Ciao 272

 

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Ciao Magazine Issue 272

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FREE There’s life in the Inner West! Issue 272 | December 4th 2015 Charitable consumerism WIN! The Bélier Family Movie TIX: xxxxx F O L LOW S! @ciaoma gazinesy dney /CiaoMa gazine U Gourmet Christmas giveaway! A sense of belonging Italian-Australians share their remarkable stories

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Inner West whispers Local gossip, rumour, hearsay and unsubstantiated fact... Refugee rumble – Nutbush city limits - Wicked Lounge MIA l This fortnight was the best of times and the WE ARE C!AO Satire for the soul Latte Leftie explains why this redneck nation – but not Inner Westies – should roll out the welcome mat for the refugee hordes  Dear LL – As a Greens activist my pro-refugee bona fides are unimpeachable. No one has wept saltier tears over the fate of the world’s displaced people nor spent more time slagging off my fellow Australians for their selfish xenophobia than I. But when I called for an open borders policy, I never imagined I’d be expected to live cheek by cheek with a pack of swarthy Middle Eastern types. Ones who have, let’s be frank, disturbingly retrograde views about empowered women and friends of Dorothy. While I know Islam is a religion of peace (which is why the Middle East is such a harmonious region) I’m worried, post-Paris, about some religious fanatic blowing himself up in my local cafe. Not, of course, that such an incident, should it occur, would have anything at all to do with Islam. Even if the suicide bomber in question was screaming ‘Death to Western infidels’ prior to detonation. Um, anyway, how exactly can I be both for the refugees and against them being accommodated at Callan Park? My labradoodle likes to go for harbourside walks there. Surely it’s speciest to deny him the pleasure of gamboling about just so a few thousand Syrian men, women and children fleeing war, torture and persecution can have somewhere to live? Nick, Rozelle    LL replies: I’m in full sympathy with your speciest concerns, Nick, but I fear the Hate Media may childishly scoff at them. Far better to proclaim you totally support housing the refugees in Callan Park but only after both the major parties have agreed to tear up the ANZUS alliance, hand this nation back to its Indigenous peoples, and burn to the ground that King Street Max Brenner outlet. Oh, and also erect giant banners declaring, “Big-hearted, progressive Inner Westies warmly welcome refugees but strongly suggest they be settled among their own kind on the outer suburban fringe.” n Email your dilemma to info@ciaomagazine.com.au. WINE Winsor Dobbin info@ciaomagazine.com.au ADVERTISING Sonya Madden sonya@ciaomagazine.com.au worst of times. Leichhardt Council infamously voted down its own proposal for a Welcome Centre at Callan Park to assist the increased refugee intake. Politicking between Leichhardt Labor and Greens ultimately resulted in a resolution to hang a banner saying “Leichhardt Welcomes Refugees”, while the council meeting (including interruption from Islamophobes) suggested otherwise. The Greens pushed for amendments to the Labor Byrne/Emsley proposal for the Welcome Centre - the inclusion of a letter to the government demanding an end to off-shore processing and the aforementioned banner. Without support for the amendments, Greens voted against the Welcome Centre proposal. In a cruel twist the Labor and Liberal councillors instead voted for a proposal that only included the Green’s banner and the letter to government, devoid of a Welcome Centre. Sigh. The People’s Climate March was also tarnished by decisions that led to two prominent Aboriginal organisations to boycott the event. Thank goodness Ashfield Council’s White Ribbon Day was a heartwarming delight – where youths, passerbys and councillors joined in a communal ‘Nutbush’ together on Liverpool Rd. Ah Nutbush... l The Wicked Lounge at the Clarence Hotel JOURNALIST Max Kobras max@ciaomagazine.com.au was the newest tenant on Parramatta Road at the beginning of 2015, promising to amp up the road’s live music and eye-candy quota. The promise of ‘Chizzeled Angels’ is still declared by the sign on its spire, however, there have been no signs of life for months. The real estate agent has postered the site with warnings of re-entry by the landlord, when usually a phone call would do. So what happened to the Wicked Lounge? Where are its tenants ? A smashed TV and pizza boxes on the bar are the only clues. JOURNALIST Kassia Aksenov kassia@ciaomagazine.com.au FOOD Melissa Leong info@ciaomagazine.com.au LOCAL history First opening as the Queens Theatre in 1912, this Petersham building was soon demolished and reconstructed as the Majestic Theatre in 1921. Taken over by Greater Union in 1946, the cinema was renamed the Odeon (as you see pictured) and remained a part of this chain until 1967. At this point it was renamed the Oreon Cinema and it largely showed Greek and Italian films, before closing in 1977. Two years later it became the Majestic Roller Skating Rink and was a particularly popular place for the gay community, before finally shutting down in 2003. It has since been converted into apartments, which are hopefully still very majestic. ART DIRECTOR Paden Hunter paden@ciaomagazine.com.au Petersham’s most protean building Things we love: EDITORIAL Phoebe Moloney phoebe@ciaomagazine.com.au Contributors: Nigel Bowen, Lianna Taranto, Elise Bruem, Valentina Giannelli, Levi Parsons Publisher: Sonia Komaravalli Ciao loves you, and our photographers only supply photos for publication with consent. We try and make you look your best. No responsibility is accepted by Ciao Magazine for the accuracy of advertisements or information. We welcome unsolicited editorial and pictorial contributions. The opinions expressed in Ciao Magazine are those of contributors, indemnifying the publisher from inaccuracy or consequences arising from its reproduction. © All rights reserved. No material is to be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Ciao Magazine is a free publication. Distribution, advertising & editorial enquiries 460A Parramatta Road, Petersham 2049 info@ciaomagazine.com.au (02) 9518 3696. 