PARfessionals' Peer Workforce Development Supervision Training Student Workbook

 

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Student Workbook

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PARfessionals’ Peer Recovery Workforce Development Supervision Training Course Summary The landscape of health and wellness industries is changing to accommodate research findings that support comprehensive care. As a result of this research, a new kind of provider has emerged. Peer Recovery Professionals are those with lived experience who are trained to work with clients and patients in a non-clinical, supportive relationship that fosters improved outcomes by reaching clients who might not be reached, increasing client empowerment, connecting people to resources and opportunities that improve their sense of wellbeing and belonging. This course addresses the changing landscape and demystifies the Peer Recovery Professional. Special issues related to providing supervision for a new classification of provider will be addressed including the supervisory relationship, ethical service delivery, cultural competence, challenges and strategies for best practices in supervision. Learning tools and resources are also included. 2

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Course Contents Estimated Talk Time Topic 15 15 10 10 10 15 15 10 10 10 10 15 5 10 5 5 5 10 15 15 20 15 10 10 5 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 360 minutes Introduction Systemic change: Transitioning to comprehensive care Recovery Wellness Peer providers Research supporting peer provided services Where do Peer Recovery Professionals fit into the system? What do they do? Types of Peer Recovery Services and Service Examples Service elements: What makes peer provided services different? What does someone with lived experience need to do in order to become a Peer Recovery Professional? Training – Certification – Continuing Education Barriers and challenges to peer support integration Supervision Organizational recommendations for implementation Are you ready? Supervisors are integral to these gears running smoothly. Supervisor qualifications Types of Supervision Professional Supervision 101 How to be a good supervisor of Peer Recovery Professionals Issues unique to supervising professionals with lived experience Supervisory Relationship Boundaries Confidentiality Cultural Intelligence Overview of what we mean by cultural competence Culturally accessible organizations Addressing stigma in supervision Compassion fatigue and burnout Supervision and learning techniques that work for creating successful teams Best Practices Ways to mitigate challenges Ideas for utilizing peer providers in existing programs 3

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Introduction Systemic change: Transitioning to comprehensive care Recovery Recovery: A process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential (SAMHSA, 2011). “Spirit of Recovery” • Accessible services that engage and retain people seeking recovery; • A continuum of services rather than crisis-oriented care; • Care that is age-and gender appropriate and culturally competent; and • Where possible, care in the person’s community and home using natural supports. 4

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Wellness Adapted from Swarbrick, M. (2006). A Wellness Approach. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 29(4), 311–314. 5

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Peer providers Research supporting peer provided services Where do Peer Recovery Professionals fit into the system? What do they do? 6

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Types of Peer Recovery Services and Service Examples Emotional: Demonstrate empathy, caring, or concern to bolster person’s self-esteem and confidence. Service example: peer mentoring, peer-led support groups Informational: Share knowledge and information and/or provide life or vocational skills training. Service example: parenting classes, job readiness training, wellness seminar Instrumental: Provide concrete assistance to help others accomplish tasks. Service example: child care, transportation, help accessing community health and social services Affiliation: Facilitate contacts with other people to promote learning of social and recreational skills, create community, and acquire a sense of belonging. Service examples: recovery centers, sports league participation, wellness focused social opportunities Service elements: What makes peer provided services different? 7

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What does someone with lived experience need to do in order to become a Peer Recovery Professional? Training – Certification – Continuing Education Barriers and challenges to peer support integration 8

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Supervision Organizational recommendations for implementation Are you ready? Supervisors are integral to these gears running smoothly. Supervisor qualifications 9

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Types of Supervision Professional Supervision 101 Professional Supervision 101 Step 1: Self awareness Step 2: Clarification Step 3: The Practice of Supervision 10

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Issues unique to supervising professionals with lived experience Supervisory Relationship Understand and promote benefits of providing peer services to the peer recovery professional Promote professional development 11

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Boundaries Confidentiality Cultural Intelligence Overview of what we mean by “cultural competence” 12

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Culturally accessible organizations A – Age ______________________________ D – Disability (born and/or acquired) ______________________________ R – Religion ______________________________ E – Ethnicity ______________________________ S – Social class ______________________________ S – Sexual orientation I – Indigenous background ______________________________ ______________________________ N – National origin ______________________________ G – Gender ______________________________ M – Military experience ______________________________ Discussion questions for self: What does it mean to be _____________? Fill in that blank with your race, religion, social class, etc. What beliefs do you hold as a result of your cultural heritage? What can you do to increase your cultural awareness? Current staff 13

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Current client base Community Addressing stigma in supervision 14

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Compassion fatigue and burnout Supervision and learning techniques that work to create successful teams 15

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