in a full-fledged personality disorder. "General diagnostic criteria for a personality disorder: F. The enduring pattern is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., head trauma)." (DSM-IV-TR, p.689) From my book "Malignant Self-love - Narcissism Revisited": "It is conceivable, though, that a third, unrelated problem causes chemical imbalances in the brain, metabolic diseases such as diabetes, pathological narcissism, and other mental health syndromes. There may be a common cause, a hidden common denominator (perhaps a group of genes). Certain medical conditions can activate the narcissistic defense mechanism. Chronic ailments are likely to lead 6

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to the emergence of narcissistic traits or a narcissistic personality style. Traumas (such as brain injuries) have been known to induce states of mind akin to full-blown personality disorders. Such "narcissism", though, is reversible and tends to be ameliorated or disappear altogether when the underlying medical problem does. Other disorders, like the Bipolar Disorder (maniadepression) are characterised by mood swings that are not brought about by external events (endogenous, not exogenous). But the narcissist's mood swings are strictly the results of external events (as he perceives and interprets them, of course). But phenomena, which are often associated with NPD (Narcissistic Personality Disorder), such as depression or OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder), are treated with medication. Rumour has it that SSRI's (such as Fluoxetine, known as Prozac) might have adverse effects if the primary disorder is NPD. They sometimes lead to the Serotonin syndrome, which includes agitation and exacerbates the rage attacks typical of a narcissist. The use of SSRI's is associated at times with delirium and the emergence of a manic phase and even with psychotic microepisodes. This is not the case with the heterocyclics, MAO and mood stabilisers, such as lithium. Blockers and 7

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inhibitors are regularly applied without discernible adverse side effects (as far as NPD is concerned). Not enough is known about the biochemistry of NPD. There seems to be some vague link to Serotonin but no one knows for sure. There isn't a reliable non-intrusive method to measure brain and central nervous system Serotonin levels anyhow, so it is mostly guesswork at this stage." Read more about Narcissism and the Bipolar Disorder click HERE! Read more about Narcissism and Asperger's Disorder click HERE! Back to Table of Contents 8

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Psychosexual Stages of Personal Development First published here: "Personality Disorders (Suite101)" By: Dr. Sam Vaknin The Viennese neurologist, Sigmund Freud, was among the first to offer a model of psychological development in early childhood (within the framework of psychoanalysis). He closely linked the sex drive (libido) to the formation of personality and described five psychosexual stages, four of which are centered around various erogenous zones in the body. The pursuit of pleasure ("the pleasure principle") and the avoidance of pain drive the infant to explore his or her self and the world at large. Pleasure is inextricably linked to sexual gratification. In the oral phase (from birth to 24 months), the baby focuses on the tongue, lips, and mouth and derives gratification from breast feeding, thumb sucking, biting, swallowing, and other oral exploratory activities. This is naturally followed by the anal stage (24 to 36 months). The baby immensely enjoys defecation and related bowel movements. But it is also the first time in his or her life that the toddler is subjected to the censure and displeasure of caretakers. Hitherto unconditionally adoring adults now demand that the infant delay gratification, relieve himself only in the bathroom, and not play with his feces. This experience - of hitherto unprecedented adult approbation - can be traumatic. 9

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The phallic stage (age 3 to 6 years) involves the discovery of the penis and clitoris as foci of pleasurable experience. This tantalizing novelty is coupled with sexual desire directed at the parent of the opposite sex (boys are attracted to their mothers and girls, to their fathers). The child overtly and covertly competes with the same-sex parent for the desired parent's attention: boys joust with their fathers and girls with their mothers. These are the famous Oedipal and Electra complexes. If the parent is insufficiently mature or narcissistic and encourages the attentions of the child in acts of covert (emotional) and overt (physical) incest, it could lead to the development of certain mental health disorders, among them the Histrionic, Narcissistic, and Borderline personality disorders. Doting, over-indulgence, and smothering are, therefore, forms of child abuse. Sexual innuendo, treating the child as an adult or substitute partner, or regarding one's offspring as an extension of one's self also constitute abusive conduct. The phallic stage is followed by 6 to 7 years of latent sexuality that is rekindled in puberty. Adolescence is a period of personal development labeled by Freud the genital phase. In the previous rungs of psychosexual evolution, the child's own body was the source of sexual pleasure. Hitherto, the adolescent and young adult seeks sexual gratification from and invests sexual energy in others. This object-relatedness is what we call mature love. Also read these: 10