0402 202 951 – Sonya 0405 509 805 – Sonia Ciao is locally owned and produced. Please recycle Printed by Spot Press, Marrickville Double Belonging Festival Coordinator, Bianca Bonino, reading Terra Matta - the autobiography of Giovanni Rabito’s (right) father. Image: Ben Cregan Have you seen Coles’ anti-consumerist art laying around? Have you found yourself reaching to grab items from the Inner West streets only to realise they are cement sculptures? If so, you must have come across the work of sculptor and street artist Will Coles. Born in England and now residing in Sydney, Coles takes his inspiration for sculpting from his grandfather (who was also a sculptor). He’s exhibited his artworks in galleries around Sydney. Coles’ street art takes a different approach, touching on social issues relevant to Inner Westies and Australians alike. From the deflated goon sack that reads “drink to get drunk” to the wallet that has “fake” labelled on its cover (on Enmore Rd), Coles tackles issues that have a connection with today’s ‘buy now, think later’ society. Coles has made duplicates of many of his street art installations, so similar cement wallets can be found all over the world. C!ao’s voice In • A new look for Five Dock Library • 1970s disco curls • Spray-on nail polish • Star Wars fan fiction • Gorgeous gift wrapping with mandatory ribbon Out • Getting shipwrecked in Sydney Harbour on a boat you don’t own... • The unused space and shelter at Callan Park • People who “don’t dance”. Not a valid excuse, sorry. C!ao Magazine There’s life in the Inner West! 4

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Community Life R OA D T E ST n Elise Bruem Bag it It’s getting very close to the season of giving, which means you’re probably getting into the season of buying. It’s also the season of feeling guilty about spending money on an iPad for an 8-yearold while watching ads asking for donations for people who can’t afford iPads, or sometimes even food. So how can you help others while feeding your compulsive need to shop? Charity stores, of course. Luckily for you Inner Westies, there are plenty of local places where you can grab a bargain and help others at the same time, just don’t forget to donate your unwanted items! RANT Tale Of Two Towers What could be happening, I wondered as I eyed the local paper. I was quite surprised to read again of the ugly prospect of twin multi storey towers being built in Rozelle. Was this the same Rozelle I wondered, that we have all come to love, a proud suburb of our municipality? Letting out a sigh, I saw it was the former Balmain Leagues Club site and Rozelle Village developers again. It seemed since their last DA rejection, this time by the NSW Department of Planning in 2012, peace efforts had been attempted by the next planning body to come in contact, Leichhardt Council. As I read on, it seemed that in October this year, this wasn’t good enough and Rozelle Village was at it again, this time with a Class 1 appeal to the NSW Land and Environment Court. I guess developers figure a stitch in time saves nine because instead of sending the project to the NSW JRPP in February, they decided the honored Justice of the NSW Land and Environment Court is more of a Santa Claus figure and so have delayed the appeal until now. Well, as we all know, Santa Claus rides in an open sleigh, does not approve bad planning applications and has never mentioned walking on water. Looking through the Rozelle Village documents, we can at least be grateful they are believers in recycling. Readers may well be aware that it was only less than 12 months ago Rozelle Village was trying to sell the former Balmain Leagues property off. It's worth about $30 million but maybe the asking price was too high. As a retailer, I am always open to learning about new concepts. Perhaps the proposed supermarket will allow imaginary Linfox trailers up its ramps from Victoria Road and serve imaginary customers. After all, it is the lead up to Christmas. But maybe I'm getting a little confused with April Fools Day. The truth is the residents and businesses of Rozelle need a fair go and they all truly need our help. Everyone knows about Victoria Road traffic. Everyone knows about Darling Street traffic. The impact of discharging up to 167 vehicles from new car spaces onto Victoria Rd is unkown. Plus, these towers will sit atop a community that has indicated in writing, at least 20,000 separate times, that it doesn’t want them. Let the NRL take care of the Tigers, and withdraw your punitive actions against the residents and businesses of Rozelle. Let the traffic on Victoria Road go on its way, don’t slow it down. Give us a fair go. I hope as many readers as possible get behind the residents of Rozelle, as their first Christmas present this December, plus protect them over the New Year. Community are en ev ts listings n Words by David Hunt. You can view the Rozelle Village DA here: www.leichhardt.nsw.gov.au/ Community-Issues/Balmain-Leagues Help the environment and soothe that hip pocket nerve Vinnies The kingpin of charity stores, what is there to say about Vinnies that you probably don’t already