Dunchurch Infant School Ofsted Report

 

Embed or link this publication

Description

Dunchurch Infant School Ofsted Report

Popular Pages


p. 1

School report Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery School Street, Dunchurch, Warwickshire, CV22 6PA Inspection dates 22–23 September 2015 Overall effectiveness Effectiveness of leadership and management Quality of teaching, learning and assessment Personal development, behaviour and welfare Outcomes for pupils Early years provision Overall effectiveness at previous inspection Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding Good Summary of key findings for parents and pupils This is an outstanding school  Leaders have ensured professional development for teachers and support staff, educational research and effective use of assessment are key features of this school’s success.  The headteacher has a highly ambitious vison for the school and has very strong support from staff, governors and parents.  Senior and middle leaders support the headteacher’s vision effectively. Consequently, outcomes in reading, writing and mathematics are consistently above the national average for all pupil groups.  Pupil outcomes are outstanding as a result of the relentless drive from all adults to constantly improve the progress of every pupil.  Governors are experienced, skilled and effectively directing resources to improve pupil outcomes. Governors use accurate and detailed information to provide robust challenge to leaders and support continued improvements across the school.  The Early Years Foundation Stage is outstanding. Children make excellent progress in the Nursery and Reception classes and are very well prepared for Year 1.  Teaching is frequently outstanding and never less than good in all year groups, including the Nursery classes. Pupils leave the school very well prepared for Year 3.  All pupils are treated as individuals. As a result, disadvantaged pupils and those with special educational needs are very well provided for and make at least good progress.  Pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is effectively developed by a highly engaging curriculum that is supplemented by creative and varied visits and opportunities.  Teamwork is evident throughout the school. Staff work together effectively and are committed to supporting every pupil. Teaching assistants are well trained, highly skilled and make a clear difference to individual pupils and groups across the school.  Pupils have excellent attitudes to learning, enjoy coming to school and take part in a broad range of extra-curricular activities.  There is a very strong sense of community. This is reflected in the school’s involvement with a number of local initiatives, such as charity work. Parents are highly supportive of the staff and the provision at the school.  Staff know all pupils very well and place a high priority on maintaining excellent pupil attitudes and safety. Pupils feel very happy and always cared for as a result.  The culture of excellence, continual improvement and successful learning for all permeates through every level of this happy school.

[close]

p. 2

What does the school need to do to improve further?  Further improve the quality of teaching and pupil outcomes by: – continuing the work to enable even more disadvantaged pupils to achieve above age-related expectations – continuing to develop the Nursery provision, to enable the progress of these children to further accelerate. Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 2 of 10

[close]

p. 3

Inspection judgements Effectiveness of leadership and management is outstanding  The headteacher’s relentless determination to further improve every aspect of the high-quality educational experiences provided has been critical in improving teaching and learning. Outcomes for all pupil groups across the school are above the national average.  The headteacher and deputy headteacher create an excellent team, lead by example and work hard to support all pupils and staff. They also go out of their way to work with families, helping parents to support their child’s educational, personal and social development.  Both the school’s own surveys and responses to Ofsted’s Parent View demonstrate overwhelmingly positive support from parents. Numerous parents commented warmly on how well their children are cared for and the variety of opportunities the school provides for pupils. One parent wrote, ‘everyone at the school genuinely cares about doing the best for the children’.  Leaders and managers have high expectations of themselves, staff and pupils in all aspects of the school. The senior leadership team work closely with governors to set the strategic direction for the school and ensure clear actions and improvements take place.  Senior and middle leaders support the headteacher very effectively and demonstrate good capacity for further leadership development. Clearly defined roles and responsibilities ensure a consistent approach to improving pupils’ skills in reading, writing and mathematics across the school.  Leaders at all levels, including in the early years, allow no room for complacency. Regular, detailed checks on teaching and individual pupil progress, linked to teachers’ performance targets, have been used effectively to support teachers to improve their practice. This has led to continued improvements in teaching and feedback to pupils and higher pupil outcomes.  Leaders make good use of school improvement plans to set clear priorities for development, and maintain regular and rigorous checks on whether actions taken have been effective or not. Staff and parents are frequently asked for their feedback on aspects of training and school provision. This demonstrates the open nature of the school and the way in which leaders constantly listen, respond and drive to improve every aspect of the school’s provision. For example, leaders agree that the school website could be more informative for parents and visitors. Staff training consistently and accurately focuses on development areas and is linked to improving pupil outcomes.  There is a strong culture of safeguarding in the school. All statutory requirements are met and arrangements to support vulnerable pupils and families are very effective. All adults are regularly trained in how to keep children safe, and individual cases of concern are followed up thoroughly to ensure pupils are kept safe. There is a high priority placed on good pupil and adult communication, to ensure the welfare and safety of all pupils.  The local authority has worked with the school on a light-touch basis to support improvements in the curriculum and pupils’ outcomes. A recent visit focused on working with a leader to develop the school’s spiritual, moral, social and cultural provision, which is now a strength of the curriculum.  Leaders are well-supported by the office staff and business manager, who are highly organised, skilled and know individual pupils well. This enables the leaders to focus on improving the welfare, experiences and quality of education of pupils from Nursery to Year 2.  Pupil premium funding is used very effectively to support the relatively small number of eligible pupils. A range of strategies, including additional teaching and funded after-school clubs, focus well on improving writing skills and supporting the social and emotional needs of disadvantaged pupils. As a result, the progress of these pupils improved sharply this year to be equal to or above that of other pupils in reading, writing and mathematics.  The curriculum provides a range of excellent learning experiences for all pupils. The teaching of English, mathematics and science is complemented by a well-organised whole-school approach in all other subjects. The curriculum provides very good opportunities for pupils to develop a range of skills, their understanding of global issues and enhance their respect for different religions and cultures.  The ‘over and above’ curriculum provides innovative opportunities for all pupils to access a broad range of learning, such as visiting three places of worship, growing food and using it to cook a meal for their family. The school makes effective use of both local and national events, such as the Rugby World Cup, to develop pupils’ cultural awareness and their understanding of British values. Pupils le arn about the Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 3 of 10