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The Pathology of Love - click HERE! In Defense of Psychoanalysis - click HERE! On Incest - click HERE! Many additional Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Personality Disorders - click HERE! Back to Table of Contents 11

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Gender Bias In Diagnosing Personality Disorders First published here: "Personality Disorders (Suite101)" By: Dr. Sam Vaknin Ever since Freud, more women than men sought therapy. Consequently, terms like "hysteria' are intimately connected to female physiology and alleged female psychology. The DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the bible of the psychiatric profession) expressly professes gender bias: personality disorders such as Borderline and Histrionic are supposed to be more common among women. but the DSM is rather even-handed: other personality disorders (e.g., the Narcissistic and Antisocial as well as the Schizotypal, Obsessive-Compulsive, Schizoid, and Paranoid) are more prevalent among men. Why this gender disparity? There are a few possible answers: Maybe personality disorders are not objective clinical entities, but culture-bound syndromes. In other words, perhaps they reflect biases and value judgments. Some patriarchal societies are also narcissistic. They emphasize qualities such as individualism and ambition, often identified with virility. Hence the preponderance of pathological narcissism among men. Women, on the other hand, are widely believed to be emotionally labile and clinging. This is why most Borderlines and Dependents are females. Upbringing and environment, the process of socialization 12

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and cultural mores all play an important role in the pathogenesis of personality disorders. These views are not fringe: serious scholars (e.g., Kaplan and Pantony, 1991) claim that the mental health profession is inherently sexist. Then again, genetics may be is at work. Men and women do differ genetically. This may account for the variability of the occurrence of specific personality disorders in men and women. Some of the diagnostic criteria are ambiguous or even considered "normal" by the majority of the population. Histrionics "consistently use physical appearance to draw attention to self." Well, who doesn't in Western society? Why when a woman clings to a man it is labeled "codependence", but when a man relies on a woman to maintain his home, take care of his children, choose his attire, and prop his ego it is "companionship" (Walker, 1994)? The less structured the interview and the more fuzzy the diagnostic criteria, the more the diagnostician relies on stereotypes (Widiger, 1998). Quotes from the Literature "Specifically, past research suggests that exploitive tendencies and open displays of feelings of entitlement will be less integral to narcissism for females than for males. For females such displays may carry a greater possibility of negative social sanctions because they would violate stereotypical gender-role expectancies for women, who are expected to engage in such positive social behavior as being tender, compassionate, warm, 13

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sympathetic, sensitive, and understanding. In females, Exploitiveness/Entitlement is less wellintegrated with the other components of narcissism as measured by the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) - Leadership/Authority, Self-absorption/Selfadmiration, and Superiority/Arrogance- than in males though 'male and female narcissists in general showed striking similarities in the manner in which most of the facets of narcissism were integrated with each other'." Gender differences in the structure of narcissism: a multi-sample analysis of the narcissistic personality inventory - Brian T. Tschanz, Carolyn C. Morf, Charles W. Turner - Sex Roles: A Journal of Research - Issue: May, 1998 "Women leaders are evaluated negatively if they exercise their authority and are perceived as autocratic." Eagly, A. H., Makhijani, M. G., & Klonsky, B. G. (1992). Gender and the evaluation of leaders: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 111, 3-22, and ... Butler, D., & Gels, F. L. (1990). Nonverbal affect responses to male and female leaders: Implications for leadership evaluations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 58, 48-59. "Competent women must also appear to be sociable and likable in order to influence men - men must only appear to be competent to achieve the same results with both genders." Carli, L. L., Lafleur, S. J., & Loeber, C. C. (1995). 14

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Nonverbal behavior, gender, and influence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 68, 1030-1041. Gender and the Narcissist - click HERE! Homosexual and Transsexual Narcissists - click HERE! Sex and Gender - click HERE! Many additional Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Personality Disorders - click HERE! Back to Table of Contents 15

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