know? Chances are you’ve probably even shopped in one before, especially because here in the Inner West they can be found in pretty much every suburb. Spend your money at Vinnies and it will go into helping the disadvantaged in your local community, as well as overseas. supporting the work of the Salvation Army across Australia and that is a lot of good work. The Smith Family The Salvos Much like Vinnies, the Salvos is a hoarders paradise, filled to the brim with all the clothes, books and other knick-knacks you could ever want. If you’re a serious bargain-hunting shopper you’ll check out the Tempe store, which is almost as big as its neighbour IKEA (except the furniture here won’t give you as much self loathing as you try and construct it), or there’s some closer to home in Glebe and Marrickville. All profits made in Salvos stores go towards The Smith Family stores specialise in clothes. So. Many. Clothes. With a massive network of donation bins across NSW and the ACT but only 19 stores to fill, you can be sure that the Smith Family has a huge range of clothing. While the store in Marrickville may look small, the team of volunteers that work there definitely know how to fit as much as possible into the tiny space. The Smith Family uses store profits to cover administration costs. This means that cash donations given to the charity are able to go entirely to helping disadvantaged young people. St. Luke’s Op Shop St. Luke’s Op Shop in Enmore prides itself on being a local community project. It’s owned by St. Luke’s Anglican Church but is run by a team of friendly volunteers. Being on Enmore Road, the shop has to pay its rent, but after that all proceeds from the shop are put towards a range of local and international community projects. Australian Red Cross Buy your summer wardrobe! Finally, a way to help the Red Cross without having to get a needle! The Australian Red Cross does amazing work in emergency and crisis situations, supporting communities in Australia, as well as helping to provide clean water to communities across the world. Buy clothes in their Newtown or Rozelle stores and this is where your money will go. But if you’re able, you should definitely donate blood too, a needle is always worth saving three lives. Spoil Your Dog Everyone loves a nice holiday, but it's rare that you can bring your dog with you, forcing you to leave your favourite furry friend with Mum. Well, at Lilianfels Resort and Spa, you can have the best of both worlds... Located at scenic Katoomba in the Blue Mountains, Lilianfels Resort and Spa is quite likely the most beautiful and luxurious pet-friendly hotel you could ever find. Not only is this hotel absolutely surrounded by great places to take your pooch for walks, they also have all the amenities you and your dog could ever ask for. If this sounds like the retreat for you, then you will love their Bring Your Dog Package, which is available over summer. This package includes overnight accommodation in a Deluxe Resort View room, includes a breakfast buffet for two, Wi-Fi access and a comfy bed and bowl for your pup, plus a free treat on arrival! n Thanks to Lilianfels Resort and Spa, we a have FREE Bring Your Dog Package to giveaway! To go into the running, email us your details at info@ciaomagazine.com.au and tell us in 25 words or less why your dog deserves a getaway. What’s on n Compiled by Max Kobras. Email info@ciaomagazine.com.au Sunday 6th December FREE email info@ m.au ciaomagazine.co Attn: Max you are in the area, make sure to get to Johnson Park in Dulwich Hill by 7:30pm to join in on the cheer. Proudly presented by the Salvation Army, a fantastic Christmas Carols event Where: Johnson Park, Constitution Road, Dulwich Hill is coming soon to Dulwich Hill. This night will, of course, feature a whole Sunday 6th December slew of carols for you to sing along to, as Drummoyne Street Fair well as a spectacular fireworks finale! If Carols in the Park and Carols A festive light show 6 What a truly lovely combination for Christmas, giving you the first chance to shop for unique and handcrafted goods at the street fair, while also enjoying everything from jumping castles to camel rides, before heading into the night for a wonderful carols event! This is really a one-stop night for everything festive, so if you are the kind of person to begin practising your “Ho Ho Hos” back in October, make sure to come down to Drummoyne Presbyterian, corner of Lyons Rd and College St! For more info, please visit www.drummoyne.org.au/ Saturday 12th December pick up a new skill and put it to use! Come visit Wyld and Whimsy on Norton St, Leichhardt and join in on these two great workshops. Starting at 12:15pm is the Christmas Card class where you can create a beautiful card that represents you. After that is a sustainability-focussed class to make decorations from discarded objects, starting with how to turn an unloved book into a Christmas tree angel! For more info or to make a booking, please visit www.wyldandwhimsy.com.au Mon 14th Dec-Thu 24th December Children's Foundation will be here offering gift wrapping for just a gold coin donation, from 11am until the evening on most days. All the funds they raise will go to granting the wishes of less fortunate children. Where: Upper Ground Floor, World Square, City 2000 Wyld and Whimsy Workshops Starlight Gift Wrapping There is no gift more sincere than one made by hand to show your loved ones how much you care. So why not If you are out doing gift shopping in the two weeks before Christmas or if you're just hopeless with paper and sticky tape, make sure to drop by World Square in the city. The Starlight Make a whimsical gift for someone you wuv See page 8 for more what's on...