[close]

p. 4

    natural world and the values of care and respect through owl visits to school. These visits link directly to the types of owl each class is named after. When asked what they liked about school, one pupil said, ‘the owl flew right over our heads’. The initiative and personal research undertaken by leaders on educational practice is exemplary. For example, leaders clearly know about the principles behind the concept of assessment without levels. Expert leadership of teaching has led to a culture of enquiry and excellence. Staff are given the time and support to develop further, leading to improved outcomes for pupils and a school which strives to continually improve. Assemblies provide good opportunities to develop pupils’ spiritual, moral, soci al and cultural awareness, as well understanding right and wrong. Staff actively promote and teach equality of opportunity by ensuring all pupils, including those who are disadvantaged and from different cultures, are treated equally. The school has developed a link with a school in Sierra Leone through a local church. Pupils have personally donated toys and resources to the link school, developing their understanding of charity and some of the challenges faced by other cultures. Pupils learn about democracy through voting for school council representatives, holding a mock general election and visiting the Houses of Parliament in Year 2. These opportunities, along with ‘Lunchtime Lookouts’, who help to promote high standards of behaviour, ensure pupils are very well prepared for life in modern Britain. Additional money to improve pupils’ participation and ability in sport has been used very well. Pupils benefit from a specialist coach teaching the first lesson each week and the class teacher delivering the second. Pupils talk enthusiastically about the popular after-school sports clubs, some of which are free for all pupils. Sports funding is also used to ensure all pupils visit a professional sports stadium, providing an opportunity many pupils may not have otherwise experienced. Leaders have made active links with sports providers, resulting in a number of Year 2 pupils now playing rugby for a local club. This broad and innovative range of opportunities helps pupils to understand competition and the importance of healthy lifestyles.  The governance of the school: ̶ Governors have a very good understanding of how well the school is performing in relation to other schools nationally. They use the high-quality pupil progress information provided by the headteacher, and gathered themselves to ask challenging questions about improvements to teaching and pupils’ outcomes. Governors’ roles are rotated regularly to further develop their skills and share responsibilities. ̶ Governors support and challenge the school systematically. Minutes of meetings show that they hold all staff to account, especially senior and middle leaders, when checking the progress of particular pupil groups and school improvement plans. ̶ Records show that governors have a precise understanding of how performance management is used to improve teaching and how this links to teachers’ pay. Leaders and governors are prepared to make difficult decisions regarding staff performance and award extra pay for exceptional outcomes. ̶ Governors are skilled and prepared to use substantial school funds to support further pupil progress, such as releasing the deputy headteacher from her class responsibilities, to further focus on the Early Years Foundation Stage and the most vulnerable pupils. Governors have completed a skills audit, so that when a vacancy occurs, it is clear which skills they are looking for in a new governor. ̶ Governors check on how the pupil premium and sports funding are spent and they are kept regularly informed by senior leaders about the progress of eligible pupils.  The arrangements for safeguarding are effective. Quality of teaching, learning and assessment is outstanding  Teaching, learning and assessment is usually outstanding and never less than good across the school. Records show that the proportion of good and outstanding teaching has increased, which is reinforced by the high quality work in pupils’ books and around the school. As a result, nearly all pupils make more than nationally expected progress in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 2.  Teachers and teaching assistants create a very positive climate for learning through focused teaching, Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 4 of 10