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n Local Gigs Saturday 5th December n Local screens Slum Sociable My God is this music sexy. It's very trip-hop but infused with a lovely layer of jazz, much like Portishead. I dare you to come to this show and not fall in love with everyone around you. Newtown Social Club, $18 FREE TICKETS Win movie passes and DVDs n Your screens Rex's last fare a bonza at the box office Last Cab to Darwin Groovy man! Saturday 5th December Get ready to fall in love with the La Famille Bélier Psychotic Turnbuckles The Bélier Family Most of the dairy-farming Bélier family – mum (Karin Viard), dad (François Damiens) and son Quentin (Luca Gelberg) – are deaf. The exception is teenage daughter Paula (Louane Emera), who acts as interpreter and farm manager – cheerfully enough – but is clearly ready to move on. When her talent for singing is discovered and a future in Paris beckons, the dramas that follow may well be totally predictable, but are enlivened by the sheer likability of the cast. The attention stays focussed on the radiant, utterly magnetic Paula, and rightly so – she’s quite a find! Director Eric Lartigau avoids the solemnity of movies about disability too, mostly with humour (the parents are a randy lot), and the near shameless sentimentality feels honest and heartfelt. That’s rare – so often cinema tears feel calculated. But be warned – they will come, especially as singer/actress Emera blitzes the climatic audition with a solid gold, knockout performance. M from Dec 26. In the Heart of the Sea Can a man who kills whales be a hero, even one as hunky as Chris Hemsworth? Director Ron Howard puts the action in context, of course. In the pre-fossil fuel era whale oil was a valuable fuel – powering a vastly profitable industry that relied on the rampant exploitation of its workers, and their incredible bravery. Very loosely telling the epic of Moby Dick, this salty sea dog story is rollicking great fun, and a fantastic morality tale. When a giant rogue sperm whale turns the tables on his attackers our hero soon wishes he was a paid-up member of Greenpeace... M on now. A hard-rock band that formed from a group of wrestlers from California who were banned from competing, so they moved to Sydney to make music. That is a great bio and their energy, even 30 years after coming together, is unmatchable. The Factory Theatre, $20 Sunday 6th December Jeremy Sim’s crowd pleaser has struck quite a chord with local audiences – picking up $7.3 million at the Aussie box office. It helps that it contains our most likeable and talented actors, Michael Caton and Jacki Weaver (plus impressive newcomers Mark Coles Smith, Ningali Lawford-Wolf and Emma Hamilton) and that it’s set against some of our most stunning landscapes. Caton plays Rex, a grizzled Broken Hill cabbie who, when told he has terminal cancer, sets out alone in his taxi to Darwin after hearing assisted suicide was legal there. It’s no surprise the film has done well. Rex's epic journey manages the near impossible task of turning that most difficult of all topics (dying) into something both affirming and gracious, but most importantly, does so with honesty, wry humour and heart. M. On DVD, Blu-Ray and digital from Dec 9. ★ Thanks to Icon Home Entertainment and to celebrate the film's local success, we have a DVD of Last Cab to Darwin, along with a fantastic pack of 5 iconic Aussie movies to give away. Details below. Mono Fun fact: I've listened to Mono for years and only just found out they are Japanese. Well, the country does have a good record for post-rock, math rock and pretty much any alternative rock. Mono is great, come enjoy them. Newtown Social Club, $49 WIN DVDS! ★ Thanks to Palace Films we have 10 double preview passes to give away – valid for the weekends of 11-13th Dec and 18-20th Dec. Details below. Don't do it, Chris! The whale wins! The star and the shutterbug Gingerbread Fundraiser While Christmas comes with a lot of classic, delicious treats, I'm sure I'm not alone in loving gingerbread houses above all. If you do too, come join this event and help raise funds for the Hope for Ollie... Hope for Ollie is a charity organisation that raises funds for research towards a cure and treatment for muscular dystrophy. This category of disease currently has no cure and little treatment beyond physical therapy, and there are over 20,000 people sufferring from this disease in Australia alone. This event will be held at 19 Cecily St, Lilyfield on Sunday, 13th December with two sessions, one running from 10am-12pm and the other from 1pm-3pm. Gather up your friends and family and join in for a fun day where you get to learn how to make your very own gingerbread house. For $50 you will receive all the ingredients (gluten free available) and decorations you need to make a special dessert. n To make a booking, please call Louisa Glindemann on 0412 885 530 or Kylie Sol on 0403 484 500. To learn more about muscular dystrophy, please visit www.hopeforollie.com Life Anton Corbijn was an acclaimed rock photographer before turning his hand to filmmaking, so no surprise that here he focuses on the art of celebrity photography and just what it takes to get a great iconic image. Hard slog, determination and personal sacrifices, actually – when the subject is James Dean, on the cusp of stardom in 1955, but already infuriatingly working hard on his aura (playing the bongos in a cow field! Really…) Dane DaHaan does a fantastic job of capturing the charisma of the world’s first hipster, but it’s Robert Pattinson (the wan vampire himself) who has the stronger role. He’s Dennis Stock, a stringer for Life magazine who finally lands that pic of a huddled Dean in wintery Times Square with the ciggy dangling, that pose we all know so well. As cool as it is calculated, Life is a fascinating portrait of the fame game and an era. MA15+ Available on DVD, Blu-Ray and digital from Dec 17. ★ Thanks to Transmission Films we have 5 DVDs to give away. Details below. Finally, an affordable Inner West house! Thur 17th-Sat 19th December Double Belonging Festival conference will be held on December Double Belonging is a not-for-profit festival created in collaboration with associations and artists with the exclusive aim of promoting the very best of Italian culture. Stemming from the duality of Australian and Italian identity, this festival is about embracing your heritage. The feature play, Terra Matta, will be held at the Italian Forum Cultural Centre. A 16th with the play's director. For more information, please visit www.doublebelonging.com Sunday 20th December Christmas Cakes Class A sense of double belonging 8 'Tis the season! To create and eat delicious cakes, that is. Any baking enthusiasts will love this event, where you will learn to make a divine fruit cake with marzipan and fondant that is perfect for any Christmas function, or even as a table centrepiece! Led by the incredible Jessica Pedemont, attendees will go home with their delicious creation, as well as step-bystep instructions so they can recreate it year after year. Spaces are strictly limited, so get in fast! For more info or to make a booking, visit www.celebrationcooking.com.au Park, this shop is a colourful maze of fashion, jewellery, homewares and much more. Even better, the pop-up is also providing an operation base for Penny Marathon, a locally-run animal welfare charity that will be raising funds through all product sales! Don't miss out on this! Visit “Inner West Designers PopUp Shop” on Facebook for more information. Learn to make a yummy fruit cake WIN MOVIE PASSES & DVDs To be in the running to win double preview passes to The Belier Family, one of five DVDs of Life, or a fantastic Aussie movies prize pack, just email your name and postal address to info@ciaomagazine.com.au telling us where you picked up your copy of Ciao. You can enter them all, but give us a preference. The Aussie prize pack Until 24th December Inner West Makers Pop-Up Lovers of all things local, handmade and unique looking for a place to get their Christmas gift fix should make tracks to this quirky pop-up store in Dulwich Hill. Housed in the old brick studio at 62 Constitution Road opposite Johnson contains Last Cab To Darwin, Rabbit Proof Fence, Two Hands, Strange Bedfellows, Oranges & Sunshine and The Black Balloon. n Reviews – Russell Edwards

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n Your say n Sustainability n Local news What do you look for in a charity? I like to know the exact benefit my donation has made. For example; Fred Hollows $25 restores sight or Red Cross, every blood donation saves three lives. I don't like minimum requirement donations like the Special Olympics who say their starting point for a donation is $20, but will take your $10 if you say that's all you've got. It feels like a scam.” Jessie “I don't like the ones that force you into a subscription type thing. I'm much happier to do one off donations for specific appeals.” Slav “I like charities where I can see their goals come to life in helping others whether that be people, animals or the environment. I try and make sure if I don't know someone personally from it that I can find a positive reputation behind it.” Paige The Business of Being Green Sustainable living and the cutthroat world of business don’t often go hand in hand, however one busy Marrickville cafe believes that in the long run, thinking green is a much more cost effective approach. For four years Alex Elliott-Howery and husband James have been running the hugely successful community business, Cornersmith. “We have a café, a picklery, we sell groceries and we also run cooking classes,” Alex says. “We wanted to see if we could take the sustainable philosophy we try to live by at home and make it work in a business setting.” “We are both Sydney-born and have lived in Dulwich Hill for about 10 years. We are local and that’s the reason why we opened the business in this area. We wanted something close to home and also we felt like the community might connect with our ideas as well.” The community in the Inner West certainly has connected with the idea, as well as the local initiatives Cornersmith support, such as minimising waste and reconnecting with the food we eat. “We have a trading program so that locals can bring in their excess homegrown produce,” Alex says. “So someone might bring in a box of lemons and swap it for some jars of pickles.” Cornersmith then use this excess produce in creative ways on the menu and in the picklery. “It’s a very nice full circle because it’s about connecting the community and it’s also about knowing where your food comes from,” she says. “We’re also big supporters of home food craft, like pickling, preserving, fermenting and cheese-making," Alex says. Alex likes getting in a pickle Brewing success CHP School of Hospitality, located in Hurlstone Park, has provided five free courses to 20 students of Bankstown Seniors College, the majority of whom have recently immigrated or sought asylum in Australia. The course gave the students RSA and RCG accreditations and trained them in barista, bar tending and restaurateur skills. Eupu, who has immigrated to Australia from Myanmar, said the opportunity was unmissable. “It's good to have a free chance to do the course, you have to pay a lot of money to get knowledge for this,” she said. Yousif, 19, who came to Sydney four years ago after fleeing persecution in Iraq, said he did the course to gain more hospitality experience. “It's fun, and I am thinking about opening a bar or club of my own,” he said. connect with the way that they eat.” Dealing with small-scale producers does increase costs for the business and it involves more work, but in Alex’s eyes this effort is worth the price. “If people start changing the way they run their businesses, it actually becomes more cost effective in the long run,” she says. “Customers and community members will respond more to your business if they feel you’re doing the right thing for your community, for the environment or for animal welfare. Customers really get behind those things. They want to show their ethics through the places they shop.” To get some ideas for your businesses or household, the Cornersmith cookbook is now available. “We have stories throughout the book and ideas about how to make your business more sustainable." n The Cornersmith Picklery is located at 441 Illawarra Rd, Marrickville, and is open Friday and Saturday. The Cornersmith cookbook can be found at www.cornersmith.com.au. n Words by Levi Parsons Alice and Hassan show off their mochas Marrickville's green genies Marrickville's Business Environment Awards celebrated the efforts of local businesses making positive changes to reduce waste and use of resources. Seven businesses were awarded by Marrickville Council including Addison Road Community Centre, clothings store The Social Outfit, Two Chaps Marrickville, Dresden Optics and Aflalfa House. “Together, our nominees are saving more than 1.3 million litres of water and