[close]

p. 5

     effective questioning and application of educational research. Consequently, pupils clearly enjoy school and take responsibility for their learning and progress. For example, most pupils in a Year 2 group chose harder mathematics work when given the choice. The teaching of mathematics is typically good or better, with outcomes in this subject continuing to improve. Current assessment information and work seen in pupils’ books shows that nearly all pupils are making outstanding progress. Pupils are encouraged to deepen their understanding of mathematical concepts and are given the opportunity to see how mathematics relates to everyday life, by making cakes for a fund-raising event, for example. The school gives all pupils mathematics resources to take home when they are in Reception, so that pupils can work with their parents to further support their mathematical progress. The teaching of phonics (the sounds that letters make) and reading is of very high quality. Teaching assistants are used to support individual pupils, such as those who are disadvantaged or have special educational needs, to ensure they progress as much as other pupils in reading. The teaching of writing has improved rapidly this year. Leaders and teachers used assessment information from last year to focus on improving writing for all groups. Pupils in Reception and Year 1 were seen completing writing activities as part of their ‘star learning’. These pupils were eagerly writing, with a clear understanding that it was their responsibility to complete these tasks before choosing their own learning activities. As a result of very effective teaching and feedback to pupils, the quality and range of writing has developed, especially for disadvantaged pupils and the most able. Teaching assistants are well-trained, deployed efficiently and keen to further develop their skills. They provide very effective support for a range of pupils both in lessons and when working with individuals. This supports pupils’ progress, personal development and fills gaps in their learning. Rarely, some teaching does not quite match the very high quality of teaching typically seen. In these lessons, where expectations, planning and teaching were not of the usually high standard, a very small number of pupils were not as engaged as the other pupils. Personal development, behaviour and welfare are outstanding Personal development and welfare  The school’s work to promote pupil’s personal development and welfare is outstanding. Staff go the extra mile to support individual pupils and families.  Pupils’ safety and care of one another is demonstrated by pupils looking after each other at playtime, especially if they hurt themselves.  Leaders have ensured pupils’ confidence, physical and emotional well-being is nurtured. Consequently, pupils have good self-awareness about their learning and confidently try out new things and seek challenges in their learning.  Pupils are fully aware of how to keep themselves and others safe. They are knowledgeable about the dangers associated with the internet. Pupils say they feel very safe because the adults are always there to help them if needed. Behaviour  The behaviour of pupils is outstanding. Their courtesy and conduct around the school and in lessons is exemplary and they have very positive attitudes towards each other. Pupils show great respect to all adults, at all times of the day.  All staff have high expectations, promote very good behaviour and manage pupils’ needs well. As a result, lessons are very rarely disrupted. The vast majority of parents are very positive about the management of behaviour in the school.  Pupils clearly enjoy lessons and respond quickly to adults’ questions and prompts. They move sensibly between activities in lessons and work thoughtfully during group work, carefully considering each other’s views and ideas.  Pupils are aware of the possible consequences of bullying and say ‘it doesn’t happen here’. Pupils have been taught about right and wrong, and governors consider pupils’ behaviour during monitoring visits.  The school analyses behaviour logs carefully and follows up any concerns. Checks on these records show Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 5 of 10