off-setting 57 tonnes of carbon emissions, per year,” said Mayor Sam Iskander. Petersham Bowling Club won the 'Energy Smart' award for their sustainability initiatives including installing 21 solar panels and upgrading lighting and refrigerating to increase energy efficiency. Restoring sight with charity "We want to encourage people to get out of the supermarket and back into their kitchens and Local film untinned A short film shot over three days at Croydon Park Public School had its first screening last week at the Chauvel Cinema. Director and screenwriter Peter Nizic and his partner Shannon Nizic-Wong came up with the idea for Spaghetti when Shannon started talking about a student in her class who loved to eat tinned spaghetti. This evolved into a short film divulging the quirky lovestory between shy Eddie 'Spaghetti' and new girl Anja 'Lasagna'. “Ultimately, I always thought it was an adult style love story played out by children, the love story of Shannon and myself,” says director Peter Nizic, “but played in a school setting to bring a sense of charm and whimsy.” Prominent Australian actor Gyton Grantley (Underbelly, The Dressmaker) played the school principal, while students at Croydon Park Public were involved in the film as extras. Nizic thanked Croydon Park Principal Daniel Hurd for being a keen supporter of the project. “We live in Croydon Park,” said Nizic, “So Croydon Park Public is our local school and it will be the school our children end up going to. We thought it would be a really amazing link one day to connect our children to the school and the film to the Inner West.” 10-year-old Eloise Joo played her first acting role ever as Anja 'Lasagna'. Since filming Spaghetti she has picked up parts in commercials and short films. “I thought the film was really sweet and I just liked all the spaghetti!” Joo said. Nizic has entered the film into the 2016 Flickerfest and will find out on December 15th if Spaghetti has made the final cut. n You can view the trailer of Spaghetti here: www.spaghettifilm.com/trailer Images courtesy of Tristan Brittaine. The cast of Spaghetti with director, Peter Nizic Co.Has.It Co.As.It has been officially named the owner of the Italian Cultural Centre, with contracts settled at 3pm on November 25th. The announcement comes after more than two years of disputes between interested buyers, the licensee Actors Centre Australia, the administrator and local council. A 2 year lease has been signed with the Actors Centre Australia to use the theatre complex, however, ACA had initially signed a twenty year lease in 2012 with previous owner, the Italian Forum Limited, before the IFL went into receivership a year later. The President of Co.As.It, Lorenzo Fazzini said he was looking forward to working in collaboration with the Actors Centre Australia. “We are really pleased to work with the Actors Centre Australia in organising cultural and artistic activities which will bring life back into the Italian Forum and the wider Leichhardt precinct,” Fazzari said. “We thank Council, the community and all the supporters of Co.As.It. for their patience and support in what has been a long battle.” Young stars, Eddie Wiseman and Eloise Joo Monday 14 December – 6:30pm Authors of The Dismissal at Paul Kelly & Troy Bramston Balmain Town Hall Free - All welcome Light refreshments Book online or call 9367 9211 Come in for a New Look and Colour! Special from $50 - $80 Seniors $ 40 Ladies’ Cut $30 Men’s Cut $30 Seniors $25 Primary school $22 Unders fives $19 We Love Kids Formerly Pixies Hair Salon and Parents! GRAND OPENING 10 BalmainLibrary 370 Darling Street Balmain N. James Hair Salon 88 Norton St Leichhardt 2040 Ph: 8068 1888

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n FEATURE Crazy Land When Vincenzo Rabito first handed over his autobiography to his son, Giovanni, it was 25 notebooks bound by scraps of rope. There were no paragraphs, no chapters and every word was punctuated by a semi colon. Vincenzo typed on an old Olivetti Typewriter that Giovanni, Vincenzo’s youngest son, had left at his parent’s house in Chiaramonte, Sicily, while he studied in Bologna. Giovanni was the only person who knew his father had spent the last seven years writing down his life story. In 2007, 26 years after Vincenzo Rabito’s death, Terra Matta (Crazy Land) was published by Einaudi, a reputable publishing house in Italy. Vincenzo’s stack of memoirs fast became an Italian bestseller, selling over 30,000 copies.  Later Terra Matta was turned into an awardwinning biopic, and later, a popular play. Giovanni Rabito moved to Australia in 1990 and now lives in Glebe. He said the book’s success was completely unexpected by his family. “They were extremely surprised. For my second brother [who still lives in Sicily] it changed his life, because he is called to do all the speeches. He gets invited to the movies and glamourous events,” Giovanni says. “I had more of an idea – but between hoping and happening there is a big gap. It was a surprise for me too.” As a student and published poet in Bologna, Giovanni Rabito had taken his father’s manuscript to several editors with no success. After his father died in 1981, he moved his antique dealership to Sydney and entered the manuscript into an Italian memoir competition. It won, but even then one critic claimed it would be “the masterpiece no one ever read”. For a start, it was written in a mix of Italian and phonetic Sicilian dialect; a self-taught “inalfabeto”(illiterate), Vincenzo Rabito weaved his own lingua franca over more than 1000 pages. Those pages, however, told an incredible story. A story set across two countries and a world of history is unfurling in Leichhardt. Phoebe Moloney learns the lessons of l’autore analfabeta siciliano, Vincenzo Rabito. The surprise of the little man’s success, not just survival, is the upshot of the whole Vincenzo Rabito story. Perhaps participating in every formative event of modern Italy fated Vincenzo to write a book definitive of Italy’s history. Giovanni shakes his head. “No, it was some special spark in him,” he says. Despite being illiterate, Vincenzo was always a master raconteur. Vincenzo wrote of the time he spent hiding in a cave with soldiers during World War II: “It didn’t seem like wartime; it was more like a theatre because there was laughing all the time. This is what I liked most: recounting all the things that happened in my life…” In person, Giovanni too is a remarkable storyteller, gesticulating with the bubbling felicity of Roberto Benigni and speaking with the gravitas of La Bocca Della Verita. Like his father, Giovanni dances between the tragic and comic aspects of life with an amicable smile intact. And now, in a suitably remarkable turn of events, Vincenzo’s words have followed Giovanni to his 25-year-old home of Sydney. The theatre ensemble from Catania that adapted his father’s book to a play are coming to Leichhardt to perform Terra Matta. “The Mayor of Catania is very keen on this book,” says Giovanni. “He found the money on his side and we found the theatre on our side.” Terra Matta will be featured as part of Leichhardt’s year-long Double Belonging festival, which explores the identity formation of Australians who have migrated from Italy. The play will be performed in The Forum’s Italian Cultural Centre. “We think it’s a perfect venue. The theatre is very beautiful and it’s in the centre of an Italian suburb,” Giovanni says. And so, despite formidable obstacles, Vincenzo Rabito’s teatro of life continues unhindered also in Sydney. n Teatro Stabile di Catania will be performing Terra Matta between December 17th-19th, you can book tickets at: www.doublebelonging.com. The play will be performed in Sicilian dialect, however, a guide book will be given to each audience member that explains the narrative of the play, scene by scene, in Italian and English. On December 16th, director Vincenzo Pirotta will present a talk on the genesis of the play adaptation of Terra Matta. “This is the story of the little man against the big history that crushes you. But it’s not tragic, it’s epico! It’s almost laughable…that even from this little town in Sicily you can see the top of history.” Indeed, Vincenzo Rabito’s life reads like a history text book. He was born during the ‘Spagnola’ [Spanish Flu] in 1899 that claimed the life of his father and two siblings. He was sent out to work at the age of seven and as a young man was enlisted as a soldier in the Great War. “He was at the Battle of the River Piave, which is Italy’s equivalent of Gallipoli. There were 70 soldiers in his battalion. 24 people survived and he was one of them,” Giovanni says. “Then he remained as a soldier during the most complicated period of Italy’s history, with fascists coming and then the communists. Then he went to Somalia in Africa, experiencing four years of the Italian fascist empire, and then he went north as a soldier in World War II. He went to Germany to work in the mines and survived bombardment from the Allies and then finally he returned to Ragusa and found a job as a road worker for the province.” “So he found stability at 40, with a salary and a family. He made me when he was 50,” says Giovanni. “All the history of Italy is in his life. And he passed judgement on it.” Vincenzo Rabito (left) with his brother “It didn’t seem like wartime; it was more like a theatre” Living through famine, war, poverty, fascism, illness and the delicate social mores of a Sicilian “martrimonio combinato” (an arranged marriage), Vincenzo’s book has been described as an adventure of “salvarsi la pelle”, learning to save your skin. But it maintains an internal joy. “He was always a happy man,” says Giovanni. “The final manuscript was mostly on us [his children], which was very touching and interesting to read what he thought we were up to. He beat the overwhelming odds. He grew up in famine, never went to school and yet he thrived and sent all his children to university and then went onto become a writer.” After the book’s posthumous success, Giovanni and his brothers had ‘Scrittore’ [writer] engraved on their father’s headstone. Giovanni smiles. “But this, of course, he doesn’t know.” “All the history of Italy is in his life” “My father did all the most important things in Italian history,” Giovanni says with a twinkle in his eye. 12 Vincenzo Rabito , lo scrittore  

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in the kitchen  with Olivia Mackay, n www.scoffandquaff. wordpress.com CherryCello Wine with Winsor n www.wdwineoftheweek.blogspot.com The rose colour of this cherry-infused vodka simply sings of summery promise. The addition of a cinnamon stick or vanilla pod is optional but recommended as it adds another layer of complexity, with the spices taking it close to a sort of spiced cherry-cola flavour. This makes a beautiful gift and will keep well even over the hot summer months. Make some for your kids’ teachers and they will love you forever, guaranteed. Instruct recipients to keep in the freezer and serve with soda and a squeeze of fresh lime. Savoury shiraz Grant Burge 2014 5th Generation Shiraz Australian wine drinkers are fortunate that they can find wines as reliably good as this for $20 or under. A youthful, fruit-driven red for everyday enjoyment, this is a pretty versatile choice, which would pair well with everything from steak and chips at the pub to some osso bucco or aged cheddar cheese. Think soft dark berry fruit flavours, cocoa notes and some smoky but restrained oak. Soft, approachable and disarmingly easy to drink. $20. Method 1. Wash and slit the cherries, then place into a medium sized saucepan. 2. Add the sugar and water and heat gently, stirring well, until the sugar has dissolved and the cherries have stained the liquid a beautiful deep ruby. 3. Remove from the heat and pour carefully into a large jar (bear in mind it must be able to hold more than 1 litre of liquid). 4. Add the vodka, one cinnamon stick and vanilla pod (if using), stir and seal. 5. Allow to steep and infuse for as long as you can - at least three weeks. Have yourself a very cherry Christmas! Tasmanian Treat Josef Chromy 2015 Riesling Tasmania is probably best known for its stellar sparkling wines and some upmarket chardonnays and pinots, but it also does some very classy – and more affordable – dry rieslings. This is a case in point, a very focussed and refreshing new release from one of the best producers in the Tamar Valley in the north. Floral and citrus zest aromas, crisp grapefruit and lemon notes on the palate and zingy refreshing acidity. Long and lively, this is a great match for seafood dishes. $28. Ingredients • 400g fresh cherries • 200g caster sugar • 150ml water • 700ml vodka • 3 cinnamon sticks and 3 vanilla pods (optional) 6. To prepare for gifts, remove the cherries and strain the liquid through a fine sieve or muslin. Pour into two clean 500ml bottles and add a new cinnamon stick and vanilla pod to each (optional). 