[close]

p. 6

behaviour incidents are rare and no pupil has been excluded in the last three years. The school works closely with parents and outside agencies to support individual pupils’ emotional, social and behavioural needs.  The school works hard to promote and sustain high attendance. Any absences are quickly followed up and leaders work closely with parents to improve low attendance for individuals. Pupil attendance rates are above the national average and stable. Pupils are keen to come to school because they feel safe and there is a very positive atmosphere around the school. Outcomes for pupils are outstanding  Children enter the school with skills broadly typical for their age. They leave Year 2 with skills that are well-above national average.  Pupils in every year group achieve very well in reading, writing and mathematics. As a result of additional support, disadvantaged pupils made more progress in reading and mathematics than other pupils this year. All pupils are extremely well prepared for the next stage of their education at the end of the early years and Year 2.  Pupils’ outcomes at the end of Year 2 have been significantly above the national average in all areas for the last five years. Work in pupils’ books and the school’s assessment information demonstrates pupils are working at a very high standard and continue to make outstanding progress.  Children read very well. High-quality, daily teaching of phonics has resulted in improved teaching and pupils’ outcomes in this area. Consequently, the proportion of pupils meeting the expected level in the Year 1 phonics check has been well above the national average for the last three years. The small number of pupils who did not pass the phonics check in Year 1 catch up quickly in Year 2, as a result of very effective support and focused teaching.  Outcomes by the end of Year 2 have continued to improve and are consistently above the national average in all subjects. Pupils have excellent mathematical skills and are able to use a range of information to solve number problems confidently. By the time they leave the school, pupils have made outstanding progress and nearly all pupils have above average skills in reading, writing and mathematics. This is a result of strong teaching in every year group.  All pupils are treated as individuals. This approach means that the provision for pupils with special educational needs is highly effective and their needs are fully met. Good quality internal and external support has resulted in a focused approach to ensure that pupils with special educational needs and those who need additional help achieve well.  Disadvantaged pupils also achieve well. National assessments and work in books indicates that across all year groups, these pupils are very well supported and achieve above other pupils nationally in reading and mathematics. Targeted support and close monitoring has resulted in a narrowing of the gap between disadvantaged pupils and other pupils in school. A small proportion of disadvantaged pupils achieve above age-related expectations and the school is rightly focused on increasing this.  The attainment of the most-able pupils has been significantly above the national average in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of Year 2 for at least the last three years. These pupils are able to demonstrate their effective use of reading, writing and mathematics skills and their high levels of engagement in all areas of learning. An example of this was seen in a Year 2 mathematics lesson where the most-able pupils were asked to complete a number line with very little information. They succeeded because they were able to use a range of facts about number properties and a high level of reasoning.  The school ensures that all pupils are treated equally and that social skills are fully developed. Pupils listen very carefully to each other and to all staff. As a result of excellent attitudes to learning and the high expectations set by the school, pupils are very successfully prepared for the next stage of their education. Early years provision is outstanding  The leadership of the Early Years Foundation Stage is outstanding. Nursery and Reception staff systematically check how children improve their skills through play, and modify activities according to the Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 6 of 10

[close]

p. 7

          children’s needs and interests. The classrooms are well equipped and staff make good use of the outside learning areas. Children start in the Nursery with skills that are broadly typical for their age. They are very keen to learn and show high levels of concentration, even very early into the school term. Both Nursery classrooms offer a warm, happy and nurturing atmosphere for children. Adults provide well-directed support and encourage children’s independence right from the start. Consequently, this provision enables the vast majority of children to progress well and reach the early learning goals. The Nursery is effective at picking up and addressing any early concerns about young children’s learning and development. One parent was particularly impre ssed that her child’s speech and language difficulty had been spotted in the Nursery. The school had contacted the parent and liaised with outside agencies to arrange support, which led to the difficulty being addressed at an early age. Leaders have appropriate plans to further develop the Nursery provision by providing additional spaces for teaching groups of children. The provision is overseen by the deputy headteacher and the Nursery staff have appropriate qualifications. The majority of Nursery children transfer into Reception. They make an excellent start in both Nursery and Reception, as a result of outstanding teaching and a very consistent approach from all adults. Leaders recognised that improvements were needed to the Reception provision in 2014. Staff support and training led to a renewed approach last year and resulted in a higher-than-national proportion of children achieving a good level of development by the time they completed Reception this year. Outcomes for all groups of children are now above the national average. Children’s love of learning is effectively promoted because of the high -quality teaching and engaging learning environments. Exciting activities planned by the adults, such as role play, respond to the children’s interests and are well matched to their needs. The adults have very quickly established learning, social and communication routines across the early years provision, enabling children to be confident and progress well. This is a key feature of the success of the early years provision. Adults promote early reading skills through daily phonics sessions. Children’s active participation helps to develop their enjoyment in learning letters and the sounds they make. Consequently, children’s reading skills at the end of Reception are well developed and have exceeded the national average for the last three years. Children also have excellent listening skills. Due to high-quality adult input and established routines, children are able to show great enthusiasm as they are learning and then immediately stop and listen when required. Children’s behaviour is outstanding as a result of high expectations, high -quality provision and an individualised approach. Adults ensure children know how to be safe and who they can talk to if they need help. Whether learning indoors or outdoors, children behave in ways that keep them happy and safe. Parents are encouraged to play an active role in their child’s learning through maintaining good communication with the school. For example, parents have the opportunity to contribute to their child’s learning journey regularly and attendance at parent workshops delivered by the school is high. Outstanding teaching, support and well-planned learning activities enable children to make excellent progress in the Nursery and Reception classes. As a result, they leave with skills above those found nationally and are very well prepared for Year 1. Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 7 of 10