8. Seal and tie with a festive ribbon. Pleasing pinot Lime Kiln Point 2015 Pinot Noir Lime Kiln Point is the entry-level label for fast-rising Tasmanian winery Derwent Estate, which has built a formidable reputation for its high-quality chardonnays. This is a very vibrant drink-now style of pinot, affordable and made in a juicy “nouveau” style designed for immediate drinking pleasure. There is plenty of cool-climate fruit character and zippy freshness. This would pair brilliantly with a roast duck from Ashfield. $25. MARKET UPDATE n Fruit: Many fruits such as lemons, mangoes, avocados and passionfruit are expensive right now. Lychees are steadily dropping in price, although their taste is perfect. Cherries are better now than the past few weeks. n Veggies: Pumpkin and eggplant are both expensive and cauliflower has also jumped up in price. Black garlic is currently unavailable, although it should be back in stores within two weeks. Courtesy of Murdoch Produce Chase the dragon (eyes) www.gourmetontheroad.blogspot.com AT HOME WITH BIANCA BONINO Bianca Bonino is a fully-trained actress who ironically embraced her love of the improvised Italian theatre form, Commedia dell’arte, when she moved to Australia! Now she is the artistic director of Fools in Progress and the coordinator of the Double Belonging Festival. What drew you to Commedia dell’arte? The fact that I am a fully trained actress, firstly. When I came to Australia everyone assumed that I was trained in Commedia dell’arte because I was Italian...and I would just say, “Yes, of course I am.” But I trained traditionally so I actually only started learning Commedia Dell’Arte when I came to Australia. And after maybe three years, only started doing it in a way that might be considered traditionally acceptable. Who is your favourite character to play in Commedia dell’arte sketches? It’s funny, I prefer the male characters, especially Pantalone. Pantalone is extremely rich and extremely stingy, with a side interest in young women. So he is a very frustrated man: he would like to act young but he just too old! He is a very full-on character as you have to think of the whole history behind him, as a merchant in Venice trying to build and protect his wealth. In English I also like to play Pulcinella by putting a Southern-Italian accent on my English, but I can’t do her in Italian because my accent is really from the North! What do you like to cook at home? Well, right now you have caught me in the process of making a frittata! But my specialty is gnocchi 14 MELISSA Leong The Mavericks of Marrickville  Call it a reaction to housing prices, too many hipsters, or just better proximity to banh mi, but Marrickville’s epic rise to one of Sydney’s most desirable suburbs is unquestionable. Of course, with cosmopolitan influx comes gentrification, and while it’s sad to lose a little of the suburb’s original charm, it’s hard to hate the vibrant mix of food and drink options on offer. I thought I’d take this opportunity to name my favourite Marrickville moments, in no particular order. at the moment, which I make by hand. My mum taught me how to make them.You can put any sauce you want on them: pesto, ragù or tomato. But four cheese sauce is really nice with blue cheese, parmigiano and butter. What is the specialty of your home town of Turin? Well, it used to be Fiats! But we practically invented chocolate, at least the way we eat it now. Turin invented ciocolata, (hot chocolate powder) and also chocolate praline. Ferrero chocolate is from just outside Torino. Everyone thinks of Belgian chocolates, but small, wrapped chocolates started in Turin - there is almost a chocolate shop on every corner! We love it! I grew up with Nutella as well. As a game when I was a child we would would spread it on each other then lick it off! What do you think of Australia’s version of Italian cuisine? Well, it’s a step forward from beef, carrot, peas and potato! However, I would like to say in honour of Australians that they really love to learn from other cultures. That Australia has its own version of Italian food is inevitable. I think us Italians just have to accept it, it’s a compromise and it’s creating something new. n The Double Belonging Festival Marrickville Pork Roll The humble banh mi. Nearly every cafe and diner has given it a go, but if you want the best, look for the red awning on Illawarra Road. Cheap as chips and just as cheerful, with a variety of options to go for. That said, the basic pork roll is the pick of the litter. Layers of rich pate and pork slices, cut by acidic pickles and the freshness of coriander and a bite of chilli, squished between crunchy French-style bread. Sure winner. 236a Illawarra Road. Bianca Bonino Cornersmith What this little gem has done for café culture in Marrickville warrants plenty of merit. The first ‘cool café’ to open on Illawarra Road amidst the line up of Vietnamese eateries, Cornersmith sets the gold standard in what a neighbourhood café should be like. Friendly, bustling, with a simple menu of honest food, washed down with great coffee. 314 Illawarra Road. Gnocchi Ingredients 1kg desiree potatoes 250g flour 1 whole egg Pinch of salt         Method Boil potatoes till soft and mash them, then carefully add the flour and the egg. Work the ingredients until you make a soft dough. Be attentive as the more flour you add the less tender the gnocchi will be. Roll the dough in long strips and cut them in small squares. Boil a salted pot of water (5 litre), put the gnocchi in and boil them just until they surface. Then put them in a plate and pour over with either pesto or or tomato sauce or blue cheese and butter and lots of Parmigiano Reggiano or pecorino. Buon appetito! Addison Road Markets Lazy Sunday mornings are made for strolling, coffee in hand, trying to decide on breakfast or for seeking inspiration for dinner, from the rows of stalls showing their jewel-bright vegetables and seeds, creamy cheeses and meaty bounties. If you can stand rising early, do so to avoid the crowds and get first pick of the produce. 142 Addison Road. is a year-long program that explores the experience of Italians who have migrated to Australia. Their next festival event is coming up on December 17th – 19th. You can view the festival program at: www.doublebelonging.com Coffee Alchemy For coffee aficionados, Coffee Alchemy should be number one on your list. Whether you’re there to pick up your beans for the week, or grab an espresso to go, Coffee Alchemy will set you off into your day abuzz. 24 Addison Road.

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