[close]

p. 8

School details Unique reference number Local authority Inspection number 125763 Warwickshire 10001560 This inspection was carried out under section 8 of the Education Act 2005. The inspection was also deemed a section 5 inspection under the same Act. Type of school School category Age range of pupils Gender of pupils Number of pupils on the school roll Appropriate authority Chair Headteacher Telephone number Website Email address Date of previous inspection Infant and Nursery Foundation 3–7 Mixed 254 The governing body Eva Goodwin Ian Dewes 01788 810292 www.dunchurchinfantschoolandnursery.co.uk office@dunchurchinfants.co.uk 10–11 November 2010 Information about this school    Dunchurch Infant and Nursery School is approximately the same size as most infant schools. The majority of pupils are of White British heritage. The proportion of pupils speaking English as an additional language is lower than other schools nationally. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium funding is below the national average. This is additional government funding for pupils known to be eligible to receive free school meals or looked after by the local authority. The proportion of pupils who have special educational needs is slightly below the national average. There are no disabled pupils at the school. Children in the Nursery classes attend part-time. Children in the Reception classes attend full-time. The school meets the government’s current floor standar ds, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics.     Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 8 of 10

[close]

p. 9

 Information about this inspection  The inspection team observed ten lessons or part lessons, including examples of teaching in every year group. Three of these lesson observations were carried out jointly with the headteacher and deputy headteacher. The lead inspector, headteacher and deputy headteacher also jointly completed a learning walk throughout the school, visiting every classroom.  Meetings were held with the headteacher, deputy headteacher, senior leadership team, middle leaders and governors. A telephone conversation took place with a representative from the local authority who works with the school.  The inspection team looked at pupils’ books in a range of subjects to establish the progress and q uality of their work over time.  Informal discussions were held with parents to gauge their views of the school. The inspector took account of 45 recent responses to Ofsted’s online questionnaire (Parent View) and analysed 42 responses from the staff questionnaires.  The inspector talked with groups of pupils as well as individual pupils during their lessons and at playtimes to find out their views about the school.  The inspection team heard pupils read and observed their behaviour in lessons and around the school.  The inspection team looked at a wide range of documents, including the school’s plans for improvement, external monitoring reports, records of checks made by leaders and information on pupils’ progress and outcomes. They also scrutinised records relating to behaviour, attendance and safeguarding. Inspection team Stuart Bellworthy, lead inspector Brian Cartwright Gail Peyton Her Majesty’s Inspector Her Majesty’s Inspector Ofsted Inspector Inspection report: Dunchurch Infant School and Nursery, 22–23 September 2015 9 of 10

[close]

p. 10

Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance 'Raising concerns and making a complaint about Ofsted', which is available from Ofsted’s website: www.gov.uk/government/publications/complaints-about-ofsted. If you would like Ofsted to send you a copy of the guidance, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk. You can use Parent View to give Ofsted your opinion on your child’s school. Ofsted will use the information parents and carers provide when deciding which schools to inspect and when and as part of the inspection. You can also use Parent View to find out what other parents and carers think about schools in England. You can visit www.parentview.ofsted.gov.uk, or look for the link on the main Ofsted website: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, further education and skills, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure establishments. It assesses council children’s services, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection. If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille, please telephone 0300 123 1231, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk. You may reuse this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence, write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk. This publication is available at www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted. Interested in our work? You can subscribe to our monthly newsletter for more information and updates: http://eepurl.com/iTrDn. Piccadilly Gate Store Street Manchester M1 2WD T: 0300 123 4234 Textphone: 0161 618 8524 E: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk W: www.ofsted.gov.uk © Crown copyright 2015

[close]

Comments

no comments yet